CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 519

_id c6e1
authors Smulevich, Gerard
year 1997
title Berlin-Crane City: Cardboard, Bits, and the Post-industrial Design Process
source Design and Representation [ACADIA ‘97 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-06-3] Cincinatti, Ohio (USA) 3-5 October 1997, pp. 139-153
summary This paper explores the impact of information technology on the architectural design process as seen through different design studios from three schools of architecture in Southern California over a two year period.

All three studios tested notions of representation, simulation and the design process in relation to a post-industrial world and its impact on how we design for it. The sites for two of these studios were in the city of Berlin, where the spearhead of the information age and a leftover of the industrial revolution overlap in an urban condition that is representative of our world after the cold war. The three studios describe a progressive shift in the use of information technology in the design process, from nearly pure image-driven simulation to a more low-tech, highly creative uses of everyday computing tools. Combined, all three cases describe an array of scenarios for content-supportive uses of digital media in a design studio. The first studio described here, from USC, utilized computer modeling and visualization to design a building for a site located within the former no-mans' land of the Berlin Wall. The second studio, from SCI-Arc, produced an urban design proposal for an area along the former Berlin Wall and included a pan-geographic design collaboration via Internet between SCI-Arc/Los Angeles and SCI-Arc/Switzerland. The third and last studio from Woodbury University participated in the 1997 ACSA/Dupont Laminated Glass Competition designing a consulate general for Germany and one for Hong Kong. They employed a hybrid digital/non-digital process extracting experiential representations from simple chipboard study models and then using that information to explore an "enhanced model" through digital imaging processes.

The end of the cold war was coincidental with the explosive popularization of information technology as a consumer product and is poised to have huge impact on how and what we design for our cities. Few places in world express this potential as does the city of Berlin. These three undergraduate design studios employed consumer-grade technology in an attempt to make a difference in how we design, incorporating discussions of historical change, ideological premise and what it means to be an architect in a world where image and content can become easily disconnected from one another.

series ACADIA
email gerards@ix.netcom.com
last changed 1998/12/31 12:37

_id 411c
authors Ataman, Osman and Bermúdez (Ed.)
year 1999
title Media and Design Process [Conference Proceedings]
source ACADIA ‘99 Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-08-X / Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, 353 p.
summary Throughout known architectural history, representation, media and design have been recognized to have a close relationship. This relationship is inseparable; representation being a means for engaging in design thinking and making and this activity requiring media. Interpretations as to what exactly this relationship is or means have been subject to debate, disagreement and change along the ages. Whereas much has been said about the interactions between representation and design, little has been elaborated on the relationship between media and design. Perhaps, it is not until now, surrounded by all kinds of media at the turn of the millennium, as Johnson argues (1997), that we have enough context to be able to see and address the relationship between media and human activities with some degree of perspective.
series ACADIA
email oataman@astro.ocis.temple.edu, bermudez@arch.utah.edu
more http://www.acadia.org
last changed 1999/12/02 07:48

_id 2e36
authors Bourdakis, Vassilis
year 1997
title Making Sense of the City
source CAAD Futures 1997 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-7923-4726-9] München (Germany), 4-6 August 1997, pp. 663-678
summary Large-scale, three dimensional, interactive computer models of cities are becoming feasible making it possible to test their suitability as a visualisation tool for the design and planning process, for data visualisation where socio-economic and physical data can be mapped on to the 3D form of the city and as an urban information repository. The CASA developed models of the City of Bath and London's West End in VRML format, are used as examples to illustrate the problems arising. The aim of this paper is to reflect on key issues related to interaction within urban models, data mapping techniques and appropriate metaphors for presenting information.
keywords 3D City modeling, Urban Modelling, Virtual Environments, Navigation, Data Mapping, VRML
series CAAD Futures
email v.bourdakis@prd.uth.gr
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id e405
authors Mitchell, William J.
year 1997
title City of Bits
source CAADRIA ‘97 [Proceedings of the Second Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 957-575-057-8] Taiwan 17-19 April 1997, pp. 1-2
summary My name is wjm@mit.edu (though I have many aliases), and I am an flâneur. I hang out on the network. The keyboard is my café. Each morning I turn to some nearby machine - my modest personal computer at home, a more powerful workstation in one of the offices or laboratories that I frequent, or a laptop in a hotel room-to log into electronic mail. I click on an icon to open an "inhox" filled with messages from round the world-replies to technical questions, queries for me to answer, drafts of papers, submissions of student work, appointments, travel and meeting arrangements. hits of business, greetings. reminders, chitchat, gossip, cornplaints, tips, jokes, flirtation. I type replies immediately, then drop them into an "otubox," from which they are forwarded automatically to the appropriate destinations. (Note the scare quotes. "Box" is a very loose metaphor. and I will come back to that later.) If I have time before I finish gulping my coffee. I also check the wire services and a couple of specialized news services to which I subscribe, then glance at the latest weather report. This ritual is repeated whenever I have a spare moment during the day.
series CAADRIA
email wjm@mit.edu
last changed 2003/04/01 17:52

