CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 21 to 40 of 548

_id bba1
authors Yau, N. and Yang, J.
year 1998
title Applying case-based reasoning technique to retaining wall selection
source Automation in Construction 7 (4) (1998) pp. 271-283
summary Case-based reasoning (CBR) approach recalls and learns from previous cases to resolve or provide recommendations for current problems. This study presents a case-based retaining wall selection system (CASTLES) in which the case base consists of 254 previous retaining wall cases in design reports in Taiwan. According to the ability of the user's input to accurately describe the characteristics of a new project and a predefined similarity function, CASTLES identifies a set of feasible retaining-wall systems from the case base. Comparing CASTLES with four actual field cases reveals that the case-based reasoning approach is highly promising for selecting retaining wall systems.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id ddss9802
id ddss9802
authors Akin, O., Aygen, Z., Cumming, M., Donia, M., Sen, R. and Zhang, Y.
year 1998
title Computational Specification of Building Requirements in theEarly Stages of Design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary We have been exploring computational techniques to help building designers to specify design requirements during the early stages of design. In the past, little has been accomplished in this area either in terms of innovative computational technologies or the improvement of design performance.The prospect of improving design productivity and creating a seamless process between requirements specification and formal design are our primary motivations. This research has been conducted as partof a larger project entitled SEED (Software Environment to Support Early Phases in Building Design). SEED features an open-ended modular architecture, where each module provides support for a design activity that takes place in early design stages. Each module is supported by a database to store and retrieve information, as well as a user interface to support the interaction with designers. The module described in this paper, SEED-Pro (the architectural programming module of SEED), is a workingprototype for building design requirements specification. It can be used by other modules in SEED or by design systems in other domains, such as mechanical engineering, civil engineering, industrial designand electrical engineering. Our approach to SEED-Pro is divided into two phases: core, and support functionalities. The core functionalities operate in an interactive mode relying on a case-based approach to retrieve and adapt complex specification records to the problem at hand. The supportfunctionalities include the case-base, the data-base, and the standards processing environment for building specification tasks. Our findings indicate that SEED-Pro: (1) is a tool that structures the unstructured domain of design requirements; (2) enables the integration of design requirements with the rest of the design process, (3) leads to the creation of complex case-bases and (4) enables the observation of their performance in the context of real world design problems.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 56
authors Barron, Alicia and Chiarelli, Julia
year 1998
title Proyecto Para la Red de un Estudio de Arquitectura (Project for the Network of a Studio of Architecture)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 418-425
summary A consequence of the globalization on information processes in the way in which new technologies influence on design and production processes. There is no doubt that there is an increasingly and a big change in the areas of architecture design concerning to the operational and working methodology on graphic and alphanumeric information. Now a day it is not a far away Utopia, but a soon to come reality that architects interact in a virtual manner with their individual or institutional clients in their own country, as well as in foreign countries. Keeping these considerations in mind, we elaborated this Paper in order to present one of the existing criteria for the organization of graphic information jointly with its spatial relationship. The work presented herewith shows the development of an informatic net for an ideal mega-studio which in its professional and entrepreneurial profile covers tasks such as design, construction, graphic design and representation of foreign concerns. In the net design and in the selection of equipment for computing design area are covered all the variables at every instance.
series SIGRADI
email barron@ub.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 4
authors Bollinger, Elizabeth and Alvarado, Rodrigo Garcia
year 1998
title Archetypes as Precedent of Virtual Architectures
