CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 547

_id cd44
authors Oxman, Rivka
year 1998
title Thought, Representation and Design in the Electronic Design Studio
source Computers in Design Studio Teaching [EAAE/eCAADe International Workshop Proceedings / ISBN 09523687-7-3] Leuven (Belgium) 13-14 November 1998, pp. 123-129
summary The relevance of design thinking and cognition to the development of pedagogical approaches in the architectural electronic design studio is presented and discussed. In this approach we emphasize and demonstrate the role of the acquisition of explicit knowledge in design. The acquisition of knowledge is achieved through the explication of cognitive structures and strategies of design thinking. The explication process is implemented in a computational medium which supports the learning process as well as the potential re-use of the knowledge.
series eCAADe
email arrro01@tx.technion.ac.il
more http://www.eaae.be/
last changed 2000/11/21 08:21

_id ascaad2006_paper19
id ascaad2006_paper19
authors Arjun, G. and J. Plume
year 2006
title Collaborative Architectural Design as a reflective Conversation: an agent facilitated system to support collaborative conceptual design
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary In this paper, definitions of collaborative design are discussed and understood in terms of a designer’s cognitive collaborations to explore his/her experiential memory for remote idea associations. Based on Schon’s reflective practice theory, Valkenburg and Dorst’s (1998) description of collaborative team designing is adopted as a model for a proposed design conversation system. The design conversation system is aimed at triggering the experiential memory of the designer by associating significant ideas from different design domains to provide different perspectives of a design situation. The paper describes a proposed framework for the design conversation system incorporating computational agents in a blackboard architecture environment.
series ASCAAD
email j.plume@unsw.edu.au
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id acadia16_140
id acadia16_140
authors Nejur, Andrei; Steinfeld, Kyle
year 2016
title Ivy: Bringing a Weighted-Mesh Representations to Bear on Generative Architectural Design Applications
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 140-151
summary Mesh segmentation has become an important and well-researched topic in computational geometry in recent years (Agathos et al. 2008). As a result, a number of new approaches have been developed that have led to innovations in a diverse set of problems in computer graphics (CG) (Sharmir 2008). Specifically, a range of effective methods for the division of a mesh have recently been proposed, including by K-means (Shlafman et al. 2002), graph cuts (Golovinskiy and Funkhouser 2008; Katz and Tal 2003), hierarchical clustering (Garland et al. 2001; Gelfand and Guibas 2004; Golovinskiy and Funkhouser 2008), primitive fitting (Athene et al. 2004), random walks (Lai et al.), core extraction (Katz et al.) tubular multi-scale analysis (Mortara et al. 2004), spectral clustering (Liu and Zhang 2004), and critical point analysis (Lin et al. 20070, all of which depend upon a weighted graph representation, typically the dual of a given mesh (Sharmir 2008). While these approaches have been proven effective within the narrowly defined domains of application for which they have been developed (Chen 2009), they have not been brought to bear on wider classes of problems in fields outside of CG, specifically on problems relevant to generative architectural design. Given the widespread use of meshes and the utility of segmentation in GAD, by surveying the relevant and recently matured approaches to mesh segmentation in CG that share a common representation of the mesh dual, this paper identifies and takes steps to address a heretofore unrealized transfer of technology that would resolve a missed opportunity for both subject areas. Meshes are often employed by architectural designers for purposes that are distinct from and present a unique set of requirements in relation to similar applications that have enjoyed more focused study in computer science. This paper presents a survey of similar applications, including thin-sheet fabrication (Mitani and Suzuki 2004), rendering optimization (Garland et al. 2001), 3D mesh compression (Taubin et al. 1998), morphin (Shapira et al. 2008) and mesh simplification (Kalvin and Taylor 1996), and distinguish the requirements of these applications from those presented by GAD, including non-refinement in advance of the constraining of mesh geometry to planar-quad faces, and the ability to address a diversity of mesh features that may or may not be preserved. Following this survey of existing approaches and unmet needs, the authors assert that if a generalized framework for working with graph representations of meshes is developed, allowing for the interactive adjustment of edge weights, then the recent developments in mesh segmentation may be better brought to bear on GAD problems. This paper presents work toward the development of just such a framework, implemented as a plug-in for the visual programming environment Grasshopper.
keywords tool-building, design simulation, fabrication, computation, megalith
series ACADIA
type paper
email ksteinfe@berkeley.edu
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id ddss9811
id ddss9811
authors Barbanente, A., Conte, E. and Monno, V.
year 1998
title Changing trends and approaches in human and computer modelling for social housing policies
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary The paper discusses conceptual issues, goals and preliminary results of an on-going research which aims at building a Decision Support System for public housing environmental oriented maintenance and management in a city in Southern Italy, Bari. Traditional post-war Italian housing policies are compared with more recent approaches in the field, pointing out the change from quantitative, aggregated, more simple building problems and relatedapproaches to qualitative, differentiated, complex ones integrating social, economic and environmental dimensions with the aim of regenerating deteriorated residential areas. The paper claims for the need shift, both in the human and computer areas, from traditional quantitative models to new approaches able to manage also qualitative variables, temporal dynamics, emergencies, and intentionality, since they appear key aspects of the real world to be modelled. The housing estate of Bari and its needs of maintenance and management are examined, eliciting essential related knowledge using the interview technique. The clear orientation towards sustainable policies for urban regeneration, at a local, national, and Community level, is also considered. The innovative and collaborative nature of such policies and the attention to be paid to the social aspects ofthe problem require a complex DSS, integrating various kind of hypertexts, information systems and case-based fuzzy expert systems, whose main aims, functions, software and general organisation are outlined in the paper.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 6a78
authors Chastain, Thomas and Elliott, Ame
year 1998
title Cultivating Design Competence: Online Support for the Beginning Design Studio
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 290-299
summary A primary lesson of a beginning design studio is the development of a fundamental design competence. This entails acquiring skills of integration, projection, exploration, as well as critical thinking–forming the basis of thinking “like a designer.” Plaguing the beginning architectural design student as she develops this competence are three typical problems: a lagging visual intelligence, a linking of originality with creativity, and the belief that design is an act of an individual author instead of a collaborative activity. We believe that computation support for design learning has particular attributes for helping students overcome these problems. These attributes include its inherent qualities for visualization, for explicitness, and for sharing. This paper describes five interactive multi-media exercises exploiting these attributes which were developed to support a beginning design studio. The paper also reports how they have been integrated into the course curriculum.
series ACADIA
email chast@socrates.berkeley.edu, aelliott@uclink4.berkeley.edu
last changed 1998/12/16 08:43