_id a977
authors Rivera , Antonieta and Wojtowicz, Jerzy
year 1997
title Aspects of Tenochtitlan: Nature of CD-ROM Production in the Construction of Content
source Design and Representation [ACADIA ‘97 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-06-3] Cincinatti, Ohio (USA) 3-5 October 1997, pp. 319-327
summary At the beginning of the sixteenth century, the Aztec capital, Tenochtitlan, was one of the world's largest cities. By 1521, the Spaniards under Hernan Cortes had destroyed both the Empire and the city. Tenochtitlan was razed to its foundations and Mexico City was built on top of it (Matos, 1993).

This paper discusses the process for developing digital interpretations of the Teocalli or Ceremonial Precinct of Tenochtitlan based on historical, iconographical, and archaeological materials. To this end, digital models were constructed by taking into consideration Aztec archaeoastronomical principles and measuring systems. The result is an interactive view of the Ceremonial Precinct, perhaps the most comprehensive since Tenochtitlan was destroyed more than 500 years ago. This project has been recently published on CD-ROM.

series ACADIA
email arivera@architecture.ubc.ca, jw@architecture.ubc.ca
last changed 1998/12/31 12:35

_id a8ff
authors Sanchez, Santiago, Zulueta, Alberto and Barrallo, Javier
year 1997
title CAAD and Historical Buildings: The Importance of the Simulation of the Historical Process
source Challenges of the Future [15th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-3-0] Vienna (Austria) 17-20 September 1997
summary The majority of the problems that CAAD deals with are located in contemporary buildings. But many other buildings of the historical heritage also need special attentions with their computer design prior to the restoration projects. Generally, in restoration work, hand drawing and artistic criteria have been more usual than work with precision topographic data and accurate technical plans.

But a very rigorous design is not always enough to start restoration work. The real state that presents a historical building could have been modified substantially from its original state due to previous interventions, wars, seismic movements, erosion, biological aggressions or any other historical event.

So, it is necessary to join CAAD tasks with a simulation of the historical process suffered by the building. Historical data and ancient cartography must be the basis of all the CAAD works, and the quality of the computer 3D model can be established comparing it with the original available maps.

This paper explains the CAAD works and the intervention proposals for the restoration of the City Walls of Hondarribia, a small Spanish village placed in the frontier between Spain and France. These Renaissance bastioned walls were partially destroyed throughout many wars with France. The exact knowledge of their original trace and dimensions only is possible comparing the real CAD models with the plans that exist in the Spanish Military Archives since the XVIth. century.

