CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id ddss9861
id ddss9861
authors Leusen, M. van and Mitossi, V.
year 1998
title A practical experiment in representation and analysis of buildings
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary The TYPOLOGY project was set up by the Dutch Government Building Agency (GBA) to explore computerised representations of buildings that allow analysis of various aspects of their performance. So far this project produced the RF-model, an abstract computerised representation.Physical elements of the building are not represented as such, only individual spaces and boundary segments along which they are adjacent are represented explicitly. Spaces can have any number of functional properties such as the general category of floor area they are included in, the activities they accommodate, or the particular safety compartment or circulation system they belong to. Similarly, boundary segments may, for example, provide access or view, may be included in a particularcategory, such as interior walls, or in a safety or security barrier.The RF-model enabled the presentation and quantitative analysis of design proposals for large and complex buildings such as courts of justice and prison buildings. The model is also used in a multiaspect analysis of a series of recently erected Dutch prison buildings. We expect that these first results will develop into a rich and professional precedent-based system, to be used in the early stages of design. The strategic goal of the project is to derive from the accumulated models and their analysis a more general understanding of the relations between a building’s actual characteristics and various aspects of its performance.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id a136
authors Blaise, J.Y., Dudek, I. and Drap, P.
year 1998
title Java collaborative interface for architectural simulations A case study on wooden ceilings of Krakow
source International Conference On Conservation - Krakow 2000, 23-24 November 1998, Krakow, Poland
summary Concern for the architectural and urban preservation problems has been considerably increasing in the past decades, and with it the necessity to investigate the consequences and opportunities opened for the conservation discipline by the development of computer-based systems. Architectural interventions on historical edifices or in preserved urban fabric face conservationists and architects with specific problems related to the handling and exchange of a variety of historical documents and representations. The recent development of information technologies offers opportunities to favour a better access to such data, as well as means to represent architectural hypothesis or design. Developing applications for the Internet also introduces a greater capacity to exchange experiences or ideas and to invest on low-cost collaborative working platforms. In the field of the architectural heritage, our research addresses two problems: historical data and documentation of the edifice, methods of representation (knowledge modelling and visualisation) of the edifice. This research is connected with the ARKIW POLONIUM co-operation program that links the MAP-GAMSAU CNRS laboratory (Marseilles, France) and the Institute HAiKZ of Kraków's Faculty of Architecture. The ARKIW programme deals with questions related to the use of information technologies in the recording, protection and studying of the architectural heritage. Case studies are chosen in order to experience and validate a technical platform dedicated to the formalisation and exchange of knowledge related to the architectural heritage (architectural data management, representation and simulation tools, survey methods, ...). A special focus is put on the evolution of the urban fabric and on the simulation of reconstructional hypothesis. Our contribution will introduce current ARKIW internet applications and experiences: The ARPENTEUR architectural survey experiment on Wieża Ratuszowa (a photogrammetrical survey based on an architectural model). A Gothic and Renaissance reconstruction of the Ratusz Krakowski using a commercial modelisation and animation software (MAYA). The SOL on line documentation interface for Kraków's Rynek G_ówny. Internet analytical approach in the presentation of morphological informations about Kraków's Kramy Bogate Rynku Krakowskiego. Object-Orientation approach in the modelling of the architectural corpus. The VALIDEUR and HUBLOT Virtual Reality modellers for the simulation and representation of reconstructional hypothesis and corpus analysis.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 68fb
authors Khemlani, L., Timerman, A., Benne, B. and Kalay, Y.E.
