CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 81 to 100 of 519

_id 9e13
authors Seward, D.W., Scott, J.N., Dixon, R., Findlay, J.D. and Kinniburgh, H.
year 1997
title The automation of piling rig positioning using satellite GPS
source Automation in Construction 6 (3) (1997) pp. 229-240
summary The paper is divided in two parts. Part one describes the Stent Automatic Pile Positioning and Recording system (SAPPAR) which was launched in November 1994. The system utilises a Trimble satellite global positioning system (GPS) to assist rig drivers in accurately positioning the rig over a pile position without the need for setting out. Advantages of the system include: cost savings by removing the need for site survey staff; faster set-up times over pile positions; increased accuracy - the system can reliably position the rig to within ± 25 mm; removal of problems resulting from damage to setting out pins; constant monitoring of pile position; and Links to CAD for data input and as-built drawings. Part two describes a further development of the system in collaboration with Lancaster University and Casagrande, the Italian rig manufacturer. The aim of the research is to fully automate the final positioning process. This represents one of the first uses of GPS for real-time automation. The system hardware components include: ultra-compact PC104 processor cards for a compact and robust embedded system; minimum sensing on the rig to minimise cost and maximise robustness; and limit sensors to facilitate on-board safety. The control algorithms were developed on a fifth-scale model in the laboratory using an innovative and new approach to the design of model based control systems. The importance of careful consideration of safety issues is stressed and conclusions are drawn based on the early findings from preliminary field trials.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id 4eea
authors Sook Lee, Y. and Kyung Shin, H.
year 1997
title Development and visualization of interior space models for university professor's office.
source Architectural and Urban Simulation Techniques in Research and Education [3rd EAEA-Conference Proceedings]
summary When visualization is required in academic area, the sound mundane realism ideally defined through scientific research is a requirement to make the testing of the visualized model worthy. Spatial model development is an essential part in every space type. Without space standards, architecture can not be existed. Lack of space standards causes some confusion, delay of decision, and trials and errors in building practice. This research deals with university professor's office space model. Currently in Korea, university building construction has been increased because of rapidly growing quantitative and qualitative needs for better education. There has been a wide range of size preference of the office space. Because of Korea's limited land availability, deliberate consideration in suggesting the minimum space standards without sacrificing the function is needed. This is especially important since professors traditionally have been highly respected from society, thereby rather authoritative with strong territoriality and privacy need and relatively sensitive to space size. Thus, presenting the 3D visual models to convince professors that the models accommodate their needs is important as well as the search process for ideal space models. The aim of the project was to develop a set of interior space models for university professor's office. To achieve the goal, 3 research projects and 1 design simulation project were implemented. Objectives of the 4 projects were 1) to identify the most popular office space conditions that is architectural characteristics, 2) to identify the most popular office space use type, 3) to identify user needs for spatial improvement, 4) to develop and suggest interior design alternatives systematically and present them in 3 dimentional computer simulation. This simulated images will be a basis of scaled model construction for endoscopy research and of full scale modelling in the future.
keywords Architectural Endoscopy, Endoscopy, Simulation, Visualisation, Visualization, Real Environments
series EAEA
email YUN2256@chollian.dacom.co.kr
more http://www.bk.tudelft.nl/media/eaea/eaea97.html
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 07ae
authors Sook Lee, Y. and Mi Lee, S.
year 1997
title Analysis of mental maps for ideal apartments to develop and simulate an innovative residential interior space.
