CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id 730e
authors Af Klercker, Jonas
year 1997
title Implementation of IT and CAD - what can Architect schools do?
source AVOCAAD First International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-01-09] Brussels (Belgium) 10-12 April 1997, pp. 83-92
summary In Sweden representatives from the Construction industry have put forward a research and development program called: "IT-Bygg 2002 -Implementation". It aims at making IT the vehicle for decreasing the building costs and at the same time getting better quality and efficiency out of the industry. A seminar was held with some of the most experienced researchers, developers and practitioners of CAD in construction in Sweden. The activities were recorded and annotated, analysed and put together afterwards; then presented to the participants to agree on. Co-operation is the key to get to the goals - IT and CAD are just the means to improve it. Co-operation in a phase of implementation is enough problematic without the technical difficulties in using computer programs created by the computer industry primarily for commercial reasons. The suggestion is that cooperation between software companies within Sweden will make a greater market to share than the sum of all individual efforts. In the short term, 2 - 5 years, implementation of CAD and IT will demand a large amount of educational efforts from all actors in the construction process. In the process of today the architect is looked upon as a natural coordinator of the design phase. In the integrated process the architect's methods and knowledge are central and must be spread to other categories of actors - what a challenge! At least in Sweden the number of researchers and educators in CAAD is easily counted. How do we make the most of it?
series AVOCAAD
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id acadia03_022
id acadia03_022
authors Anders, Peter
year 2003
title Towards Comprehensive Space: A context for the programming/design of cybrids
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 161-171
summary Cybrids have been presented as mixed realities: spatial, architectural compositions comprised of physical and cyberspaces (Anders 1997). In order to create a rigorous approach to the design of architectural cybrids, this paper offers a model for programming their spaces. Other than accepting cyberspaces as part of architecture’s domain, this approach is not radical. Indeed, many parts of program development resemble those of conventional practice. However, the proposition that cyberspaces should be integrated with material structures requires that their relationship be developed from the outset of a project. Hence, this paper provides a method for their integration from the project’s earliest stages, the establishment of its program. This study for an actual project, the Planetary Collegium, describes a distributed campus comprising buildings and cyberspaces in various locales across the globe. The programming for these cybrids merges them within a comprehensive space consisting not only of the physical and cyberspaces, but also in the cognitive spaces of its designers and users.
series ACADIA
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2003/11/27 14:21

_id 8ec9
authors Asanowicz, Alexander
year 1997
title Incompatible Pencil - Chance for Changing in Design Process
source AVOCAAD First International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-01-09] Brussels (Belgium) 10-12 April 1997, pp. 93-101
summary The existing Caad systems limit designers creativity by constraining them to work with prototypes provided by the system's knowledge base. Most think of computers as drafting machines and consider CAAD models as merely proposals for future buildings. But this kind of thinking (computers as simple drafting machines) seems to be a way without future. New media demands new process and new process demands new media. We have to give some thougt to impact of CAAD on the design process and in which part of it CAAD can add new value. In this paper there will be considered two ways of using of computers. First - creation of architectural form in an architect's mind and projects visualisation with using renderings, animation and virtual reality. In the second part - computer techniques are investigated as a medium of creation. Unlike a conventional drawing the design object within computer has a life of its own. In computer space design and the final product are one. Computer creates environments for new kind of design activities. In fact, many dimensions of meaning in cyberspace have led to a cyberreal architecture that is sure to have dramatic consequences for the profession.
series AVOCAAD
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id eb53
authors Asanowicz, K. and Bartnicka, M.
year 1997
title Computer analysis of visual perception - endoscopy without endoscope
source Architectural and Urban Simulation Techniques in Research and Education [Proceedings of the 3rd European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 90-407-1669-2]
summary This paper presents a method of using computer animation techniques in order to solve problems of visual pollution of city environment. It is our observation that human-inducted degradation of city environmental results from well - intentioned but inappropriate preservation actions by uninformed designers and local administration. Very often, a local municipality administration permits to build bad-fitting surroundings houses. It is usually connected with lack of visual information's about housing areas of a city, its features and characteristics. The CAMUS system (Computer Aided Management of Urban Structure) is being created at the Faculty of Architecture of Bialystok Technical University. One of its integral parts is VIA - Visual Impact of Architecture. The basic element of this system is a geometrical model of the housing areas of Bialystok. This model can be enhanced using rendering packages as they create the basis to check our perception of a given area. An inspiration of this approach was the digital endoscopy presented by J. Breen and M. Stellingwerff at the 2nd EAEA Conferences in Vienna. We are presenting the possibilities of using simple computer programs for analysis of spatial model. This contribution presents those factors of computer presentation which can demonstrate that computers achieve such effects as endoscope and often their use be much more efficient and effective.