year 1998
title Intelligent representation for computer-aided building design
source Automation in Construction 8 (1) (1998) pp. 49-71
summary At the core of any computational system that can support design development, analysis, and evaluation is an “intelligent” building representation which should be able to represent all the different components that make up a building, along with the manner in which they come together. In other words, the representation must be informationally complete and semantically rich. The paper discusses these two criteria and briefly reviews other research efforts aimed at developing building representations for computer-aided design that attempt to meet them. Our solution to this problem is then presented. It is aimed primarily at the schematic design phase, the rationale for which is also stated. Taking the view that buildings are unique assemblies of discrete, mostly standardized components, our representation is clearly divided into two components: the Object Database (ODB) which stores detailed information about various building elements, and the Project Database (PDB) which holds information about how these elements are assembled to make up a particular building. An ODB may be shared by many building projects, while the PDB must necessarily be unique to each. The data schemas of both the PDB and the ODB are described in detail and their computational implementation, to the extent that it has been completed, is illustrated.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/03/05 12:12

_id 42
authors Kos, Jose Ripper
year 1998
title Analisis de la Evolucion de la Ciudad a Traves de un Multimedia Interactivo (Analisis of the Evolution of the City by Means of Interactive Multimedia)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 316-323
summary The purpose of this work is the discussion of issues related to the use of interactive multimedia for the documentation of buildings and cities. These issues emerged from the analysis of the cities of Havana and Rio de Janeiro, as researched at PROURB, the Graduate Program of Urban Design of the School of Architecture and Urbanism, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. Interactive multimedia applications have been developed through many years. Some areas presented mature works, other are still researching specific forms to employ the available resources of this new media. In this situation are the interpretations of buildings and cities, which still hasn't found a proper language for it's complexly and scale. Interactive multimedia has many resources which are adequate for buildings and cities' analysis and representation. Two questions may be considered crucial for the use of hyperdocuments in architecture and urban planning and design: the first allows us a glimpse of a technique which can document the bridge between the architectís space imagining and this space experienced by it's users. The second issue is the proximity between the role of the architect and those of the author of interactive multimedia.
series SIGRADI
email josekos@pobox.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:54

_id e35f
authors Monedero, Javier
year 1998
title The Role of the Architect in the Age of Automatic Reproduction
source Computerised Craftsmanship [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Paris (France) 24-26 September 1998, pp. 158-163
summary This paper is a general reflection on the relationship between computer architectural education and professional practice or, in other words, the social role of architects. This reflection is grounded on the experience of the author as director of a Master program on computerized architectural projects and as professor of two general school courses: one consisting on a theoretical review of computer applications in architecture, the other consisting on a practical development of modeling and visualization techniques. The main argument is that little attention is being given in recent publications and CAAD conferences to the actual role of architect in society and that a big gap is growing between what is currently taught in architectural schools and what happens in real life. This gap has as one pole what is loosely called the "star system" of famous architects that create singular buildings and that constitute the main reference of our architectural culture and, as another pole, the rigid laws of the market that dictate the types of most residential buildings. This lack of attention manifests itself in the unbalanced weight of papers on multimedia, historical modeling or visualization techniques and papers on housing or architectural current elements analysis. Some very interesting lines of research, perhaps distorted due to an insufficient analysis of the general notion of type in architecture, have been abandoned without much comment. The conclusion is that a discussion on this line would perhaps help to define better the distance between computer craftsmanship and architectural education.