source Architectural and Urban Simulation Techniques in Research and Education [3rd EAEA-Conference Proceedings]
summary Even though results of applied research have been ideally expected to be read and used by practitioners, written suggestions have been less persuasive especially, in visual field such as environmental design, architecture, and interior design. Therefore, visualization of space has been frequently considered as an ideal alternative way of suggestions and an effective method to disseminate research results and help decision makers. In order to make the visualized target space very solid and mundane, scientific research process to define the characteristics of the space should be precedent. This presentation consists of two parts : first research part ; second design and simulation part. The purpose of the research was to identify the ideal residential interior characteristics on the basis of people's mental maps for ideal apartments. To achieve this goal, quantitative content analysis was used using an existing data set of floor plans drawn by housewives. 2,215 floorplans were randomly selected among 3,012 floorplans collected through nation-wide housing design competition for ideal residential apartments. 213 selected variables were used to analyze the floorplans. Major contents were the presentational characteristics of mental maps and the characteristics of design preference such as layout, composition, furnishing etc. As a result, current and future possible trends of ideal residence were identified. On the basis of the result, design guidelines were generated. An interior spatial model for small size unit using CAD was developed according to the guidelines. To present it in more effective way, computer simulated images were made using 3DS. This paper is expected to generate the comparison of various methods for presenting research results such as written documents, drawings, simulated images, small scaled model for endoscopy and full scale modeling.
keywords Architectural Endoscopy, Endoscopy, Simulation, Visualisation, Visualization, Real Environments
series EAEA
email YUN2256@chollian.dacom.co.kr
more http://www.bk.tudelft.nl/media/eaea/eaea97.html
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id ddssup9619
id ddssup9619
authors Tisma, Alexandra
year 1996
title Multimedia Training "Designing Randstad"
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary The project multimedia training "Designing Randstad" (MTDR) is an experimental attempt to introduce multimedia in education at the Faculty of Architecture in Delft. It intends to develope teachware which will learn the students the basics of Geographic Informational Systems (GIS) implementation in land use evaluation appropriate for physical planning purposes. Interaction between students and the system will enable students to learn about GIS, to design a model of the spatial development of Randstad area and to evaluate their own designs, to produce immediate graphic visualisation of the evaluation and to compare it with the evaluations of the fellow students. The project will be applied in the first year curriculum, in the course "Region" of the Department of Urban planning of the Faculty of Architecture, in the first half of the year 1997.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 736a
authors Van Helvoort, Rob
year 1997
title Drawing with Pencil, Pen and Mouse
source AVOCAAD First International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-01-09] Brussels (Belgium) 10-12 April 1997, pp. 363-368
summary The traditional way of architectural design leads to some shortcomings with respect to the quality of the design and the efficiency of the design process. Therefore possibilities for improvements have to be considered. In order to come to fundamental improvements the application of advanced computer technology in the field of architecture has to be co-ordinated with improvements in the area of design methodologies. In this paper we suggest a new methodology for architectural design. It is based on an integrated manner of designing. Despite some early design steps the whole design process is executed on the basis of a 3D model which is handled by means of computers. The central data objects in the design process are the different types of models. The models contain all relevant information generated in the design process. A comparison of our approach with the traditional way of designing illustrates the potential of the new methodology.
keywords Design Methodologies, Integrated Design Systems, Computer Support
series AVOCAAD
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id caadria2006_633
id caadria2006_633
authors WAN-YU LIU
year 2006
title THE EMERGING DIGITAL STYLE: Attention shift in architectural style recognition
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 633-635
summary “Style” has long been an important index to observe the design thinking of designers in architecture. Gombrich (1968) defined style as a particular selection from the alternatives when doing things; Ackerman (1963) considered that a distiguishable ensemble of certain characteristics we call a style; Schapiro (1961) pointed out that style is constant forms, and sometimes the constant elements, qualities and expression; Kirsch (1998), Cha and Gero (1999) thought of style as a form element and shape pattern. As Simon and others referred to, style emerged from the process of problem solving, Chan (1994, 2001) ever devised a serious of experiments to set up the operational definitions of style, further five factors that relate to generating styles. Owing to that the greater part of sketches and drawings in the design process couldn’t be replaced by computer-aided design systems (Eisentraut, 1997), designers must shift between different problem-solving methods while facing different design problems. The purpose in this research is to discuss the influences of computer usage on style generation and style recognition: The employment of certain procedural factors that occurred in the design processes that using conventional media is different from the ones that using computer media? Do personal styles emerge while designers shifting between different media in the design processes? Does any unusual phenomenon emerge while accustomed CAD-systems designers recognizing a style?
