CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 552

_id d35f
authors Akin, O.
year 1997
title Researching Descriptive Models of Design
source Automation in Construction 7 (2-3) (1998) pp. 97-100
summary This special double issue is a result of the international symposium and workshop on „Descriptive Models of Design“ wich was held during July 1-5, 1996, at Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey. The primary goal of the symposium was to promote greater understanding and to develop recommendations for funding policy and practices in the area of descriptive models of design.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 6df0
authors Komatsu, Kiichiro and Watanabe, Shun
year 1998
title Spatial Database for Model Analysis Methods
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 203-212
summary In the field of architectural and urban planning and design, computer education needs to move beyond basic computer literacy and have more emphasis placed on special subjects related to planning and design. How to manage spatial data is becoming an essential issue for research and education in planning and design especially in the analysis and evaluation phases. This paper discusses the importance of spatial data in planning education and shows how a common spatial database for model analysis methods was constructed at the University of Tsukuba. The database consists of many geographical and statistical data files classified under the standard region mesh codes and covers the whole country from global areas to local areas. Web-based instructions about how to use the database have also been prepared which enable students to study practical spatial analysis by themselves.
keywords Education, Database, GIS, Spatial Analysis
series CAADRIA
email komak@wright.sk.tsukuba.ac.jp, shun@sk.tsukuba.ac.jp
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:35

_id e72f
authors Dorta, Tomás and LaLande, Philippe
year 1998
title The Impact of Virtual Reality on the Design Process
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 138-163
summary Sketching, either hand or computer generated, along with other traditional visualization tools such as perspective drawing have difficulty in correctly representing three dimensional objects. Even physical models, in architecture, suffer in this regard because of inevitable scaling. The designer finds himself cut off from the reality of the object and is prone to misinterpretations of the object and its surrounding space and to resulting design errors. These are sometimes not perceived until too late, once the object has been constructed. Traditional tools use 2D media to represent 3D objects and only manage to introduce the third dimension in a limited manner (perspectives, not only tedious to construct, are static). This scenario affects the design process, particularly the cycle of proposal, verification and correction of design hypotheses as well as the cognitive aspects that condition the designer’s visualization of the designed object. In most cases, computer graphics mimic, through its interface, the traditional way of doing things. The architectural model is parametricized with little regard for visualization. No allowance is made for the change in the medium of graphic representation. Moreover, effort is not made to capitalize on the advantages of numerical calculation to propose new interfaces and new dimensions in object visualization. Virtual Reality (VR), seen not only as technology but as experience, brings the 3D object, abstractly viewed by traditional means, into clearer focus and provides us with these new dimensions. Errors due to abstracted representation are reduced since the interface is always three dimensional and the interactions intuitively made in real time thus allowing the designer to experience the presence of the designed object very quickly. At the École de design industriel of the Faculté d’aménagement, we have run tests using non-immersive VR–one passive (comprehension) and another active (design). This project, involving a group of 72 students during a period of six weeks (6h/week), aimed at analyzing the impact of VR as a visualization tool on the design process versus traditional tools. The results, described in this presentation, shed light on the effect of VR on the creative process as such, as well as on the quality of the results produced by that process.

series ACADIA
email dortat@ere.umontreal.ca, lalandep@ere.umontreal.ca
last changed 1998/12/16 07:27

_id 602d
authors Oxman, R., Shaphir, O. and Yukla, M.
year 1998
title Beyond Sketching : Visual Reasoning Through Re-Representation in Cognitive Design Media
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 337-346
summary Our research approach which is termed Cognitive Design Media (CDM) demonstrates how the cognitive phenomena of design can be supported in computerized environments. Our current work on the ‘sketch’ project is introduced presented and illustrated. Sketching in design is considered to be one of the significant cognitive phenomena which supports exploration through re-representation in design. Until now, only the medium of hand drawing and sketching has been considered to support these processes. Rather than automating the traditional hand-made sketch, or interpreting sketches in a computer system, we are attempting to employ the computer to support one of the cognitive mechanism of re-representation which underlie the sketch activity.
keywords esign Creativity, Exploration, Design Cognition, Sketch Design, Re-Representation, Cognitive Design Media
series CAADRIA
email arrro01@techunix.technion.ac.il
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:21

