CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 81 to 100 of 546

_id b335
authors Bayle, E., Bellamy, R., Casaday, G., Erickson, T., Fincher, S., Grinter, B., Gross, B., Lehder, D., Marmolin, H., Moore, B., Potts, C., Skousen, G. and Thomas, T.
year 1998
title Putting It All Together: Towards a Pattern Language for Interaction Design Reports
source ACM SIGCHI Bulletin 1998 v.30 n.1 pp.17-23
summary Pattern languages are representations that have been used in architecture and urban design for about twenty years. They focus on the interaction between physical form and social behavior, and express design solutions in an understandable and generalizable form. But pattern languages are not simply set of patterns intended to be universally applied; instead, they are actually meta-languages which, when used in a particular situations, generate situated design languages. This report describes a CHI 97 workshop which explored the utility of pattern languages for interaction design. We discuss the workshop's rationale, the structure and process of the workshop, and some of the workshop's results. In particular, we describe some patterns developed as part of the workshop, and our consequent reflections on the use of patterns and pattern languages as lingua franca for interaction design. This report concludes with a bibliography on pattern languages and related matters that spans architecture, software design, and organizational design.
series other
last changed 2002/07/07 14:01

_id 7
authors Bermudez, Julio
year 1998
title Interaccion de Medios y Proceso De DiseÒo: Teoria y Base de Conocimientos Para una Produccion Arquitectonica Hibrida (Interaction of Design Media and Process: Theory and Knowledge Base for in the Production of Architectural Hybrids)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 56-65
summary Integrating computers in architectural design means to negotiate between centuries-old analog design methods and the new digital systems of production. The difficulty lies in the underdeveloped state of the necessary methods, techniques, and theories to relate traditional and new media. Recent investigations on the use of multiple iterations between manual and electronic systems to advance architectural work show promising results. However, these experiments have not yet either developed a theoretical base that connects their procedures to a larger conceptual framework nor been sufficiently cross-referenced and third party tested to conform a reliable knowledge base. This paper addresses the first shortcoming in the light of the forces transforming our contemporary civilization and architecture.
series SIGRADI
email bermudez@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 029f
authors Bermudez, Julio and King, Kevin
year 1998
title Media Interaction & Design Process: Establishing a Knowledge Base
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 6-25
summary Integrating computers in architectural design means to negotiate between centuries-old analog design methods and the new digital systems of production. Analog systems of architectural production use tracing paper, vellum, graphite and ink, clipboard, clay, balsa wood, plastic, metal, etc. Analog systems have also been termed ‘handmade’, ‘manual’, ‘material’ or ‘physical’. Digital systems of architectural production use scanning, image manipulation, visualization, solid modeling, computer aided drafting, animation, rendering, etc. Digital systems have also been called ‘electronic’, ‘computer-aided’, ‘virtual’, etc. The difficulty lies in the underdeveloped state of the necessary methods, techniques, and theories to relate traditional and new media. Recent investigations on the use of multiple iterations between manual and electronic systems to advance architectural work show promising results. However, these experiments have not been sufficiently codified, cross-referenced and third party tested to conform a reliable knowledge base. This paper addresses this shortcoming by bringing together reported experiences from diverse researchers over the past decade. This summary is informed by more than three years of continuous investigation in the impacts of analog-digital conversations in the design process. The goal is to establish a state-of-the-art common foundation that permits instructors, researchers and practitioners to refer to, utilize, test, criticize and develop. An appendix is included providing support for the paper’s arguments.

series ACADIA
email bermudez@arch.utah.edu, kingke@slcc.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id a136
authors Blaise, J.Y., Dudek, I. and Drap, P.