_id aa52
authors Chiu, Mao-Lin
year 1998
title The Design Guidance of CSCW - Learning from Collaborative Design Studios
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 261-270
summary Computer supported collaborative work (CSCW) becomes important for the architectural practice and design education in recent years. Design guidance on design operations facilitates design studios to achieve their educational and research purposes. This study depicts the experience of computer-supported collaborative design learned from three collaborative design studios. Design guidance can advise participants to understand the purpose of communication in CSCW, anticipate design collaboration, and formulate design operations by the process model. Based on the observations of CDS, the discussion focuses on how to develop guidance on design operations according to the following factors: (1) structured framework, (2) the kind of technology, (3) the level of communication, and (4) the process model of CSCW.
series CAADRIA
email mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:29

_id c88d
authors Dave, Bharat and Danahy, John
year 1998
title Virtual Study Abroad and Exchange Studio
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 100-115
summary The digital design studio has an area of application where conventional media are incapable of being used; collaboration in learning, design and dialogue with people in places other than where one lives. This distinctive opportunity has lead the authors to explore a form of design brief and virtual design studio (VDS) format not well addressed in the literature. Instead of sharing the same design brief, students in this alternative format design a project in the other students’ city and do not collaborate on the same design. Collaboration with other students takes the form of teaching each other about the city and culture served by the design. The authors discovered these studios produce a focus on site context that serves our pedagogical objectives–a blend of architectural, landscape architectural and urban design knowledge. Their students use a range of commercial CAD and computer supported collaborative work (CSCW) software common to that used in many VDS experiments reported on in the literature. However, this conventional use of technology is contrasted with a second distinctive characteristic of these studios, the use of custom software tools specifically designed to support synchronous and asynchronous three-dimensional model exchange and linked attribute knowledge. The paper analyzes some of the virtual design studio (VDS) work between the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, the University of Toronto, and the University of Melbourne. The authors articulate a framework of VDS dimensions that structures their teaching and research.

