CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 551

_id 07d8
authors Garza, J.M. de la and Howitt, I.
year 1998
title Wireless communication and computing at the construction jobsite
source Automation in Construction 7 (4) (1998) pp. 327-347
summary For many years, the walkie-talkie has been synonymous with the construction industry. During jobsite project execution, there are three variables which can either hinder or facilitate successful results, namely, quality, quantity, and timing of information. Wireless data communications technology is capable of delivering just-in-time information within the `last mile' between the trailer and a desired location on the jobsite. This paper reports on a study which surveyed information needs at the jobsite, emerging wireless data communications technology, and assessed the extent to which wireless data technology can fulfill the information needs of the jobsite [J.M. de la Garza, I. Howitt, Wireless communication and computing at the jobsite, Research Report 136-11, Construction Industry Institute, Austin, TX, 1997]. We have organized jobsite information needs into the following ten categories: (a) requests for information, (b) materials management, (c) equipment management, (d) cost management, (e) schedule and means and methods, (f) jobsite record keeping, (g) submittals, (h) safety, (i) QC/QA, and (k) future trends. Each category was analyzed in terms of its appropriateness to take advantage of wireless technology. The four formats considered to transmit information wirelessly were: (a) live voice, (b) live video, (c) batched data, and (d) live data. Current wireless communication technology has been classified into the following five classes: (a) circuit-switched wireless data systems, (b) packet-switched wireless data systems––this class was further subdivided into specialized mobile radio systems and cellular digital packet data systems, (c) wireless local area networks, (d) paging systems, and (e) satellite-based data communications. A primer for wireless communications covering both fundamental and advanced communications concepts has also been included to enable a better understanding of the issues involved in making trade-offs while configuring a wireless jobsite communication system. The example presented in this paper shows how a contractor can define a subset of information needs by choosing from those already articulated herein and determine if a given wireless technology should even be considered as a viable way of meeting the information needs that such company has.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 0beb
authors Koch, Volker and Russell, Peter
year 2000
title VuuA.Org: The Virtual Upperrhine University of Architecture
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 23-25
summary In 1998, architecture schools in the three nation region of the upper Rhine came together to undertake a joint design studio. With the support of the Center for Entrepeneurship in Colmar, France, the schools worked on the reuse of the Kuenzer Mill situated near Herbolzheim, Germany. The students met jointly three times during the semester and then worked on the project at their home universities usng conventional methods. This project was essential to generating closer ties between the participating students, tutors and institutions and as such, the results were quite positive. So much so, that the organisers decided to repeat the exercise one year later. However, it became clear that although the students had met three times in large groups, the real success of a co-operative design studio would require mechanisms which allow far more intimate interaction among the participants, be they students, teachers or outside experts. The experiences from the Netzentwurf at the Institut für Industrielle Bauproduktion (ifib) showed the potential in a web based studio and the addition of ifib to the three nation group led to the development of the VuuA platform. The first project served to illuminate the the differences in teaching concepts among the partner institutions and their teaching staff as well as problems related to the integration of students from three countries with two languages and four different faculties: landscape architecture, interior design, architecture and urban planning. The project for the Fall of 1999 was the reuse of Fort Kléber in Wolfisheim by Strasbourg, France. The students again met on site to kick off the Semester but were also instructed to continue their cooperation and criticism using the VuuA platform.
keywords Virtual Design Studio, CSCW, International Cooperation, Planning Platform
series eCAADe
email volker.koch@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de, peter.russell@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
more http://www.vuua.org
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id ecaade03_059_29_russel
id ecaade03_059_29_russel
authors Russell, P., Stachelhaus, T. and Elger, D.