keywords Architectural Endoscopy, Endoscopy, Simulation, Visualisation, Visualization, Real Environments
series EAEA
email mmm@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
more http://www.bk.tudelft.nl/media/eaea/eaea97.html
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 58f4
authors Barequet, G. and Kumar, S.
year 1997
title Repairing CAD models
source Proceedings of IEEE Visualizationí97, pp. 363-370
summary We describe an algorithm for repairing polyhedral CAD models that have errors in their B-REP. Errors like cracks, degeneracies, duplication, holes and overlaps are usually introduced in solid models due to imprecise arithmetic, model transformations, designer's fault, programming bugs, etc. Such errors often hamper further processing like finite element analysis, radiosity computation and rapid prototyping. Our fault-repair algorithm converts an unordered collection of polygons to a shared-vertex representation to help eliminate errors. This is done by choosing, for each polygon edge, the most appropriate edge to unify it with. The two edges are then geometrically merged into one, by moving vertices. At the end of this process, each polygon edge is either coincident with another or is a boundary edge for a polygonal hole or a dangling wall and may be appropriately repaired. Finally, in order to allow user- inspection of the automatic corrections, we produce a visualization of the repair and let the user mark the corrections that conflict with the original design intent. A second iteration of the correction algorithm then produces a repair that is commensurate with the intent. Thus, by involving the users in a feedback loop, we are able to refine the correction to their satisfaction.
series other
email barequet@cs.technion.ac.il
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 841a
authors Bartnicka, Malgorzata
year 1997
title The Animal, Full Blood maybe, but Untamed
source AVOCAAD First International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-01-09] Brussels (Belgium) 10-12 April 1997, pp. 103-108
summary So far yet, even the most advanced technology has not been able to substitute a human, his thoughts, feelings, dreams, longings, visions. It can though, removing need for all kind of effort from our everyday life, surrounding a human with unprecedented comfort, create feeling of peace and security. Task of a computer is to provide assistance, helping in calculations, forming of refined solids, It contains a compendium of knowledge and memory - but not creative skills. So far it's only a machine, with help of which a possibility of creative expression is expanded. It only can solve problems for a human faster and more efficient way, does not have the ability to describe (formulate) problems. Even while providing a support, does it do that honestly? It means, does it support us in those of our doings where we truly need it? Computers have enormous possibilities of use that are not exploited sufficiently and all the time new generations of yet quicker machines with unbelievable power are being created. Every new type of computer appears to be obsolete and insufficient within a few months. Insufficient for what?
series AVOCAAD
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id a726
authors Belblidia, S. and Perrin, J.P.
year 1997
title Level-of-Detail Visualization of Architectural Models
source CAAD Futures 1997 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-7923-4726-9] München (Germany), 4-6 August 1997, pp. 831-836
summary The work presented in this paper aims to use level-of-detail representation in realizing interactive walkthroughs or ignoring useless details in large architectural models. In order to choose the right representation of a model, we have to evaluate the error committed when using a simplified version instead of the full description of an object. This error depends on the object deformation during the simplification process but also on the importance of this object in the current viewing conditions. This "visible" error is used with different visualization strategies to find the model representation which satisfies either a quality criterion or a cost condition.
series CAAD Futures
email belblid@crai.archi.fr
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 4e1c
authors Berdinski, D.
year 1997
title Combining different kinds of perspective images in architectural practice.