year 1998
title Java collaborative interface for architectural simulations A case study on wooden ceilings of Krakow
source International Conference On Conservation - Krakow 2000, 23-24 November 1998, Krakow, Poland
summary Concern for the architectural and urban preservation problems has been considerably increasing in the past decades, and with it the necessity to investigate the consequences and opportunities opened for the conservation discipline by the development of computer-based systems. Architectural interventions on historical edifices or in preserved urban fabric face conservationists and architects with specific problems related to the handling and exchange of a variety of historical documents and representations. The recent development of information technologies offers opportunities to favour a better access to such data, as well as means to represent architectural hypothesis or design. Developing applications for the Internet also introduces a greater capacity to exchange experiences or ideas and to invest on low-cost collaborative working platforms. In the field of the architectural heritage, our research addresses two problems: historical data and documentation of the edifice, methods of representation (knowledge modelling and visualisation) of the edifice. This research is connected with the ARKIW POLONIUM co-operation program that links the MAP-GAMSAU CNRS laboratory (Marseilles, France) and the Institute HAiKZ of Kraków's Faculty of Architecture. The ARKIW programme deals with questions related to the use of information technologies in the recording, protection and studying of the architectural heritage. Case studies are chosen in order to experience and validate a technical platform dedicated to the formalisation and exchange of knowledge related to the architectural heritage (architectural data management, representation and simulation tools, survey methods, ...). A special focus is put on the evolution of the urban fabric and on the simulation of reconstructional hypothesis. Our contribution will introduce current ARKIW internet applications and experiences: The ARPENTEUR architectural survey experiment on Wie¿a Ratuszowa (a photogrammetrical survey based on an architectural model). A Gothic and Renaissance reconstruction of the Ratusz Krakowski using a commercial modelisation and animation software (MAYA). The SOL on line documentation interface for Kraków's Rynek G_ówny. Internet analytical approach in the presentation of morphological informations about Kraków's Kramy Bogate Rynku Krakowskiego. Object-Orientation approach in the modelling of the architectural corpus. The VALIDEUR and HUBLOT Virtual Reality modellers for the simulation and representation of reconstructional hypothesis and corpus analysis.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 487c
authors Blazquez, Oscar and Hardin, Mary
year 1998
title Balancing Computer Use and Design Content in Studio Projects
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 36-43
summary Particular design approaches must be taught in order to take advantage of the strengths of computers in design rather than attempting to make computers conform to methods developed as by-products of manual design techniques. For the last three years our team of faculty teaching the second year design studio has been trying different approaches to the use of computers in design, in order to find the advantages and opportunities especially suited to electronic media. There are several projects during the semester which use computers at different stages of the design process. One of these projects, called “A Spatial Sequence,” uses information from a previous project as well as the knowledge from the computer class in parallel to design studio. The project asked students to create spatial archetypes based on the work of well-known architects. They explore the following topics as represented in the work of one particular architect: relationships of major spaces/minor spaces, approach/entry, and transition/threshold. Following the analysis, they create digital models to explore the spaces formed by their archetypes. Before committing to a physical study model, they look at the transitions between spaces by creating a sequence using the digital model and producing a series of shots through the digital model to show the flow of spaces. The use of computer through the process accelerates the options available to explore a sequence of elements, while simultaneously giving them a window to look into the spaces they have created. This hybridized approach of precedent analysis, digital modeling, and physical modeling was uniquely suited to the studio problem.

series ACADIA
email blasquez@u.arizona.edu, mchardin@u.arizona.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id sigradi2004_487
id sigradi2004_487
authors Bob Martens
year 2004
title Cumincad Hacks
source SIGraDi 2004 - [Proceedings of the 8th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Porte Alegre - Brasil 10-12 november 2004
summary CUMINCAD (CUMulative INdex of papers on CAD) was created in 1998 and since then hundreds of users working in the field of CAAD have been taken advantage of this Digital Library. The number of recorded entries is currently over 6.600, from which a substantial part also provide a full paper in PDF-format. The effort is part of a portal solution: for example CUMINCAD archives English CAAD-related publications; CUMINCAD.ES focuses on publications in Spanish. A search in these Digital Libraries is as simple as in Google, but with the help of the following instructions, more valuable information could potentially be retrieved and this defines the goal of this paper. In other words: How to get more out of CUMINCAD and CUMINCAD.ES?
series SIGRADI
email b.martens@tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ddss9808
id ddss9808
authors Boelen, A.J.