series ACADIA
email bdave@arbld.unimelb.edu.au, land@clr.utoronto.ca
last changed 1998/12/16 08:36

_id 074a
authors Gross, M.D., Do, E.Y., McCall, R.J., Citrin, W.V., Hamill, P., Warmack, A. and Kuczun, K.S.
year 1998
title Collaboration and coordination in architectural design: approaches to computer mediated team work
source Automation in Construction 7 (6) (1998) pp. 465-473
summary The paper reports on three projects at our laboratory that deal respectively with synchronous collaborative design, asynchronous collaborative design, and design coordination. The Electronic Cocktail Napkin and its mobile extension that runs on hand-held computers supports synchronous design with shared freehand drawing environments. The PHIDIAS hypermedia system supports long-term, asynchronous collaboration by enabling designers of large complex artifacts to store and retrieve rationale about design decisions and the Construction Kit Builder (CKB) supports team design by supporting a priori agreements among team members to avoid conflicts.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 10f9
authors Kvan, Th., West, R. and Vera, A.
year 1998
title Tools and Channels of Communication
source International Journal of Virtual Reality, 3:3, 1998, pp. 21-33
summary This paper proposes a methodology to evaluate the effects of computer-mediated communication on collaboratively solving design problems. When setting up a virtual design community; choices must be made between a variety of tools; choices dictated by budget; bandwidth; ability and availability. How do you choose between the tools; which is useful and how will each affect the outcome of the design exchanges you plan? A commonly used method is to analyze the work done and to identify tools which support this type of work. In general; research on the effects of computer-mediation on collaborative work has concentrated mainly on social-psychological factors such as deindividuation and attitude polarization; and used qualitative methods. In contrast; we propose to examine the process of collaboration itself; focusing on separating those component processes which primarily involve individual work from those that involve genuine interaction. Extending the cognitive metaphor of the brain as a computer; we view collaboration in terms of a network process; and examine issues of control; coordination; and delegation to separate sub-processors. Through this methodology we attempt to separate the individual problem-solving component from the larger process of collaboration.
keywords Expertise; Collaboration; Novice
series journal paper
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2002/11/15 17:29

_id 581f
authors Vera, A., Kvan, Th., West, R. and Lai, S.
year 1998
title Expertise and collaborative design
source CHI’98 Conference Proceedings. Los Angeles: ACM, 1998, pp. 503-510
summary This paper describes the results of a study evaluating the effects of computer mediation on collaboratively solving architectural design problems. Pairs of graduate design students were asked to work on a landscape architecture design problem via computer terminals. In one condition they were allowed to communicate with an electronic whiteboard and a chat-line while in the other; the chat-line was substituted with video-conferencing (real-time video and audio). The protocols were evaluated according to two models. First; they were coded according to the pattern of collaboration; distinguishing meta-planning; negotiation; evaluation; and individual work. No differences were found between the two groups when coded this way. The protocols were also coded in terms of the problem-solving content; distinguishing task-related exchanges; interface-related exchanges; low-level design exchanges; and high-level design exchanges. The results showed that in the bandwidth-limited chat-line condition; participants cut down task and interface-related as well as low-level design exchanges but attempted to maintain the same amount of high-level design exchanges. When the final designs were evaluated by professional architects; no differences were found between two conditions indicating that chat-line participants implicitly compensate for the narrower bandwidth interface.
keywords Cognitive Models; Expertise; Collaboration; CSCW
series other
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2002/11/15 17:29