year 2003
title CSNCW: Computer Supported Non-Cooperative Work Barriers to Successful Virtual Design Studios
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 59-66
summary The paper describes a design studio jointly undertaken by four Universities. With respect given to the groundbreaking work carried out by [Wojtowicz and Butelski (1998)] and [Donath et al 1999] and some of the problems described therein, the majority of the Studio partners had all had positive, if not exemplary experiences with co-operative studio projects carried out over the internet. The positive experience and development of concepts have been well documented in numerous publications over the last 5 years. A platform developed by one of the partners for this type of collaboration is in its third generation and has had well over 1000 students from 12 different universities in over 40 Projects. With this amount of experience, the four partners entered into the joint studio project with high expectations and little fear of failure. This experimental aspect of the studio, combined with the “well trodden” path of previous virtual design studios, lent an air of exploration to an otherwise well-worn format. Everything looked good, or so we thought. This is not to say that previous experiments were without tribulations, but the problems encountered earlier were usually spread over the studio partners and thus, the levels and distribution of frustration were more or less balanced. This raised a (theoretically) well-founded expectation of success. In execution, it was quite the opposite. In this case, the difficulties tended to be concentrated towards one or two of the partners. The partners spoke the same language, but came from different sets of goals, and hence, interpreted the agreements to suit their goals. This was not done maliciously, however the results were devastating to the project and most importantly, the student groups. The differing pedagogical methods of the various institutes played a strong role in steering the design critique at each school. Alongside these difficulties, the flexibility (or lack thereof) of each university’s calendar as well as national and university level holidays led to additional problems in coordination. And of course, (as if this was all not enough), the technical infrastructure, local capabilities and willingness to tackle technological problems were heterogeneous (to put it lightly).
keywords CSCW: Virtual Design Studio; Mistakes in Pedagogy
series eCAADe
email russell@bazillus.architektur.rwth-aachen.de
more http://caad.arch.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id ddss9848
id ddss9848
authors Yyldyrym, Sercan and Doday, Asly
year 1998
title Design Theory and Film
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary Design theories and film work with the same keywords since the designative concepts for both are time and space. At the beginning of the 20th century, the discovery of montage technique and a new esthetic language took place synchronically. This led to an interaction between them. Throughout the paper, this situation has been searched. However, the look is operational. For this reason, other discussions, concerning the topic have been excluded. The discussion is formed basically around four points defined in the 20th century. Four directors: Eisenstein, Tarkovski, Lynch and Greenaway are examined and discussed with their operational methods of filming. Various architects’ works are also searched and discussed with the same operational keywords. The paper aims to disclose the interaction between the topics.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id c304
authors Barber, T.and Hanna, R.
year 1998
title Appraisal of Design Studio Methodologies
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 21-30
summary This paper investigates the relationship between different design approaches and their effectiveness in the formulation of design concepts. This inquiry will focus on the computer as the sole design and developmental tool. The research employs a short design programme, a small building with a given urban site, as its investigative vehicle. Nineteen second year students of the Mackintosh School of Architecture were monitored and their design progress evaluated. They were split into two groups: one used CAD and AEC as the only drawing and modelling tool, tutorial and review, and another used conventional tools of drawing and model making (mixed media). Structured interviews and personal observations were used as a means for data collection. Questionnaires were administered to students and their response was analysed using the statistical programme SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences). The Mann-Whitney test was used to test the Null Hypothesis that different design approaches will not produce different design outcomes. Correlation, Regression and the X2 test of independence were also employed to screen data and identify patterns of relationships.

series CAADRIA
email gtca09@udcf.gla.ac.uk
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 21
authors Barroso, Jorge
year 1998
title Reflexiones Sobre la EnseÒanza de la Arquitectura, la Informatica e Internet (Reflections on the Teaching of the Architecture, Computing and the Internet)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 174-179
summary This paper proposes a reflection upon the teaching of architecture as seen from the actual practice of the profession within the context of the changes caused by the widespread use of computers and Internet in recent years. This proposal designates the present time as "semic revolution", superseding denominations like post industrial" or information revolution", emphasizing that the "mental prosthesis" created by man represents the highest degree of exploitation of his innerness as a "semic subject". A brief epistemological framework serves to lay the foundation for the concepts of imagination, creation, and design, differentiating the creator by his characteristic of requiring or not, semic mediation in order to reach his goals. The dominant use of new instruments which serve to represent and operate the "primary virtual object" giving priority to the comprehension and function of the new tool over the acquisition of information and ability to use it, is proposed when carried over to the field of application. The integration of internal networks through email strives not only to facilitate document transmission, exercises, group work, etc. but to understand the new dimension in the intellectual activities of man.