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 32-35
summary Archetypes are psychological concepts described by the renowned Swiss psychologist Cari Jung. It is possible identify archetypal forms in eminent buildings of different regions and ages, recognizing archetypes as a multi-cultural liaison for various architectures. These concepts function as basic precedents of spatial design in different geographical and historical contexts. The emerging digital culture is establishing a plethora of virtual environments, through web-pages of the Internet, global TV, multimedia CD, video games and immersive devices. These virtual environments offer electronic activities and tools for architectural practice. In both senses, virtual architectures conforms to the visual and spatial characteristics of technologies. Thus, electronic capabilities establish digital habitats and references to contemporary architecture. Since virtual architectures are immaterial constructions, perceptual properties guide the spatial and formal design. In that sense, archetypes allow a basic vocabulary for the design of virtual architectures, linking them to cultural history and giving them a human orientation.
series SIGRADI
email rgarcia@pegasus.dci.ubiobio.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id bb72
authors Bourdot, P., Krus, M., Gherbi, R.
year 1998
title Cooperation Between Reactive 3D Objects and a Multimodal X Window Kernel for CAD
source Bunt, H., Beun, R.J., Borghuis, T. (Eds.). Multimodal Human-Computer Communication : Systems, Techniques, and Experiments. Berlin : Springer
summary From the early steps of sketching to final engineering, a frequent and very important activity in designing objects is to perform graphical and spatial simulations to solve the constraints on the objects which are being designed. But when we analyse work situations involving the use of CAD systems, it is today an acknowledged fact that these tools are not helpful to perform these types of simulations. While knowledge modeling based on form feature concepts already offers some possibilities for attaching behaviour to objects, the simulation activity requires in addition a `real time' and `intelligent' management of the interactions between the 3D virtual objects and the CAD user. Our general purpose is to study how future CAD systems could be improved to achieve the simulation steps of object design. In this context we present some issues concerning the cooperation between a model of reactive 3D objects and a multimodal X Window kernel. We have developed a prototype of a system where objects with reactive behaviour can be built, and with which the user can interact with a combination of graphical actions and vocal commands. This prototype is used to evaluate the feasability and the usefulness of the integration of such techniques in futur applications that would be used by object designers in a real working context. We describe the current state of this system and the planned improvements.
series other
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id a841
authors Brady, Darlene A.
year 1998
title Premise & Process: The Pedagogical Implications of Computing in Design
source Computers in Design Studio Teaching [EAAE/eCAADe International Workshop Proceedings / ISBN 09523687-7-3] Leuven (Belgium) 13-14 November 1998, pp. 31-39
summary Form is capable of communicating a profound idea only when it is linked to a more essential metaphorical intention. The design studio is a forum for addressing this relationship of idea and the means of expression. Computing offers the potential to enhance the design enquiry, but issues of how and when to integrate computer applications in the studio have significant pedagogical implications. It not only has an impact on the size, complexity and number of design projects, but also on whether architectural ideas or computer technology is the content of the studio. It is important to distinguish between the computer image and the process used to achieve the final result. Many computer-based studios focus on the final product which encourages technology to drive design. This paper addresses how design issues can determine the use of technology so that design ideas and computing can reinforce each other, rather than be competing issues. It examines how the unique strengths of computer modeling and animation is used to explore the relationship between visual expression and intention via the issues of metaphor, tectonic color, context and kinetics in several of my graduate and upper-level undergraduate computer-based design studios in the School of Architecture at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UI-UC). The studio topics are diverse in nature and include Normative Studio: Prototype as Formgiver; Urban Issues: Context, Color & Kinetics; and Virtual Metaphors: Literature as Formgiver.

