CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 81 to 100 of 485

_id 807c
authors Kellett, Ronald
year 1996
title MEDIA MATTERS: NUDGING DIGITAL MEDIA INTO A MANUAL DESIGN PROCESS (AND VICE VERSA)
source Design Computation: Collaboration, Reasoning, Pedagogy [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-05-5] Tucson (Arizona / USA) October 31 - November 2, 1996, pp. 31-43
summary This paper reports on a media class offered during the 1995-96 academic year at the University of Oregon. This course, a renovation of an existing 'manual' media offering targeted intermediate Ievel graduate and undergraduate students who, while relatively experienced design students, were relatively inexperienced users of digital media for design. This course maintained a pedagogical emphasis on design process, a point of view that media are powerful influences on design thinking, and an attitude toward experimentation (and reflection) in matters of media and design process. Among the experiments explored were fitting together digital with manual media, and using digital media to collaborate in an electronic workspace. The experience offers opportunity to consider how digital media might be more widely integrated with what remains a predominantly 'manual' design process and media context for many architecture schools and practices.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email kellett@interchange.ubc.ca
last changed 2006/03/15 21:34

_id 2466
authors Paranandi, Murali
year 1996
title CAAD as a Thinking Medium: A Strategy for Computer Aided Architectural Design Education
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 313-324
summary This paper is organized into two parts. The first part is a commentary on the state of CAAD in response to the three very important pedagogical issues raised by Klerker in the conference theme narrative. The second part presents an introductory course developed and taught by the author that is based on a very simple premise; until intelligent CAAD (Computer Aided Architectural Design) programs become available, use what is available intelligently. The pedagogical model employed is explained. Some of the work done by the students of this course is included. The impact of this course on the curriculum in the school, the marketability of our students, and our future plans are summarized in the concluding remarks.
series eCAADe
email paranam@muohio.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id 88a2
authors Zhang, Lei
year 1996
title The Design of a Test Program for Basic Design
source CAADRIA ‘96 [Proceedings of The First Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 9627-75-703-9] Hong Kong (Hong Kong) 25-27 April 1996, pp. 253-267
summary Within the whole range of methods available in the teaching of design with computer the "Exercise" made, seems to be one of the most productive. Not only the student but also the teacher is involved in a step by step process of search, discovery and development. The continuous and controlled building of complexity in architecture design are the underlying issues. The student models in desecrate steps, exploring, testing, discovering and thus build a "repertoire" which combines knowledge skills, experience, attitudes as well as methodology. Symbiotically related the teacher prepares the exercise, one might call the process applied design research. Since based upon research, the teacher structures the learning process defining the what and why by indirect means. Leaving the how to the student's initiative and inventiveness. The design of the design or the design of the learning process poses one of the real challenges to the teacher. In the case of chains of exercise the interactiveness of the student and teacher are of specific interest, since feedback loops add to the process. The following test program is directly related to this line of thinking. In it a "teacher" is asked to develop a simple chain of exercises based on a given "theoretical model". Thus building his own experience in basic design. In this test run the student is introduced to the concept of continuous space as well as the notion of architecture form as the interaction between space, site and structure a course. It could be seen as a basic model since we could have much more complex resolutions if we change the given elements and limitations.
series CAADRIA
last changed 2003/04/01 17:57

_id 846c
authors Achten, Henri
year 1996
title Generic Representations: Intermediate Structures in Computer Aided Architectural Composition.
source Approaches to Computer Aided Architectural Composition [ISBN 83-905377-1-0] 1996, pp. 9-24
summary The paper discusses research work on typological and generic knowledge in architectural design. Architectural composition occurs predominantly through drawings as a medium. Throughout the process, architects apply knowledge. The paper discusses the question how to accommodate this process in computers bearing in mind the medium of drawings and the application of knowledge. It introduces generic representations as one particular approach and discusses its implications by the concept of intermediate structures. The paper concludes with an evaluation of the presented ideas.
keywords
series other
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 1999/04/08 15:16