series eCAADe
more http://www.paris-valdemarne.archi.fr/archive/ecaade98/html/33monedero/index.htm
last changed 1998/09/25 17:16

_id avocaad_2001_20
id avocaad_2001_20
authors Shen-Kai Tang
year 2001
title Toward a procedure of computer simulation in the restoration of historical architecture
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In the field of architectural design, “visualization¨ generally refers to some media, communicating and representing the idea of designers, such as ordinary drafts, maps, perspectives, photos and physical models, etc. (Rahman, 1992; Susan, 2000). The main reason why we adopt visualization is that it enables us to understand clearly and to control complicated procedures (Gombrich, 1990). Secondly, the way we get design knowledge is more from the published visualized images and less from personal experiences (Evans, 1989). Thus the importance of the representation of visualization is manifested.Due to the developments of computer technology in recent years, various computer aided design system are invented and used in a great amount, such as image processing, computer graphic, computer modeling/rendering, animation, multimedia, virtual reality and collaboration, etc. (Lawson, 1995; Liu, 1996). The conventional media are greatly replaced by computer media, and the visualization is further brought into the computerized stage. The procedure of visual impact analysis and assessment (VIAA), addressed by Rahman (1992), is renewed and amended for the intervention of computer (Liu, 2000). Based on the procedures above, a great amount of applied researches are proceeded. Therefore it is evident that the computer visualization is helpful to the discussion and evaluation during the design process (Hall, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998; Liu, 1997; Sasada, 1986, 1988, 1990, 1993, 1997, 1998). In addition to the process of architectural design, the computer visualization is also applied to the subject of construction, which is repeatedly amended and corrected by the images of computer simulation (Liu, 2000). Potier (2000) probes into the contextual research and restoration of historical architecture by the technology of computer simulation before the practical restoration is constructed. In this way he established a communicative mode among archeologists, architects via computer media.In the research of restoration and preservation of historical architecture in Taiwan, many scholars have been devoted into the studies of historical contextual criticism (Shi, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1995; Fu, 1995, 1997; Chiu, 2000). Clues that accompany the historical contextual criticism (such as oral information, writings, photographs, pictures, etc.) help to explore the construction and the procedure of restoration (Hung, 1995), and serve as an aid to the studies of the usage and durability of the materials in the restoration of historical architecture (Dasser, 1990; Wang, 1998). Many clues are lost, because historical architecture is often age-old (Hung, 1995). Under the circumstance, restoration of historical architecture can only be proceeded by restricted pictures, written data and oral information (Shi, 1989). Therefore, computer simulation is employed by scholars to simulate the condition of historical architecture with restricted information after restoration (Potier, 2000). Yet this is only the early stage of computer-aid restoration. The focus of the paper aims at exploring that whether visual simulation of computer can help to investigate the practice of restoration and the estimation and evaluation after restoration.By exploring the restoration of historical architecture (taking the Gigi Train Station destroyed by the earthquake in last September as the operating example), this study aims to establish a complete work on computer visualization, including the concept of restoration, the practice of restoration, and the estimation and evaluation of restoration.This research is to simulate the process of restoration by computer simulation based on visualized media (restricted pictures, restricted written data and restricted oral information) and the specialized experience of historical architects (Potier, 2000). During the process of practicing, communicates with craftsmen repeatedly with some simulated alternatives, and makes the result as the foundation of evaluating and adjusting the simulating process and outcome. In this way we address a suitable and complete process of computer visualization for historical architecture.The significance of this paper is that we are able to control every detail more exactly, and then prevent possible problems during the process of restoration of historical architecture.
series AVOCAAD
email tsk.aa88g@nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id ddss9856
id ddss9856
authors Suter, Georg and Mahdavi, Ardeshir
year 1998
title Generation and communication of design information:a building performance simulation perspective
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary There is general agreement that the process of design and construction of buildings typically involves multiple players. This has been the impetus to develop concepts for computational environments that would supportcollaborative design. While there has been considerable progress with regard to hardware and electronic communication, the underlying representations of design ideas and artifacts have not kept pace with thisprogress. In this paper we deal with this problem not from a global conceptual perspective, but rather from the specific point of view of those designers who use design representation toward extraction and manipulation of specialized technical information. For example, engineers in various fields of building technology require a rich representation of building information in terms of geometry (with special focus on topology), materials, systems attributes, etc. We argue that the current building analysis tools do not operate on the basis of such rich informational representations. Instead the needed information is often assembled on an ad hoc basis from various non-integrated informational sources. We review three representations as they are implemented in commercial or research systems and explore their potential for communicating design information to computational building analysis tools. Based on this review, we describe desirable characteristics of more sophisticated building representations.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id de77
authors Ahmad Rafi, M.E.