_id e78b
authors Akin, O. and Akin, C.
year 1998
title On the process of creativity in puzzles, inventions, and designs
source Automation in Construction 7 (2-3) (1998) pp. 123-138
summary The most common means of identifying creativity has been through its products. In architecture, music, writing, art, even puzzle solving and scientific discovery, the prerequisite for considering creativity has been the presence of a creative product. Alternatively, anecdotal descriptions have been used to identify processes that are considered creative. Many scientific discoveries have been linked to a sudden realization or unexplainable revelation punctuated with the AHA! response. Outside of the creative product itself and the AHA! response, the kinds of concrete evidence that point to the process of creativity are precious few. Our purpose here is to further examine these phenomena and develop hypotheses about the nature of the creative process. Our ultimate aim is to develop a general theory of creativity. We intend to base this theory on a set of conditions that are necessary for the creative process to take place in a number of domains: puzzles, scientific discoveries, and design, with special emphasis on architectural design.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id a136
authors Blaise, J.Y., Dudek, I. and Drap, P.
year 1998
title Java collaborative interface for architectural simulations A case study on wooden ceilings of Krakow
source International Conference On Conservation - Krakow 2000, 23-24 November 1998, Krakow, Poland
summary Concern for the architectural and urban preservation problems has been considerably increasing in the past decades, and with it the necessity to investigate the consequences and opportunities opened for the conservation discipline by the development of computer-based systems. Architectural interventions on historical edifices or in preserved urban fabric face conservationists and architects with specific problems related to the handling and exchange of a variety of historical documents and representations. The recent development of information technologies offers opportunities to favour a better access to such data, as well as means to represent architectural hypothesis or design. Developing applications for the Internet also introduces a greater capacity to exchange experiences or ideas and to invest on low-cost collaborative working platforms. In the field of the architectural heritage, our research addresses two problems: historical data and documentation of the edifice, methods of representation (knowledge modelling and visualisation) of the edifice. This research is connected with the ARKIW POLONIUM co-operation program that links the MAP-GAMSAU CNRS laboratory (Marseilles, France) and the Institute HAiKZ of Kraków's Faculty of Architecture. The ARKIW programme deals with questions related to the use of information technologies in the recording, protection and studying of the architectural heritage. Case studies are chosen in order to experience and validate a technical platform dedicated to the formalisation and exchange of knowledge related to the architectural heritage (architectural data management, representation and simulation tools, survey methods, ...). A special focus is put on the evolution of the urban fabric and on the simulation of reconstructional hypothesis. Our contribution will introduce current ARKIW internet applications and experiences: The ARPENTEUR architectural survey experiment on Wie¿a Ratuszowa (a photogrammetrical survey based on an architectural model). A Gothic and Renaissance reconstruction of the Ratusz Krakowski using a commercial modelisation and animation software (MAYA). The SOL on line documentation interface for Kraków's Rynek G_ówny. Internet analytical approach in the presentation of morphological informations about Kraków's Kramy Bogate Rynku Krakowskiego. Object-Orientation approach in the modelling of the architectural corpus. The VALIDEUR and HUBLOT Virtual Reality modellers for the simulation and representation of reconstructional hypothesis and corpus analysis.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 18
authors Castane, D., Leirado, E.R., Tessier, C. and Martinez.R.
year 1998
title El Docente y la Utilizacion de Sistemas Multimediales en Redes Telematicas Aplicados a la Ensenanza 3D en Diseno Arquitectonico (The Teacher and the use of Multimedia Systems in Telematicas Networks Applied to the Teaching of 3D in Architectonic Design)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 154-159
summary The remarkable advances in the technology of computer systems, including software, hardware, and networks, continuously give us new avenues to be utilized in education. The pedagogic strategy to be developed in the utilization of digital graphic systems applied to three-dimensional design in architecture (both in the design and virtual expression of objects or already designed architectural groups) is still changing with the times.Therefore, the Department, as an extension of its experience with this type of development and as a response to deal with special situations such as large numbers of students, develops this new proposal, which is currently being used. This project uses the implementation, structuring, and building of a virtual site as an informatics classroom, utilizing multimedia systems, to be used as a support for acquiring knowledge during the learning that takes place doing the coursework. This setting would allow for the feedback between the instructor and the student to be on-going, hence both groups being efficiently motivated through examples and opportunities of how to do the following: utilize appropriate technology, manipulate the right information, utilize the right kind of software programs and techniques, revamp the knowledge, and benefit from using the appropriate digital techniques for each specific case of architectural design and expression.
series SIGRADI
email dorcas@fadu.uba.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:48