_id 438d
authors Bartnicka, Malgorzata
year 1996
title Who Uses Whom
source CAD Creativeness [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 83-905377-0-2] Bialystock (Poland), 25-27 April 1996 pp. 21-26
summary For many years architects have been improving their tools in order to make their visions most comprehensible to the future customers - investor and building contractor. Not everyone is able to read the technical drawings of the designed building as it requires the spatial imagination to be developed. For such non-professional persons and also because of the innate need of convenience architect has decided to use a machine called computer. With the help of computer technical drawings, axonometries, perspectives and colourful pictures are being created. They show reality in a more or less precise way. Architects eagerly use such methods of presentation as perspective views, that is photographic images of objects which do not yet exist. All of these measures taken are just a kind of advertising. The architect wants to sell his vision in the most accessible way to beat the competition.
series plCAD
last changed 1999/04/09 13:30

_id ecba
authors Bosco, Antonio
year 1996
title Hypertext for Building Rehabilitation. A didactic Use of an Innovative Methodology of Diagnosis of the Building Decay
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 59-64
summary In the paper presented in the last ECAADE conference in Palermo we described a first hypertext for the analysis of ancient buildings. One section of the hypertext was devoted to show diagnostic procedures and specific instrumental tests for building rehabilitation. We can consider that the hypertext represent the best answer to the request of an organised knowledge coming from students of the schools of architecture and public operators. So we describe how the proposed arrangement of the diagnostic tests can become a real operative tool technicians of public agencies and powerful means of building technology knowledge for students too. The diagnostic procedures are related to the specific needs of the architectural design; changing ways to archive the tests are showed. The goal is to allow the architects, operating in the rehabilitation field, to operate the right choice of diagnostic methods to avoid doing many unnecessary, expensive tests.
series eCAADe
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 0c50
authors Heikkilä, Rauno and Haapasalo, Harri
year 1996
title Creative Computer Aided Architectural Design
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 191-198
summary Computer aided architectural design is considered on the basis of the newest knowledge of man's creative thinking and intuitive design. A creative architectural design method of universal application is outlined. The method is verified on account of both the empirical observations from practical architectural design as well as the presentations of architects in the literature. The policies of different CAAD programs are discussed. Lines for the development of a new creative CAAD program is also discussed.

series eCAADe
email rkheikki@cc.oulu.fi, harri.haapasalo@oulu.fi
last changed 1998/08/17 13:42

_id cf2009_poster_09
id cf2009_poster_09
authors Hsu, Yin-Cheng
year 2009
title Lego Free-Form? Towards a Modularized Free-Form Construction
source T. Tidafi and T. Dorta (eds) Joining Languages Cultures and Visions: CAADFutures 2009 CD-Rom
summary Design Media is the tool designers use for concept realization (Schon and Wiggins, 1992; Liu, 1996). Design thinking of designers is deeply effected by the media they tend to use (Zevi, 1981; Liu, 1996; Lim, 2003). Historically, architecture is influenced by the design media that were available within that era (Liu, 1996; Porter and Neale, 2000; Smith, 2004). From the 2D plans first used in ancient egypt, to the 3D physical models that came about during the Renaissance period, architecture reflects the media used for design. When breakthroughs in CAD/CAM technologies were brought to the world in the twentieth century, new possibilities opened up for architects.
keywords CAD/CAM free-form construction, modularization
series CAAD Futures
type poster
last changed 2009/07/08 20:12

_id 8de0
authors Kokosalakis, Jen
year 1996
title THE CAAC 3D Model as the Focus, or Vehicle for Effective Participation with the Design's Client, Observer or User
source Approaches to Computer Aided Architectural Composition [ISBN 83-905377-1-0] 1996, pp. 133-152
summary Architectural composition is central to most education and training of architects. Hence, though not every architect's role in practice deals directly with architectural composition, all will have a greater likelihood of ability to visualise and understand others' visual concepts than the average client. This text is concerned with the involvement of the client in composition of the building design. The medium of the three dimensional model, manoeuvrable at the computer screen or in Virtual Reality resembles well the intended physical reality of the designed building that the client will either own, use, occupy, or observe and so can assist tremendously. It is suggested that through this empowering vehicle of the CAAC model, far more informed response and tangible, visible vocabulary is accessible to the client to assist dialogue. This text proposes that practice can indicate better participation as a more evident principle. CAAC enables dynamic influences on the architectural composition of the building as accountable, truly potential dialogue towards design outcome from the construction team. The case rests with current exploratory cases of dynamic, participatory architectural composition activity, as a sign for the future.
keywords
series other
email J.Kokosalakis@livjm.ac.uk
last changed 1999/04/08 15:16