series SIGRADI
email jbarroso@movi.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 4
authors Bollinger, Elizabeth and Alvarado, Rodrigo Garcia
year 1998
title Archetypes as Precedent of Virtual Architectures
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 32-35
summary Archetypes are psychological concepts described by the renowned Swiss psychologist Cari Jung. It is possible identify archetypal forms in eminent buildings of different regions and ages, recognizing archetypes as a multi-cultural liaison for various architectures. These concepts function as basic precedents of spatial design in different geographical and historical contexts. The emerging digital culture is establishing a plethora of virtual environments, through web-pages of the Internet, global TV, multimedia CD, video games and immersive devices. These virtual environments offer electronic activities and tools for architectural practice. In both senses, virtual architectures conforms to the visual and spatial characteristics of technologies. Thus, electronic capabilities establish digital habitats and references to contemporary architecture. Since virtual architectures are immaterial constructions, perceptual properties guide the spatial and formal design. In that sense, archetypes allow a basic vocabulary for the design of virtual architectures, linking them to cultural history and giving them a human orientation.
series SIGRADI
email rgarcia@pegasus.dci.ubiobio.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id bb72
authors Bourdot, P., Krus, M., Gherbi, R.
year 1998
title Cooperation Between Reactive 3D Objects and a Multimodal X Window Kernel for CAD
source Bunt, H., Beun, R.J., Borghuis, T. (Eds.). Multimodal Human-Computer Communication : Systems, Techniques, and Experiments. Berlin : Springer
summary From the early steps of sketching to final engineering, a frequent and very important activity in designing objects is to perform graphical and spatial simulations to solve the constraints on the objects which are being designed. But when we analyse work situations involving the use of CAD systems, it is today an acknowledged fact that these tools are not helpful to perform these types of simulations. While knowledge modeling based on form feature concepts already offers some possibilities for attaching behaviour to objects, the simulation activity requires in addition a `real time' and `intelligent' management of the interactions between the 3D virtual objects and the CAD user. Our general purpose is to study how future CAD systems could be improved to achieve the simulation steps of object design. In this context we present some issues concerning the cooperation between a model of reactive 3D objects and a multimodal X Window kernel. We have developed a prototype of a system where objects with reactive behaviour can be built, and with which the user can interact with a combination of graphical actions and vocal commands. This prototype is used to evaluate the feasability and the usefulness of the integration of such techniques in futur applications that would be used by object designers in a real working context. We describe the current state of this system and the planned improvements.
series other
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 0471
authors Bruton, B.
year 1998
title Grammars and Pedagogy - Towards new Media Art and Design Education Strategies
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 385-394
summary The impact of computational grammatical design on pedagogy has received little attention in art education due to the dominant modes of traditional approaches to art and design education. This paper explores the pedagogical implications of grammatical strategies using computers for judgements of design within an art educational setting. Grammatical strategies are studied for their effect on the judgements of novice artists in a new media educational context. It is argued that concepts of grammar and views of contingency are used in a variety of senses in the conception and form making of artists; that finding methods for discussing and utilising complex visual information is aided by grammatical formalisation; that these strategies are evidently effective at both early and mature stages of the realisation of a project. The research explores the relation between computer and art on three levels in which grammar is used: as a sense of grammar, as a computational paradigm and as a description of a kind of computer program. Grammatical formalism is apparent in two dimensional linear and non-linear animations using Photoshop, Premiere and Director, and in solid modelling programs such as Extreme 3D, Form Z, Strata Studio Pro, 3D Studio Max and SoftImage. Web site construction also impacts on the judgements of 2D and 3D design. Computational grammatical programs generate forms that reflect alternative understandings of art and design. Art practise is defined in terms of developing consistent and appropriate design language for the contingency at hand. Form making using grammatical tools, both recursive and array types, is discussed in terms of their applicability and educative value. Reference is made to formal qualities for critique and strategic capability of alternative pedagogy for generation of forms. Examples provided show how simple rule sets develop into complex derivational sequences that challenge traditional strategies for computer imaging. The paper demonstrates the value of a sense of grammars for novice art and design practitioners by using first hand examples of experimental work at the South Australian School of Art, University of South Australia. For novice artists and designers, grammars in conjunction with reflective practice is offered as a useful mind set that supports an interest in actively defining a new kind of art. Illustrations provided show the utility of a contingent sense of grammar for pedagogy and highlights the significant role of grammar in pedagogy.