year 1998
title Pattern Matching for Decision Support
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary In this paper is discussed how we can use pattern matching techniques in combination with object orientation to support decision makers in arranging offices and industrial and commercial facilities in existing urban areas. The method used is based on the findings of a Ph.D. project almost finishedwhen writing this. The tool under development is specifically useful for rehabilitation of deteriorated industrial or commercial areas.I consider such an area already occupied and surrounded with all kinds of urban objects and connected to all kinds of infrastructure. I can describe this area in available objects and facilities. Furthermore we can describe the areas capacity left within the infrastructure, the capacity in forexample work force or clients and the available band width in noise or pollution. By describing the area in terms of availability of capacity to absorb or produce flows of people, goods, energy and information we sketch the room available for certain types of industrial or commercial facilities. I developed a technique to describe industrial and commercial facilities in such a way that we enable the match between these and the characteristics of an area available. Pattern matching techniquesenable the system to generate best matches between available areas, locations and facilities. This model can be adapted in several object oriented geographical information systems and be integrated with other information systems that for example calculate the pollution of certain kinds of facilities. The rules to match with are partly based on objective, measurable data like available capacity on the electricity network and needed electrical power for certain facilities. Other matching rules are based on political norms on for example acceptable pollution levels and suggested pollution of facilities. The paper presents the problem area of industrial area rehabilitation, describes the architecture of the modeling technique and presents the first findings of implementation studies.
keywords Pattern matching, Object GIS, Urban object modeling, Facility planning
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id ddss9807
id ddss9807
authors Boelen, A.J. and Lugt, Hermen J. van der
year 1998
title Communication of design parameters within groups
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary This paper discusses the facilitation of worldwide concurrent design within the domains involved in environmental planning, urban design and civil engineering. Typical projects in these domains require the collaboration of many experts. Each of these has his reference framework for the taskat hand and for the variables used. The amount of variables makes it impossible for each project participant to take account for all possible impacts of proposed or planned actions. The typical project demands for a concurrent design process that enables all participants to concentrate ontheir domain of expertise. On the other hand the design process should enable them to have insight in the problems, within the domains of other experts. The system should provide a generic environment with the ability to attach domain specific knowledge. By providing this support thesystem integrates knowledge specific to various expert domains.In the PortPlan project within the LWI organization a system is being developed that supports the integration of various reference frameworks involved in environmental planning. We no longer need to develop a common language for the users. The system contains a dynamic set of scalebound reference objects for the domains involved. The system facilitates the communication of object characteristics. It also supports the presentation of these objects, in legends for each participant involved.We achieve the communication between participants using a dynamic legend. We also enable all participants to become informed on the interests of other participants. We achieve the technical communication using the exchange of interventions. We do not exchange results. This leads to alow "network traffic load" and thus enables the system to operate within the current Internet infrastructure. In this paper we present the problem area of concurrent design in environmental planning. We present this describing the background of our project, describing the overall architecture of the system and presenting the first findings of user studies.
keywords Concurrent Design, Interfaces, Legends
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 817b
authors Bong, C.W. and Wang, Y.C.
year 2002
title A Shape Compactness Measurement Indexing with Fuzzy Multicriteria Decision Making Approach
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 093-100
summary Compactness of a district or zone is determined by considering its appearance and the area of dispersal of the district (Altman, 1998) and it is used as a characteristic to describe shape (Shiode, 1998; Knight, 1997). However, existing compactness measurement used to assess district plans in redistricting applications are vague and imprecision although there are more than thirty over Euclidean or non-Euclidean measurement methods. Therefore, this paper presents an integrated shape compactness measurement indexing with a fuzzy multicriteria decision making approach (FMCDM) to enhance the measurement of shape compactness. An experiment is conducted in order to verify the practically of the proposed model to improve existing compactness measurement method.
series CAADRIA
email cwbong@pd.jaring.my
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id a47a
authors Bourdakis, V.
year 1998
title Navigation in Large VR Urban Models. In Virtual Worlds
source J. Heudin (ed.), Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence 1434, Springer, Berlin, pp. 345-356
summary The aim of this research project is to utilise VR models in urban planning in order to provide easy-to-use visualisation tools that will allow non-experts to understand the implications of proposed changes to their city. In this paper, the navigation problems identified whilst working on large VR city models are discussed and a "fly" based navigation mode is proposed and evaluated.