series CAADRIA
email Giselle@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id 2a63
authors Wrona, S., Miller, D. and Klos, J.
year 1997
title The Systematization of Information in the Computer Aided Architectural Design
source Challenges of the Future [15th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-3-0] Vienna (Austria) 17-20 September 1997
summary Since the CAD methods were invented, the systematization of information in CAD has been strongly connected to the computerization of architect’s workshop. Nowadays, in 90., this systematization has to the great extent negative consequences. A designer understands the systematization of information through abilities and disabilities of the one, particular graphical aided documentation development system, which he deploys himself. The traditional method of design is clearly opposed to the computerized method. Data bases are seen by architects as a set of information describing particular and unique architectural project and some selected aspects correlated with narrow specialization of designer. Collaboration between participants of design process is still very challenging due to the usage of different tools and different systematization of information. It is necessary to define modern part of information in architectural design. The systematization of information should be a foundation for development of computer systems and not contrary, in this way it will be possible to overcome opposition between traditional and computerized techniques. Architect’s workshop, from the point of view of the informational structure of ongoing information exchange processes, should in greater part relay on the experience of structural analysis used for development of information systems in business. Effective utilization of computer methods requires the extension of collaboration between all the participants of design process, search for active access to distributed data bases (i.e. Internet) and increase of methodological consciousness (the ability to form own design strategies, methods and structures) indispensable for development of modern CAD systems which wouldn’t be limited to a computer graphics.
keywords CAAD, Collaboration, Databases, Information, Systematization, Workshop
series eCAADe
email wrona@arch.pw.edu.pl
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/ecaade/proc/wrona/wrona.htm
last changed 2001/08/17 13:11

_id avocaad_2001_09
id avocaad_2001_09
authors Yu-Tung Liu, Yung-Ching Yeh, Sheng-Cheng Shih
year 2001
title Digital Architecture in CAD studio and Internet-based competition
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary Architectural design has been changing because of the vast and creative use of computer in different ways. From the viewpoint of designing itself, computer has been used as drawing tools in the latter phase of design (Mitchell 1977; Coyne et al. 1990), presentation and simulation tools in the middle phase (Liu and Bai 2000), and even critical media which triggers creative thinking in the very early phase (Maher et al. 2000; Liu 1999; Won 1999). All the various roles that computer can play have been adopted in a number of professional design corporations and so-called computer-aided design (CAD) studio in schools worldwide (Kvan 1997, 2000; Cheng 1998). The processes and outcomes of design have been continuously developing to capture the movement of the computer age. However, from the viewpoint of social-cultural theories of architecture, the evolvement of design cannot be achieved solely by designers or design processes. Any new idea of design can be accepted socially, culturally and historically only under one condition: The design outcomes could be reviewed and appreciated by critics in the field at the time of its production (Csikszentmihalyi 1986, 1988; Schon and Wiggins 1992; Liu 2000). In other words, aspects of design production (by designers in different design processes) are as critical as those of design appreciation (by critics in different review processes) in the observation of the future trends of architecture.Nevertheless, in the field of architectural design with computer and Internet, that is, so-called computer-aided design computer-mediated design, or internet-based design, most existing studies pay more attentions to producing design in design processes as mentioned above. Relatively few studies focus on how critics act and how they interact with designers in the review processes. Therefore, this study intends to investigate some evolving phenomena of the interaction between design production and appreciation in the environment of computer and Internet.This paper takes a CAD studio and an Internet-based competition as examples. The CAD studio includes 7 master's students and 2 critics, all from the same countries. The Internet-based competition, held in year 2000, includes 206 designers from 43 counties and 26 critics from 11 countries. 3 students and the 2 critics in the CAD studio are the competition participating designers and critics respectively. The methodological steps are as follows: 1. A qualitative analysis: observation and interview of the 3 participants and 2 reviewers who join both the CAD studio and the competition. The 4 analytical criteria are the kinds of presenting media, the kinds of supportive media (such as verbal and gesture/facial data), stages of the review processes, and interaction between the designer and critics. The behavioral data are acquired by recording the design presentation and dialogue within 3 months. 2. A quantitative analysis: statistical analysis of the detailed reviewing data in the CAD studio and the competition. The four 4 analytical factors are the reviewing time, the number of reviewing of the same project, the comparison between different projects, and grades/comments. 