keywords Grammar, Pedagogy, Computer, Art, Design
series CAADRIA
email d.bruton@unisa.edu.au
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:15

_id 20
authors Cabezas, M., Mariano, C., MÌtolo, S., MuÒoz, P., Oliva, S. and Ortiz, M.
year 1998
title Aportes a la EnseÒanza de la ComunicaciÛn Visual (Contributions to the Teaching of Visual Communication)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 168-173
summary Going back to the proposal for the incorporation of multimid oriented towards the study of visual communication in 1st year of Architecture and Industrial Design which was presented on the 1st Seminary of Digital Graph that was held in 1997, in the FAU of UBA,it is being developed an educative programme of hypermedial character. Referring to Monge System development, it is though for the students so that they can consul and have a first contact with theoretical concepts. Through direct experience, starting from the studentís pre-existence of a lineal path from general to specific, proposing transversal perspective to start in depth conceptual contents according. Completing the traditional view of drawing by enlarging the iconicity and comprehension of a complex topic like geometry of the space.
series SIGRADI
email mariadc@copetel.com.ar, mirortiz@mdp.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id eac5
authors Damski, J. and Gero, J.S.
year 1998
title Object representation and reasoning using halfplanes and logic
source J.S. Gero and F. Sudweeks (eds), Artificial Intelligence in Design '98, Kluwer, Dordrecht, pp. 107-126
summary Shapes and objects represent important ways with which to perceive and reason about the world. This paper develops a framework which uniformly encompasses both planar and non-planar surfaces to represent graphical objects in three dimensions. Based on the concept of halfspaces this framework allows the representation of volumes as predicates in logic. This representation is applied to demonstrate object concepts associated with reasoning about the topology of objects as individuals as well as groups of objects at the early, conceptual phase of designing. The example shows how both planar and non-planar boundaries of objects are treated uniformly.
keywords Shape Reasoning, Logic Models
series other
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/04/06 06:59

_id 7f71
authors De Landa, Manuel
year 1998
title Meshworks, Hierarchies and Interfaces
source Virtual Dimension Ed. Beckmann, J., Princeton Architectural Press, NewYork
summary The world of interface design is today undergoing dramatic changes which in their impact promise to rival those brought about by the use of the point-and-click graphical interfaces popularized by the Macintosh in the early 1980's. The new concepts and metaphors which are aiming to replace the familiar desk-top metaphor all revolve around the notion of semi-autonomous, semi-intelligent software agents. To be sure, different researchers and commercial companies have divergent conceptions of what these agents should be capable of, and how they should interact with computer users. But whether one aims to give these software creatures the ability to learn about the users habits, as in the non-commercial research performed at MIT autonomous agents group, or to endow them with the ability to perform transactions in the users name, as in the commercial products pioneered by General Magic, the basic thrust seems to be in the direction of giving software programs more autonomy in their decision-making capabilities.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 3d1d
authors De Vries, B. and Jessurun, A.J.
year 1998
title An Experimental Design System for the Very Early Design Stage
source Timmermans (ed.) Proceedings of the 4th Conference on Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Maastricht
summary The concepts of the experimental design system that are discussed are feature modeling and geometrical constraints. The main technique for creating the user environment is Virtual Reality. Feature modeling forms the basis for managing the design data. To start with, data storage is implemented in a Relational Data Base Management System. Along with this a (traditional) interface is developed for managing the data. Data management consists of feature type creation and feature type instancing. Features are used to define building elements, their relationships and additional constraints. Apart from the design data, geometrical data are stored. Possible design solutions can be limited using geometrical constraints. Specifying connection types between building elements result in a set of solutions for the position of the bounding boxes of the building elements in space.
