CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 81 to 100 of 499

_id 837b
authors Elger, Dietrich and Russell, Peter
year 2000
title Using the World Wide Web as a Communication and Presentation Forum for Students of Architecture
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 61-64
summary Since 1997, the Institute for Industrial Building Production (ifib) has been carrying out upper level design studios under the framework of the Netzentwurf or Net-Studio. The Netzentwurf is categorized as a virtual design studio in that the environment for presentation, criticism and communication is web based. This allows lessons learned from research into Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) to be adapted to the special conditions indigenous to the architectural design studio. Indeed, an aim of the Netzentwurf is the creation and evolution of a design studio planing platform. In the Winter semester 1999-2000, ifib again carried out two Netzentwurf studios. involving approximately 30 students from the Faculty of Architecture, University of Karlsruhe. The projects differed from previous net studios in that both studios encompassed an inter-university character in addition to the established framework of the Netzentwurf. The first project, the re-use of Fort Kleber in Wolfisheim by Strasbourg, was carried out as part of the Virtual Upperrhine University of Architecture (VuuA) involving over 140 students from various disciplines in six institutions from five universities in France, Switzerland and Germany. The second project, entitled "Future, Inc.", involved the design of an office building for a scenario 20 years hence. This project was carried out in parallel with the Technical University Cottbus using the same methodology and program for two separate building sites.
keywords Virtual Design Studios, Architectural Graphics, Presentation Techniques
series eCAADe
email dietrich.elger@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 1f0c
authors Fukai, D.
year 1997
title PCIS: a piece-based construction information system on the world wide web
source Automation in Construction 6 (4) (1997) pp. 287-298
summary This paper describes a piece-based construction information system organized as a hypergraphic virtual environment on the World Wide Web. An array of cubes on the site's animated splash-page acts as a directory to a collection of data-theaters that give this information its virtual form. A mouse click on one of these cubes leads to an orthographic model of the object to be constructed. This model is an index to a database of scaled drawings, animations, and specifications. The index is hypergraphic because a click on the image of one of the pieces of the model leads to a data page that provides information about that piece in the context of its assembly. Panels surround the index to act as an interface to projections of the pieces of the object. These projections include elevations, plans, slices, and dimensioned details. A click on the elevation-panel leads to information on finishes, framing, and construction of each face of the object. From above, the plan-panel shows roofing, framing, floor plan, foundation layout, excavation, and utilities as an animation of the construction process. There are also animated slice-panels that cut through the object to give heights and materials. A click on one of these panels leads to two-dimensional drawings and details of the actual construction. The orthographic index morphs to a framed VR environment where the model can be turned and viewed in perspective. A click on one of the pieces of the model in this information the VR environment leads to specifications and manufacturing information about the materials of its construction. The user accesses this information through a tool-palette to communicate with design team members. In this way, the team can coordinate the document's development, review progress, and make changes to the information system. This breaks the notion of a construction document as an object-of-exchange and suggests the use of the computer as a medium of communication that facilitates the design and construction process.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 452a
id 452a
authors Fukuda, T., Nagahama, R., Nomura, J.
year 1997
title Networked VR System: Kitchen Layout Design for Customers
source Proceedings of the second symposium on Virtual reality modeling language, Monterey, California, United States, pp.93-100
summary In this paper, we present our Virtual Reality (VR) technology application, a networked VR-supported design system of a kitchen layout. This networked VR system was developed on personal computers to allow customers to design at home. With the VR system, customers can have a pseudo-experience of their “virtual kitchen”, modify the design of the kitchen, and make decisions by being provided with a good idea of their potential purchase. The VR system will also play an important role in user interface in the House Design Advisory System. This system, which we are currently developing, will give advice on house design, as well as on kitchen layout design, according tothe customers’ diversified lifestyles.
keywords Kitchen Layout Design, Virtual Reality, VRML, VRML Browser, script, RDB, EUC
series other
type symposium
email fukuda@env.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp
last changed 2006/08/24 05:28