_id 8b9d
authors Corrao, R. and Fulantelli, G.
year 1998
title Cognitive Accessibility to Information on the Web: Insights from a System for Teaching and Learning Architecture through the Net ShortPapers: Design Methodology for Universal Access
source Proceedings of the 4th ERCIM Workshop on "User Interfaces forAll" 1998 n.14 p.6 ERCIM
summary The question of accessibility to the Web takes on a special meaning in educational settings where access to information requires cognitive elaboration of the page contents. It is, therefore, a matter of "cognitive access" to the Web. The main efforts of the designers of Web Based Instruction (WBI) environments to encourage cognitive access are usually aimed at the organisation and presentation of Web documents and at specific cues which can improve the user's interaction, orientation and navigation through the pages. However, it is possible to improve this high-level access to the information by supporting study activities through specific "Working tools" which can be implemented in the Web environment. In this paper we report on the design solutions we have adopted to provide cognitive access to a WBI environment for university students studying Architecture and Town Planning. In particular, we introduce "Working tools" that can be used to support flexible and effective study activities. The adopted design solutions provide different classes of users (not only students) with different access facilities. Finally, it should be noted that the methodologies of the design of WBI systems should deal with this kind of high level access and support it through specific solutions at interface and implementation levels.
series other
last changed 2002/07/07 14:01

_id 05d5
authors Corrao, R. and Fulantelli, G.
year 1998
title Cognitive accessibility to information on the Web: insights from a system for teaching and learning Architecture through the Net
source AA VV, Towards an Accesible Web, Proceedings of the IV ERCIM Workshop “User Interfaces for All”, Långholmen-Stockholm
summary The question of accessibility to the Web takes on a special meaning in educational settings where access to information requires cognitive elaboration of the page contents. It is, therefore, a matter of "cognitive access" to the Web. The main efforts of the designers of Web Based Instruction (WBI) environments to encourage cognitive access are usually aimed at the organisation and presentation of Web documents and at specific cues which can improve the user's interaction, orientation and navigation through the pages. However, it is possible to improve this high-level access to the information by supporting study activities through specific "Working tools" which can be implemented in the Web environment. In this paper we report on the design solutions we have adopted to provide cognitive access to a WBI environment for university students studying Architecture and Town Planning. In particular, we introduce "Working tools" that can be used to support flexible and effective study activities. The adopted design solutions provide different classes of users (not only students) with different access facilities. Finally, it should be noted that the methodologies of the design of WBI systems should deal with this kind of high level access and support it through specific solutions at interface and implementation levels.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 4ea3
authors Johnson, S.
year 1998
title What's in a representation, why do we care, and what does it mean? Examining evidence from psychology
source Automation in Construction 8 (1) (1998) pp. 15-24
summary This paper examines psychological evidence on the nature and role of representations in cognition. Both internal (mental) and external (physical or digital) representations are considered. It is discovered that both types of representation are deeply linked to thought processes. They are linked to learning, the ability to use existing knowledge, and problem solving strategies. The links between representations, thought processes, and behavior are so deep that even eye movements are partly governed by representations. Choice of representations can affect limited cognitive resources like attention and short-term memory by forcing a person to try to utilize poorly organized information or perform 'translations' from one representation to another. The implications of this evidence are discussed. Based on these findings, a set of guidelines are presented, for digital representations which minimize drain of cognitive resources. These guidelines describe what sorts of characteristics and behaviors a representation should exhibit, and what sorts of information it should contain in order to accommodate and facilitate design. Current attempts to implement such representations are discussed.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 807b
authors Kalisperis, Loukas N. and Pehlivanidou-Liakata, Anastasia
year 1998
title Architectural Design Studio: Digital and Traditional
source Computers in Design Studio Teaching [EAAE/eCAADe International Workshop Proceedings / ISBN 09523687-7-3] Leuven (Belgium) 13-14 November 1998, pp. 73-81
summary The nature of the task of representing architecture alters to reflect the state of architecture at each period of time. In simulating architecture, the necessary conversion from that which is inhabitable, experiential, functional, and at times, indescribable to an abstraction in an entirely different media is often an imperfect procedure that centers on its translation rather than the actual design. The objective in visualizing any architectural design is to achieve a situational awareness that allows for meaningful criticism of the design. Computer-aided three-dimensional (3D) visualization technology has made available new representation techniques. Surpassing the traditional means of graphic illustration and scaled models, this technology has been primarily developed to decrease the amount of abstraction between architecture and its documentation. The general objective of this paper is to present a study carried out over the last six years in which the progress of students in a traditional studio was compared to the progress of similar students in a digital studio. We have assessed the effects of the tools over the six-year period (24 different projects) by evaluating solution-generation in trial-and-error process and learning problem-solving strategies based on the Cognitive Flexibility Theory paradigm. Students using the digital studio were found to generate more and various solutions consistently.
series eCAADe
email lnk@psu.edu
more http://www.eaae.be/
last changed 2000/11/21 08:14