_id 010d
authors Kokosalakis, Jen
year 1996
title The Role and Status of Computing and Participation of Design Clients in the Curriculum
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 227-238
summary This paper is not intended as a fully researched exploration into architecture course coverage, but an attempt to introduce debate regarding some concerns on the role and status of Computing and consumer participation in the hope that CAAD peers will discuss and reflect with other specialists. A number of commentaries on serious deficiencies in the education of architects point to poor take-up of computing into the curriculum and an almost disassociation of the eventual designed building user from decisions on the design. By comparison it seems easier to find architects today who involve clients almost throughout the design process and increasing competency and continuity of CAAD usage in practices. The few brief references to Schools’ curricula are not formalised random studies. Certainly many excellent features will have been omitted. The intention is to start the debate. Finally a few directions are noted and some conclusions proffered. An argument is made for 3D CAAD models as the backbone and direct negotiating focus for design arbitration between consumer, designer [or students] and other professional collaborators in tesigning buildings, particularly where complex forms and spatial relationships are involved.

series eCAADe
email j.kokosalakis@livjm.ac.uk
last changed 1998/08/17 13:45

_id ce1b
authors Kvan, Th., Lee, A. and Ho, L.
year 2000
title Anthony Ng Architects Limited: Building Towards a Paperless Future
source Case Study and Teaching Notes number 99/65, 10 pages, distributed by HKU Centre for Asian Business Cases, Harvard Business School Publishing (HBSP) and The European Case Clearing House (ECCH), June 2000
summary In early 1997; Mr. Anthony Ng; managing director of Anthony Ng Architects Ltd.; was keenly looking forward to a high-tech; paperless new office; which would free his designers from paperwork and greatly improve internal and external communication – a vision that he had had for a couple of years. In 1996; he brought on board a friend and expert in Internet technology to help him realise his vision. In July 1997; his company was to move into its new office in Wan Chai. Their plan was to have in place an Intranet and a web-based document management system when they moved into the new office. But he had to be mindful of resulting changes in communication patterns; culture and expectations. Resistance from within his company was also threatening to ruin the grand plan. Several senior executives were fiercely opposed to the proposal and refused to read a document off a computer screen. But Ng knew it was an important initiative to move his practice forward. Once the decision was made there would be no chance to reconsider; given the workload demands of the new HK$12 billion project. And this decision would mark a watershed in the company’s evolution. This case study examines the challenges and implications of employing IT to support an architectural office.
keywords IT In Practice; Professional Practice; Archives
series other
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2002/11/15 17:29

_id 5570
authors Mahnke, Frank H.
year 1996
title Color, environment, and human response: an interdisciplinary understanding of color and its use as a beneficial element in the design of the architectural environment
source Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York
summary Written for architects, interior designers, and color consultants, this ambitious study explores the psychological and physiological effects of color in the man-made environment. Scientific findings and industry-by-industry examples are furnished to help professionals specify colors that will create healthful environments in hospitals, schools, restaurants, and other public facilities.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 4b22
authors Moorhouse, J.
year 1996
title Teach a Man to Catch a Fish
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 281-286
summary An international charity outlined the following principle recently in an advertisement. “Give a man a fish and he will feed himself for a day, teach a man how to catch a fish and he will feed himself for a lifetime.” In education, the same principle may be applied to learning.

To the student of architecture, skills in the use of commercial software may be advantageouus in the search for future employment and can prove for be a useful springboard for exploring the potential of CAAD in a broader sense. However, software (and hardware) is continually being upgraded and developed, and it is apparent that such software does not fully meet the need of the designer.

Exploring the possibilities of CAADesigning as an integral part of learning to design will equip the student with the CAAD literacy necessary for working in practice, but more importantly will provide the student with a rich and diverse understanding of design approaches.

Traditionally design tutors have taught (by example) how individual architects design. Providing a library of architects CAADesigning in different ways can be used to establish precedents and examples, demystify the activities to both students and tutors and provide a rich set of methodologies as a working context for students to draw inspiration from.