keywords 3D City modeling
series other
email V.Bourdakis@prd.uth.gr
more http://fos.prd.uth.gr/vas/papers/VW98/
last changed 2003/04/02 09:55

_id bb72
authors Bourdot, P., Krus, M., Gherbi, R.
year 1998
title Cooperation Between Reactive 3D Objects and a Multimodal X Window Kernel for CAD
source Bunt, H., Beun, R.J., Borghuis, T. (Eds.). Multimodal Human-Computer Communication : Systems, Techniques, and Experiments. Berlin : Springer
summary From the early steps of sketching to final engineering, a frequent and very important activity in designing objects is to perform graphical and spatial simulations to solve the constraints on the objects which are being designed. But when we analyse work situations involving the use of CAD systems, it is today an acknowledged fact that these tools are not helpful to perform these types of simulations. While knowledge modeling based on form feature concepts already offers some possibilities for attaching behaviour to objects, the simulation activity requires in addition a `real time' and `intelligent' management of the interactions between the 3D virtual objects and the CAD user. Our general purpose is to study how future CAD systems could be improved to achieve the simulation steps of object design. In this context we present some issues concerning the cooperation between a model of reactive 3D objects and a multimodal X Window kernel. We have developed a prototype of a system where objects with reactive behaviour can be built, and with which the user can interact with a combination of graphical actions and vocal commands. This prototype is used to evaluate the feasability and the usefulness of the integration of such techniques in futur applications that would be used by object designers in a real working context. We describe the current state of this system and the planned improvements.
series other
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id a841
authors Brady, Darlene A.
year 1998
title Premise & Process: The Pedagogical Implications of Computing in Design
source Computers in Design Studio Teaching [EAAE/eCAADe International Workshop Proceedings / ISBN 09523687-7-3] Leuven (Belgium) 13-14 November 1998, pp. 31-39
summary Form is capable of communicating a profound idea only when it is linked to a more essential metaphorical intention. The design studio is a forum for addressing this relationship of idea and the means of expression. Computing offers the potential to enhance the design enquiry, but issues of how and when to integrate computer applications in the studio have significant pedagogical implications. It not only has an impact on the size, complexity and number of design projects, but also on whether architectural ideas or computer technology is the content of the studio. It is important to distinguish between the computer image and the process used to achieve the final result. Many computer-based studios focus on the final product which encourages technology to drive design. This paper addresses how design issues can determine the use of technology so that design ideas and computing can reinforce each other, rather than be competing issues. It examines how the unique strengths of computer modeling and animation is used to explore the relationship between visual expression and intention via the issues of metaphor, tectonic color, context and kinetics in several of my graduate and upper-level undergraduate computer-based design studios in the School of Architecture at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UI-UC). The studio topics are diverse in nature and include Normative Studio: Prototype as Formgiver; Urban Issues: Context, Color & Kinetics; and Virtual Metaphors: Literature as Formgiver.

series eCAADe
email architexture@earthlink.net
more http://www.eaae.be/
last changed 2000/11/21 08:10

_id 2873
authors Brin, S. and Page, L.
year 1998
title The Anatomy of a Large-Scale Hypertextual Web Search Engine
source Computer Science Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
summary In this paper, we present Google, a prototype of a large-scale search engine which makes heavy use of the structure present in hypertext. Google is designed to crawl and index the Web efficiently and produce much more satisfying search results than existing systems. The prototype with a full text and hyperlink database of at least 24 million pages is available at http://google.stanford.edu/ To engineer a search engine is a challenging task. Search engines index tens to hundreds of millions of web pages involving a comparable number of distinct terms. They answer tens of millions of queries every day. Despite the importance of large-scale search engines on the web, very little academic research has been done on them. Furthermore, due to rapid advance in technology and web proliferation, creating a web search engine today is very different from three years ago. This paper provides an in-depth description of our large-scale web search engine -- the first such detailed public description we know of to date. Apart from the problems of scaling traditional search techniques to data of this magnitude, there are new technical challenges involved with using the additional information present in hypertext to produce better search results. This paper addresses this question of how to build a practical large-scale system which can exploit the additional information present in hypertext. Also we look at the problem of how to effectively deal with uncontrolled hypertext collections where anyone can publish anything they want.