year 1998
title Computer animation for architectural visualisation
source University of Strathclyde
summary This thesis critically reviews the state of architectural animation, and relates this specific field to the more general motion-based representations, particularly traditional film-making techniques. It identifies key elements from traditional filmmaking and shows how these elements can improve computer-based architectural animation. The process of identification of the key elements from traditional film-making starts with a critical survey of the use of motion-based representation in local architectural practices and an empirical analysis of several architectural-based documentary films and past and present computer animations. All of the key ideas are illustrated on video by comparing real shooting clips to digital sequences focusing on production and post-production works. Some of these were implemented in two live projects ( Ministry of Finance, Malaysia and Damansara Parade ) for architects to understand the real problems and potentials in each process. These sets of illustrations expand the architect ideas to make full use of the motion-based process to improve the skill of combining architectural information in a good animation. The overall production process becomes more efficient when the motion-based footage is edited using a non-linear editing platform as it enhances the professional appearance as well as vastly saving most of the production time. The thesis concludes with specific recommendations relative to the stage at which the animation is produced. This technology can be best utilised with the right skills (a gained from film-making) and an understanding of each stage that requires a different level of input and gives a certain impact to the viewers.
series thesis:PhD
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 2796
authors Brown, Andy and Lee, Hwa, Ryong
year 1998
title A Mental Space Model
source Cyber-Real Design [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 83-905377-2-9] Bialystock (Poland), 23-25 April 1998, pp. 27-42
summary The architectural design process is often characterised a series of evolving ideas, and involving a cyclical process between design and visualisation. However, the nature of the internal representation still remains unclear. What is actually represented in a designers mental space and what drives and influences the mental design process? If we wish to programme a computer to mimic or work in tandem with the mental processes involved we need to make that representation and the associated cognitive processes explicit. The ways that designers form mental representations are so diverse, personal, and often transient that it is not easy to externalise and articulate them in explicit terms. In order to propose a mental model, we can take in a particular I psychological research approach; that of introspective observation from design drawing . In doing so, we posit an assumption that the designer's drawing can be seen as an extension of the internal mental feature, and hence internal representation could be inferred from the analysis of external representation - the drawing or sketch. This approach contrasts with the protocol analysis approach where mental operations are inferred from words, what could be termed thinking aloud.
series plCAD
email andygpb@liverpool.ac.uk
last changed 2003/05/17 08:01

_id e513
authors Chaikin, George
year 1998
title The Computer and the Studio
source Computers in Design Studio Teaching [EAAE/eCAADe International Workshop Proceedings / ISBN 09523687-7-3] Leuven (Belgium) 13-14 November 1998, pp. 51-54
summary The studio is the primary place of architectural education - the place where the warp of representation and the weft of technique are woven together. Architecture is taught as a domain of ideas, ideas about how and why buildings are built, about the dialectic between concept and materiality. To the architectural student, the drawing is the exemplar of the quality of work he or she will expect in the final construction process. As such, it is very important that the student appreciate the "materiality" of the work to be realized, and this is best done through the education of the whole person, of the entire cognitive mechanism, which most certainly includes the hands. We feel strongly that the student must engage in the creative process in a profoundly physical way, must learn the art and joy of making things, and only then can she or he appreciate the representational abstraction offered by the computer.
series eCAADe
email george@cooper.edu, george@s87.lehman.cuny.edu
more http://www.eaae.be/
last changed 2000/11/21 08:11

_id ddss9813
id ddss9813
authors Cordan, Ozge and Besgen, Asu
year 1998
title No Times But Principles, A Case Study From Priene, Anatolia
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary To emphasise the reusing of the local identities and cultural effects on contemporary designs, this paper is believed to have an important role for architects and for further designs. In this paper design theories in 1000's BC from Priene is held. The theories in urban and architectural design took place. From the intersection point of Ancient Greek and Western Anatolia, a city named "Priene" is chosen as a point of view because of its speciallocation on the Aegean Sea Coasts; Asia Minor and its design principles on urban and housing scale which were used during 1000's and are still common. Also, in this paper, an analysis is done on urban and housing scale. The analysis has two main parts. In the first part, the important buildings in Priene and their settlement decisions take part. And in the second part, the houses of Priene are explained. The general outputs of the study can be put under two titles: urbanism and architecture. In terms of urbanism, those features of a city image reflecting onto today’s world have been examined and the city of Priene has been analysed in the content of Lynch’s elements ensuring formation of a city image. In terms of architecture, results obtained have been separately examined in the content of today’s architecture as public buildings reflecting unique characteristics of Hellenistic architecture and as settlements. In short, the result that it is wished to reach in terms of city scale of the city of Priene in this study isthe expression of the essence of the historical heritage using a modern language to ensure historical continuity.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9829
id ddss9829
authors De Hoog, J., Hendriks, N.A. and Rutten, P.G.S.