series eCAADe
email architexture@earthlink.net
more http://www.eaae.be/
last changed 2000/11/21 08:10

_id 35e3
authors Buchacz, A., Machura, A. and Pasek, M.
year 1998
title Hypergraphs in investigation of trajectory of robot's manipulator with links as thin-walled bars
source Automation in Construction 7 (5) (1998) pp. 363-383
summary A 3-dimensional model of an industrial robot's manipulator is discussed here. The manipulator is built of two links. Each link is a bar of thin walls, with a box-shaped cross section. Harmonical forces and moments work on both ends of each bar. Lengthwisely and flexibly vibrating robot model is presented in the form of two-block hypergraph. On the base of the skeleton of this hypergraph, a matrix of dynamical flexibilities is developed for the system. The matrix allows us to determine amplitudes of the vibrations of the end of point of the robot's manipulator, separately along each of global axis X, Y, Z. The determined amplitudes anable us to predict the real trajectory of the manipulator and compare it with theoretical trajectory.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id c11a
authors Campbell, D.A.
year 1998
title VRML In Architectural Construction Documents: A Case Study
source VRML 98 Monterey - Proceedings of the 1998 VRML Conference, pp. 115-120
summary The Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) and the World Wide Web (WWW) offer new opportunities to communicate an architect's design intent throughout the design process. We have investigated the use of VRML in the production and communication of construction documents, the final phase of architectural building design. A prototype, experimental Web site was set up and used to disseminate design data as VRML models and HTML text to the design client, contractor, and fabricators. In this paper, we discuss the way our construction documents were developed in VRML, the issues we faced implementing it, and critical feedback from the users of the Web space/site. Finally, we suggest ways to enhance the VRML specification which would enable its widespread use as a communication tool in the design and construction industries. CR Categories and Subject Descriptors: 1.3.5 [Computer Graphics]: Computational Geometry and Object Modeling - Curve, surface, solid, and object representations; 1.3.7 [Computer Graphics]: Three-Dimensional Graphics and Realism - Virtual Reality; J-6. [Computer Applications]: Computer-aided Engineering - Computer-aided design (CAD), Computer-aided manufacturing (CAM). Additional Keywords: architecture, construction, AEC, design, construction documentation, specifications, Internet, extranet, World Wide Web, VRML, virtual worlds, virtual environments
series other
email dcampbell@nbbj.com
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 7a20
id 7a20
authors Carrara, G., Fioravanti, A.
year 2002
title SHARED SPACE’ AND ‘PUBLIC SPACE’ DIALECTICS IN COLLABORATIVE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN.
source Proceedings of Collaborative Decision-Support Systems Focus Symposium, 30th July, 2002; under the auspices of InterSymp-2002, 14° International Conference on Systems Research, Informatics and Cybernetics, 2002, Baden-Baden, pg. 27-44.
summary The present paper describes on-going research on Collaborative Design. The proposed model, the resulting system and its implementation refer mainly to architectural and building design in the modes and forms in which it is carried on in advanced design firms. The model may actually be used effectively also in other environments. The research simultaneously pursues an integrated model of the: a) structure of the networked architectural design process (operators, activities, phases and resources); b) required knowledge (distributed and functional to the operators and the process phases). The article focuses on the first aspect of the model: the relationship that exists among the various ‘actors’ in the design process (according to the STEP-ISO definition, Wix, 1997) during the various stages of its development (McKinney and Fischer, 1998). In Collaborative Design support systems this aspect touches on a number of different problems: database structure, homogeneity of the knowledge bases, the creation of knowledge bases (Galle, 1995), the representation of the IT datum (Carrara et al., 1994; Pohl and Myers, 1994; Papamichael et al., 1996; Rosenmann and Gero, 1996; Eastman et al., 1997; Eastman, 1998; Kim, et al., 1997; Kavakli, 2001). Decision-making support and the relationship between ‘private’ design space (involving the decisions of the individual design team) and the ‘shared’ design space (involving the decisions of all the design teams, Zang and Norman, 1994) are the specific topic of the present article.

Decisions taken in the ‘private design space’ of the design team or ‘actor’ are closely related to the type of support that can be provided by a Collaborative Design system: automatic checks performed by activating procedures and methods, reporting of 'local' conflicts, methods and knowledge for the resolution of ‘local’ conflicts, creation of new IT objects/ building components, who the objects must refer to (the ‘owner’), 'situated' aspects (Gero and Reffat, 2001) of the IT objects/building components.