_id 8b9d
authors Corrao, R. and Fulantelli, G.
year 1998
title Cognitive Accessibility to Information on the Web: Insights from a System for Teaching and Learning Architecture through the Net ShortPapers: Design Methodology for Universal Access
source Proceedings of the 4th ERCIM Workshop on "User Interfaces forAll" 1998 n.14 p.6 ERCIM
summary The question of accessibility to the Web takes on a special meaning in educational settings where access to information requires cognitive elaboration of the page contents. It is, therefore, a matter of "cognitive access" to the Web. The main efforts of the designers of Web Based Instruction (WBI) environments to encourage cognitive access are usually aimed at the organisation and presentation of Web documents and at specific cues which can improve the user's interaction, orientation and navigation through the pages. However, it is possible to improve this high-level access to the information by supporting study activities through specific "Working tools" which can be implemented in the Web environment. In this paper we report on the design solutions we have adopted to provide cognitive access to a WBI environment for university students studying Architecture and Town Planning. In particular, we introduce "Working tools" that can be used to support flexible and effective study activities. The adopted design solutions provide different classes of users (not only students) with different access facilities. Finally, it should be noted that the methodologies of the design of WBI systems should deal with this kind of high level access and support it through specific solutions at interface and implementation levels.
series other
last changed 2002/07/07 14:01

_id 05d5
authors Corrao, R. and Fulantelli, G.
year 1998
title Cognitive accessibility to information on the Web: insights from a system for teaching and learning Architecture through the Net
source AA VV, Towards an Accesible Web, Proceedings of the IV ERCIM Workshop “User Interfaces for All”, Långholmen-Stockholm
summary The question of accessibility to the Web takes on a special meaning in educational settings where access to information requires cognitive elaboration of the page contents. It is, therefore, a matter of "cognitive access" to the Web. The main efforts of the designers of Web Based Instruction (WBI) environments to encourage cognitive access are usually aimed at the organisation and presentation of Web documents and at specific cues which can improve the user's interaction, orientation and navigation through the pages. However, it is possible to improve this high-level access to the information by supporting study activities through specific "Working tools" which can be implemented in the Web environment. In this paper we report on the design solutions we have adopted to provide cognitive access to a WBI environment for university students studying Architecture and Town Planning. In particular, we introduce "Working tools" that can be used to support flexible and effective study activities. The adopted design solutions provide different classes of users (not only students) with different access facilities. Finally, it should be noted that the methodologies of the design of WBI systems should deal with this kind of high level access and support it through specific solutions at interface and implementation levels.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 8fa8
authors Dolinsek, B. and Duhovnik, J.
year 1998
title Robotic assembly of rebar cages for beams and columns
source Automation in Construction 8 (2) (1998) pp. 195-207
summary In the paper, the design and method of operation of a robot cell for the assembly of rebar cages for beams and columns is described. The input elements are pre-manufactured rebars, and the output consists of rebar cages. Inside the robot cell, assembly is performed by robots equipped with tools for grasping the rebars, tools for bending the stirrups, and tools for welding the stirrups to the longitudinal bars. Various mechanisms for supplying the robots with rebars and supporting them during the assembly process have also been designed. Because of the specific nature of the assembly process, where robots have to successfully avoid various obstacles, mass-produced robots cannot be used for the assembly of rebar cages. For this reason, special robot configurations have to be designed. The robot cell described in this paper is at present at the design stage. It was modelled and simulated using the program 3 for robot simulation, which makes it possible to study, optimise, and design in detail the proposed robot systems. The figures in the paper describing how such a system works have also been taken from this simulation.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 25d4
authors Frankenberger, E. and Badke-Schaub, P.
year 1998
title Modelling design processes in industry--empirical investigations of design work in practice
source Automation in Construction 7 (2-3) (1998) pp. 139-155
summary In the research project `Teamwork in Engineering Design Practice,' engineers of the Darmstadt University of Technology and psychologists of the University of Bamberg are investigating design processes of groups in industry in order to get a deeper understanding of the interdependencies in design practice. The overall aim of this project is to outline a model of group design processes in industry as a basis for further development of systematic design with special emphasis on teamwork.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id a787
authors Kaga, A., Shimazu, Y., Yamauchi, T., Ishihara, H. And Sasada, T.
year 1998
title City Information Visualizer Using 3-D Model and Computer Graphics
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 193-202
summary 3-D models and computer graphics with its visual characteristics enables easier understanding of various information. Up until now 3-D models and computer graphics has not been used for the analysis of city information due to its high cost and the need for special techniques. Currently, we have discovered new technology in hyper medium based on network technology and lower costs. This paper focuses on the construction of an interactive and visual 3-D city information system, aiming at the ‘idea processor’ for research and analysis of city planning and market research. We have discovered the requirements necessary for the City Information Visualizer system. Using this technology we will construct the prototype system of the 3-D City Information Visualizer. This system is based on the personal computer and the Client/Server system. The system is then applied to practical city analysis. This paper presents the prototype system and its evaluation in a real project.
keywords City Planning, Computer Graphics, 3-D Model, VRML, JAVA
series CAADRIA
email kaga@hankyu.co.jp
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:36