source Architectural and Urban Simulation Techniques in Research and Education [Proceedings of the 3rd European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 90-407-1669-2]
summary This paper is about combining photo-, video-, endoscope captured images with handmade or computer generated ones. Practically all optical systems are known to produce more or less curved perspective (spherical or cylindrical) which depends of angle-of-view, and a computer as a rule (as handmade) constructs linear perspective images. To combine them on any media correctly, an operator has to be professional painter or designer, because there is no mathematically determined way to combine them. The author's-made demo-computer program is able to generate spherical perspective of simple spatial constructions. It allows to illustrate mathematically and visually the principles of optical curved perspective, laws of their combination with linear ones and helps to feel how to achieve the accordance with natural visual architectural images.
keywords Architectural Endoscopy, Endoscopy, Simulation, Visualisation, Visualization, Real Environments
series EAEA
email bvl@icp.ac.ru
more http://www.bk.tudelft.nl/media/eaea/eaea97.html
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 76ba
authors Bermudez, Julio
year 1997
title Cyber(Inter)Sections: Looking into the Real Impact of The Virtual in the Architectural Profession
source Proceedings of the Symposium on Architectural Design Education: Intersecting Perspectives, Identities and Approaches. Minneapolis, MN: College of Architecture & Landscape Architecture, pp. 57-63
summary As both the skepticism and 'hype' surrounding cyberspace vanish under the weight of ever increasing power, demand, and use of information, the architectural discipline must prepare for significant changes. For cyberspace is remorselessly cutting through the dearest structures, rituals, roles, and modes of production in our profession. Yet, this section is not just a detached cut through the existing tissues of the discipline. Rather it is an inter-section, as cyberspace becomes also transformed in the act of piercing. This phenomenon is causing major transformations in at least three areas: 1. Cyberspace is substantially altering the way we produce and communicate architectural information. The arising new working environment suggests highly hybrid and networked conditions that will push the productive and educational landscape of the discipline towards increasing levels of fluidity, exchanges, diversity and change. 2. It has been argued that cyberspace-based human and human-data interactions present us with the opportunity to foster a more free marketplace of ideologies, cultures, preferences, values, and choices. Whether or not the in-progress cyberincisions have the potential to go deep enough to cure the many illnesses afflicting the body of our discipline need to be considered seriously. 3. Cyberspace is a new place or environment wherein new kinds of human activities demand unprecedented types of architectural services. Rather than being a passing fashion, these new architectural requirements are destined to grow exponentially. We need to consider the new modes of practice being created by cyberspace and the education required to prepare for them. This paper looks at these three intersecting territories showing that it is academia and not practice that is leading the profession in the incorporation of virtuality into architecture. Rafael Moneo's words come to mind. [2]
series other
email bermudez@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id debf
authors Bertol, D.
year 1997
title Designing Digital Space - An Architect's Guide to Virtual Reality
source John Wiley & Sons, New York
summary The first in-depth book on virtual reality (VR) aimed specifically at architecture and design professionals, Designing Digital Space steers you skillfully through the learning curve of this exciting new technology. Beginning with a historical overview of the evolution of architectural representations, this unique resource explains what VR is, how it is being applied today, and how it promises to revolutionize not only the design process, but the form and function of the built environment itself. Vividly illustrating how VR fits alongside traditional methods of architectural representation, this comprehensive guide prepares you to make optimum practical use of this powerful interactive tool, and embrace the new role of the architect in a virtually designed world. Offers in-depth coverage of the virtual universe-data representation and information management, static and dynamic worlds, tracking and visual display systems, control devices, and more. Examines a wide range of current VR architectural applications, from walkthroughs, simulations, and evaluations to reconstructions and networked environments Includes insightful essays by leading VR developers covering some of today's most innovative projects Integrates VR into the historical framework of architectural development, with detailed sections on the past, present, and future Features a dazzling array of virtual world images and sequential displays Explores the potential impact of digital architecture on the built environment of the future
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 127c
authors Bhavnani, S.K. and John, B.E.
year 1997
title From Sufficient to Efficient Usage: An Analysis of Strategic Knowledge
source Proceedings of CHI'97 (1997), 91-98
summary Can good design guarantee the eflicient use of computer tools? Can experience guarantee it? We raise these questions to explore why empirical studies of real-world usage show even experienced users under-utilizing the capabilities of computer applications. By analyzing the use of everyday devices and computer applications, as well as reviewing empirical studies, we conclude that neither good design nor experience may be able to guarantee efficient usage. Efficient use requires task decomposition strategies that exploit capabilities offered by computer applications such as the ability to aggregute objects, and to manipulate the aggregates with powerful operators. To understand the effects that strategies can have on performance, we present results from a GOMS analysis of a CAD task. Furthermore, we identify some key aggregation strategies that appear to generalize across applications. Such strategies may provide a framework to enable users to move from a sufficient to a more ef)icient use of computer tools.