Decisions taken in the ‘shared design space’ involve aspects that are typical of networked design and that are partially present in the ‘private’ design space. Cross-checking, reporting of ‘global’ conflicts to all those concerned, even those who are unaware they are concerned, methods for their resolution, the modification of data structure and interface according to the actors interacting with it and the design phase, the definition of a 'dominus' for every IT object (i.e. the decision-maker, according to the design phase and the creation of the object). All this is made possible both by the model for representing the building (Carrara and Fioravanti, 2001), and by the type of IT representation of the individual building components, using the methods and techniques of Knowledge Engineering through a structured set of Knowledge Bases, Inference Engines and Databases. The aim is to develop suitable tools for supporting integrated Process/Product design activity by means of a effective and innovative representation of building entities (technical components, constraints, methods) in order to manage and resolve conflicts generated during the design activity.

keywords Collaborative Design, Architectural Design, Distributed Knowledge Bases, ‘Situated’ Object, Process/Product Model, Private/Shared ‘Design Space’, Conflict Reduction.
series other
type symposium
email antonio.fioravanti@uniroma1.it
last changed 2005/03/30 14:25

_id 6279
id 6279
authors Carrara, G.; Fioravanti, A.
year 2002
title Private Space' and ‘Shared Space’ Dialectics in Collaborative Architectural Design
source InterSymp 2002 - 14th International Conference on Systems Research, Informatics and Cybernetics (July 29 - August 3, 2002), pp 28-44.
summary The present paper describes on-going research on Collaborative Design. The proposed model, the resulting system and its implementation refer mainly to architectural and building design in the modes and forms in which it is carried on in advanced design firms. The model may actually be used effectively also in other environments. The research simultaneously pursues an integrated model of the: a) structure of the networked architectural design process (operators, activities, phases and resources); b) required knowledge (distributed and functional to the operators and the process phases). The article focuses on the first aspect of the model: the relationship that exists among the various ‘actors’ in the design process (according to the STEP-ISO definition, Wix, 1997) during the various stages of its development (McKinney and Fischer, 1998). In Collaborative Design support systems this aspect touches on a number of different problems: database structure, homogeneity of the knowledge bases, the creation of knowledge bases (Galle, 1995), the representation of the IT datum (Carrara et al., 1994; Pohl and Myers, 1994; Papamichael et al., 1996; Rosenmann and Gero, 1996; Eastman et al., 1997; Eastman, 1998; Kim, et al., 1997; Kavakli, 2001). Decision-making support and the relationship between ‘private’ design space (involving the decisions of the individual design team) and the ‘shared’ design space (involving the decisions of all the design teams, Zang and Norman, 1994) are the specific topic of the present article.

Decisions taken in the ‘private design space’ of the design team or ‘actor’ are closely related to the type of support that can be provided by a Collaborative Design system: automatic checks performed by activating procedures and methods, reporting of 'local' conflicts, methods and knowledge for the resolution of ‘local’ conflicts, creation of new IT objects/ building components, who the objects must refer to (the ‘owner’), 'situated' aspects (Gero and Reffat, 2001) of the IT objects/building components.

Decisions taken in the ‘shared design space’ involve aspects that are typical of networked design and that are partially present in the ‘private’ design space. Cross-checking, reporting of ‘global’ conflicts to all those concerned, even those who are unaware they are concerned, methods for their resolution, the modification of data structure and interface according to the actors interacting with it and the design phase, the definition of a 'dominus' for every IT object (i.e. the decision-maker, according to the design phase and the creation of the object). All this is made possible both by the model for representing the building (Carrara and Fioravanti, 2001), and by the type of IT representation of the individual building components, using the methods and techniques of Knowledge Engineering through a structured set of Knowledge Bases, Inference Engines and Databases. The aim is to develop suitable tools for supporting integrated Process/Product design activity by means of a effective and innovative representation of building entities (technical components, constraints, methods) in order to manage and resolve conflicts generated during the design activity.