As part of an ongoing research study, a new direction has been taken gathering, comparing, contrasting and grouping live records of architects CAADesigning. This paper will outline the benefits of recording and creating such a library and will describe examples of recent findings.

series eCAADe
email j.moorhouse@livjm.ac.uk
last changed 1998/08/17 14:24

_id a4a4
authors Pellegrino, Anna and Caneparo, Luca
year 1996
title Lighting Simulation for Architectural Design: a Case Study
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 335-346
summary The paper considers some of the lighting simulation instruments at present available to architects for lighting design. We study the usability and accuracy of various systems, scale models, numerical simulations, rendering programs. An already built environment is the reference comparison for the accuracy of the simulation systems. The accuracy of the systems is evaluated for respectively quantitative simulation and qualitative visualisation. Quantitatively, the programs compute photometric values in physical units in a discrete number of points of the environment. Qualitatively, the programs generate images of visible radiation comparable to photographs of the real environment. They combine calculations with computer graphics, that is, they translate numerical values into images.

series eCAADe
email luca.caneparo@polito.it
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id ddssar9627
id ddssar9627
authors Sariyildiz, S., Schwenck, M. and Jander, E.
year 1996
title Multimedia Teachware in the Field of Architectural Design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary Software systems for educational purposes have been developed and used in many application areas. In this paper we will describe a development in the field of building science. ClAD is a teachware system directed to be used in the education of students of architecture as well as a tool that gives a survey to architects and engineers in the practice. In the first place it provides information about the use of computer science technologies in the building design process. Furthermore, information about the architectural design process itself is included. Based on an analysis of general requirements and specific demands of the application field we describe our solution concept. Very important conclusions are that the system has to integrate the use of all media which are usually used by architects by offering a flexible and well-designed user interface and allowing a high degree of interactive work. After covering the development process as a combination of top down and bottom up strategies we describe the overall structure of ClAD as a modular system which can be extended and updated easily. Finally, we give an overview about some parts of the system to demonstrate the implementation of the concepts mentioned above.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id avocaad_2001_20
id avocaad_2001_20
authors Shen-Kai Tang
year 2001
title Toward a procedure of computer simulation in the restoration of historical architecture
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In the field of architectural design, “visualization¨ generally refers to some media, communicating and representing the idea of designers, such as ordinary drafts, maps, perspectives, photos and physical models, etc. (Rahman, 1992; Susan, 2000). The main reason why we adopt visualization is that it enables us to understand clearly and to control complicated procedures (Gombrich, 1990). Secondly, the way we get design knowledge is more from the published visualized images and less from personal experiences (Evans, 1989). Thus the importance of the representation of visualization is manifested.Due to the developments of computer technology in recent years, various computer aided design system are invented and used in a great amount, such as image processing, computer graphic, computer modeling/rendering, animation, multimedia, virtual reality and collaboration, etc. (Lawson, 1995; Liu, 1996). The conventional media are greatly replaced by computer media, and the visualization is further brought into the computerized stage. The procedure of visual impact analysis and assessment (VIAA), addressed by Rahman (1992), is renewed and amended for the intervention of computer (Liu, 2000). Based on the procedures above, a great amount of applied researches are proceeded. Therefore it is evident that the computer visualization is helpful to the discussion and evaluation during the design process (Hall, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998; Liu, 1997; Sasada, 1986, 1988, 1990, 1993, 1997, 1998). In addition to the process of architectural design, the computer visualization is also applied to the subject of construction, which is repeatedly amended and corrected by the images of computer simulation (Liu, 2000). Potier (2000) probes into the contextual research and restoration of historical architecture by the technology of computer simulation before the practical restoration is constructed. In this way he established a communicative mode among archeologists, architects via computer media.In the research of restoration and preservation of historical architecture in Taiwan, many scholars have been devoted into the studies of historical contextual criticism (Shi, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1995; Fu, 1995, 1997; Chiu, 2000). Clues that accompany the historical contextual criticism (such as oral information, writings, photographs, pictures, etc.) help to explore the construction and the procedure of restoration (Hung, 1995), and serve as an aid to the studies of the usage and durability of the materials in the restoration of historical architecture (Dasser, 1990; Wang, 1998). Many clues are lost, because historical architecture is often age-old (Hung, 1995). Under the circumstance, restoration of historical architecture can only be proceeded by restricted pictures, written data and oral information (Shi, 1989). Therefore, computer simulation is employed by scholars to simulate the condition of historical architecture with restricted information after restoration (Potier, 2000). Yet this is only the early stage of computer-aid restoration. The focus