CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 510

_id 4df8
authors Hanna, R., Barber T. and Qaqish, R.
year 1997
title Computers as the Sole Design Tool: The Mackintosh Experiment
source Challenges of the Future [15th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-3-0] Vienna (Austria) 17-20 September 1997
summary This paper reports on the findings of an empirical investigation into the use of the computer as the only design media in solving a design problem. Several 1st and 2nd year students took part in a two week experiment on the use of a CAD programme, AutoCAD 13 and AEC 5.0, to design a studio for a graphic designer.

Prior to the experiment an extensive literature search was carried out to explore the relationship between the design process, visual thinking, conventional sketching (interactive imagery) and Computer Aided Design. Out of this search a number of design variables were identified, developed and then tested through a series of observations and interviews with the students while they were engaged in the design of the Graphic Designer’s Studio. Questionnaires were also administered to students to explore their views on issues including, using CAD instead of conventional tools, design areas where CAD is most effective, and how CAD can improve design skills.

series eCAADe
email gtca09@udcf.gla.ac.uk
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/ecaade/proc/hanna/hanna.htm
last changed 2001/08/17 13:11

_id efa4
authors Pellitteri, G.
year 1997
title A tool for a first analysis of architectural facades
source Automation in Construction 5 (5) (1997) pp. 379-391
summary This work presents a tool for analysing the figurative structure of architectural façades. The procedure begins by singling out the elementary shapes which make up the façade image; it detects and identifies them as "area objects", even if present in combination in virtual or mental form and groups them into classes of equal objects. A second step is the analysis of the inner structure of the classes: equidistant, arithmetical and geometrical sequences, or alternate distances are distinguished. The procedure ends by singling out the symmetries which structure the façade image and displaying them, pointing out their implied hierarchy through a thickness differentiation.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id 07ae
authors Sook Lee, Y. and Mi Lee, S.
year 1997
title Analysis of mental maps for ideal apartments to develop and simulate an innovative residential interior space.
source Architectural and Urban Simulation Techniques in Research and Education [3rd EAEA-Conference Proceedings]
summary Even though results of applied research have been ideally expected to be read and used by practitioners, written suggestions have been less persuasive especially, in visual field such as environmental design, architecture, and interior design. Therefore, visualization of space has been frequently considered as an ideal alternative way of suggestions and an effective method to disseminate research results and help decision makers. In order to make the visualized target space very solid and mundane, scientific research process to define the characteristics of the space should be precedent. This presentation consists of two parts : first research part ; second design and simulation part. The purpose of the research was to identify the ideal residential interior characteristics on the basis of people's mental maps for ideal apartments. To achieve this goal, quantitative content analysis was used using an existing data set of floor plans drawn by housewives. 2,215 floorplans were randomly selected among 3,012 floorplans collected through nation-wide housing design competition for ideal residential apartments. 213 selected variables were used to analyze the floorplans. Major contents were the presentational characteristics of mental maps and the characteristics of design preference such as layout, composition, furnishing etc. As a result, current and future possible trends of ideal residence were identified. On the basis of the result, design guidelines were generated. An interior spatial model for small size unit using CAD was developed according to the guidelines. To present it in more effective way, computer simulated images were made using 3DS. This paper is expected to generate the comparison of various methods for presenting research results such as written documents, drawings, simulated images, small scaled model for endoscopy and full scale modeling.
keywords Architectural Endoscopy, Endoscopy, Simulation, Visualisation, Visualization, Real Environments
series EAEA
email YUN2256@chollian.dacom.co.kr
more http://www.bk.tudelft.nl/media/eaea/eaea97.html
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id e336
authors Achten, H., Roelen, W., Boekholt, J.-Th., Turksma, A. and Jessurun, J.