keywords Collaborative Design, Architectural Design, Distributed Knowledge Bases, ‘Situated’ Object, Process/Product Model, Private/Shared ‘Design Space’, Conflict Reduction.
series other
type symposium
email antonio.fioravanti@uniroma1.it
last changed 2012/12/04 06:53

_id ddss9810
id ddss9810
authors Celebi, Gulser
year 1998
title Development of a Building System
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary The universal principle of architecture can be defined as follows: “The architectural product is the synthesis of the different man-made physical environments that are formed by locating the series of building components in different ways”. Within this context; it is necessary to determine the principle of building assembly and the assembly of ‘material components’ in order to produce the building. The material components are the elements of sub systems (such as; structural, envelope, services, partitions, circulation, and finishing systems) which form the building system of an architectural product. Every building is an integrated product. Integration defines the relations of sub systems with the whole. Therefore, it is necessary to define the sub systems and their relations in realizing the architectural product. This paper presents the analysis principles of the sub-systems, relationship between the analyzed systems and components, integration principles and possibilities of them, and the future conditions.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id e513
authors Chaikin, George
year 1998
title The Computer and the Studio
source Computers in Design Studio Teaching [EAAE/eCAADe International Workshop Proceedings / ISBN 09523687-7-3] Leuven (Belgium) 13-14 November 1998, pp. 51-54
summary The studio is the primary place of architectural education - the place where the warp of representation and the weft of technique are woven together. Architecture is taught as a domain of ideas, ideas about how and why buildings are built, about the dialectic between concept and materiality. To the architectural student, the drawing is the exemplar of the quality of work he or she will expect in the final construction process. As such, it is very important that the student appreciate the "materiality" of the work to be realized, and this is best done through the education of the whole person, of the entire cognitive mechanism, which most certainly includes the hands. We feel strongly that the student must engage in the creative process in a profoundly physical way, must learn the art and joy of making things, and only then can she or he appreciate the representational abstraction offered by the computer.
series eCAADe
email george@cooper.edu, george@s87.lehman.cuny.edu
more http://www.eaae.be/
last changed 2000/11/21 08:11

_id caadria2006_617
id caadria2006_617
authors CHING-CHIEN LIN
year 2006
title A GREATER SENSE OF PRESENCE: SPATIAL INTERFACE IN VR CAVE
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 617-619
summary Virtual environments are three–dimensional spaces presented visually. They combine the user’s experience and sense of 'being there' in the virtual environment. Presence is a central element of virtual reality that it is seen as a part of its definition (Steuer, 1992). Direct interactions between participants and the virtual environment generate a more enhanced sense of immersion, thus making the participants feels they are part of that environment (Witmer & Singer, 1998).
series CAADRIA
email karenlin@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id 032b
authors Cicognani, Anna
year 1998
title A linguistic characterisation of design in text-based virtual worlds
source University of Sydney
summary In this research, it is suggested that design in text-based virtual worlds can be identified as a series of interactions between users and the virtual environment, and that these interactions for design can be approached using a linguistic perspective. The main assumption of this research is that a parallel can be drawn between the performance of design commands, and the one of speech acts in the physical world. Design in text-based virtual environments can then be articulated using a restricted set of speech acts, as design commands. Virtual worlds, represented as spaces, can be constructed following an architectural design metaphor. This metaphor provides a framework for the organisation of virtual entity relationships, and for the choice of words used to design. A linguistic characterisation is presented, by means of design activities, prototypes and scenarios, which derive from the architectural design metaphor. The characterisation of design is then validated by the analysis of an existing text-based virtual world.
keywords Virtual Reality; Human-Computer Interaction; Computer-Aided Design; Programming Languages (Electronic Computers); Semantics; Programming Languages (Electronic Computers); Design
series thesis:PhD
email anna@arch.su.edu.au
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id a96f
id a96f
authors Clayton, M., Johnson, R., Song, Y and Al-Qawasmi, J.
year 1998
title Delivering Facility Documentation using Intranet Technology
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 240-253
summary Intranet technologies present new opportunities for delivering facility documentation for use in facility management. After the design stage, building documentation is reused to support construction and then facility operation. However, a common perception is that construction documents and as-built drawings are less than optimal for reuse to support operations. We have conducted a study of facility management processes and the information content of facility documentation in the context of information technologies that are emerging into the marketplace. The study provides guidance for facility managers who are implementing and fielding new information technology systems. A better understanding of information needs during operations may also help designers to better structure their own documents for reuse. An analysis of documents that are used throughout the life cycle of facilities has led us to a characterization of operations documents that are distinct from design drawings, record drawings or as-built drawings. From an analysis of facility management processes, we have identified different roles for facility documentation in those processes. Facility documentation may be used as a resource, as input, or as output. Furthermore, from interviews of facility management personnel, we identified facility information that was rated high in importance and low in satisfaction that might be targeted when implementing a facility information system. We prepared software demonstrations that show how the information may be extracted from drawings, entered into databases and then retrieved via Web and CAD interfaces. We suggest that operations documents consist of a variety of information types and require several kinds of information tools, including databases, CAD drawings and hypertext. Intranet technologies, databases and CAD software can be integrated to achieve facility management systems that address shortcomings in current facility management operations. In particular, intranet technologies provide improved accessibility to information for facility management customers and occasional users of the systems. Our study has produced recommendations based upon utility and ease-of-implementation for delivery of information from the design team to the owner, and among personnel during operation of the facility.