3. Both the qualitative and quantitative data are cross analyzed and discussed, based on the theories of design thinking, design production/appreciation, and the appreciative system (Goodman 1978, 1984).The result of this study indicates that the interaction between design production and appreciation during the review processes could differ significantly. The review processes could be either linear or cyclic due to the influences from the kinds of media, the environmental discrepancies between studio and Internet, as well as cognitive thinking/memory capacity. The design production and appreciation seem to be more linear in CAD studio whereas more cyclic in the Internet environment. This distinction coincides with the complementary observations of designing as a linear process (Jones 1970; Simon 1981) or a cyclic movement (Schon and Wiggins 1992). Some phenomena during the two processes are also illustrated in detail in this paper.This study is merely a starting point of the research in design production and appreciation in the computer and network age. The future direction of investigation is to establish a theoretical model for the interaction between design production and appreciation based on current findings. The model is expected to conduct using revised protocol analysis and interviews. The other future research is to explore how design computing creativity emerge from the process of producing and appreciating.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id eea1
authors Achten, Henri
year 1997
title Generic Representations - Typical Design without the Use of Types
source CAAD Futures 1997 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-7923-4726-9] München (Germany), 4-6 August 1997, pp. 117-133
summary The building type is a (knowledge) structure that is both recognised as a constitutive cognitive element of human thought and as a constitutive computational element in CAAD systems. Questions that seem unresolved up to now about computational approaches to building types are the relationship between the various instances that are generally recognised as belonging to a particular building type, the way a type can deal with varying briefs (or with mixed functional use), and how a type can accommodate different sites. Approaches that aim to model building types as data structures of interrelated variables (so-called 'prototypes') face problems clarifying these questions. It is proposed in this research not to focus on a definition of 'type,' but rather to investigate the role of knowledge connected to building types in the design process. The basic proposition is that the graphic representations used to represent the state of the design object throughout the design process can be used as a medium to encode knowledge of the building type. This proposition claims that graphic representations consistently encode the things they represent, that it is possible to derive the knowledge content of graphic representations, and that there is enough diversity within graphic representations to support a design process of a building belonging to a type. In order to substantiate these claims, it is necessary to analyse graphic representations. In the research work, an approach based on the notion of 'graphic units' is developed. The graphic unit is defined and the analysis of graphic representations on the basis of the graphic unit is demonstrated. This analysis brings forward the knowledge content of single graphic representations. Such knowledge content is declarative knowledge. The graphic unit also provides the means to articulate the transition from one graphic representation to another graphic representation. Such transitions encode procedural knowledge. The principles of a sequence of generic representations are discussed and it is demonstrated how a particular type - the office building type - is implemented in the theoretical work. Computational work on implementation part of a sequence of generic representations of the office building type is discussed. The paper ends with a summary and future work.
series CAAD Futures
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.n
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 730e
authors Af Klercker, Jonas
year 1997
title Implementation of IT and CAD - what can Architect schools do?
source AVOCAAD First International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-01-09] Brussels (Belgium) 10-12 April 1997, pp. 83-92
summary In Sweden representatives from the Construction industry have put forward a research and development program called: "IT-Bygg 2002 -Implementation". It aims at making IT the vehicle for decreasing the building costs and at the same time getting better quality and efficiency out of the industry. A seminar was held with some of the most experienced researchers, developers and practitioners of CAD in construction in Sweden. The activities were recorded and annotated, analysed and put together afterwards; then presented to the participants to agree on. Co-operation is the key to get to the goals - IT and CAD are just the means to improve it. Co-operation in a phase of implementation is enough problematic without the technical difficulties in using computer programs created by the computer industry primarily for commercial reasons. The suggestion is that cooperation between software companies within Sweden will make a greater market to share than the sum of all individual efforts. In the short term, 2 - 5 years, implementation of CAD and IT will demand a large amount of educational efforts from all actors in the construction process. In the process of today the architect is looked upon as a natural coordinator of the design phase. In the integrated process the architect's methods and knowledge are central and must be spread to other categories of actors - what a challenge! At least in Sweden the number of researchers and educators in CAAD is easily counted. How do we make the most of it?