The digital store and index of all the historical information, their comparison with real photographs of the city walls, the creation of photo realistic images with the intervention proposals, and the influence of the structural repairs in the final project will be explained in the CAAD context.

keywords CAAD, Historical Buildings
series eCAADe
email mapbacaj@sa.ehu.es
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/ecaade/proc/barrallo/sanchez.htm
last changed 2001/08/17 13:11

_id b833
authors Sullivan, W. C., Kuo, F. E. and Prabhu, M.
year 1997
title Communicating with citizens: The power of photosimulations and simple editing
source Managing the EIA process. E. Johnson. Amsterdam, Elsevier Science Inc., pp. 295-310
summary Contributed by Susan Pietsch (spietsch@arch.adelaide.edu.au)
keywords 3D City Modeling, Development Control, Design Control
series other
last changed 2001/06/04 18:41

_id 536e
authors Bouman, Ole
year 1997
title RealSpace in QuickTimes: architecture and digitization
source Rotterdam: Nai Publishers
summary Time and space, drastically compressed by the computer, have become interchangeable. Time is compressed in that once everything has been reduced to 'bits' of information, it becomes simultaneously accessible. Space is compressed in that once everything has been reduced to 'bits' of information, it can be conveyed from A to B with the speed of light. As a result of digitization, everything is in the here and now. Before very long, the whole world will be on disk. Salvation is but a modem away. The digitization process is often seen in terms of (information) technology. That is to say, one hears a lot of talk about the digital media, about computer hardware, about the modem, mobile phone, dictaphone, remote control, buzzer, data glove and the cable or satellite links in between. Besides, our heads are spinning from the progress made in the field of software, in which multimedia applications, with their integration of text, image and sound, especially attract our attention. But digitization is not just a question of technology, it also involves a cultural reorganization. The question is not just what the cultural implications of digitization will be, but also why our culture should give rise to digitization in the first place. Culture is not simply a function of technology; the reverse is surely also true. Anyone who thinks about cultural implications, is interested in the effects of the computer. And indeed, those effects are overwhelming, providing enough material for endless speculation. The digital paradigm will entail a new image of humankind and a further dilution of the notion of social perfectibility; it will create new notions of time and space, a new concept of cause and effect and of hierarchy, a different sort of public sphere, a new view of matter, and so on. In the process it will indubitably alter our environment. Offices, shopping centres, dockyards, schools, hospitals, prisons, cultural institutions, even the private domain of the home: all the familiar design types will be up for review. Fascinated, we watch how the new wave accelerates the process of social change. The most popular sport nowadays is 'surfing' - because everyone is keen to display their grasp of dirty realism. But there is another way of looking at it: under what sort of circumstances is the process of digitization actually taking place? What conditions do we provide that enable technology to exert the influence it does? This is a perspective that leaves room for individual and collective responsibility. Technology is not some inevitable process sweeping history along in a dynamics of its own. Rather, it is the result of choices we ourselves make and these choices can be debated in a way that is rarely done at present: digitization thanks to or in spite of human culture, that is the question. In addition to the distinction between culture as the cause or the effect of digitization, there are a number of other distinctions that are accentuated by the computer. The best known and most widely reported is the generation gap. It is certainly stretching things a bit to write off everybody over the age of 35, as sometimes happens, but there is no getting around the fact that for a large group of people digitization simply does not exist. Anyone who has been in the bit business for a few years can't help noticing that mum and dad are living in a different place altogether. (But they, at least, still have a sense of place!) In addition to this, it is gradually becoming clear that the age-old distinction between market and individual interests are still relevant in the digital era. On the one hand, the advance of cybernetics is determined by the laws of the marketplace which this capital-intensive industry must satisfy. Increased efficiency, labour productivity and cost-effectiveness play a leading role. The consumer market is chiefly interested in what is 'marketable': info- and edutainment. On the other hand, an increasing number of people are not prepared to wait for what the market has to offer them. They set to work on their own, appropriate networks and software programs, create their own domains in cyberspace, domains that are free from the principle whereby the computer simply reproduces the old world, only faster and better. Here it is possible to create a different world, one that has never existed before. One, in which the Other finds a place. The computer works out a new paradigm for these creative spirits. In all these distinctions, architecture plays a key role. Owing to its many-sidedness, it excludes nothing and no one in advance. It is faced with the prospect of historic changes yet it has also created the preconditions for a digital culture. It is geared to the future, but has had plenty of experience with eternity. Owing to its status as the most expensive of arts, it is bound hand and foot to the laws of the marketplace. Yet it retains its capacity to provide scope for creativity and innovation, a margin of action that is free from standardization and regulation. The aim of RealSpace in QuickTimes is to show that the discipline of designing buildings, cities and landscapes is not only a exemplary illustration of the digital era but that it also provides scope for both collective and individual activity. It is not just architecture's charter that has been changed by the computer, but also its mandate. RealSpace in QuickTimes consists of an exhibition and an essay.
series other
email oleb@xs4all.nl
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id ffe2
authors Carrar, G., Luna, F. and Rajchman, A.
year 1999
title Cúpulas Telefónicas - Mobiliario Urbano, Diseño Industrial aplicado a una empresa de servicios (Telephone Cupolas - Urban Furniture, Industrial Design Applied to a Company of Services)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 426-409
summary By november 1996, the state telecomunication company called for a national booth design contest. The idea was to use the awarded design shortly as part of the renovation of the public phone service. Gruppo MDM won the design contest and was contracted to do the manufacture technical drawings and a prototype which was tested during 1997. By 1997, an international bid was held, including the awarded project. Gruppo MDM was contracted for the follow up of the manufacture process, including research of suppliers worldwide, materials arriving on time with the quality required, verifying local suppliers with deadlines and quality controlls according to the specifications.
series SIGRADI
email fluna@adinet.com.uy
last changed 2016/03/10 08:48