keywords Strategies; Task Decomposition; Aggregation
series other
email bhavnani@umich.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 536e
authors Bouman, Ole
year 1997
title RealSpace in QuickTimes: architecture and digitization
source Rotterdam: Nai Publishers
summary Time and space, drastically compressed by the computer, have become interchangeable. Time is compressed in that once everything has been reduced to 'bits' of information, it becomes simultaneously accessible. Space is compressed in that once everything has been reduced to 'bits' of information, it can be conveyed from A to B with the speed of light. As a result of digitization, everything is in the here and now. Before very long, the whole world will be on disk. Salvation is but a modem away. The digitization process is often seen in terms of (information) technology. That is to say, one hears a lot of talk about the digital media, about computer hardware, about the modem, mobile phone, dictaphone, remote control, buzzer, data glove and the cable or satellite links in between. Besides, our heads are spinning from the progress made in the field of software, in which multimedia applications, with their integration of text, image and sound, especially attract our attention. But digitization is not just a question of technology, it also involves a cultural reorganization. The question is not just what the cultural implications of digitization will be, but also why our culture should give rise to digitization in the first place. Culture is not simply a function of technology; the reverse is surely also true. Anyone who thinks about cultural implications, is interested in the effects of the computer. And indeed, those effects are overwhelming, providing enough material for endless speculation. The digital paradigm will entail a new image of humankind and a further dilution of the notion of social perfectibility; it will create new notions of time and space, a new concept of cause and effect and of hierarchy, a different sort of public sphere, a new view of matter, and so on. In the process it will indubitably alter our environment. Offices, shopping centres, dockyards, schools, hospitals, prisons, cultural institutions, even the private domain of the home: all the familiar design types will be up for review. Fascinated, we watch how the new wave accelerates the process of social change. The most popular sport nowadays is 'surfing' - because everyone is keen to display their grasp of dirty realism. But there is another way of looking at it: under what sort of circumstances is the process of digitization actually taking place? What conditions do we provide that enable technology to exert the influence it does? This is a perspective that leaves room for individual and collective responsibility. Technology is not some inevitable process sweeping history along in a dynamics of its own. Rather, it is the result of choices we ourselves make and these choices can be debated in a way that is rarely done at present: digitization thanks to or in spite of human culture, that is the question. In addition to the distinction between culture as the cause or the effect of digitization, there are a number of other distinctions that are accentuated by the computer. The best known and most widely reported is the generation gap. It is certainly stretching things a bit to write off everybody over the age of 35, as sometimes happens, but there is no getting around the fact that for a large group of people digitization simply does not exist. Anyone who has been in the bit business for a few years can't help noticing that mum and dad are living in a different place altogether. (But they, at least, still have a sense of place!) In addition to this, it is gradually becoming clear that the age-old distinction between market and individual interests are still relevant in the digital era. On the one hand, the advance of cybernetics is determined by the laws of the marketplace which this capital-intensive industry must satisfy. Increased efficiency, labour productivity and cost-effectiveness play a leading role. The consumer market is chiefly interested in what is 'marketable': info- and edutainment. On the other hand, an increasing number of people are not prepared to wait for what the market has to offer them. They set to work on their own, appropriate networks and software programs, create their own domains in cyberspace, domains that are free from the principle whereby the computer simply reproduces the old world, only faster and better. Here it is possible to create a different world, one that has never existed before. One, in which the Other finds a place. The computer works out a new paradigm for these creative spirits. In all these distinctions, architecture plays a key role. Owing to its many-sidedness, it excludes nothing and no one in advance. It is faced with the prospect of historic changes yet it has also created the preconditions for a digital culture. It is geared to the future, but has had plenty of experience with eternity. Owing to its status as the most expensive of arts, it is bound hand and foot to the laws of the marketplace. Yet it retains its capacity to provide scope for creativity and innovation, a margin of action that is free from standardization and regulation. The aim of RealSpace in QuickTimes is to show that the discipline of designing buildings, cities and landscapes is not only a exemplary illustration of the digital era but that it also provides scope for both collective and individual activity. It is not just architecture's charter that has been changed by the computer, but also its mandate. RealSpace in QuickTimes consists of an exhibition and an essay.