year 1998
title Evaluating Office Buildings with MOLCA(Model for Office Life Cycle Assessment)
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary MOLCA (Model for Office Life Cycle Assessment) is a project that aims to develop a tool that enables designers and builders to evaluate the environmental impact of their designs (of office buildings) from a environmental point of view. The model used is based on guidelinesgiven by ISO 14000, using the so-called Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) method. The MOLCA project started in 1997 and will be finished in 2001 resulting in the aforementioned tool. MOLCA is a module within broader research conducted at the Eindhoven University of Technology aiming to reduce design risks to a minimum in the early design stages.Since the MOLCA project started two major case-studies have been carried out. One into the difference in environmental load caused by using concrete and steel roof systems respectively and the role of recycling. The second study focused on biases in LCA data and how to handle them. For the simulations a computer-model named SimaPro was used, using the world-wide accepted method developed by CML (Centre for the Environment, Leiden, the Netherlands). With this model different life-cycle scenarios were studied and evaluated. Based on those two case studies and a third one into an office area, a first model has been developed.Bottle-neck in this field of study is estimating average recycling and re-use percentages of the total flow of material waste in the building sector and collecting reliable process data. Another problem within LCA studies is estimating the reliability of the input data and modelling uncertainties. All these topics will be subject of further analysis.
keywords Life-Cycle Assessment, Office Buildings, Uncertainties in LCA
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 6b33
authors Dudek, I., Czubinski J., Blaise, J.-Y. and Drap, P.
year 1998
title Collaborative Network Tools for the Architectural Analysis in Conservation Research
source Cyber-Real Design [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 83-905377-2-9] Bialystock (Poland), 23-25 April 1998, pp. 75-84
summary Development of net-based tools initiate a new architecture-computer science junction, offering a possibility to investigate distant exchange and updating of research work on architectural artefacts. Tools such as CAD platforms, rendering software and DBMS are integrated to the every day work of more and more architects and conservationists. Computer tools, which have been introduced in the process of analysing architecture as drawing and data management platforms, now bring to the fore a deeper change: distant analysis. The development of web technologies and the object oriented approach to knowledge representation give us an opportunity of research in the fields of collaborative work on architectural data models. The research presented in this paper focuses on a first set of network operative tools for a co-operation program aimed at developing web-enabled architectural data models referring to the evolution of Cracow's Old Town Hall.
series plCAD
last changed 1999/04/08 15:16

_id 852a
authors Falabella, T., Fernández, L.R. and Goyeneche, H.
year 1998
title Utilizacion de la Grafica Digital en la Gestion del Mantenimiento de Edificios (Use of Digital Graphics in the Management of the Maintenance of Buildings)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 446-451
summary The study and development of an informatic application as part of the Research Project informatic application for the building maintenance action", consist on the peripheric and software surface outline, frequently used in this discipline, like the Data Base of the programs Access of Microsoft and Autocad of Autodesk. The outline of data base implies the concept of sensitive matrix, necessary for the systemic analysis of the information. This software not only let you make the initial diagnostic of the buildings, necessary for the Plan of Corrective Maintenance (PMC) and Plan of Preventive Maintenance (PMP), but also it is used as an efficient tool of the maintenance, which allow the constant up to date information, the exact on time diagnostic, to make the necessary adjustments to the PMC and PMP. Besides, a good technical documentation is necessary for an efficient maintenance action. The entail of the Data Base with the CAD Systems allows a fast access to a big volume of centralized information to consult or change. To formulate a pattern of integral maintenance action on buildings, implies the systematic conception of them and the Philosophy of the Preventive Maintenance. They are less than the Model and do not consider the former concepts. It is difficult to define and solve the matrix system (inside or outside the software) and the relations where the information run. The informatic application outline in its different steps (planning, operation, evaluation) with the elements (technical, administrative, of control) are the structural axis of a new form of the Maintenance Action.