series other
email page@cs.stanford.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id ddss9809
id ddss9809
authors Brondino, Nair Cristina Margarido and Da Silva, Antônio Nélson Rodrigues
year 1998
title A comparison of land valuation methods supported by GIS
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary The purpose of this work was to study three different strategies for the appraisal of urban land. The first, a theoretical strategy created by the authors of this study to reproduce the common conditions of Brazilian cities, uses increments and reductions in the value of a square meter of land according to each lot’s individual features. The second method, based on Multiple Regression techniques, is widely used for valuation purposes. Finally, the effectiveness of Artificial Neural Networks to deal with thiskind of problem is studied. A sample of 157 lots was collected from several neighbourhoods of a small Brazilian city for the case study. The lot features recorded were area, width, shape, distance to the downtown district of the city through the street network, existence of fences and paved sidewalks, and market price. Prediction errors have been estimated for each of the three methods in order to compare their results. Predicted and error values, added to Geographical Information Systems, may be used to build thematic maps and to check how each strategy applies to different areas of the city. The analyses of error values conducted in this study showed that Artificial Neural Networks presented the best performance as a land appraisal method for the case studied.
series DDSS
email anelson@sc.usp.br
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 0471
authors Bruton, B.
year 1998
title Grammars and Pedagogy - Towards new Media Art and Design Education Strategies
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 385-394
summary The impact of computational grammatical design on pedagogy has received little attention in art education due to the dominant modes of traditional approaches to art and design education. This paper explores the pedagogical implications of grammatical strategies using computers for judgements of design within an art educational setting. Grammatical strategies are studied for their effect on the judgements of novice artists in a new media educational context. It is argued that concepts of grammar and views of contingency are used in a variety of senses in the conception and form making of artists; that finding methods for discussing and utilising complex visual information is aided by grammatical formalisation; that these strategies are evidently effective at both early and mature stages of the realisation of a project. The research explores the relation between computer and art on three levels in which grammar is used: as a sense of grammar, as a computational paradigm and as a description of a kind of computer program. Grammatical formalism is apparent in two dimensional linear and non-linear animations using Photoshop, Premiere and Director, and in solid modelling programs such as Extreme 3D, Form Z, Strata Studio Pro, 3D Studio Max and SoftImage. Web site construction also impacts on the judgements of 2D and 3D design. Computational grammatical programs generate forms that reflect alternative understandings of art and design. Art practise is defined in terms of developing consistent and appropriate design language for the contingency at hand. Form making using grammatical tools, both recursive and array types, is discussed in terms of their applicability and educative value. Reference is made to formal qualities for critique and strategic capability of alternative pedagogy for generation of forms. Examples provided show how simple rule sets develop into complex derivational sequences that challenge traditional strategies for computer imaging. The paper demonstrates the value of a sense of grammars for novice art and design practitioners by using first hand examples of experimental work at the South Australian School of Art, University of South Australia. For novice artists and designers, grammars in conjunction with reflective practice is offered as a useful mind set that supports an interest in actively defining a new kind of art. Illustrations provided show the utility of a contingent sense of grammar for pedagogy and highlights the significant role of grammar in pedagogy.
keywords Grammar, Pedagogy, Computer, Art, Design
series CAADRIA
email d.bruton@unisa.edu.au
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:15

_id 35e3
authors Buchacz, A., Machura, A. and Pasek, M.
year 1998
title Hypergraphs in investigation of trajectory of robot's manipulator with links as thin-walled bars
source Automation in Construction 7 (5) (1998) pp. 363-383
summary A 3-dimensional model of an industrial robot's manipulator is discussed here. The manipulator is built of two links. Each link is a bar of thin walls, with a box-shaped cross section. Harmonical forces and moments work on both ends of each bar. Lengthwisely and flexibly vibrating robot model is presented in the form of two-block hypergraph. On the base of the skeleton of this hypergraph, a matrix of dynamical flexibilities is developed for the system. The matrix allows us to determine amplitudes of the vibrations of the end of point of the robot's manipulator, separately along each of global axis X, Y, Z. The determined amplitudes anable us to predict the real trajectory of the manipulator and compare it with theoretical trajectory.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id cb96
authors Buckley, E., Zarli, A., Reynolds, C. and Richaud, O.