series other
email b.d.vries@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id ddss9816
id ddss9816
authors Demirel, Füsun
year 1998
title A Research on Housing in Ankara-Turkey
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary The subject of this research contains an opinionnaire study and its results obtained from 30 houses in Ankara-TURKEY in which the people have middle and upper middle income so as to identify their favourites and criticsm about housing, regarding to their both houses and environment as well as tomake the definition of ideal houses and environment. Totally 30 subjects of which 21 are female and 9 are male which represent middle and upper middle incomed people. The average age of the subjects whose age range vary between 21 and 70 is 41. In the study, firstly, the opinionnaire questions were prepared and the housing in which the middle and upper middle incomed people live were determined as socio-economic level to be examined. Next permission and time reservation were requested fromthe owner's of housing to implement the study. During the times which have been determined by the subjects, the following procedure has been followed reading of the opinionnaire forms by myself and recording of responses of the subjects exactly, drawing of reliefs and plans of house, taking pictures of outer views and surroundings of housings. Tendencies of users' against various conditions have been transformed into numerical values from 1 to 7 in a scale with 7 column. In the light of above information; Considering the country conditions it was observed that these housing were excessivelylarge and were built for ostentation purposes, not for functional purposes. Usefulness, that is to say, design of house is in the bottom of the criteria list and it is not an important factor to choose the house, form another part of interesting findings of this study. Another significant result has been observed due to users desire about their house. Although the rising of design which was in 6th rank among the reasons to prefer a house was not an effective criteria on users' attitudes merely to have ahouse, this criteria was the 1st rank (87 %) among reasons due to the advantages that were provided for the users with respected to design and functionality as a result of meticulous studies of architects.Users' criticisms on their vicinity have shown variations according to their sexes.As a result of this research that were initiated to define the ideal house and environment concepts; interesting and detailed data about users' tendencies in the scope of both house and settling are available in "Findings" part of this study. Rising of desing criteria which was the 6 th rank amongcriteria's to choose a house, to 1st rank has brought the following conclusion: since the users are not able to act consciously due to the consideration of the properly owing action much more important,the main duty here is performed by the planner. Hence, starting from the assumption that users living in housings are extremely sensitive to their houses and especially environments, provision of public participation via this kind of opinionnaire studies while creating new environments, may contribute to create such environments in which people can live.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 852a
authors Falabella, T., Fernández, L.R. and Goyeneche, H.
year 1998
title Utilizacion de la Grafica Digital en la Gestion del Mantenimiento de Edificios (Use of Digital Graphics in the Management of the Maintenance of Buildings)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 446-451
summary The study and development of an informatic application as part of the Research Project informatic application for the building maintenance action", consist on the peripheric and software surface outline, frequently used in this discipline, like the Data Base of the programs Access of Microsoft and Autocad of Autodesk. The outline of data base implies the concept of sensitive matrix, necessary for the systemic analysis of the information. This software not only let you make the initial diagnostic of the buildings, necessary for the Plan of Corrective Maintenance (PMC) and Plan of Preventive Maintenance (PMP), but also it is used as an efficient tool of the maintenance, which allow the constant up to date information, the exact on time diagnostic, to make the necessary adjustments to the PMC and PMP. Besides, a good technical documentation is necessary for an efficient maintenance action. The entail of the Data Base with the CAD Systems allows a fast access to a big volume of centralized information to consult or change. To formulate a pattern of integral maintenance action on buildings, implies the systematic conception of them and the Philosophy of the Preventive Maintenance. They are less than the Model and do not consider the former concepts. It is difficult to define and solve the matrix system (inside or outside the software) and the relations where the information run. The informatic application outline in its different steps (planning, operation, evaluation) with the elements (technical, administrative, of control) are the structural axis of a new form of the Maintenance Action.
series SIGRADI
email goyeneche@mdp.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:51

_id ga9811
id ga9811
authors Feuerstein, Penny L.
