CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 101 to 120 of 484

_id fabd
authors Jabi, Wassim
year 1996
title Domain-Specific Tools for Collaboration in Architectural Design
source Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning. Spa, Belgium: Technical University of Eindhoven, 1996, pp. 248-259
summary By using a semantically significant and parsimonious representation of collaborative work in architecture an approach is demonstrated that allows the construction of a computer environment that can support collaborative design among geographically dispersed participants. A principal characteristic of this approach is a shift away from a focus on multi-user access to shared databases towards a shared protocol of interaction that is independent of implementation and storage schemes. To arrive at the components of this protocol an analysis of the nature of collaborative design was conducted in order to derive its syntactic and semantic structures. This paper will detail the argument put forth and demonstrate a possible solution through a discussion of the elements of a protocol of interaction and a brief description of a prototype Synchronous Collaborative Design Environment (SYCODE) that was implemented on two heterogeneous computer systems at distant sites.
keywords Computer Supported Collaborative Design
series other
email jabi@njit.edu
last changed 2002/03/05 18:54

_id 479b
authors Kirkby, S. D., Flint, R. Jacobs, S.R., Saunderson, C. and Bamford, E.
year 1996
title Interactive Urban Planning: The Adelaide Model Case Study
source AURISA '96: Australasian Urban and Regional Information Systems Association, Hobart, Australia, 25-29 November, Australasian Urban and Regional Information Systems Association, pp. 235-240
summary Contributed by Susan Pietsch (spietsch@arch.adelaide.edu.au)
keywords 3D City Modeling, Development Control, Design Control
series other
last changed 2001/06/04 18:38

_id 3cd6
authors Kirkby, S. D., Pollitt, S.E.P., Eklund, P.W., Coulson, T. and Ratcliffe, S.
year 1996
title An Interactive 3D GIS Urban Planning Model
source 28th International Geographical Congress, The Hague, 4-10 August, pp. 4-10
summary Contributed by Susan Pietsch (spietsch@arch.adelaide.edu.au)
keywords 3D City Modeling, Development Control, Design Control
series other
last changed 2001/06/04 18:38

_id 647a
authors Kirschner, Ursula
year 1996
title Teaching Experimental Design with CAAD
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 221-226
summary 2-D CAAD is the standard tool in architectural work and education. whereas 3-dimensional CAAD is still used to present a finished design. This paper demonstrates that experimental design in 3-D allows students to deal with new methods of design. At North East Lower Saxony Polytechnic, 1995 saw the beginning of development of didactic methods for teaching design with the interactive use of common 3-D CAAD tools. Six exercises were devised, the first two being 2-D exercises in urban and layout design. Subsequent steps introduced three styles of architectural designing with 3-D tools. The students selected one of these styles for their three-day exercise in urban planning. Based on the results, three main ways were developed: the "digital toolkit", the "additive design approach" and the "lighting simulation".
series eCAADe
last changed 1998/08/18 04:53

_id ddssup9612
id ddssup9612
authors Kribbe, Willeke and Sanders, Frank
year 1996
title Growth of spatial network constructions: a decision support systems oriented approach
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary The paper describes a method that has been developed to be used in a process for a systematic search of alternative designs for a network configuration. In the design process we will take into account that we may not be able to implement the full configuration all at once. Logical partial configurations must be derived. The process can than also be used to investigate the expansion of (railroad) networks. The basic idea is that either the most profitable trajectories or the trajectories that contribute most to the improved quality of the configuration will be developed first. A method cannot incorporate all criteria that are relevant for the final decision simultaneously, one of the reasons being that not all criteria are suitable for a mathematical formulation. Therefore a method cannot be used to replace current legal and political procedures. However it can be considered to be part of a decision support system that could be used in a preliminary investigation preceeding such procedures. In the example presented in this paper the criteria and calculations are kept simple for illustrative purposes. However they can easily be made more complex and realistic without damaging the fundamental concepts of the search algorithm. If the system is implemented in a way that the criteria to be used in the selection process can be chosen in interaction with the decision maker (or moderator) one can truly speak of a decision support system for the project formulation phase for the construction of the physical network. In the algorithm the network is represented as a graph and the nodes connected by the network are termed centers of attraction, supply and demand.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9837
id ddss9837
authors Liu, Yu-Tung and Bai, Rui-Yuan
year 1998
title The roles of virtual reality, image processing, and multimedia in thedesign of public spaces: 1997 Hsinchu Project
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary This paper examines the procedure of visual impact analysis and assessment proposed by Rahman and reviews the use of CAD applications in urban projects in the real world. A preliminary computerized procedure for visual impact analysis and assessment is proposed. An experiments wasconducted in our laboratory to verify the preliminary procedure. In order to further study the revised procedure in real urban projects, it was also applied into the renew project of The Eastern Gate Plaza located in the center of city Hsinchu, Taiwan from 1996 to 1998. According to several face-to-face discussions with Hsinchu habitants, government officials, and professional designers, a final computerized procedure for visual impact analysis and assessment is concluded.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id a9e4
authors Lloyd-Jones, T. (Ed.)
year 1996
title Computers in Urban Spatial Planning: A guide to research for developing world applications
source London, Report of the Overseas Development Administration funded CUSP Research Project
summary Contributed by Susan Pietsch (spietsch@arch.adelaide.edu.au)
keywords 3D City Modeling, Development Control, Design Control
series other
last changed 2001/06/04 19:12