_id e373
authors Johnson, Robert E. and Clayton, Mark
year 1997
title The Impact of Information Technology in Design and Construction: The Owner's Perspective
source Design and Representation [ACADIA ‘97 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-06-3] Cincinatti, Ohio (USA) 3-5 October 1997, pp. 229-241
summary This paper reports on findings of a November 1996 exploratory survey of architecture-engineering clients (Fortune 500 corporate facility managers). This research investigated how the practices of corporate facility managers are being influenced by rapid changes in information technology. The conceptual model that served as a guide for this research hypothesized that information technology acts as both an enabler (that is, information technology provides an effective mechanism for managers to implement desired changes) as well as a source of innovation (that is, new information technology innovations create new facility management opportunities). The underlying assumption of this research is that information technology is evolving from a tool that incrementally improves "back-office" productivity to an essential component of strategic positioning that may alter the basic economics, organizational structure and operational practices of facility management organizations and their interactions with service providers (architects, engineers and constructors). The paper concludes with a discussion of researchable issues.
series ACADIA
email rejohnson@tamu.edu, mark-clayton@tamu.edu
last changed 1998/12/31 12:45

_id d5b3
authors Knight, Michael and Brown, Andre
year 1999
title Working in Virtual Environments through appropriate Physical Interfaces
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 431-436
summary The work described here is aimed at contributing towards the debate and development relating to the construction of interfaces to explore buildings and their environs through virtual worlds. We describe a particular hardware and software configuration which is derived by the use of low cost games software to create the Virtual Environment. The Physical Interface responds to the work of other researchers, in this area, in particular Shaw (1994) and Vasquez de Velasco & Trigo (1997). Virtual Evironments might have the potential to be "a magical window into other worlds, from molecules to minds" (Rheingold, 1992), but what is the nature of that window? Currently it is often a translucent opening which gives a hazy and distorted (disembodied) view. And many versions of such openings are relatively expensive. We consider ways towards clearing the haze without too much expense, adapting techniques proposed by developers of low cost virtual reality systems (Hollands, 1995) for use in an architectural setting.
keywords Virtual Environments, Games Software
series eCAADe
email mknight@liv.ac.uk
last changed 2002/11/22 17:33

_id 2653
authors Kohler, N., Barth, B. Heitz, S. and Hermann, M.
year 1997
title Life Cycle Models of Buildings - A New Approach
source CAAD Futures 1997 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-7923-4726-9] München (Germany), 4-6 August 1997, pp. 519-531
summary The idea of life cycle cost was developed a quarter of a century ago. A wide dissemination of the term was given through a report for the US Secretary of Defense "Life Cycle Cost in Equipment Procuration". This report was followed by a series of guide lines in the defense field and later on in other government activities. The basic definition of life cycle costs is: "The sum of all costs incurred during the lifetime of an item, i.e. the total of procurement and ownership costs". There are several life cycle costs models available in literature. In the building field attempts have been made to introduce the notion of life cycle costs mainly through building surveys and for public owned buildings. Recorded data of construction, refurbishment and maintenance costs of buildings show that over a 50 year period the total costs amount to approximate twice the investment costs (without financial costs).
keywords Life Cycle Costs, Life Cycle Impact Assessment, Product Models
series CAAD Futures
email Niklaus.Kohler@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
last changed 1999/04/06 07:19

_id 0f97
authors Kvan, Th., West, R. and Vera, A.
year 1997
title Choosing Tools for a Virtual Community
source Creative Collaboration in Virtual Communities 1997, ed. A. Cicognani. VC'97. Sydney: Key Centre of Design Computing, Department of Architectural and Design Science, University of Sydney, 20 p.
summary This paper reports on the results of experiments carried out to identify the effects of computer-mediated communication between participants involved in a design problem. When setting up a virtual design community, choices must be made between a variety of tools, choices dictated by budget, bandwidth, ability, availability. How do you choose between the tools, which is useful and how will each affect the outcome of the design exchanges you plan? Cognitive modelling methodologies such as GOMS have been used by interface designers to capture the mechanisms of action and interaction involved in routine expert behavior. Using this technique, which breaks down an individual's behaviors into Goals, Operators, Methods, and Selection rules, it is possible to evaluate the impact of different aspects of an interface in task-specific ways. In the present study, the GOMS methodology was used to characterize the interactive behavior of knowledgeable participants as they worked on a design task under different communication-support conditions.