year 1999
title Virtual Reality in the Design Studio: The Eindhoven Perspective
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 169-177
summary Since 1991 Virtual Reality has been used in student projects in the Building Information Technology group. It started as an experimental tool to assess the impact of VR technology in design, using the environment of the associated Calibre Institute. The technology was further developed in Calibre to become an important presentation tool for assessing design variants and final design solutions. However, it was only sporadically used in student projects. A major shift occurred in 1997 with a number of student projects in which various computer technologies including VR were used in the whole of the design process. In 1998, the new Design Systems group started a design studio with the explicit aim to integrate VR in the whole design process. The teaching effort was combined with the research program that investigates VR as a design support environment. This has lead to increasing number of innovative student projects. The paper describes the context and history of VR in Eindhoven and presents the current set-UP of the studio. It discusses the impact of the technology on the design process and outlines pedagogical issues in the studio work.
keywords Virtual Reality, Design Studio, Student Projects
series eCAADe
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 0c91
authors Asanowicz, Aleksander
year 1997
title Computer - Tool vs. Medium
source Challenges of the Future [15th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-3-0] Vienna (Austria) 17-20 September 1997
summary We have arrived an important juncture in the history of computing in our profession: This history is long enough to reveal clear trends in the use of computing, but not long to institutionalize them. As computers peremate every area of architecture - from design and construction documents to project administration and site supervision - can “virtual practice” be far behind? In the old days, there were basically two ways of architects working. Under stress. Or under lots more stress. Over time, someone forwarded the radical motion that the job could be easier, you could actually get more work done. Architects still have been looking for ways to produce more work in less time. They need a more productive work environment. The ideal environment would integrate man and machine (computer) in total harmony. As more and more architects and firms invest more and more time, money, and effort into particular ways of using computers, these practices will become resistant to change. Now is the time to decide if computing is developing the way we think it should. Enabled and vastly accelerated by technology, and driven by imperatives for cost efficiency, flexibility, and responsiveness, work in the design sector is changing in every respect. It is stands to reason that architects must change too - on every level - not only by expanding the scope of their design concerns, but by altering design process. Very often we can read, that the recent new technologies, the availability of computers and software, imply that use of CAAD software in design office is growing enormously and computers really have changed the production of contract documents in architectural offices.
keywords Computers, CAAD, Cyberreal, Design, Interactive, Medium, Sketches, Tools, Virtual Reality
series eCAADe
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/ecaade/proc/asan/asanowic.htm
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 0992
authors Belibani, R. and Gadola, A.
year 1997
title On Digital Architecture
source Challenges of the Future [15th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-3-0] Vienna (Austria) 17-20 September 1997
summary One of the main aims of this research was to highlight the influence of computer as a designing tool. Their wide acceptance as drawing tools might occult the importance of their role in architectural design. We will try to apprehend, with the help of synthetic images, that computers mark a historic step forward in drawing and representation, as well as a major progress in the understanding of creative processes.

Together these features offer a broader horizon to architectural design. New source of inspiration can be found in virtual reality that makes visible what does not really exist, permitting design to suggest itself with its primordial image. We mean a kind of architectural imprint, where the first three-dimensional lines suggest in some way the designer with their shape, and encourage the definition process.

Through the visualisation of some images, it is possible to show the modifications of language and style, to examine the transformation modalities of the design process and to propose an essay of the new methods to communicate architecture.