_id ddssar9622
id ddssar9622
authors Macmillan, Andrew andMezughi, Mustafa M.
year 1996
title The integral role of conventional sketching in conceptualisation
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary Architectural Design Studies is an expanding research area, which recently has experienced dramatic shifts in approach. The successful application of computing to architectural practice has created pressure leading to a rediscovery of Architectural Drawing. The thrust of recent design studies is toward the early stages of the design process, where the modes of conception, human perceptual, and cognitive systems are the focus. In this paper we endeavour to examine the integral role of sketching in conceptualisation. A modelling technique relating to both the design and the graphic process 'sheds light' on the interaction between thought and drawing. Data from a protocol analysis is tested within the framework of the proposed model.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 8b8d
authors Martens, B., Voigt, A. and Linzer, H.
year 1996
title Information Technologies within Academic Context: Remote Teamwork – A Challenge for the Future
source CAADRIA ‘96 [Proceedings of The First Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 9627-75-703-9] Hong Kong (Hong Kong) 25-27 April 1996, pp. 227-232
summary "Remote Teamwork”, i.e. the substance-related cooperation of people over spatial distances in decision-situations relies on "CIVIC” (Computer-Integrated Video-Conferencing-audio-visual communication at spatial distances integrating interactively digital, spatial computer models) and "CISP” (Computer-Integrated Spatial Planning) aiming at the elaboration of suited remote-working structures of research, project transactions and teaching preferably on the basis of "ATM” (a technology of broad band telecommunications). The generation and manipulation of digital spatial models and their virtual transportation within large spatial distances represent the main research objectives. The efficient use of teaching resources calls for the integration of new teaching possibilities within the framework of "Remote Teamwork”, e.g. Distributed and Shared Modelling, Distant Learning and Remote Teaching. The Faculty of Architecture, Urban and Regional Planning therefore is stressing information technologies within academic context. The following contribution is dedicated to the focal field of research and teaching "Remote Teamwork” of the Vienna University of Technology. This project is carried out in cooperation with the Institute of Spatial Interaction and Simulation (IRIS-ISIS), Vienna and the Research Institute for Symbolic Computation (RISC Linz-Hagenberg). Teaching experience relevant for "Remote Teamwork” is derived from various experiments of cooperative teamwork.
series CAADRIA
email b.martens@tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2002/09/04 13:43

_id c219
authors Maver, T.W. and Petric, J.
year 1996
title Predicting Visual Impact: Computer Aided Visual Impact Analysis
source Approaches to Computer Aided Architectural Composition [ISBN 83-905377-1-0] 1996, pp. 163-184
summary The natural and the man-made environment is under increasing stress. We are entering a phase when the exploitation of energy resources is likely to cause a dramatic acceleration in our rate of impact on the natural environment; in particular, there is cause for serious concern regarding the damaging visual impact of energy related developments - oil terminals, dams, power stations, electricity transmission lines, open cast mining - on remaining areas of relatively unspoilt rural landscape. In the developed countries, the urban environment is presenting architects, planners and development agencies with some of the most significant and intractable problems in the last decade of the 20 Century. The problems are the most chronic in those cities which rose to greatness at the height of the industrial revolution- as heavy industry has declined, industrial sites have become derelict, the working population has drifted away and housing has fallen below tolerable standards. Yet in most cases, much evidence of urban greatness remains - in the grandeur of the public buildings, in the scale of the cityscape and in the spirit of those who still have their homes, and their cultural roots, in the inner city.
series other
email abacus@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/04/16 09:53