Pairs of participants were set a design problem and asked to solve it in face-to-face settings. The same problem was then tackled by participants in settings using two different modes of computer-supported communication: email and an electronic whiteboard. Protocols were collected and analyzed in terms of the constraints of each tool relative to the task and to each other. The GOMS methodology was used as a way to represent the collaborative design process in a way that yields information on both the productivity and performance of participants in each of the three experimental conditions. It also yielded information on the component elements of the design process, the basic cognitive building-blocks of design, thereby suggesting fundamentally new tools that might be created for interaction in virtual environments.

A further goal of the study was to explore the nature of task differences in relation to alternative platforms for communication. It was hypothesized that design processes involving significant negotiation would be less aided by computer support than straight forward design problems. The latter involve cooperative knowledge application by both participants and are therefore facilitated by information-rich forms of computer support. The former, on the other hand, requires conflict resolution and is inhibited by non face-to-face interaction. The results of this study point to the fact that the success of collaboration in virtual space is not just dependent on the nature of the tools but also on the specific nature of the collaborative task.

keywords Cognitive Models, Task-analysis, GOMS
series other
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2003/05/15 18:50

_id 6cb4
authors Leupen, B., Grafe, C., Körnig, N., Lampe, M. and De Zeeuw, P.
year 1997
title Design and Analysis
source New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold
summary Design and Analysis by Bernard Leupen, Christoph Grafe, Nicola Körnig, Marc Lampe, and Peter de Zeeuw Design and Analysis is an insightful, interdisciplinary exploration of the diversity of analytic methods used by architects, designers, urban planners, and landscape architects to understand the structure and principles of the built environment. Developed by a team headed by Bernard Leupen at Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands, Design and Analysis defies borders of history, geography, and discipline, tracing the evolution of design principles from ancient Greece to the 20th century. "Only methodical analysis gives us an insight into the design process," states architect Bernard Tschumi. Using historical examples from architecture, urban design, and landscape architecture, Design and Analysis defines an ordered system that enables the design student or professional to identify the factors that influence designers' decisions, and shows how to relate them to the finished project. Design and Analysis is organized into six chapters that correspond to these factors: order and composition, functionality, structure, typology, context, and analytical techniques. The authors introduce the analytical drawing as a time-tested means to obtaining insight into the design process. Over 100 line drawings are featured in all. Using contemporary architectural examples to teach ancient design principles, Design and Analysis is more than just an introduction to analytical methods. The authors give an outline of space design as a whole, from individual buildings to urban and landscape ensembles. Though primarily intended for design students to help them appreciate many of the issues that they will face as professionals, Design and Analysis's broad, easy-to-read approach makes it an invaluable handbook for designers of all disciplines.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 8804
authors QaQish, R. and Hanna, R.
year 1997
title A World-wide Questionnaire Survey on the Use of Computers in Architectural Education
source Challenges of the Future [15th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-3-0] Vienna (Austria) 17-20 September 1997
summary The paper reports on a study which examines the impact on architectural education needs arising from the changes brought about by the implications of CAD teaching/learning (CAI/CAL). The findings reflect the views of fifty-one (51) architecture schools through a world-wide questionnaire survey conducted in mid 1996. The survey was structured to cover four continents represented by seven countries, namely the USA, UK, Israel, Australia, Canada, Sweden and the Netherlands. Structurally the main findings of this study are summarised under five areas, namely: 1) General Information, 2) Program of Study (curriculum) and CAD course, 3) CAD Laboratories: Hardware, Software, 4) Departmental Current and Future Policies, 5) Multi-media and Virtual Reality. Principally, there were three main objectives for using the computers survey. Firstly, to accommodate a prevalent comprehension of CAD integration into the curriculum of architecture schools world wide. Secondly, to identify the main key factors that control the extent of association between CAD and architectural curriculum. Thirdly, to identify common trends of CAD teaching in Architecture schools world-wide and across the seven countries to establish whether there are any association between them. Several variables and factors that were found to have an impact on AE were examined, namely: the response rate, the conventional methods users and the CAD methods users amongst students, CAD course employment in the curriculum, age of CAD employment, the role of CAD in the curriculum, CAD training time in the Curriculum, CAD laboratories/Hardware & Software, computing staff and technicians, department policies, Multi-Media (MM) and Virtual-Reality (VR). The statistical analysis of the study revealed significant findings, one of which indicates that 35% of the total population of students at the surveyed architecture schools are reported as being CAD users. Out of the 51 architecture schools who participated in this survey, 47 have introduced CAD courses into the curriculum. The impact of CAD on the curriculum was noted to be significant in several areas, namely: architectural design, architectural presentation, structural engineering, facilities management, thesis project and urban design. The top five CAD packages found to be most highly used across universities were, namely, AutoCAD (46), 3DStudio (34), Microstation (23), Form Z (17), ArchiCAD (17). The findings of this study suggest some effective and efficient future directions in adopting some form of effective CAD strategies in the curriculum of architecture. The study also serves as an evaluation tool for computing teaching in the design studio and the curriculum.