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 43e5
authors Ho, Chun-Heng
year 1998
title A Computational Model for Problem-Decomposing Strategy
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 415-424
summary Conventional computational models such as Soar, Act, and Mental Models, solve problems by pattern matching. However, according to other cognitive psychology-related studies, the searching strategies employed by experts and novices in well-structured problems closely resemble each other. Restated, problem-decomposing strategies allow expert designers to perform more effectively than novices. In this study, we construct a rule-based floor-planning CAD system in Lisp to closely examine the relationship between problem-decomposing strategies and design behavior in computation. Execution results demonstrate that the larger the number of elements that the system considers implies more efficient problem-decomposing strategies.
keywords Computational Model, Rule-Based Expert System, Housing Floor Planning, Problem-Decomposing Strategy
series CAADRIA
email chunheng@iaa.nctu.edu.tw
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:13

_id ddss9853
id ddss9853
authors Sidjanin, Predrag and Gerhardt, Waltraud
year 1998
title A design tool for analysis and visual quality control of urbanenvironments supported by object databases
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary In the paper, the main concepts about a design tool supported by an object database system will be described. The design tool should improve architectural design with respect to analysis and improving existing and planned urban environments regarding several quality criteria, especially those associated with visual aspects. Preconditions for defining the design tool's purpose are the determination of the "well-situated" urban elements, their impact on cognitive mapping, and the exploitation of thisknowledge on cognitive mapping for the improvement of urban environments. Cognitive mapping is a kind of representation of schematic knowledge that a person has about familiar environments. A cognitive map is stored information or knowledge about the purpose and function of the environment. This leads to the conclusion that an urban environment design which takes of the process of cognitive mapping into consideration, will be experienced by most of the people in the same way. Investigationsof this process result in a theoretical model of elements of urban environments, their relationships and their dependencies. The theoretical platform of the tool is based on design theory, cognitive science andcomputer science. Design theory and cognitive science will be used to develop the theoretical model. This theoretical model together with computer science will be the basis for tool development. The tooluses a schematic representation of urban environment, based partly on Lynch's theory of "urban form". Lynch's theory is crucial for the tool because it explains almost all elements of urban environments. Systematic investigation of urban environments and their characteristics are important for theoretical modeling as well as for the later computational modeling of the tool. The main computational support for the tool will be provided by an object database system, which helps to represent and to handle all the urban elements with their properties and relationships, with their natural semantics. The information represented in the database will be used to analyze urban environments as well as to improve andcontrol their visual quality.
series DDSS
email p.sidjanin@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 0471
authors Bruton, B.
year 1998
title Grammars and Pedagogy - Towards new Media Art and Design Education Strategies
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 385-394
summary The impact of computational grammatical design on pedagogy has received little attention in art education due to the dominant modes of traditional approaches to art and design education. This paper explores the pedagogical implications of grammatical strategies using computers for judgements of design within an art educational setting. Grammatical strategies are studied for their effect on the judgements of novice artists in a new media educational context. It is argued that concepts of grammar and views of contingency are used in a variety of senses in the conception and form making of artists; that finding methods for discussing and utilising complex visual information is aided by grammatical formalisation; that these strategies are evidently effective at both early and mature stages of the realisation of a project. The research explores the relation between computer and art on three levels in which grammar is used: as a sense of grammar, as a computational paradigm and as a description of a kind of computer program. Grammatical formalism is apparent in two dimensional linear and non-linear animations using Photoshop, Premiere and Director, and in solid modelling programs such as Extreme 3D, Form Z, Strata Studio Pro, 3D Studio Max and SoftImage. Web site construction also impacts on the judgements of 2D and 3D design. Computational grammatical programs generate forms that reflect alternative understandings of art and design. Art practise is defined in terms of developing consistent and appropriate design language for the contingency at hand. Form making using grammatical tools, both recursive and array types, is discussed in terms of their applicability and educative value. Reference is made to formal qualities for critique and strategic capability of alternative pedagogy for generation of forms. Examples provided show how simple rule sets develop into complex derivational sequences that challenge traditional strategies for computer imaging. The paper demonstrates the value of a sense of grammars for novice art and design practitioners by using first hand examples of experimental work at the South Australian School of Art, University of South Australia. For novice artists and designers, grammars in conjunction with reflective practice is offered as a useful mind set that supports an interest in actively defining a new kind of art. Illustrations provided show the utility of a contingent sense of grammar for pedagogy and highlights the significant role of grammar in pedagogy.
keywords Grammar, Pedagogy, Computer, Art, Design
series CAADRIA
email d.bruton@unisa.edu.au
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:15