series SIGRADI
email goyeneche@mdp.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:51

_id dd16
authors Gibson, Kathleen
year 1999
title STUDIO @ CORNELL
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 18-21
summary Unique to the interior design program at Cornell University is a planned pedagogical approach requiring equal emphasis toward manual and digital graphic communication at the freshman level. Prior to 1998, computer-based instruction only occurred at the junior year of study. Recognizing that cultural and symbolic biases against digital media were formally being instituted by curriculum policy, faculty searched for a new perspective. Central to success was the removal of illogically placed boundaries, both mental and physical. In response, students are now encouraged to cultivate a fluid dexterity between traditional and digital methods, at times using various skills concurrently for design analysis and representation (Figures 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7). Course content for DEA115 ranges from basic orthographic drafting, paraline projection, and perspective drawing to color rendering and composition. Students utilize a full range of media: pencil, ink, marker, pastel, AutoCAD, 3DS/ MAX, and Photoshop in this graphics studio. Course meetings total six contact hours per week, constituting a three credit hour class. Assignments are purposefully created to shatter digital myths. For example, instead of a standard, rote drafting exercise, AutoCAD is used to explore design ideas through systemic object manipulation (Figures 8, 9).
series ACADIA
last changed 2002/12/14 08:21

_id 7560
authors Gomez, Nestor
year 1998
title Conceptual Structural Design Through Knowledge Hierarchies
source Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Pittsburgh
summary Computer support for conceptual design still lags behind software available for analysis and detailed design. The Software Environment to Support the Early Phases in Building Design (SEED) project has the goal of providing design generation and exploration capabilities to aid in the conceptual design of buildings, from architectural programming and layout to enclosure design and structural configuration. The current work presents a component of the efforts of the SEED-Config Structure group in providing computer support for conceptual structural design. The Building Entity and Technology (BENT) approach models data about building elements in a general, hierarchical form, where design evolution is represented by the growing specificity of the design description. Two methods of system-supported design generation are provided: case-based reasoning and application of knowledge rules. The knowledge rules, termed technologies, and how they are specified and used are the primary focus of this thesis. In the BENT approach, conceptual structural engineering knowledge is modularized into technology nodes arranged in a directed 'AND/OR' graph, where OR nodes represent alternative design decisions and AND nodes represent problem decomposition. In addition, nodes in the graph may also be specified as having AND/OR incoming arcs thus reducing the duplication of nodes and enhancing the representational power of the approach. In order to facilitate the incorporation of new knowledge into the system, and verify and/or change the knowledge already in the system, the data model and the interface allow for dynamic creation, browsing, and editing of technology nodes. Design generation through the use of the knowledge hierarchy involves the conditional application of nodes according to the design context as represented by the building element(s) under consideration. Each application of a technology node expands the design of building elements by increasing the detail of the design description or by decomposing the elements into less abstract components. In addition, support for simultaneous design of multiple elements and for iteration control are also provided. An important feature of the BENT approach is that the generative knowledge (i.e., the technology hierarchy) is detached from the information repository (i.e., the database of entities which make up the building). This allows the technology hierarchies to be used in a modular fashion from building problem to building problem.
series thesis:PhD
email ngomez@eng.fiu.edu
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id ddss9825
id ddss9825
authors Hartog, J. P. den, Koutamanis, A. and Luscuere, P. G.