 

keywords CAD Integration, Employment, Users and Effectiveness
series eCAADe
email r.qaqish@gsa.ac.uk
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/ecaade/proc/qaqish/qaqish.htm
last changed 2001/08/17 13:11

_id 2d60
authors Schwenck, M. and Sariyildiz, S.
year 1997
title An Integrated Software Environment for the Architectural Design Process
source Proceedings of the International Conference on Applications of Computer Science and Mathematics in Architecture and Building Science (IKM 1997), Weimar, Germany
summary Many software systems are in common use in the field of architectural design. On the other hand, we consider a complete automation of architectural design as an unlikely proposition and undesirable for the architect. Therefore, the general objective is to support the designer during the whole process of architectural design in order to increase the efficiency and to improve the quality of the results. So far there are different tools providing such functionality. Nevertheless, there are no appropriate tools for many of the sub-processes. Furthermore, the current state of available design software is characterised by a lack of integration of different tools. In this paper we will provide a survey on a project dealing with the solution of both problems. First we will give a general description of the support that software can provide to architects during the design process. We conclude that many different tools are needed which have to be integrated in an open, modular, distributed, user friendly and efficient environment. We will explain the necessity of integration and cover integration technologies. Besides the aspect of integration we also deal with the development of tools which can operate in the integrated design environment. We suggest a strategy where the tool functions are specified on the basis of a transformation from hierarchical process descriptions of architectural design into a hierarchy of tool descriptions.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id avocaad_2001_20
id avocaad_2001_20
authors Shen-Kai Tang
year 2001
title Toward a procedure of computer simulation in the restoration of historical architecture
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In the field of architectural design, “visualization¨ generally refers to some media, communicating and representing the idea of designers, such as ordinary drafts, maps, perspectives, photos and physical models, etc. (Rahman, 1992; Susan, 2000). The main reason why we adopt visualization is that it enables us to understand clearly and to control complicated procedures (Gombrich, 1990). Secondly, the way we get design knowledge is more from the published visualized images and less from personal experiences (Evans, 1989). Thus the importance of the representation of visualization is manifested.Due to the developments of computer technology in recent years, various computer aided design system are invented and used in a great amount, such as image processing, computer graphic, computer modeling/rendering, animation, multimedia, virtual reality and collaboration, etc. (Lawson, 1995; Liu, 1996). The conventional media are greatly replaced by computer media, and the visualization is further brought into the computerized stage. The procedure of visual impact analysis and assessment (VIAA), addressed by Rahman (1992), is renewed and amended for the intervention of computer (Liu, 2000). Based on the procedures above, a great amount of applied researches are proceeded. Therefore it is evident that the computer visualization is helpful to the discussion and evaluation during the design process (Hall, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998; Liu, 1997; Sasada, 1986, 1988, 1990, 1993, 1997, 1998). In addition to the process of architectural design, the computer visualization is also applied to the subject of construction, which is repeatedly amended and corrected by the images of computer simulation (Liu, 2000). Potier (2000) probes into the contextual research and restoration of historical architecture by the technology of computer simulation