_id ecaade2018_243
id ecaade2018_243
authors Gardner, Nicole
year 2018
title Architecture-Human-Machine (re)configurations - Examining computational design in practice
source Kepczynska-Walczak, A, Bialkowski, S (eds.), Computing for a better tomorrow - Proceedings of the 36th eCAADe Conference - Volume 2, Lodz University of Technology, Lodz, Poland, 19-21 September 2018, pp. 139-148
summary This paper outlines a research project that explores the participation in, and perception of, advanced technologies in architectural professional practice through a sociotechnical lens and presents empirical research findings from an online survey distributed to employees in five large-scale architectural practices in Sydney, Australia. This argues that while the computational design paradigm might be well accepted, understood, and documented in academic research contexts, the extent and ways that computational design thinking and methods are put-into-practice has to date been less explored. In engineering and construction, technology adoption studies since the mid 1990s have measured information technology (IT) use (Howard et al. 1998; Samuelson and Björk 2013). In architecture, research has also focused on quantifying IT use (Cichocka 2017), as well as the examination of specific practices such as building information modelling (BIM) (Cardoso Llach 2017; Herr and Fischer 2017; Son et al. 2015). With the notable exceptions of Daniel Cardoso Llach (2015; 2017) and Yanni Loukissas (2012), few scholars have explored advanced technologies in architectural practice from a sociotechnical perspective. This paper argues that a sociotechnical lens can net valuable insights into advanced technology engagement to inform pedagogical approaches in architectural education as well as strategies for continuing professional development.
keywords Computational design; Sociotechnical system; Technology adoption
series eCAADe
email n.gardner@unsw.edu.au
last changed 2018/07/24 10:23

_id 0f09
authors Ando, H., Kubota, A. and Kiriyama, T.
year 1998
title Study on the collaborative design process over the internet: A case study on VRML 2.0 specification design
source Design Studies 19, pp. 289-308
summary In this paper, we analyze the process of VRML 2.0 (Virtual Reality Modeling Language, Version 2.0) specification design for the deeper understanding of Internet-based collaboration. The VRML design process has the characteristics of being open to the public, geographically distributed, long-term, large-scale, and diverse. First, we examine the overall features of the design process by analyzing the VRML mailing list archive statistically. Secondly, we extract prototyping vocabulary (operational patterns) from the document change log. Thirdly, we analyze the process of proposing and agreeing with the PROTO node in detail. The results of analysis provide us with a guidance for facilitating innovation in the Internet-based collaboration.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

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