series other
email oleb@xs4all.nl
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 2e36
authors Bourdakis, Vassilis
year 1997
title Making Sense of the City
source CAAD Futures 1997 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-7923-4726-9] München (Germany), 4-6 August 1997, pp. 663-678
summary Large-scale, three dimensional, interactive computer models of cities are becoming feasible making it possible to test their suitability as a visualisation tool for the design and planning process, for data visualisation where socio-economic and physical data can be mapped on to the 3D form of the city and as an urban information repository. The CASA developed models of the City of Bath and London's West End in VRML format, are used as examples to illustrate the problems arising. The aim of this paper is to reflect on key issues related to interaction within urban models, data mapping techniques and appropriate metaphors for presenting information.
keywords 3D City modeling, Urban Modelling, Virtual Environments, Navigation, Data Mapping, VRML
series CAAD Futures
email v.bourdakis@prd.uth.gr
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id ce11
authors Bradford, J., Wong, W.S. and Tang, H.F.
year 1997
title Bridging Virtual Reality to Internet for Architecture
source Challenges of the Future [15th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-3-0] Vienna (Austria) 17-20 September 1997
summary This paper presents a virtual reality interface tool which allows a user to perform the following action :

1.Import design from other CAD tools.

2.Assemble an architecture structure from a library of pre-built blocks and geometry primitives dynamically created by user.

3.Export the design interactively in VRML format back to the library for Internet browsing.

The geometry primitives include polygon, sphere, cone, cylinder and cube. The pre-built blocks consist of fundamental architecture models which have been categorized with architectural related style, physical properties and environmental attributes. Upon a user’s request, the tool or the composer, has the ability to communicate with the library which indeed is a back-end distributed client-server database engine. The user may specify any combination of properties and attributes in the composer which will instantly bring up all matching 3-dimensional objects through the database engine. The database is designed in relational model and comes from the work of another research group.

keywords Virtual Reality, Architecture Models, Relational Database, Client-Server
series eCAADe
email bradford@hku.hk
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/ecaade/proc/bradford/bradford.htm
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 2b38
authors Bradford, J., Wong, R. and Yeung, C.S.K.
year 1997
title Hierarchical Decomposition of Architectural Computer Models
source CAADRIA ‘97 [Proceedings of the Second Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 957-575-057-8] Taiwan 17-19 April 1997, pp. 197-203
summary Architectural models can be represented in a hierarchy of complexity. Higher level or more complex architecture structures are then designed by repetitively instantiating libraries of building blocks. The advantages are that the object can be achieved in modular fashion and any modification to the definition of a building block can be easily propagated to all higher level objects using the block. Unfortunately, many existing representations of architectural models are monolithic instead of hierarchical and modular, thus, making the reuse of models very difficult and inefficient. This paper describes a research project on developing a tool to decompose a monolithic architectural model into elementary building blocks and then create a hierarchy in the model representation. The tool provides a graphical interface for the visualization of a model and a cutting plane. An associated algorithm will then automatically detach parts of the model into building blocks depending on where the user is applying the cutting plane. Studies will also be made on dividing more complex models employing spherical and NURBS surfaces.
series CAADRIA
email bradford@hkuxa.hku.hk
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id c5a0
authors Bradford, J., Wong, W.S., Tang, A.H.F. and Yeung, C.S.K.
year 1997
title A Virtual Reality Building Block Composer for Architecture
source CAADRIA ‘97 [Proceedings of the Second Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 957-575-057-8] Taiwan 17-19 April 1997, pp. 51-59
summary Design is a complex and time consuming process. One way to simplify the design process is to use pre-build blocks for commonly known parts instead of creating them again with CAD. To give the designer an immediate 3D view of the design, designing in virtual reality is a good choice. This paper presents a virtual reality interface tool which allows a user to assemble an architecture structure from a library of pre-built blocks. The library is a distributed client-server database.