_id b4c4
authors Carrara, G., Fioravanti, A. and Novembri, G.
year 2000
title A framework for an Architectural Collaborative Design
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 57-60
summary The building industry involves a larger number of disciplines, operators and professionals than other industrial processes. Its peculiarity is that the products (building objects) have a number of parts (building elements) that does not differ much from the number of classes into which building objects can be conceptually subdivided. Another important characteristic is that the building industry produces unique products (de Vries and van Zutphen, 1992). This is not an isolated situation but indeed one that is spreading also in other industrial fields. For example, production niches have proved successful in the automotive and computer industries (Carrara, Fioravanti, & Novembri, 1989). Building design is a complex multi-disciplinary process, which demands a high degree of co-ordination and co-operation among separate teams, each having its own specific knowledge and its own set of specific design tools. Establishing an environment for design tool integration is a prerequisite for network-based distributed work. It was attempted to solve the problem of efficient, user-friendly, and fast information exchange among operators by treating it simply as an exchange of data. But the failure of IGES, CGM, PHIGS confirms that data have different meanings and importance in different contexts. The STandard for Exchange of Product data, ISO 10303 Part 106 BCCM, relating to AEC field (Wix, 1997), seems to be too complex to be applied to professional studios. Moreover its structure is too deep and the conceptual classifications based on it do not allow multi-inheritance (Ekholm, 1996). From now on we shall adopt the BCCM semantic that defines the actor as "a functional participant in building construction"; and we shall define designer as "every member of the class formed by designers" (architects, engineers, town-planners, construction managers, etc.).
keywords Architectural Design Process, Collaborative Design, Knowledge Engineering, Dynamic Object Oriented Programming
series eCAADe
email fioravanti@uniroma1.it
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 4983
authors Cutting-Decelle, A.-F., Dubois, A.-M. and Fernandez, I.
year 1997
title Management and Integration of Product Information in Construction: Reality and Future Trends
source The Int. Journal of Construction IT 5(2), pp. 19-46
summary For many years numerous efforts have been spent on the development of standardized approaches for modelling industrial information. During this period stand-alone software tools have been developed in most industries including the Building and Construction sector : Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools, technical software such as software development for energy analysis, project management systems, product databases etc. As this set of computer tools became more and more heterogeneous, the need for communication tools has emerged to enable data to be exchanged between them. Standardising data exchange then becomes a logical step in the improvement of the information management during the whole construction process. The aim of this paper is to put forward the state-of-the art in the domain of product model approaches and standards developments : ISO 10303 STEP, ISO 13584 P-LIB and ISO 15531 MANDATE. We will give a global overview of the existing applications in the construction sector, both in terms of product, or process models, most of them provided by either national or European projects.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:45