year 1998
title Collage, Technology, and Creative Process
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Since the turn of the twentieth century artists have been using collage to suggest new realities and changing concepts of time. Appropriation and simulation can be found in the earliest recycled scraps in Cubist collages. Picasso and Braque liberated the art world with cubism, which integrated all planes and surfaces of the artists' subjects and combined them into a new, radical form. The computer is a natural extension of their work on collage. The identifying characteristics of the computer are integration, simultaneity and evolution which are inherent in collage. Further, the computer is about "converting information". There is something very facinating about scanning an object into the computer, creating a texture brush and drawing with the object's texture. It is as if the computer not only integrates information but different levels of awareness as well. In the act of converting the object from atoms to bits the object is portrayed at the same conscious level as the spiritual act of drawing. The speed and malleability of transforming an image on the computer can be compared to the speed and malleability of thought processes of the mind. David Salle said, "one of the impulses in new art is the desire to be a mutant, whether it involves artificial intelligence, gender or robotic parts. It is about the desire to get outside the self and the desire to trandscend one's place." I use the computer to transcend, to work in different levels of awareness at the same time - the spiritual and the physical. In the creative process of working with computer, many new images are generated from previous ones. An image can be processed in unlimited ways without degradation of information. There is no concept of original and copy. The computer alters the image and changes it back to its original in seconds. Each image is not a fixed object in time, but the result of dynamic aspects which are acquired from previous works and each new moment. In this way, using the computer to assist the mind in the creative processes of making art mirrors the changing concepts of time, space, and reality that have evolved as the twentieth century has progressed. Nineteenth-century concepts of the monolithic truth have been replaced with dualism and pluralism. In other words, the objective world independent of the observer, that assumes the mind is separate from the body, has been replaced with the mind and body as inseparable, connected to the objective world through our perception and awareness. Marshall Mcluhan said, "All media as extensions of ourselves serve to provide new transforming vision and awareness." The computer can bring such complexities and at the same time be very calming because it can be ultrafocused, promoting a higher level of awareness where life can be experienced more vividly. Nicholas Negroponte pointed out that "we are passing into a post information age, often having an audience of just one." By using the computer to juxtapose disparate elements, I create an impossible coherence, a hodgepodge of imagery not wholly illusory. Interestingly, what separates the elements also joins them. Clement Greenberg states that "the collage medium has played a pivotal role in twentieth century painting and sculpture"(1) Perspective, developed by the renaissance archetect Alberti, echoed the optically perceived world as reality was replaced with Cubism. Cubism brought about the destruction of the illusionist means and effects that had characterized Western painting since the fifteenth century.(2) Clement Greenberg describes the way in which physical and spiritual realities are combined in cubist collages. "By pasting a piece of newspaper lettering to the canvas one called attention to the physical reality of the work of art and made that reality the same as the art."(3) Before I discuss some of the concepts that relate collage to working with computer, I would like to define some of the theories behind them. The French word collage means pasting, or gluing. Today the concept may include all forms of composite art and processes of photomontage and assemblage. In the Foreword on Katherine Hoffman's book on Collage Kim Levin writes: "This technique - which takes bits and pieces out of context to patch them into new contexts keeps changeng, adapting to various styles and concerns. And it's perfectly apt that interpretations of collage have varied according to the intellectual inquiries of the time. From our vantage point near the end of the century we can now begin to see that collage has all along carried postmodern genes."(4) Computer, on the other hand is not another medium. It is a visual tool that may be used in the creative process. Patrick D. Prince's views are," Computer art is not concrete. There is no artifact in digital art. The images exist in the computer's memory and can be viewed on a monitor: they are pure visual information."(5) In this way it relates more to conceptual art such as performance art. Timothy Binkley explains that,"I believe we will find the concept of the computer as a medium to be more misleading than useful. Computer art will be better understood and more readily accepted by a skeptical artworld if we acknowledge how different it is from traditional tools. The computer is an extension of the mind, not of the hand or eye,and ,unlike cinema or photography, it does not simply add a new medium to the artist's repertoire, based on a new technology.(6) Conceptual art marked a watershed between the progress of modern art and the pluralism of postmodernism(7) " Once the art is comes out of the computer, it can take a variety of forms or be used with many different media. The artist does not have to write his/her own program to be creative with the computer. The work may have the thumbprint of a specific program, but the creative possibilities are up to the artist. Computer artist John Pearson feels that,"One cannot overlook the fact that no matter how technically interesting the artwork is it has to withstand analysis. Only the creative imagination of the artist, cultivated from a solid conceptual base and tempered by a sophisticsated visual sensitivity, can develop and resolve the problems of art."(8) The artist has to be even more focused and selective by using the computer in the creative process because of the multitude of options it creates and its generative qualities.