year 1998
title Business objects in construct IT
source R. Amor (ed.) Product and Process Modelling in the Building Industry, Building Research Establishment, Watford, England, pp. 117-130
summary Objective: EU Esprit Project 25.741 Wonda aims to meet the needs for Enterprise Information Systems and E-Commerce in the construction and banking industries. Wonda aims to deliver a solution suitable for contracting firms. The solution should enable take-up by SMEs, incremental value-added growth (perhaps Incremental Radicalism), mobile computing for location independent access by project managers and quick set-up of virtual enterprises reflecting both the short customer-supplier relationships in the industry and the need of construction firms to constantly re-configure and re-invent themselves. Method: Wonda will develop an open and secure framework for business objects and electronic payment. Business objects can be defined as software components, which encapsulate business rules and procedures and which can run anywhere on the network. They provide secure and sophisticated access to diverse electronic content and software applications. Indeed, just as a building can be described as a unique arrangement of standard products, a building project can be described as a unique arrangement of standard product data. Business Objects give a high level view of product data. They can be assembled into frameworks to support high-level views on industrial projects. The open framework will enable a distributed architecture through CORBA thus facilitating the interoperation of heterogeneous software components as found in legacy systems. The modular security of the framework and its support for electronic payment ensure authenication, confidentiality and non-repudiation as required for the business processes of construction virtual enterprises. Indeed the modular and incremental implemenation of security will be achieved partly through a Business Object architecture. Results will comprise o a pilot in 2 product cycles, o an open & secure framework architecture, o Commotion middleware for enabling business objects on top of Corba, o WeBuild (construction), WeBank (banking) and SILK (security) business objects o OpenDMX component to enable object orientated access to legacy databases.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id ec50
authors Bullock, D. and Heymsfield, E.
year 1998
title Innovative application of directional boring procedures for replacing failed inductive loop detectors
source Automation in Construction 8 (2) (1998) pp. 143-148
summary Actuated traffic signal controllers typically depend on inductive loop detectors to determine demand for a particular signal phase. The basic philosophy of these controllers is to only provide a green indication to a particular lane group when there is a vehicle waiting. If an inductive loop detector fails, it must be put in recall mode so that the lane group with the corresponding failed detector is serviced every cycle. When actuated controllers operate in this mode, the performance of the signalized intersection degenerates. Since the vast majority of actuated intersections operate with inductive loop detectors it is useful to have maintenance procedures that can be used to replace loop detectors that have failed due to pavement distress. This paper describes a procedure that has been developed using directional boring equipment to install a micro loop below the surface of the pavement where it is not subject to pavement distress. The authors believe this procedure will provide a cost effective method of restoring actuated control on approaches or lanes groups where the pavement condition makes it unfeasible to install or re-install a traditional saw cut loop detector.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 10
authors Bund, Elizabeth and Barros, Diana Rodriguez
year 1998
title Imagen Digital: Proceso Proyectual Confluyente (Digital Image: Confluyent Design Process)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 84-93
summary The introduction of new technologies in architectural projects causes, in first place, their adaptation as an operative and instrumental resource, without considering the deep changes that their use generates. The digital image, understood as a reference of this process, is spreading and conquering new fields on ideation, representation and communication. The absence of theoretical support, that would offered another point of view is evident, so consequently we believe that is necessary to consider approaches qualitatively new, from epistemologic, methodologic, perceptive and aesthetic fields, in order to transfer them into professional an teaching practice. Today, the annulment of universal validity rules, and the different and contradictory interpretations, oblige to center our view in the interrelationships and,connections, rather than in the definition of each entity. This work develops synthetically a study which confronts and compares traditional project process - composition and heuristic design supported by linear proceeding and analogic media, with confluent project process, based on digital data and hypermedia links, generated simultaneously. The variants of the topics analyzed are at the same time the project itself, the underlying thinking model, and the project communication strategies.
series SIGRADI
email dibarros@mdp.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id caadria2003_a1-2
id caadria2003_a1-2
authors Bunyavipakul, Monchai and Charoensilp, Ekasidh
year 2003
title Designing the Virtual Design Studio System for Collaborative Work on Pda Collaborative Works Anytime, Anywhere
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 43-54
summary This research presents the collaboration in the VDS system through a microcomputer technology- a PDA (Personal Digital Assistants). Architect can collaborate anytime anyplace via VDS, a substitution to an old system that requires a specific location to work on. This research has studied and analyzed the format and the limitation of collaboration between PDA and Personal Computer, the wireless communication technology, and the Web Service technology, which enable different devices to share information through the Internet Network. The work process and the studied information have been used to develop a Web Application, a collaboration tool for a team of architect and designer. This Web Application has been tested in a renovation project, a clubhouse for a scuba diving place The objective of this research is to become a guideline of collaboration in architectural design work through Smart Object in order to serve the coming Ubiquitous era (Weiser, 1998)
series CAADRIA
email Tony_caad@hotmail.com
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

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