_id ddss9832
id ddss9832
authors Keuren, A. and Sanders, F.M.
year 1998
title Integrated Land-Use and Network Modelling
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary In this paper, the integration of modelling the changes in land-use and the changes in the infrastructure network will be described. Emphasis is laid on the automatic development of the network instead of changing the network by hand before simulating the changes in the land-use pattern.The approach and working procedure were tested by developing a pilot model simulating the spatial situation on the Frisian island Ameland (The Netherlands). The pilot is developed within the geographical information system Arcinfo. In this pilot model, special attention is paid to the extension of the infrastructure network and the allocation of more than one activity. Network analysis for the purpose of network extension is based on graph theory. Selection of links is based on the increase of the total accessibility within the network system as a result of adding a link to the network. The allocation of activities is based on several selection criteria and takes place within a cellular grid. Several methods ofselecting cells and links and the choices made will be discussed.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 0320
authors Lynn, G.
year 1998
title Animate Form
source Princeton Architectural Press, New York
summary Animate Form is a book and interactive CD-ROM of recent architectural projects designed by Form, the office of Greg Lynn. The projects documented here explore the potential of time-based animation techniques to inform architectural design. Historically, architecture has been considered static, fixed, and inert. Through the use of state-of-the-art animation and special-effects software, Lynn transforms space and form into highly plastic, flexible, and mutable entities. He uses topological geometries to bend, twist, deform, and differentiate structure, creating unprecedented departures from preconceived notions of architecture. In experimenting with these new methods and media, Lynn has charted an innovative direction in design. The book provides a theoretical context for the experimental projects through a collection of texts by Lynn, extensively illustrated in color. The CD-ROM is an interactive hypertext environment that fully documents the design processes used to generate the projects through animations, renderings, model photographs, videos, and texts. Using a virtual 3D interface, the viewer is able to navigate through space and select objects and animations to view at different scales.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 81f3
authors Martens, Bob and Turk, Ziga
year 1999
title Working Experiences with a Cumulative Index on CAD: "CUMINCAD"
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 327-333
summary To researchers in every discipline, Internet is quickly becoming the dominating environment to do literature studies. Commercial bibliographic databases tend to be too general, are not up-to-date and require special skills and effort to be searched. On the other hand researchers also publish on the Web and collaboratively that can create indexes of relevant publications. CUMINCAD is a bibliographic index that compiles papers related to computer aided architectural design. Implemented with a database, it allows searching and browsing in the ways usual on the Web. It provides a "historical evolution" to learn from previous efforts and draws attention to older original works that could have been ignored because they could not be found on the Web otherwise. The authors believe that CUMINCAD will help focus future CAAD research and improve the education. CUMINCAD work started in 1998 and is available at www.fagg.uni-lj.si/cumincad/. This paper focusses on the design and development of the database and presents some ideas concerning its advanced use in the analysis of research efforts.
keywords CAAD-related Publications, Web-based Bibliographic Database, Searchable Index, Retrospective CAAD Research
series eCAADe
email b.martens@tuwien.ac.at, ziga.turk@ikpir.fagg.uni-lj.si
last changed 2001/02/11 19:22

_id 791e
id 791e
authors Monreal, Amadeo; Jacas, Joan
year 2004
title COMPUTER AIDED GENERATION OF ARCHITECTURAL TYPOLOGIES
source Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference of Mathematics & Design, Special Edition of the Journal of Mathematics & Design, Volume 4, No.1, pp. 73-82.
summary The work we present may be considered as the consolidation of a methodology that was already outlined in the paper presented in the second M&D congress held in San Sebastian (1998). We establish that, in architectural design, the computer is only used in the last step in order to achieve the traditional Euclidean design in a more precise and comfortable way and to improve the quality of the handmade designs. Our proposal consists in modifying the process from the very beginning of the creative act. That is, when the design conception is born. If we want to obtain the maximum benefit of the computer possibilities, we ought to support this conception by means of a language tuned with the mentioned tool. Due to the fact that the internal language used by the computer for producing graphics is mathematical, we must incorporate, in some way, this language in the codification of the creative process. In accordance with this setting, we propose a mathematical grammar for the design based on the construction of modulated standard mathematical functions. This grammar is developed independently from the graphical software and it is specified only when a particular computer program for the effective generation on the graphical objects is selected.
series other
type normal paper
email joan.jacas@upc.es
last changed 2005/04/07 10:49