series AVOCAAD
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 1fb3
authors Akin, O., Cumming, M., Shealey, M. and Tuncer, B.
year 1997
title An electronic design assistance tool for case-based representation of designs
source Automation in Construction 6 (4) (1997) pp. 265-274
summary In precedent based design, solutions to problems are developed by drawing from an understanding of landmark designs. Many of the key design operations in this mode are similar to the functionalities present in case-based reasoning systems: case matching, case adapting, and case representation. It is clear that a rich case-base, encoding all major product types in a design domain would be the centerpiece of such an approach. EDAT (Electronic Design Assistance Tool) is intended to assist in precedent based design in the studio with the potential of expansion into the office setting. EDAT has been designed using object oriented system development methods. EDAT was used in a design studio at Carnegie Mellon University, during Spring 1996.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id a93b
authors Anders, Peter
year 1997
title Cybrids: Integrating Cognitive and Physical Space in Architecture
source Design and Representation [ACADIA ‘97 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-06-3] Cincinatti, Ohio (USA) 3-5 October 1997, pp. 17-34
summary People regularly use non-physical, cognitive spaces to navigate and think. These spaces are important to architects in the design and planning of physical buildings. Cognitive spaces inform design - often underlying principles of architectural composition. They include zones of privacy, territory and the space of memory and visual thought. They let us to map our environment, model or plan projects, even imagine places like Heaven or Hell.

Cyberspace is an electronic extension of this cognitive space. Designers of virtual environments already know the power these spaces have on the imagination. Computers are no longer just tools for projecting buildings. They change the very substance of design. Cyberspace is itself a subject for design. With computers architects can design space both for physical and non-physical media. A conscious integration of cognitive and physical space in architecture can affect construction and maintenance costs, and the impact on natural and urban environments.

This paper is about the convergence of physical and electronic space and its potential effects on architecture. The first part of the paper will define cognitive space and its relationship to cyberspace. The second part will relate cyberspace to the production of architecture. Finally, a recent project done at the University of Michigan Graduate School of Architecture will illustrate the integration of physical and cyberspaces.

series ACADIA
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 2dc0
authors Arkin, H. and Paciuk, M.
year 1997
title Evaluating intelligent buildings according to level of service systems integration
source Automation in Construction 6 (5-6) (1997) pp. 471-479
summary The intelligent building is supposed to provide the environment and means for an optimal utilization of the building, according to its designation. This extended function of a building can be achieved only by means of an extensive use of building service systems, such as HVAC; electric power; communication; safety and security; transportation; sanitation, etc. Building intelligence is not related to the sophistication of service systems in a building, but rather to the integration among the various service systems, and between the systems and the building structure. Systems' integration can be accomplished through teamwork planning of the building, starting at the initial design stages of the building. This paper examines some existing buildings claimed to be "intelligent", according to their level of systems' integration.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 0c91
authors Asanowicz, Aleksander
year 1997
title Computer - Tool vs. Medium
source Challenges of the Future [15th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-3-0] Vienna (Austria) 17-20 September 1997
summary We have arrived an important juncture in the history of computing in our profession: This history is long enough to reveal clear trends in the use of computing, but not long to institutionalize them. As computers peremate every area of architecture - from design and construction documents to project administration and site supervision - can “virtual practice” be far behind? In the old days, there were basically two ways of architects working. Under stress. Or under lots more stress. Over time, someone forwarded the radical motion that the job could be easier, you could actually get more work done. Architects still have been looking for ways to produce more work in less time. They need a more productive work environment. The ideal environment would integrate man and machine (computer) in total harmony. As more and more architects and firms invest more and more time, money, and effort into particular ways of using computers, these practices will become resistant to change. Now is the time to decide if computing is developing the way we think it should. Enabled and vastly accelerated by technology, and driven by imperatives for cost efficiency, flexibility, and responsiveness, work in the design sector is changing in every respect. It is stands to reason that architects must change too - on every level - not only by expanding the scope of their design concerns, but by altering design process. Very often we can read, that the recent new technologies, the availability of computers and software, imply that use of CAAD software in design office is growing enormously and computers really have changed the production of contract documents in architectural offices.