_id 837b
authors Elger, Dietrich and Russell, Peter
year 2000
title Using the World Wide Web as a Communication and Presentation Forum for Students of Architecture
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 61-64
summary Since 1997, the Institute for Industrial Building Production (ifib) has been carrying out upper level design studios under the framework of the Netzentwurf or Net-Studio. The Netzentwurf is categorized as a virtual design studio in that the environment for presentation, criticism and communication is web based. This allows lessons learned from research into Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) to be adapted to the special conditions indigenous to the architectural design studio. Indeed, an aim of the Netzentwurf is the creation and evolution of a design studio planing platform. In the Winter semester 1999-2000, ifib again carried out two Netzentwurf studios. involving approximately 30 students from the Faculty of Architecture, University of Karlsruhe. The projects differed from previous net studios in that both studios encompassed an inter-university character in addition to the established framework of the Netzentwurf. The first project, the re-use of Fort Kleber in Wolfisheim by Strasbourg, was carried out as part of the Virtual Upperrhine University of Architecture (VuuA) involving over 140 students from various disciplines in six institutions from five universities in France, Switzerland and Germany. The second project, entitled "Future, Inc.", involved the design of an office building for a scenario 20 years hence. This project was carried out in parallel with the Technical University Cottbus using the same methodology and program for two separate building sites.
keywords Virtual Design Studios, Architectural Graphics, Presentation Techniques
series eCAADe
email dietrich.elger@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 412e
authors Gross, M.D., Do, E. and McCall, R.J.
year 1997
title Collaboration and Coordination in Architectural Design: approaches to computer mediated team work
source TeamCAD 97, 17-23
summary In 1993 and 1994, instructors and students of architecture at several universities around the world* collaborated briefly on two "virtual design studio" projects. Using off-the-shelf technology of the time-email, CU-See-Me internet video, international conference calls, and exchange of CAD drawings, images, and Quicktime animations-this ambitious project explored the possibility of bringing together diverse members of an international design team together to collaborate on a short term (two week) project. Central to the "Virtual Design Studio" was a 'digital pinup board', an area where participating designers could post and view drawings and textual comments; video links and email exchange provided the media for direct communication media about designs. A report on the project [21] makes clear that the process was not without technical difficulties: a significant amount of communication concerned scheduling and coordinating file formats; disappointingly little was devoted to discussions of design issues. Although it's clear that many of the minor technical problems that inevitably plague a forward-looking effort like the Virtual Design Studio will be solved in the near term, the project also reveals the need for research on software and design practices to make computer mediated design collaboration realize its attractive promise.
series journal paper
email mdgross@u.washington.edu
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 0bc0
authors Kellett, R., Brown, G.Z., Dietrich, K., Girling, C., Duncan, J., Larsen, K. and Hendrickson, E.
year 1997
title THE ELEMENTS OF DESIGN INFORMATION FOR PARTICIPATION IN NEIGHBORHOOD-SCALE PLANNING
source Design and Representation [ACADIA ‘97 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-06-3] Cincinatti, Ohio (USA) 3-5 October 1997, pp. 295-304
summary Neighborhood scale planning and design in many communities has been evolving from a rule-based process of prescriptive codes and regulation toward a principle- and performance-based process of negotiated priorities and agreements. Much of this negotiation takes place in highly focused and interactive workshop or 'charrette' settings, the best of which are characterized by a fluid and lively exchange of ideas, images and agendas among a diverse mix of citizens, land owners, developers, consultants and public officials. Crucial to the quality and effectiveness of the exchange are techniques and tools that facilitate a greater degree of understanding, communication and collaboration among these participants.