before the practical restoration is constructed. In this way he established a communicative mode among archeologists, architects via computer media.In the research of restoration and preservation of historical architecture in Taiwan, many scholars have been devoted into the studies of historical contextual criticism (Shi, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1995; Fu, 1995, 1997; Chiu, 2000). Clues that accompany the historical contextual criticism (such as oral information, writings, photographs, pictures, etc.) help to explore the construction and the procedure of restoration (Hung, 1995), and serve as an aid to the studies of the usage and durability of the materials in the restoration of historical architecture (Dasser, 1990; Wang, 1998). Many clues are lost, because historical architecture is often age-old (Hung, 1995). Under the circumstance, restoration of historical architecture can only be proceeded by restricted pictures, written data and oral information (Shi, 1989). Therefore, computer simulation is employed by scholars to simulate the condition of historical architecture with restricted information after restoration (Potier, 2000). Yet this is only the early stage of computer-aid restoration. The focus of the paper aims at exploring that whether visual simulation of computer can help to investigate the practice of restoration and the estimation and evaluation after restoration.By exploring the restoration of historical architecture (taking the Gigi Train Station destroyed by the earthquake in last September as the operating example), this study aims to establish a complete work on computer visualization, including the concept of restoration, the practice of restoration, and the estimation and evaluation of restoration.This research is to simulate the process of restoration by computer simulation based on visualized media (restricted pictures, restricted written data and restricted oral information) and the specialized experience of historical architects (Potier, 2000). During the process of practicing, communicates with craftsmen repeatedly with some simulated alternatives, and makes the result as the foundation of evaluating and adjusting the simulating process and outcome. In this way we address a suitable and complete process of computer visualization for historical architecture.The significance of this paper is that we are able to control every detail more exactly, and then prevent possible problems during the process of restoration of historical architecture.
series AVOCAAD
email tsk.aa88g@nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id ac52
authors Shih, Naai-Jung and Yan, Chie-Shan
year 1997
title A Study of the Location of Fire Egress Signs by VR Simulation
source CAAD Futures 1997 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-7923-4726-9] München (Germany), 4-6 August 1997, pp. 311-316
summary The purpose of this paper is to present a suggestion for the location of fire egress signs along a corridor in a building. The suggestion is made based on a virtual reality simulation of human behavior while rooms are on fire, particularly in a public Karaoka TV entertainment center (KTV). Both the rooms and smoke were modeled to simulate similar situations in which people were asked to find their routes to an egress. Case studies were made of the occurrence of two local severe fire disasters, the official investigation of damages, and related building codes. The simulation concluded that the traditional designation of egress signs at a higher location or just above the door frame may be not function appropriately in indicating the location of exit in case of fire. Since smoke is usually lighter than air and is accumulated closer to the ceiling level, either human vision or egress signs are very likely to be blocked by the darkness of smoke. Vision is additionally restricted because people are suggested to lower their body position to avoid smoke while escaping. Suggestion of alternate location of signage is also made in the research.
series CAAD Futures
email shihnj@mail.ntit.edu.tw
last changed 1999/04/06 07:19