of the paper aims at exploring that whether visual simulation of computer can help to investigate the practice of restoration and the estimation and evaluation after restoration.By exploring the restoration of historical architecture (taking the Gigi Train Station destroyed by the earthquake in last September as the operating example), this study aims to establish a complete work on computer visualization, including the concept of restoration, the practice of restoration, and the estimation and evaluation of restoration.This research is to simulate the process of restoration by computer simulation based on visualized media (restricted pictures, restricted written data and restricted oral information) and the specialized experience of historical architects (Potier, 2000). During the process of practicing, communicates with craftsmen repeatedly with some simulated alternatives, and makes the result as the foundation of evaluating and adjusting the simulating process and outcome. In this way we address a suitable and complete process of computer visualization for historical architecture.The significance of this paper is that we are able to control every detail more exactly, and then prevent possible problems during the process of restoration of historical architecture.
series AVOCAAD
email tsk.aa88g@nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id ddssar9630
id ddssar9630
authors Stark, S.L. and Phillips, R.G.
year 1996
title Occupational Performance Theory as a Support to Design of the Built Environment for Persons with Disabilities
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary Architectural practice should not be considered only a method of building buildings, but also a process of creating places for those who will use them. The interdependent nature of humans and the environment has provided architects and designers with a challenge; to build not only a space, but also a place in which human performance occurs. Environment -- behavior relations are complex and transactional. An understanding of this relationship facilitates the creation of environments that improve the quality of life for the buildings users. A strong understanding of the complexities of the environment is greatly enhanced by knowledge of the performance of the person. Knowledge of the person as a unique being who assumes different roles, possesses skills, and has attributes (abilities) allows the designer a greater respect of the dynamic experience of a person engaged in activity within an environment. The theory of occupational performance supports the understanding of the person and the persons daily tasks. These models describe human performance components and human performance areas. They also acknowledge that the person is engaged in activity within an environment. These models could prove to be invaluable to designers and architects interested in using knowledge of the persons in conjunction with knowledge of the environment to create spaces for people with disabilities.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddssar9635
id ddssar9635
authors Vasquez de Velasco de la Puente, G.P. and Angulo MendIvil, A.H.
year 1996
title Professional Decision Support Clients and Instructional Knowledge Based Servers
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary The paper sets its focus on the problem of supporting the decision making process of the architect by means of Knowledge Based Systems that tend to concentrate on narrow domains of knowledge and fail to support global domain integration in our path towards an architectural synthesis. In response to this concern, the paper recognises the theoretical soundness of Integrated Decision Support Systems that seek the articulation of diversified knowledge based resources in pursue of achieving integral design support, but at the same time, the paper needs to acknowledge the multiple factors that have limited their wide spread development, in particular: lack of true commercial interest and a related absence of relevant authorship. From a conceptual and a commercial perspective, the paper transfers the traditional development scenario of our Integrated Decision Support Systems, and their array of knowledge based resources, into the market place of world-wide networks where Integrated Decision Support Platforms may perform as professional high-end clients and Knowledge Based Systems may be clustered within multimedia instructional servers. The paper ends by making reference to the positive reaction of a given group of practising architects that were recently exposed to a simulation of the intelligent front-end of a professional decision support client.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id c20d
authors Wie, Zhao Ji
year 1996
title Interactive Optimization: A Practical CAAD Model
source CAADRIA ‘96 [Proceedings of The First Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 9627-75-703-9] Hong Kong (Hong Kong) 25-27 April 1996, pp. 75-80
summary In recent years, the CAAD technique become more and more popular in most of architectural design institutions in China. Then, like in many other countries, CAAD in China is mainly used for making working drawings and perspectives, a drawing tool not a design tool, and the traditional architectural design process still remain unchanged. The decision making and layout approaching of the designs are based on the skills and experiences of architects, lacking of effective means for architects making design analysis and evaluation during designing.
series CAADRIA
last changed 1999/01/31 13:59

_id 4c06
authors Frazer, John H.
year 1996
title Second Order Computer Aided Design
source CAD Creativeness [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 83-905377-0-2] Bialystock (Poland), 25-27 April 1996 pp. 79-93
summary Following introductory remarks differentiating between those who see Computer Aided Design as a tool for radical change and those who do not, the paper gives examples drawn from the author's own research, of three of different kinds of change in design practice which result from the introduction of computer based techniques.
series plCAD
email sdfrazer@polyu.edu.hk
last changed 2003/05/17 08:01

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