_id ddssar9623
id ddssar9623
authors Mitossi, V. and Koutamanis, A.
year 1996
title Parametric design of stairs
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary Stairs represent one of the oldest and most intricate design problems in architecture. Aesthetics, pedestrian circulation, construction and safety combine to create a complex network of factors. Despite the essentially parametric nature of stairs, designers have been eager to adopt and apply simplistic standardization schemes, often unrelated to safety issues. Moreover, while there are several computerized systems for the automated design of stairs, there has been little if any interest in the computer-based analysis of stair designs. The objective of our research has been to develop a transparent and flexible computer system for the design and analysis of stairs. The system employs constraint propagation networks for the calculation of stair dimensions in generation and for the correlation of floor levels to stairs and their dimensions in analysis. Computerization also allows us to re-examine and refine the norms underlying stair design. We propose that our understanding of stair design can be improved by the analysis of proprioceptive sizes in ascent and descent. Simulation of these sizes with virtual robots combines accurate measurement with visual evaluation. This combination facilitates the effortless and direct integration of advanced technologies and new methods in architectural design.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id d5d0
authors Park, B. S.
year 1996
title Visual Simulation and Perception in Urban Planning
source The Faculty of Environmental Design, Supervisor : Dr. R M Levy, The University of Calgary
summary Contributed by Susan Pietsch (spietsch@arch.adelaide.edu.au)
keywords 3D City Modeling, Development Control, Design Control
series other
last changed 2001/06/04 18:41

_id 8804
authors QaQish, R. and Hanna, R.
year 1997
title A World-wide Questionnaire Survey on the Use of Computers in Architectural Education
source Challenges of the Future [15th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-3-0] Vienna (Austria) 17-20 September 1997
summary The paper reports on a study which examines the impact on architectural education needs arising from the changes brought about by the implications of CAD teaching/learning (CAI/CAL). The findings reflect the views of fifty-one (51) architecture schools through a world-wide questionnaire survey conducted in mid 1996. The survey was structured to cover four continents represented by seven countries, namely the USA, UK, Israel, Australia, Canada, Sweden and the Netherlands. Structurally the main findings of this study are summarised under five areas, namely: 1) General Information, 2) Program of Study (curriculum) and CAD course, 3) CAD Laboratories: Hardware, Software, 4) Departmental Current and Future Policies, 5) Multi-media and Virtual Reality. Principally, there were three main objectives for using the computers survey. Firstly, to accommodate a prevalent comprehension of CAD integration into the curriculum of architecture schools world wide. Secondly, to identify the main key factors that control the extent of association between CAD and architectural curriculum. Thirdly, to identify common trends of CAD teaching in Architecture schools world-wide and across the seven countries to establish whether there are any association between them. Several variables and factors that were found to have an impact on AE were examined, namely: the response rate, the conventional methods users and the CAD methods users amongst students, CAD course employment in the curriculum, age of CAD employment, the role of CAD in the curriculum, CAD training time in the Curriculum, CAD laboratories/Hardware & Software, computing staff and technicians, department policies, Multi-Media (MM) and Virtual-Reality (VR). The statistical analysis of the study revealed significant findings, one of which indicates that 35% of the total population of students at the surveyed architecture schools are reported as being CAD users. Out of the 51 architecture schools who participated in this survey, 47 have introduced CAD courses into the curriculum. The impact of CAD on the curriculum was noted to be significant in several areas, namely: architectural design, architectural presentation, structural engineering, facilities management, thesis project and urban design. The top five CAD packages found to be most highly used across universities were, namely, AutoCAD (46), 3DStudio (34), Microstation (23), Form Z (17), ArchiCAD (17). The findings of this study suggest some effective and efficient future directions in adopting some form of effective CAD strategies in the curriculum of architecture. The study also serves as an evaluation tool for computing teaching in the design studio and the curriculum.

 

keywords CAD Integration, Employment, Users and Effectiveness
series eCAADe
email r.qaqish@gsa.ac.uk
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/ecaade/proc/qaqish/qaqish.htm
last changed 2001/08/17 13:11