_id c61f
authors Stellingwerff, M.C.
year 1997
title Changing approaches to the Real World
source Published in the book : 'CAAD - Towards New Design Conventions', Technical University of Bialystok, Poland, Edited by Aleksander Asanowicz and Adam Jakimowicz. ISBN83-86272-63-5.
summary Different kinds of design media change the designers approach to the 'real world' and have an important impact on the design process and its results. Six main directions are described and evaluated: design through contemplation, design by means of traditional media, design using desktop computers, design within a virtual reality environment, design with ubiquitous computers and design through augmented interaction. A number of these directions are still developing in unexpected ways, other directions are established and seem to become less interesting for research and in design. The goal of this paper is to value and characterise each above mentioned direction, relate each direction to 'reality', 'mind' and 'media' and place each of them in a historical / futurological sequence.
keywords design, computers, interaction, reality, mind, media, future
series other
email m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl
more http://www.bk.tudelft.nl/media/papers/approaches.html
last changed 1998/07/08 11:08

_id 88f9
authors Carrara, G., Novembri, G., Zorgno, A.M., Brusasco, P.L.
year 1997
title Virtual Studio of Design and Technology on Internet (I) - Educator's approach
source Challenges of the Future [15th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-3-0] Vienna (Austria) 17-20 September 1997
summary This paper presents a teaching experience involving students and professors from various universities, in Italy and abroad, which began in 1996 and is still on going. The Virtual Studios on the Internet (VSI) have some features in common with the Teaching Studios planned for the new programme of the faculties of Architecture in Italian universities. These are the definition of a common design theme, and the participation of disciplinary teachers. The greatest difference is in the modes of collaboration, which is achieved through information and communication technologies. The chief result of this is that the various work groups in different places can work and collaborate at the same time: the computer networks provide the means to express, communicate and share the design project.
keywords CAAD, Teaching of architectural design, Shared virtual reality, Virtualdesign studio, Collective intelligence.
series eCAADe
email guyver@arch.hku.hk
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/ecaade/proc/lvi_i&ii/zorgno.html
last changed 2001/08/17 13:11

_id fd8b
authors Czernuszenko, M., Pape, D., Sandin, D., DeFanti, T., Dawe, G. and Brown, M.
year 1997
title The ImmersaDesk and Infinity Wall projection-based virtual reality displays
source Computer Graphics, 31(2): 46-49, May
summary Virtual reality (VR) can be defined as interactive computer graphics that provides viewer-centered perspective, large field of view and stereo. Head-mounted displays (HMDs) and BOOMs™ achieve these features with small display screens which move with the viewer, close to the viewer's eyes. Projection-based displays, supply these characteristics by placing large, fixed screens more distant from the viewer. The Electronic Visualization Laboratory (EVL) of the University of Illinois at Chicago has specialized in projection-based VR systems. EVL's projection-based VR display, the CAVE™ premiered at the SIGGRAPH 92 conference.In this article we present two new, CAVE-derived, projection-based VR displays developed at EVL: the ImmersaDesk™ and the Infinity Wall™, a VR version of the PowerWall. We describe the different requirements which led to their design, and compare these systems to other VR devices.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id e22d
authors Emprin, G., Girotto, E., Gotta, A., Livi, T. and Luigia, M.Priore
year 1997
title Virtual Studio of Design and Technology on Internet (II): Student's experience
source Challenges of the Future [15th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-3-0] Vienna (Austria) 17-20 September 1997
summary For about a year the members of our group have been working on their degree thesis focused on the project of the new intermodal node of Porta Susa in Turin. The theses are concerned with complex urban and architectural problems in the light of the innovations brought by computers and networks. The experience, up to now, makes us conscious that telematics is, and will be, more and more able to offer new tools and different methodologies to approach architectural design. Collaboration across computer networks has improved our design experience with systematic contributions from various skills and methodologies.