series eCAADe
email rbelibani@axrma.uniroma1.it
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/ecaade/proc/belibani/belibani.htm
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 2e36
authors Bourdakis, Vassilis
year 1997
title Making Sense of the City
source CAAD Futures 1997 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-7923-4726-9] München (Germany), 4-6 August 1997, pp. 663-678
summary Large-scale, three dimensional, interactive computer models of cities are becoming feasible making it possible to test their suitability as a visualisation tool for the design and planning process, for data visualisation where socio-economic and physical data can be mapped on to the 3D form of the city and as an urban information repository. The CASA developed models of the City of Bath and London's West End in VRML format, are used as examples to illustrate the problems arising. The aim of this paper is to reflect on key issues related to interaction within urban models, data mapping techniques and appropriate metaphors for presenting information.
keywords 3D City modeling, Urban Modelling, Virtual Environments, Navigation, Data Mapping, VRML
series CAAD Futures
email v.bourdakis@prd.uth.gr
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id b4c4
authors Carrara, G., Fioravanti, A. and Novembri, G.
year 2000
title A framework for an Architectural Collaborative Design
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 57-60
summary The building industry involves a larger number of disciplines, operators and professionals than other industrial processes. Its peculiarity is that the products (building objects) have a number of parts (building elements) that does not differ much from the number of classes into which building objects can be conceptually subdivided. Another important characteristic is that the building industry produces unique products (de Vries and van Zutphen, 1992). This is not an isolated situation but indeed one that is spreading also in other industrial fields. For example, production niches have proved successful in the automotive and computer industries (Carrara, Fioravanti, & Novembri, 1989). Building design is a complex multi-disciplinary process, which demands a high degree of co-ordination and co-operation among separate teams, each having its own specific knowledge and its own set of specific design tools. Establishing an environment for design tool integration is a prerequisite for network-based distributed work. It was attempted to solve the problem of efficient, user-friendly, and fast information exchange among operators by treating it simply as an exchange of data. But the failure of IGES, CGM, PHIGS confirms that data have different meanings and importance in different contexts. The STandard for Exchange of Product data, ISO 10303 Part 106 BCCM, relating to AEC field (Wix, 1997), seems to be too complex to be applied to professional studios. Moreover its structure is too deep and the conceptual classifications based on it do not allow multi-inheritance (Ekholm, 1996). From now on we shall adopt the BCCM semantic that defines the actor as "a functional participant in building construction"; and we shall define designer as "every member of the class formed by designers" (architects, engineers, town-planners, construction managers, etc.).
keywords Architectural Design Process, Collaborative Design, Knowledge Engineering, Dynamic Object Oriented Programming
series eCAADe
email fioravanti@uniroma1.it
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 6496
authors Chen, Y.Z. and Maver, T.W.
year 1997
title Integrating Design Tools within a Human Collaborative Working
source The Int. Journal of Construction IT 5(2), pp. 47-73
summary This paper stresses the importance of establishing a collaborative working context as the basis for design integration. Within a virtual studio environment framework, a hybrid architecture for design tool integration is presented. Each design tool is wrapped as an autonomous service provider with its own data store; thus the project design data is physically distributed with the design tools. A global product model, which is augmented with meta-data description, is employed to provide a common vocabulary for communications and to assist the management of the distributed resources and activities. Collaboration-aware information is modelled and structured through the meta-data model and a tool model. Based on this, mechanisms for tool service coodination in varying modes are developed. It is then illustrated, through an implemented prototype system, how the integrated design tools might be used in human design work.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:45

_id maver_107
id maver_107
authors Chen, Yan and Maver, Tom W.
year 1997
title Integrating Design Tools within a Human Collaborative Working Context
source International Journal of Construction IT, Vol5, No 2, pp 35-53
summary Integrating design tools has been an important research subject. The work to be reported in this paper differs from many previous efforts in that it not only tackles tool-tool interoperation, but also does so within a human collaborative working context We suggest that design integration support should include not only tool interoperability, but also mechanisms for co-ordinate and control the tool use. We also argue that the higher-level management support should include not only formalised and automated mechanisms, but also semi-automated and even informal mechanisms for human designers to directly interact with each other. Within a collaborative working framework, we'll present a hybrid architecture for tool integration, in which the human designers and the design tools are assumed to be distributed while the management is centralised. In this approach, each design tool is wrapped as an autonomous service provider with its own data store; thus the project design data is physically distributed with the design tools. A meta-data augmented product model, which populates a central meta-data repository serving as a "map" for locating the distributed design objects, is devised to provide a common vocabulary for communications and to assist the management of the distributed resources and activities. A design object broker is used to mediate among the distributed tools, and the central meta-data repository. The reported work has been part of a collaborative design system called virtual studio environment We'll illustrate how the integrated design tools might be used in human design work within the virtual studio environment.
series other
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/09/03 13:36