series CAADRIA
email bradford@hkuxa.hku.hk
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 4b46
authors Brady, Darlene A.
year 1997
title The Mind's Eye: Movement and Time in Architecture
source Design and Representation [ACADIA ‘97 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-06-3] Cincinatti, Ohio (USA) 3-5 October 1997, pp. 85-93
summary Le Corbusier notes in Vers Une Architecture that, because we look at the creation of architecture with eyes which are 5'-6" from the ground, it is imperative to "deal with aims which the eye can appreciate, and intentions which take into account architectural elements." (Le Corbusier 1927) Architecture is a three-dimensional entity that we experience as much through movement as repose. Therefore, it is essential that the computer technology used to design architecture enables the consideration of both aspects of this experience. This paper presents several ways in which animation is used to enhance the design process.

series ACADIA
email architexture@earthlink.net
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id ccc0
authors Braithwaite, G., Radford, A., Huang, E. , Chang, T.W., Jones, D., Woodbury, R. and Sweeting, R.
year 1997
title The Computer Modeling of Development Proposals: A Routine Part of Development Control
source CAADRIA ‘97 [Proceedings of the Second Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 957-575-057-8] Taiwan 17-19 April 1997, pp. 123-132
summary This paper describes and discusses the aims and practicalities involved in the computer modeling of contentious development applications becoming accepted as a routine part of the processes of development control. It uses three case studies drawn from the University of Adelaide’s work with the City of Adelaide in Australia to delineate the role of 3D computer models of proposed new buildings and their immediate surroundings in the public understanding of the streetscape, neighbourhood context, overshadowing and overlooking implications of the proposals.
keywords 3D City Modeling
series CAADRIA
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id cabb
authors Broughton, T., Tan, A. and Coates, P.S.
year 1997
title The Use of Genetic Programming In Exploring 3D Design Worlds - A Report of Two Projects by Msc Students at CECA UEL
source CAAD Futures 1997 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-7923-4726-9] München (Germany), 4-6 August 1997, pp. 885-915
summary Genetic algorithms are used to evolve rule systems for a generative process, in one case a shape grammar,which uses the "Dawkins Biomorph" paradigm of user driven choices to perform artificial selection, in the other a CA/Lindenmeyer system using the Hausdorff dimension of the resultant configuration to drive natural selection. (1) Using Genetic Programming in an interactive 3D shape grammar. A report of a generative system combining genetic programming (GP) and 3D shape grammars. The reasoning that backs up the basis for this work depends on the interpretation of design as search In this system, a 3D form is a computer program made up of functions (transformations) & terminals (building blocks). Each program evaluates into a structure. Hence, in this instance a program is synonymous with form. Building blocks of form are platonic solids (box, cylinder, etc.). A Variety of combinations of the simple affine transformations of translation, scaling, rotation together with Boolean operations of union, subtraction and intersection performed on the building blocks generate different configurations of 3D forms. Using to the methodology of genetic programming, an initial population of such programs are randomly generated,subjected to a test for fitness (the eyeball test). Individual programs that have passed the test are selected to be parents for reproducing the next generation of programs via the process of recombination. (2) Using a GA to evolve rule sets to achieve a goal configuration. The aim of these experiments was to build a framework in which a structure's form could be defined by a set of instructions encoded into its genetic make-up. This was achieved by combining a generative rule system commonly used to model biological growth with a genetic algorithm simulating the evolutionary process of selection to evolve an adaptive rule system capable of replicating any preselected 3D shape. The generative modelling technique used is a string rewriting Lindenmayer system the genes of the emergent structures are the production rules of the L-system, and the spatial representation of the structures uses the geometry of iso-spatial dense-packed spheres
series CAAD Futures
email p.s.coates@btinternet.com
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 1073
authors Bruton, Dean
year 1997
title A contingent sense of grammar
source University of Adelaide
summary Investigates the contingent senses in which concepts of grammars and grammatical design apply in the practice of form making in art and design. Using the strategies of a literature review; an examination through a perspective of grammatical design of some selected bodies of art work, including interviews with artists, theorists and some designers; and the reflective practice of image making with computer media in the author's own work as an artists.
series thesis:PhD
email d.bruton@unisa.edu.au
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

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