series ACADIA
email mark-clayton@tamu.edu
last changed 2003/12/06 07:44

_id 05d5
authors Corrao, R. and Fulantelli, G.
year 1998
title Cognitive accessibility to information on the Web: insights from a system for teaching and learning Architecture through the Net
source AA VV, Towards an Accesible Web, Proceedings of the IV ERCIM Workshop “User Interfaces for All”, Långholmen-Stockholm
summary The question of accessibility to the Web takes on a special meaning in educational settings where access to information requires cognitive elaboration of the page contents. It is, therefore, a matter of "cognitive access" to the Web. The main efforts of the designers of Web Based Instruction (WBI) environments to encourage cognitive access are usually aimed at the organisation and presentation of Web documents and at specific cues which can improve the user's interaction, orientation and navigation through the pages. However, it is possible to improve this high-level access to the information by supporting study activities through specific "Working tools" which can be implemented in the Web environment. In this paper we report on the design solutions we have adopted to provide cognitive access to a WBI environment for university students studying Architecture and Town Planning. In particular, we introduce "Working tools" that can be used to support flexible and effective study activities. The adopted design solutions provide different classes of users (not only students) with different access facilities. Finally, it should be noted that the methodologies of the design of WBI systems should deal with this kind of high level access and support it through specific solutions at interface and implementation levels.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 8b9d
authors Corrao, R. and Fulantelli, G.
year 1998
title Cognitive Accessibility to Information on the Web: Insights from a System for Teaching and Learning Architecture through the Net ShortPapers: Design Methodology for Universal Access
source Proceedings of the 4th ERCIM Workshop on "User Interfaces forAll" 1998 n.14 p.6 ERCIM
summary The question of accessibility to the Web takes on a special meaning in educational settings where access to information requires cognitive elaboration of the page contents. It is, therefore, a matter of "cognitive access" to the Web. The main efforts of the designers of Web Based Instruction (WBI) environments to encourage cognitive access are usually aimed at the organisation and presentation of Web documents and at specific cues which can improve the user's interaction, orientation and navigation through the pages. However, it is possible to improve this high-level access to the information by supporting study activities through specific "Working tools" which can be implemented in the Web environment. In this paper we report on the design solutions we have adopted to provide cognitive access to a WBI environment for university students studying Architecture and Town Planning. In particular, we introduce "Working tools" that can be used to support flexible and effective study activities. The adopted design solutions provide different classes of users (not only students) with different access facilities. Finally, it should be noted that the methodologies of the design of WBI systems should deal with this kind of high level access and support it through specific solutions at interface and implementation levels.
series other
last changed 2002/07/07 14:01