keywords Computers, CAAD, Cyberreal, Design, Interactive, Medium, Sketches, Tools, Virtual Reality
series eCAADe
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/ecaade/proc/asan/asanowic.htm
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 8ec9
authors Asanowicz, Alexander
year 1997
title Incompatible Pencil - Chance for Changing in Design Process
source AVOCAAD First International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-01-09] Brussels (Belgium) 10-12 April 1997, pp. 93-101
summary The existing Caad systems limit designers creativity by constraining them to work with prototypes provided by the system's knowledge base. Most think of computers as drafting machines and consider CAAD models as merely proposals for future buildings. But this kind of thinking (computers as simple drafting machines) seems to be a way without future. New media demands new process and new process demands new media. We have to give some thougt to impact of CAAD on the design process and in which part of it CAAD can add new value. In this paper there will be considered two ways of using of computers. First - creation of architectural form in an architect's mind and projects visualisation with using renderings, animation and virtual reality. In the second part - computer techniques are investigated as a medium of creation. Unlike a conventional drawing the design object within computer has a life of its own. In computer space design and the final product are one. Computer creates environments for new kind of design activities. In fact, many dimensions of meaning in cyberspace have led to a cyberreal architecture that is sure to have dramatic consequences for the profession.
series AVOCAAD
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id dfaf
authors Ataman, Osman
year 2000
title Some Experimental Results in the Assessment of Architectural Media
source Eternity, Infinity and Virtuality in Architecture [Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / 1-880250-09-8] Washington D.C. 19-22 October 2000, pp. 163-171
summary The relationship between the media and architectural design can be an important factor and can influence the design outcome. However, the nature, direction and magnitude of this relationship are unknown. Consequently, there have been many speculative claims about this relationship and almost none of them are supported with empirical research studies. In order to investigate these claims and to provide a testable framework for their potential contributions to architectural education, this study aims to explore the effects of media on architectural design. During 1995-1997, a total of 90 students enrolling in First Year Design Studio and Introduction to Computing classes at Georgia Tech participated in the study. A set of quantitative measures was developed to assess the differences between the two media and the effects on the architectural design. The results suggested that media influenced certain aspects of students’ designs. It is concluded that there is a strong relationship between the media and architectural design. The type of media not only changes some quantifiable design parameters but also affects the quality of design.
series ACADIA
email oataman@uiuc.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id 58f4
authors Barequet, G. and Kumar, S.
year 1997
title Repairing CAD models
source Proceedings of IEEE Visualizationí97, pp. 363-370
summary We describe an algorithm for repairing polyhedral CAD models that have errors in their B-REP. Errors like cracks, degeneracies, duplication, holes and overlaps are usually introduced in solid models due to imprecise arithmetic, model transformations, designer's fault, programming bugs, etc. Such errors often hamper further processing like finite element analysis, radiosity computation and rapid prototyping. Our fault-repair algorithm converts an unordered collection of polygons to a shared-vertex representation to help eliminate errors. This is done by choosing, for each polygon edge, the most appropriate edge to unify it with. The two edges are then geometrically merged into one, by moving vertices. At the end of this process, each polygon edge is either coincident with another or is a boundary edge for a polygonal hole or a dangling wall and may be appropriately repaired. Finally, in order to allow user- inspection of the automatic corrections, we produce a visualization of the repair and let the user mark the corrections that conflict with the original design intent. A second iteration of the correction algorithm then produces a repair that is commensurate with the intent. Thus, by involving the users in a feedback loop, we are able to refine the correction to their satisfaction.
series other
email barequet@cs.technion.ac.il
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 0992
authors Belibani, R. and Gadola, A.
year 1997
title On Digital Architecture
source Challenges of the Future [15th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-3-0] Vienna (Austria) 17-20 September 1997
summary One of the main aims of this research was to highlight the influence of computer as a designing tool. Their wide acceptance as drawing tools might occult the importance of their role in architectural design. We will try to apprehend, with the help of synthetic images, that computers mark a historic step forward in drawing and representation, as well as a major progress in the understanding of creative processes.