Digital media have a significant and strategic role to play toward this end. Of particular value are representational strategies that help disentangle issues, clarify alternatives and evaluate consequences of very complex and often emotional issues of land use, planning and design. This paper reports on the ELEMENTS OF NEIGHBORHOOD, a prototype 'electronic notebook' (relational database) tool developed to bring design information and example 'to the table' of a public workshop. Elements are examples of the building blocks of neighborhood (open spaces, housing, commercial, industrial, civic and network land uses) derived from built examples, and illustrated with graphic, narrative and numeric representations relevant to planning, design, energy, environmental and economic performance. Quantitative data associated with the elements can be linked to Geographic Information based maps and spreadsheet based-evaluation models.

series ACADIA
type normal paper
email kellett@interchange.ubc.ca
last changed 2006/03/15 21:35

_id 73d7
authors Spath, D. and Andres, J.
year 1997
title Concept of a robot for interior building trades by the example of wall slits in masonry
source Automation in Construction 6 (3) (1997) pp. 205-214
summary This article that is taking pattern from a presentation held at the 13th ISARC in Tokyo deals with the automation of interior building trades by the use of robots. Therefore, the specifications of a robot system for the manufacturing of wall slits, as a preliminary step of wiring and electrical installations in masonry construction, will be defined. The main motivation to reduce the manual tasks is the great difference between the high qualification of workers (especially electricians) and partly the unpretending hard work that does not require such a professional education in the same way. So, the focus of the article lays on a manufacturing process that is suitable for automation, kinematical concepts for the robot and the development of an appropriate end effector. The requirements of the closeness of space and light weight result in the necessity of other kinematical concepts and structures, because common structures of industrial robots are not suitable. The presented kinematics are based on linear components as best solution to cope with the two-dimensional area and a special developed wrist to bridge the existing clearance volumes of the main axes and to allow the accessibility of corners. Furthermore, the robot has to be able to reach working heights near to ceilings and simultaneously to pass a door. Besides this, a robotized process will be explained in order to reduce manual refinishing operations as much as possible because of economical reasons. Consequently, the design of an appropriate end effector based on a joint cutter will be shown. Finally, the sequence of work preparation tasks for the set-up of the robot will be described and a proof for the efficiency of the system will be given.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id c0da
authors Gero, J.S., Kazakov, V. and Schnier, T.
year 1997
title Genetic engineering and design problems
source D. Dasgupta and Z. Michalewicz (Eds.), Evolutionary Algorithms in Engineering Applications, Springer Verlag, Berlin, pp.47-68
summary This chapter reviews developments in genetic algorithms based on genetic engineering extensions. It presents the development a computational model of genetic engineering and demonstrates its applicability and utility.
keywords Genetic Engineering, Learning
series other
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/04/06 05:18