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 460e
authors Dannettel, Mark E
year 1997
title Interactive Multimedia Design: Operational Structures and Intuitive Environments for CD-ROM
source CAADRIA ‘97 [Proceedings of the Second Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 957-575-057-8] Taiwan 17-19 April 1997, pp. 415-427
summary This paper presents practical design concepts for the production of CD-ROMs or on-line media projects which are intended for scholastic and professional use. It is based on the experience and knowledge which has been gained while developing a multimedia package here at the Department of Architecture at CUHK. The package deals exclusively with the technical issue of vertical transportation in buildings, and is intended to be used as a design tool in professional offices, as well as in classroom settings. The required research and production for the development of the structures, formats, and interfaces of this project, along with the consequential evaluation and revision of this work, has led to a greater understanding of appropriate applications for interactive interactive multimedia designs. Specially, the paper addresses the fundamental issues of ‘user-format’, and a distinction is made between applications which operate as ‘tools’ and those which operate as ‘resources’. Descriptions are provided for both types of operational formats, and suggestions are made as to how one might decided which format would be appropriate for a specific project. Briefly, resource produces imply that a user actively pursues information in a relatively static environment, while tool procedures imply that a user works jointly with the software to process information and arrive at a unique output. This distinction between the two formats is mostly grounded in the design of the structure and user-interface, and thus the point is made that the material content of the application does not necessarily imply a mandatory use of either format. In light of this observation that an application’s format relies on the appropriateness of operational procedures, rather than on its material content, further discussions of the implications of such procedures (using a ‘resource’ vs. using a ‘tool’) are provided.
series CAADRIA
email dannettel@cuhk.edu.hk
last changed 1999/02/01 14:16

_id 598d
authors Davies, P.
year 1997
title Case study - Multiprofessional
source Automation in Construction 6 (1) (1997) pp. 51-57
summary IT is just a tool, but the most powerful one ever to be offered to us. This case study deals with the areas at which IT can be targeted within the Building Design Partnership. Firstly, should anything be done and if so, what criteria should be used to choose the priorities? A SWOT analysis is one way way to identify goals. Strengths/weeknesses, opportunities/threats are the positive/negative pairs. We have to build our strength and perceive and take opportunities while at the same time countering weaknesses and threats. It is a threat that the industry sets a moving target of IT capability without wanting to meet its cost. It is an opportunity that only a few practices will be at the leading edge and that they will secure the key projects. IT could help us to overcome technical weaknesses and liability and reduce staff and premises costs. It could also increase our exposure to fixed capital costs in a cyclical business. IT could increase the success of integrated practice or it could make it easier for separate firms. We believe the likelihood is that IT will do as it has for financial services and favour the large, multi-national, well prepared and technologically advanced firms. New services will emerge and become assential and will separate the `sheep from the goats.'
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id af28
authors Dijkstra, J. and Timmermans, H.J.P.
year 1997
title The Application of Conjoint Measurement as a Dynamic Decision Making Tool in a Virtual Reality Environment
source CAAD Futures 1997 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-7923-4726-9] München (Germany), 4-6 August 1997, pp. 757-770
summary This paper describes an innovative aspect of an ongoing research project to develop a virtual reality based conjoint analysis system. Conjoint analysis involves the use of designed hypothetical choice situations to measure subjects' preferences and predict their choice in new situations. Conjoint experiments involve the design and analysis of hypothetical decision tasks. Hypothetical alternatives, called product profiles, are generated and presented to subjects. A virtual reality presentation format has been used to represent these profiles. A profile consists of a virtual environment model and dynamic virtual objects representing the attributes with their respective levels. Conventional conjoint choice models are traditionally based on preference or choice data, not on dynamic decision making aspects. The status of this new approach will be described.
series CAAD Futures
email j.dijkstra@bwk.tue.nl, h.j.p.timmermans@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 1999/04/06 07:19