The presentation of our still on-going didactic experience has been subdivided into phases, strictly interrelated The first one, almost over, is concerned with the analysis of the area and the representation of the collected data.

keywords CAAD, Teaching of Architectural Design, Shared Virtual Reality, Virtual Design Studio
series eCAADe
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/ecaade/proc/lvi_i&ii/gotta.html
last changed 2001/08/17 13:11

_id 47fc
authors Costanzo, E., De Vecchi, A., Di Miceli, C. and Giacchino, V.
year 1997
title A Software for Automatically Verifying Compatibility in Complicated Building Assemblies
source Challenges of the Future [15th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-3-0] Vienna (Austria) 17-20 September 1997
summary The research we are carrying on is intended to develop a tool aiding to design building mechanical assembly systems, which are often characterised by high complexity levels. In fact, when designing complicated building assemblies by making use of common graphical representations, it might be impossible for the operator to choose the proper shape and installation sequence of components so that they do not interfere during the assembly, and to check, in the meantime, the most favorable setting up modalities according to execution problems. Our software, running within CAD, by starting from the definition of the node features, will allow the operator to automatically get three types of representation that can simulate the assembly according to the assigned installation sequence: - instant images of the phases for setting up each component into the node; - 3D views showing the position of each component disassembled from the node and indicating the movements required for connection; - the components moving while the node is being constructed. All the representations can be updated step by step each time modifications to the node are made. Through this digital iterative design process - that takes advantage of various simultaneous and realistic prefigurations - the shape and function compatibility between the elements during the assembling can be verified. Furthermore, the software can quickly check whether any change and integration to the node is efficacious, rising the approximation levels in the design phase. At the moment we have developed the part of the tool that simulates the assembly by moving the components into the nodes according to the installation sequence.
series eCAADe
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/ecaade/proc/costanzo/costanzo.htm
last changed 2001/08/17 13:11

_id e907
authors Gero, John S. and Maher, Mary Lou
year 1997
title A Framework for Research in Design Computing
source Challenges of the Future [15th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-3-0] Vienna (Austria) 17-20 September 1997
summary Design computing has often been considered a subset of computer applications that assist the designer in documenting and analysing complex designs. As one of many areas in which computer applications have beeen developed, design computing has relied on software developers and vendors to implement and market software with the relevant features and utilities to support some aspects of design activity. In this paper we consider design computing as a research area, one in which the results of the research lead to more than additional computer programs and in fact lead to a better understanding of designing and computer support for designing.
keywords CAAD, research, cognitive models, axiomatic models, conjecturalmodels
series eCAADe
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/ecaade/proc/gero/gero.htm
last changed 2001/08/17 13:11

_id a8e1
authors Glaser, Daniel C.
year 1997
title I-Walkways - An Exploration in Knowledge Visualization
source CAAD Futures 1997 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-7923-4726-9] München (Germany), 4-6 August 1997, pp. 305-310
summary This paper describes a prototype which extends a logic system into a useful design tool to aid in designing pedestrian walkways. A highly interactive program, I-Walkways demonstrates how a logic system can meaningfully aid with design. This technique will allow the designer and the logic system to work harmoniously together to reach a good design solution.
series CAAD Futures
email dcg@uclink4.berkeley.edu
last changed 1999/04/06 07:19

_id e82f
authors Howe, A Scott
year 1997
title Designing for Automated Construction
source CAADRIA ‘97 [Proceedings of the Second Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 957-575-057-8] Taiwan 17-19 April 1997, pp. 83-92
summary The majority of automated construction research and development has been bottom-up, from the construction/engineering side rather than top-down from the design end. In order to optimize the use of automated technology, it is important that design principles based on the technology are considered. This paper seeks to address topics related to designing robotic systems for construction, and developing overall design principles for top-down architect/design applications. The research herein is divided into a theoretical research programme for the purpose of deriving a simple shape grammar and a simulation research programme for understanding component connections and robotic manipulation. The second part of this paper introduces a concept automated construction system designed according to the principles derived from the investigation.
series CAADRIA
last changed 1999/02/01 11:50

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