series other
email pennyf@mcs.net
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 99f2
authors Gero, J.S.
year 1998
title Concept formation in design
source Knowledge-Based Systems 10(7-8): 429-435
summary This paper presents a computationally tractable view on where simple design concepts come from by proposing a paradigm for the formation of design concepts based on the emergence of patterns in the representation of designs. It is suggested that these design patterns form the basis of concepts. These design patterns once learned are then added to the repertoire of known patterns so that they do not need to be learned again. This approach uses the notion called the loosely-wired brain. The paper elaborates this idea primarily through implemented examples drawn from the genetic engineering of evolutionary systems and the qualitative representation of shapes and their multiple representations.
keywords Concept Formation, Pattern Emergence, Representation
series other
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/04/06 07:00

_id a959
authors Glanville, Ranulph
year 1998
title Cybernetic Realities
source Cyber-Real Design [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 83-905377-2-9] Bialystock (Poland), 23-25 April 1998, pp. 101-116
summary In a meeting that focuses on the opportunities offered us by what the organisers call the "Cyber-Real", it is, perhaps, fitting to return to the root word on the so-called "CyberCulture", Cybernetics, and to reflect what the concepts and understandings it has developed and deals with offer us, especially in the light of the "Cyber-Real". To that end, I explore some features of current Cybernetic thinking in order to develop a view of Cybernetic Realities, and to use those to elucidate just what might be "Cyber-Real". The reader may well ask why this paper is called "Cybernetic Realities" when, all through, I talk of Cybernetic Reality. The reason comes from a key argument in this paper: each of us constructs our own Cybernetic Reality. The result is singularly plural.
series plCAD
email ranulph@glanville.co.uk
last changed 2003/05/17 08:01

_id sigradi2007_af13
id sigradi2007_af13
authors Granero, Adriana Edith; Alicia Barrón; María Teresa Urruti
year 2007
title Transformations in the educational system, Influence of the Digital Graph [Transformaciones en el sistema educacional, influencia de la Gráfica Digital]
source SIGraDi 2007 - [Proceedings of the 11th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] México D.F. - México 23-25 October 2007, pp. 182-186
summary The educative proposal was based on the summary attained through experiences piled up during the 2 last semester courses, 2/2006-1/2007. This proposal corresponds to a mix of methodology (by personal attendance / by internet). Founding on the Theory of the Game (Eric Berne 1960) and on different theories such as: Multiple intelligences (Haward Gardner 1983), Emotional Intelligence (Peter Salowey and John Mayer 1990, Goleman 1998), Social Intelligence (Goleman 2006), the Triarchy of Intelligence (Stemberg, R.J. 1985, 1997), “the hand of the human power”, it´s established that the power of the voice, that of the imagination, the reward, the commitment and association produce a significant increase of the productivity (Rosabeth Moss Kanter 2000), aside from the constructive processes of the knowledge (new pedagogical concepts constructivista of Ormrod J.E. 2003 and Tim O´Reilly 2004).
series SIGRADI
email ag@ub.edu.ar adriana.granero@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id ddss9824
id ddss9824
authors Halin, G., Bignon, J.C.,Benali, K. and Godart, C.
year 1998
title Cooperation models in co-design: application to architectural design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary This paper focuses on cooperation concepts necessary for managing concurrent engineering. It reports on a research work being done in a project which establishes a connection between computer sciences, architecture, and telecommunications research1. Simple electronic cooperation paradigms (also called generic cooperation bricks) are found by analysing the current usage of human cooperation in the domainof AEC design environments. We introduce the principles of a middleware to build easily cooperative applications to assist cooperative design. In this approach, the design actors choose cooperation forms by instancing adapted generic cooperation bricks.
series DDSS
email halin@crai.archi.fr
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

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