_id 0627
authors Dijkstra, J. and Timmermans, H.J.P.
year 1997
title Exploring the Possibilities of Conjoint Measurement as a Decision-Making Tool for Virtual Wayfinding Environments
source CAADRIA ‘97 [Proceedings of the Second Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 957-575-057-8] Taiwan 17-19 April 1997, pp. 61-71
summary Virtual reality systems may have a lot to offer in architecture and urban planning when visual and active environments may have a dramatic impact on individual preferences and choice behaviour. Conjoint analysis involves the use of designed hypothetical choice situations to measure individuals’ preferences and predict their choice in new situations. Conjoint experiments involve the design and analysis of hypothetical decision tasks. Alternatives are described by their main features, called attributes. Multiple hypothetical alternatives, called product profiles, are generated and presented to respondents, who are requested to express their degree of preference for these profiles or choose between these profiles. Conjoint experiments have become a popular tool to model individual preferences and decision-making in a variety of research areas. Most studies of conjoint analysis have involved a verbal description of product profiles, although some studies have used a pictorial presentation of production profiles. Virtual reality systems offer the potential of moving the response format beyond these traditional response modes. This paper describes a particular aspect of an ongoing research project which aims to develop a virtual reality based system for conjoint analysis. The principles underlying the system will be illustrated by a simple example of wayfinding in a virtual environment.
series CAADRIA
last changed 1999/02/01 11:48

_id 389b
authors Do, Ellen Yi-Luen
year 2000
title Sketch that Scene for Me: Creating Virtual Worlds by Freehand Drawing
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 265-268
summary With the Web people can now view virtual threedimensional worlds and explore virtual space. Increasingly, novice users are interested in creating 3D Web sites. Virtual Reality Modeling Language gained ISO status in 1997, although it is being supplanted by the compatible Java3D API and alternative 3D Web technologies compete. Viewing VRML scenes is relatively straightforward on most hardware platforms and browsers, but currently there are only two ways to create 3D virtual scenes: One is to code the scene directly using VRML. The other is to use existing CAD and modeling software, and save the world in VRML format or convert to VRML from some other format. Both methods are time consuming, cumbersome, and have steep learning curves. Pen-based user interfaces, on the other hand, are for many an easy and intuitive method for graphics input. Not only are people familiar with the look and feel of paper and pencil, novice users also find it less intimidating to draw what they want, where they want it instead of using a complicated tool palette and pull-down menus. Architects and designers use sketches as a primary tool to generate design ideas and to explore alternatives, and numerous computer-based interfaces have played on the concept of "sketch". However, we restrict the notion of sketch to freehand drawing, which we believe helps people to think, to envision, and to recognize properties of the objects with which they are working. SKETCH employs a pen interface to create three-dimensional models, but it uses a simple language of gestures to control a three-dimensional modeler; it does not attempt to interpret freehand drawings. In contrast, our support of 3D world creation using freehand drawing depend on users’ traditional understanding of a floor plan representation. Igarashi et al. used a pen interface to drive browsing in a 3D world, by projecting the user’s marks on the ground plane in the virtual world. Our Sketch-3D project extends this approach, investigating an interface that allows direct interpretation of the drawing marks (what you draw is what you get) and serves as a rapid prototyping tool for creating 3D virtual scenes.
keywords Freehand Sketching, Pen-Based User Interface, Interaction, VRML, Navigation
series eCAADe
email ellendo@cmu.edu
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2004/10/04 05:49