year 1998
title Simulation and evaluation of environmental aspects throughout the designprocess
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary The evaluation of environmental aspects in architectural design has traditionally been performed by means of simple (and often simplistic) rule systems. These generally remain at the normative level of minimal control one encounters in building rules and regulations, thereby failing to provide sufficient information and clarity for design guidance. Despite this, evaluation results normally bound subsequent design decisions as fundamental, inflexible constraints. At much later design stages, whenarchitectural form has been largely crystallized and when environmental subsystems must be specified in detail, both the architect and the contributing engineers often realize the severe limitation of theinitial choices. A frequently voiced argument for such simplification in the guise of abstraction is the lack of detailed information on the form and functional content of a building in the early stages of the designprocess. This obviously presupposes a tabula rasa generative approach. The application of a priori knowledge in the form of types, cases, precedents and automated recognition permits direct transaction from the abstract to the specific at and between a number of predefined relevant abstraction levels in the representation. The combination of a priori knowledge at the typological level with multilevel representations permits the use of precise simulation techniques already in the early design stages and throughout thedesign process. The simulation results employ the dual representation principle of scientific visualization, thereby linking form with measurable performance. Feedback from the simulation provides the analysis and evaluation means for design guidance and for communication between thearchitect and the contributing engineers. A prerequisite to this is that the abstraction level in the representation constrains the analysis derived from the simulation, e.g., by means of grades of fuzziness applied to different zones in the representation on the basis of information specificity.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 0fbd
authors Hartog, J.P., Koutamanis, A. and Luscuere, P.G.
year 1998
title Simulation and evaluation of environmental aspects throughout the design process
source 4th Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Conference. Eindhoven
summary The evaluation of environmental aspects in architectural design has traditionally been performed by means of simple (and often simplistic) rule systems. These generally remain at the normative level of minimal control one encounters in building rules and regulations, thereby failing to provide sufficient information and clarity for design guidance. Despite this, evaluation results normally bound subsequent design decisions as fundamental, inflexible constraints. At much later design stages, when architectural form has been largely crystallized and when environmental subsystems must be specified in detail, both the architect and the contributing engineers often realize the severe limitation of the initial choices. A frequently voiced argument for such simplification in the guise of abstraction is the lack of detailed information on the form and functional content of a building in the early stages of the design process. This obviously presupposes a tabula rasa generative approach. The application of a priori knowledge in the form of types, cases, precedents and automated recognition permits direct transaction from the abstract to the specific at and between a number of predefined relevant abstraction levels in the representation. The combination of a priori knowledge at the typological level with multilevel representations permits the use of precise simulation techniques already in the early design stages and throughout the design process. The simulation results employ the dual representation principle of scientific visualization, thereby linking form with measurable performance. Feedback from the simulation provides the analysis and evaluation means for design guidance and for communication between the architect and the contributing engineers. A prerequisite to this is that the abstraction level in the representation constrains the analysis derived from the simulation, e.g., by means of grades of fuzziness applied to different zones in the representation on the basis of information specificity.
series other
email A.Koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 6db8
authors Iki, K., Shimoda, S., Miyazaki, T. and Homma, R.
year 1998
title On the Development and the Use of Network Based Cafm System
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 253-260
summary The purpose of this study to develop a prototype of the network based and distributed database integrated CAFM (Computer Aided Facility Management) system for spatial analysis and space planning of office building. This system developed for the FM (Facility Management) works of large company that owns many office buildings in wide spread area. This system has following characteristic capabilities; 1) data acquisition from distributed database 2) benchmark comparison among in-house offices, particular office and several outside office standards 3) analysis of POE database and spatial condition database 4) evaluation of space planning by using CAD database and POE database This paper reports these four points. 1) conceptual and functional frame work of the system 2) technical arrangement of the system development 3) case study of the system use in a FM works on spatial analysis and space planning 4) evaluation of the system
keywords CAFM, POE, Windows, Network
series CAADRIA
email iki@arch.kumamoto-u.ac.jp
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:30

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