Together these features offer a broader horizon to architectural design. New source of inspiration can be found in virtual reality that makes visible what does not really exist, permitting design to suggest itself with its primordial image. We mean a kind of architectural imprint, where the first three-dimensional lines suggest in some way the designer with their shape, and encourage the definition process.

Through the visualisation of some images, it is possible to show the modifications of language and style, to examine the transformation modalities of the design process and to propose an essay of the new methods to communicate architecture.

series eCAADe
email rbelibani@axrma.uniroma1.it
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/ecaade/proc/belibani/belibani.htm
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 76ba
authors Bermudez, Julio
year 1997
title Cyber(Inter)Sections: Looking into the Real Impact of The Virtual in the Architectural Profession
source Proceedings of the Symposium on Architectural Design Education: Intersecting Perspectives, Identities and Approaches. Minneapolis, MN: College of Architecture & Landscape Architecture, pp. 57-63
summary As both the skepticism and 'hype' surrounding cyberspace vanish under the weight of ever increasing power, demand, and use of information, the architectural discipline must prepare for significant changes. For cyberspace is remorselessly cutting through the dearest structures, rituals, roles, and modes of production in our profession. Yet, this section is not just a detached cut through the existing tissues of the discipline. Rather it is an inter-section, as cyberspace becomes also transformed in the act of piercing. This phenomenon is causing major transformations in at least three areas: 1. Cyberspace is substantially altering the way we produce and communicate architectural information. The arising new working environment suggests highly hybrid and networked conditions that will push the productive and educational landscape of the discipline towards increasing levels of fluidity, exchanges, diversity and change. 2. It has been argued that cyberspace-based human and human-data interactions present us with the opportunity to foster a more free marketplace of ideologies, cultures, preferences, values, and choices. Whether or not the in-progress cyberincisions have the potential to go deep enough to cure the many illnesses afflicting the body of our discipline need to be considered seriously. 3. Cyberspace is a new place or environment wherein new kinds of human activities demand unprecedented types of architectural services. Rather than being a passing fashion, these new architectural requirements are destined to grow exponentially. We need to consider the new modes of practice being created by cyberspace and the education required to prepare for them. This paper looks at these three intersecting territories showing that it is academia and not practice that is leading the profession in the incorporation of virtuality into architecture. Rafael Moneo's words come to mind. [2]
series other
email bermudez@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 127c
authors Bhavnani, S.K. and John, B.E.
year 1997
title From Sufficient to Efficient Usage: An Analysis of Strategic Knowledge
source Proceedings of CHI'97 (1997), 91-98
summary Can good design guarantee the eflicient use of computer tools? Can experience guarantee it? We raise these questions to explore why empirical studies of real-world usage show even experienced users under-utilizing the capabilities of computer applications. By analyzing the use of everyday devices and computer applications, as well as reviewing empirical studies, we conclude that neither good design nor experience may be able to guarantee efficient usage. Efficient use requires task decomposition strategies that exploit capabilities offered by computer applications such as the ability to aggregute objects, and to manipulate the aggregates with powerful operators. To understand the effects that strategies can have on performance, we present results from a GOMS analysis of a CAD task. Furthermore, we identify some key aggregation strategies that appear to generalize across applications. Such strategies may provide a framework to enable users to move from a sufficient to a more ef)icient use of computer tools.
keywords Strategies; Task Decomposition; Aggregation
series other
email bhavnani@umich.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

For more results click below:

show page 0show page 1show page 2show page 3this is page 4show page 5show page 6show page 7show page 8show page 9... show page 25HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_502447 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002