_id d4b1
authors Egglib, L., Ching-yaob, H., Brüderlinb, B. and Elbera, G.
year 1997
title Inferring 3D models from freehand sketches and constraints
source Computer-Aided Design, Vol. 29 (2) (1997) pp. 101-112
summary This paper describes `Quick-sketch', a 2D and 3D modelling tool for pen-based computers. Users of this system define a model by simple pen strokes, drawn directlyon the screen of a pen-based PC. Exact shapes and geometric relationships are interpreted from the sketch. The system can also be used to sketch 3D solid objects andB-spline surfaces. These objects may be refined by defining 2D and 3D geometric constraints. A novel graph-based constraint solver is used to establish the geometricrelationships, or to maintain them when manipulating the objects interactively. The approach presented here is a first step towards a conceptual design system.Quick-sketch can be used as a hand sketching front-end to more sophisticated modelling, rendering or animation systems.
keywords Geometric Constraints, Conceptual Design, Free-Hand Sketch Interpretation
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:33

_id ce97
authors Faconti, D., Giacchin V. and Pellitteri, G.
year 1997
title On-line Handbook to Support Brickwork Design
source Challenges of the Future [15th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-3-0] Vienna (Austria) 17-20 September 1997
summary Computer assistants to building design are more and more oriented to construct repertories of cases to be recalled as possible suggestions to a real design situation. For this purpose it is necessary that the cases be described by the parameters most apt to describe the design situations. In this way it will be possible to extract out of the repertory the existing case most akin to the design problem the designer is dealing with. This kind of help is the most fit to the usual behaviour of a designer which, in order to find the best solution to a design problem, resort to his culture, his knowledge of real cases, which he tries to adapt to the peculiar need of his present case. This paper presents an attempt to construct such a tool also if restricted to only one building component: the exterior brickwork. It is structured as an Hypertext, which allows a net of relationships much richer than the one of a conventional handbook.
series eCAADe
email pellitt@mbox.unipa.it
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/ecaade/proc/faconti/faconti.htm
last changed 2001/08/17 13:11

_id 567d
authors Farrag, C., Pinna Braga, F. and Teixeira, P.
year 2000
title Investigação de Metodologia de Ensino de Informática Aplicada à Arquitetura (Research on the Methodology for Teaching Computer Applications in Architecture)
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 347-349
summary Description of class research from 1997-2 to 2000-1 in “Applied Computing in Architecture” conducted in the sixth semester of the Architecture Program at Faculdade de Belas Artes de São Paulo. The study is intended to analyze, evaluate and discover new paradigms in the introduction/application of class methodologies of teaching the use of computer in the design process. Our intention is to verify the students natural understanding of the principles of 3D digital modeling by introducing new tools for defining space and form, using the computer as a communication/representation system, and not only as a mimetized production tool. The challenge was to find a natural syntony between the digital projectual process and the learning process. At the end of each semester we evaluated the results and redirected the class proposals.
series SIGRADI
email sigradi@belasartes.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:51

_id c557
authors Fuchs, W. and Martinico, A.
year 1997
title The V.C.net--A digital study in architecture
source Automation in Construction 6 (4) (1997) pp. 335-339
summary The V.C.net project is an Internet-based educational and communication tool for the architectural community. Its goal is to encourage students from architecture programs across the country and around the world to examine problems and collaborate in the exploration of ideas through the World Wide Web. The central concept of the project involves the creation of a simulated, vital urban environment constructed from various forms of digital data. This `virtual city' will be comprised of projects executed by students of architecture and urban design in US and abroad. Projects will be proposed for specific sites and will reflect real-world questions as they are mirrored in the virtual world. The city exists as a heuristic tool and is not intended as a copy of any existing human habitat. The ultimate goal of the project is to create a dynamic platform to study the interrelationship of various forces effecting urban development: architecture, planning, civil engineering, economics, social sciences, etc. The project originates at the School of Architecture of the University of Detroit Mercy and is intended to be truly interdisciplinary.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

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