_id ddssar9627
id ddssar9627
authors Sariyildiz, S., Schwenck, M. and Jander, E.
year 1996
title Multimedia Teachware in the Field of Architectural Design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary Software systems for educational purposes have been developed and used in many application areas. In this paper we will describe a development in the field of building science. ClAD is a teachware system directed to be used in the education of students of architecture as well as a tool that gives a survey to architects and engineers in the practice. In the first place it provides information about the use of computer science technologies in the building design process. Furthermore, information about the architectural design process itself is included. Based on an analysis of general requirements and specific demands of the application field we describe our solution concept. Very important conclusions are that the system has to integrate the use of all media which are usually used by architects by offering a flexible and well-designed user interface and allowing a high degree of interactive work. After covering the development process as a combination of top down and bottom up strategies we describe the overall structure of ClAD as a modular system which can be extended and updated easily. Finally, we give an overview about some parts of the system to demonstrate the implementation of the concepts mentioned above.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddssup9616
id ddssup9616
authors Schmidt-Belz, B., Voß, A., Emkes, L. and Coulon, C.H.
year 1996
title How to support city planning using map interpretation techniques
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary We suggest and motivate a system to support city traffic planning. Our approach is derived from Case-Based Reasoning (CBR), where former experiences (cases) are stored and made available for reuse. To start with, a collection of examples from books or other sources is stored as hypermedia documents. Retrieval of useful examples is enabled by describing (indexing) the examples in several aspects. While some descriptors have to be attached by users or system administrators, others could be automatically inferred. The vision is, that in the long run cases are derived from GIS plans and the CBR support is an integrated tool in a GIS working environment.
series DDSS
email Barbara.Schmidt-Belz@gmd.de
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddssup9618
id ddssup9618
authors Stamps, Arthur E.
year 1996
title Significant visual impact: Is it or isn't it?
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary Thirty-eight countries, from all continents except Antarctica, have formal environmental impact review procedures. These impact procedures typically require distinctions between "significant impacts" and "non-significant" impacts. For some issues, such as visual quality, distinguishing the major from the trivial impacts is especially difficult. This paper outlines a theory of visual impacts, shows how the theory can be implemented, and illustrates the theory with three cases histories and a survey of research on the effects of various planning policies. The case histories are examples of statutory and discretionary design review in California and include specifying bay windows on houses, specifying contextual fit, and a before and after study of decisions of a review board. The talk concludes with a discussion of the ranges over which the theory will or will not be applicable and of the opportunities for future cooperative international research.
series DDSS
email aestamps@ix.netcom.com
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddssar9630
id ddssar9630
authors Stark, S.L. and Phillips, R.G.
year 1996
title Occupational Performance Theory as a Support to Design of the Built Environment for Persons with Disabilities
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary Architectural practice should not be considered only a method of building buildings, but also a process of creating places for those who will use them. The interdependent nature of humans and the environment has provided architects and designers with a challenge; to build not only a space, but also a place in which human performance occurs. Environment -- behavior relations are complex and transactional. An understanding of this relationship facilitates the creation of environments that improve the quality of life for the buildings users. A strong understanding of the complexities of the environment is greatly enhanced by knowledge of the performance of the person. Knowledge of the person as a unique being who assumes different roles, possesses skills, and has attributes (abilities) allows the designer a greater respect of the dynamic experience of a person engaged in activity within an environment. The theory of occupational performance supports the understanding of the person and the persons daily tasks. These models describe human performance components and human performance areas. They also acknowledge that the person is engaged in activity within an environment. These models could prove to be invaluable to designers and architects interested in using knowledge of the persons in conjunction with knowledge of the environment to create spaces for people with disabilities.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddssar9632
id ddssar9632
authors Sun M. and Lockley S.R.
year 1996
title A STEP Towards a Computer based Integrated Building Design System
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary Building design is a multi-actor and multi-task process. In a design project architects, engineers and other specialists need to exchange information in order to produce a coherent design. These design participants often have different views of the design from their own perspectives. The aim of an integrated building design system is to develop a building data model that integrates all views so that building information can be exchanged in electronic form between the designers and also throughout various design stages. This paper introduces an integrated building design system developed as part of the European project, Computer Models for the Building Industry in Europe. It concentrates on the development of the Data Exchange System which is a central data repository implemented using an object oriented database and ISO STEP technology and it is able to support concurrent engineering, versioning, history tracing and other data transaction management
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddssup9619
id ddssup9619
authors Tisma, Alexandra
year 1996
title Multimedia Training "Designing Randstad"
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary The project multimedia training "Designing Randstad" (MTDR) is an experimental attempt to introduce multimedia in education at the Faculty of Architecture in Delft. It intends to develope teachware which will learn the students the basics of Geographic Informational Systems (GIS) implementation in land use evaluation appropriate for physical planning purposes. Interaction between students and the system will enable students to learn about GIS, to design a model of the spatial development of Randstad area and to evaluate their own designs, to produce immediate graphic visualisation of the evaluation and to compare it with the evaluations of the fellow students. The project will be applied in the first year curriculum, in the course "Region" of the Department of Urban planning of the Faculty of Architecture, in the first half of the year 1997.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddssar9634
id ddssar9634
authors Tonarelli, P., Ferries, B., Delaporte, J.L. and Tahon, C.
year 1996
title STEP approach applied to a design support system in construction, within the context of concurrent engineering
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary The purpose of this article is to show that a building project design requires a concurrent engineering approach. Therefore, a concurrent preparation phase which requires the choice of a product approach applied to the building trade will be defined. During the building project design, handled data are multiple; current models, used to define, to represent, and to communicate these data, are insufficient. To solve these problems, the achievement of this approach has to be supported by reliable models and computer systems. These systems have to integrate data set and treatments one. The models and tools used in this concurrent preparation must to take into account the standards set in the domain, in particular the STEP (STandard Exchange for Product model data) project. STEP technology uses a methodology of product data definition which can be applied to a particular domain: the application protocol approach. This methodology will be applied to data and support system modelling, so that a concurrent approach to the building trade can be achieved. Finally the specification and the software architecture of this system will be presented.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

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