_id 634d
authors Seebohm, Thomas and Van Wyk, Skip (Eds.)
year 1998
title Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [Conference Proceedings]
source ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1 / Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, 383 p.
summary With an inevitability that is the beyond the control of architecture faculty everywhere, computers are being increasingly used in design studios. As student ownership of computers proliferates and architectural firms begin to use computers for design as well as drafting, the momentum will accelerate. The question is whether the use of computers in design studios makes a difference and what sort. Moreover, if it does make a difference, should it just be allowed to happen or should the momentum be guided by studio teachers skilled in computing. Does the use of computers in studios demand a special pedagogy that goes beyond teaching the use of the software and hardware? Are there design approaches that need to be taught in order to take advantage of the strengths of computers in design rather than attempt to make computers follow the paths trodden by manual design techniques? The question is critical because, as yet, we know very little about how computers can truly enable design, how computers can help us conceive design hypotheses, structure alternatives and simulations, and evaluate alternatives. As yet we have no body of recorded evidence to demonstrate how computer-based design studios produce work that is different from or better than traditional design, except, perhaps, in slickness of the images. Is it only in modeling and rendering final images that computers are useful or are there advantages in the use of computers through all stages design. If so what are they? In recent years many non-ACADIANS have become involved in using computers in design studios. Do we use design computing differently? Do we judge our successes differently? Do we have different expectations than these colleagues. And, even more interesting , what do they perceive as our experience and direction?
series ACADIA
email vanwyk@mail.unm.edu
more http://www.acadia.org
last changed 1998/12/16 07:24

_id ddss9856
id ddss9856
authors Suter, Georg and Mahdavi, Ardeshir
year 1998
title Generation and communication of design information:a building performance simulation perspective
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary There is general agreement that the process of design and construction of buildings typically involves multiple players. This has been the impetus to develop concepts for computational environments that would supportcollaborative design. While there has been considerable progress with regard to hardware and electronic communication, the underlying representations of design ideas and artifacts have not kept pace with thisprogress. In this paper we deal with this problem not from a global conceptual perspective, but rather from the specific point of view of those designers who use design representation toward extraction and manipulation of specialized technical information. For example, engineers in various fields of building technology require a rich representation of building information in terms of geometry (with special focus on topology), materials, systems attributes, etc. We argue that the current building analysis tools do not operate on the basis of such rich informational representations. Instead the needed information is often assembled on an ad hoc basis from various non-integrated informational sources. We review three representations as they are implemented in commercial or research systems and explore their potential for communicating design information to computational building analysis tools. Based on this review, we describe desirable characteristics of more sophisticated building representations.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id c70e
authors Coyne, Richard
year 1998
title Design with Attitude - Postures Intellectuelles
source Computers in Design Studio Teaching [EAAE/eCAADe International Workshop Proceedings / ISBN 09523687-7-3] Leuven (Belgium) 13-14 November 1998, pp. 55-63
summary This paper examines the issue of attitude, as when we inquire about peoples’ attitudes to the computer, as a matter of bodily comportment. The theme is illustrated through a recent design studio project that focused on the issue of the body and the computer through the design of a museum of body technologies.  
series eCAADe
email richard.coyne@ed.ac.uk
more http://www.eaae.be/
last changed 2000/11/21 08:12

_id 8ad1
authors Elsas, P.A. and Vergeest, J.S.M.
year 1998
title New functionality for computer-aided conceptual design: the displacement feature
source Design Studies 19 (1), pp. 81-102
summary Conceptual design using conventional 3D CAD systems is a controversial issue among industrial designers. Although one can produce complex, accurate, finished 3D models using these CAD systems, it is still difficult to use them during early, creative product design. In this paper, a method is described that allows the design of protrusions and depressions in sculptured surfaces in a flexible and interactive manner. Through interviews with industrial designers, the basic requirements for support of such functionality during conceptual design have been formulated. An implemented method based upon these requirements has been extensively evaluated by industrial designers, and these evaluations show that industrial designers find this functionality extremely useful during conceptual shape design.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

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