_id ddss9815
id ddss9815
authors Cutler, Lorraine M.
year 1998
title Prototypical Laboratory Design to Support Learning and Teaching
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary Collaboration between designers and scientists is an unusual combination to undertake the prototypical design of a teaching laboratory funded by Howard Hughes Medical Institute. The zoologists are developing a cooperative learning and interactive teaching pedagogy to make learningscience a process of critical inquiry and discovery. The industrial and interior designers are paying attention to the design issues of function and environmental support for teaching and doing the work required in a three-hour, hands-on beginning science learning space. Using both qualitative andquantitative research methods, the designers are able to determine a framework for making design decisions in prototypical beginning science environments. This framework is being developed as a guideline for designing similar environments at other institutions of higher learning. Videotape analysis precedes the research to uncover the underlying problems of the existing space and to formulate the questions for the research. Elements of a case study and an evaluative study integratewith the design process to form the basis of an intensive investigation of design issues for a beginning science teaching laboratory. Using two pretests as a baseline, the posttest data evaluates the success orfailure of the prototypical design. Both the pretests and the posttest evaluate the physical attributes of the old and new learning environment related to a beginning laboratory course in Zoology at Arizona State University.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id c721
authors Dauner, J., Landauer, E. and Fraunhofer, I.
year 1998
title 3D Product Presentation Online: The Virtual Design Exhibition
source VRML 98 - Third Symposium on the Virtual Reality Modeling Language. S. N. Spencer. Monterey, CA, ACM: 57-62
summary VRML offers a high potential for product presentation: Instead of regarding flat, static pictures, configurable and animated 3D models embedded in entertaining environments provide a new way of product presentation. But seriously using VRML for this application domain means facing several challenges. We discuss these issues by using the Virtual Design Exhibition as a showcase. In this exhibition seven interior design companies show products with high aesthetic quality. We discuss how these aesthetics influence the VRML presentation and give some guidelines resulting from our experience. CR Categories and Subject Descriptors: H.5.1 [Information Interfaces and Presentation] Multimedia Information; Systems - Artificial realities H.5.2 [Information Interfaces and Presentation] User Interfaces - Screen design; I.3.6 [Computer Graphics] Methodology and Techniques - Interaction techniques
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 0374
authors De Vecchi, Antonio and Navarra, Laura
year 1998
title Verification of Building Assemblage Compatability
source Computerised Craftsmanship [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Paris (France) 24-26 September 1998, pp. 234-238
summary A computer program is being elaborated as an aid in designing assembled parts whose assembly presents high degrees of complexity. The newly created program, once incorporated in the CAD sector to increase its potential applications, will facilitate the analysis of reciprocal relationhips between pieces of the assemblage; this will enhance optimum decision-making in terms of geometric and functional characteristics with respect to the previously conceived assembly sequence. The program will automatically create images in three different ways: instantaneous images of assembly stages for each piece of the assembled part; exploded axonometric view of the whole structure with indications of necessary procedures for inserting or connecting the assembled part;sequenced procedures for connecting the assembled part. The different methods of visualization listed above will allow for project verification of the part by means of simultaneous visual analysis of the images and rapid updating should any changes in their properties arise. These types of visualization include simulations of piece by piece assemblage, which will facilitate an "optimal assemblage", meaning a set of components which are assembled in a specific sequence according to their "structural compatibility" and taking into consideration "particular assembly requirements".
series eCAADe
more http://www.paris-valdemarne.archi.fr/archive/ecaade98/html/28de_vecchi/index.htm
last changed 2003/03/05 12:15

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