_id 1a91
id 1a91
authors Bourdakis, V.
year 1997
title The Future of VRML on Large Urban Models.
source The 4th UK VRSIG Conference
summary In this paper, the suitability and usability of VRML for urban modelling is discussed based on the experience gained by the creation of urban models of varying sizes, level of detail and use. Areas where the current VRML specification is failing to satisfy the needs of large-scale urban modelling are highlighted. Properties of a successful alternative or VRML3.0 specification are suggested and briefly discussed.
keywords 3D City Modeling, Development Control, Design Control
series other
email b.martens@tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id ccc0
authors Braithwaite, G., Radford, A., Huang, E. , Chang, T.W., Jones, D., Woodbury, R. and Sweeting, R.
year 1997
title The Computer Modeling of Development Proposals: A Routine Part of Development Control
source CAADRIA ‘97 [Proceedings of the Second Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 957-575-057-8] Taiwan 17-19 April 1997, pp. 123-132
summary This paper describes and discusses the aims and practicalities involved in the computer modeling of contentious development applications becoming accepted as a routine part of the processes of development control. It uses three case studies drawn from the University of Adelaide’s work with the City of Adelaide in Australia to delineate the role of 3D computer models of proposed new buildings and their immediate surroundings in the public understanding of the streetscape, neighbourhood context, overshadowing and overlooking implications of the proposals.
keywords 3D City Modeling
series CAADRIA
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 848a
authors Caneparo, Luca
year 1997
title Shared Virtual Reality for Architectural Design
source CAAD Futures 1997 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-7923-4726-9] München (Germany), 4-6 August 1997, pp. 431-442
summary The paper presents the implementation of a system of Shared Virtual Reality (SVR) in Internet applied to a large- scale project. The applications of SVR to architectural and urban design are presented in the context of a real project, the new railway junction of Porta Susa and the surrounding urban area in the city centre of Turin, Italy. SVR differs from Virtual Reality in that the experience of virtual spaces is no longer individual, but rather shared across the net with other users simultaneously connected. SVR offers an effective approach to Computer Supported Collaborative Work, because it integrates both the communicative tools to improve collaboration and the distributed environment to elaborate information across the networks.
series CAAD Futures
email luca.caneparo@polito.it
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id d60a
authors Casti, J.C.
year 1997
title Would be Worlds: How simulation is changing the frontiers of science
source John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York.
summary Five Golden Rules is caviar for the inquiring reader. Anyone who enjoyed solving math problems in high school will be able to follow the author's explanations, even if high school was a long time ago. There is joy here in watching the unfolding of these intricate and beautiful techniques. Casti's gift is to be able to let the nonmathematical reader share in his understanding of the beauty of a good theory.-Christian Science Monitor "[Five Golden Rules] ranges into exotic fields such as game theory (which played a role in the Cuban Missile Crisis) and topology (which explains how to turn a doughnut into a coffee cup, or vice versa). If you'd like to have fun while giving your brain a first-class workout, then check this book out."-San Francisco Examiner "Unlike many popularizations, [this book] is more than a tour d'horizon: it has the power to change the way you think. Merely knowing about the existence of some of these golden rules may spark new, interesting-maybe even revolutionary-ideas in your mind. And what more could you ask from a book?"-New Scientist "This book has meat! It is solid fare, food for thought . . . makes math less forbidding, and much more interesting."-Ben Bova, The Hartford Courant "This book turns math into beauty."-Colorado Daily "John Casti is one of the great science writers of the 1990s."-San Francisco Examiner In the ever-changing world of science, new instruments often lead to momentous discoveries that dramatically transform our understanding. Today, with the aid of a bold new instrument, scientists are embarking on a scientific revolution as profound as that inspired by Galileo's telescope. Out of the bits and bytes of computer memory, researchers are fashioning silicon surrogates of the real world-elaborate "artificial worlds"-that allow them to perform experiments that are too impractical, too costly, or, in some cases, too dangerous to do "in the flesh." From simulated tests of new drugs to models of the birth of planetary systems and galaxies to computerized petri dishes growing digital life forms, these laboratories of the future are the essential tools of a controversial new scientific method. This new method is founded not on direct observation and experiment but on the mapping of the universe from real space into cyberspace. There is a whole new science happening here-the science of simulation. The most exciting territory being mapped by artificial worlds is the exotic new frontier of "complex, adaptive systems." These systems involve living "agents" that continuously change their behavior in ways that make prediction and measurement by the old rules of science impossible-from environmental ecosystems to the system of a marketplace economy. Their exploration represents the horizon for discovery in the twenty-first century, and simulated worlds are charting the course. In Would-Be Worlds, acclaimed author John Casti takes readers on a fascinating excursion through a number of remarkable silicon microworlds and shows us how they are being used to formulate important new theories and to solve a host of practical problems. We visit Tierra, a "computerized terrarium" in which artificial life forms known as biomorphs grow and mutate, revealing new insights into natural selection and evolution. We play a game of Balance of Power, a simulation of the complex forces shaping geopolitics. And we take a drive through TRANSIMS, a model of the city of Albuquerque, New Mexico, to discover the root causes of events like traffic jams and accidents. Along the way, Casti probes the answers to a host of profound questions these "would-be worlds" raise about the new science of simulation. If we can create worlds inside our computers at will, how real can we say they are? Will they unlock the most intractable secrets of our universe? Or will they reveal instead only the laws of an alternate reality? How "real" do these models need to be? And how real can they be? The answers to these questions are likely to change the face of scientific research forever.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

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