CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 553

_id e336
authors Achten, H., Roelen, W., Boekholt, J.-Th., Turksma, A. and Jessurun, J.
year 1999
title Virtual Reality in the Design Studio: The Eindhoven Perspective
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 169-177
summary Since 1991 Virtual Reality has been used in student projects in the Building Information Technology group. It started as an experimental tool to assess the impact of VR technology in design, using the environment of the associated Calibre Institute. The technology was further developed in Calibre to become an important presentation tool for assessing design variants and final design solutions. However, it was only sporadically used in student projects. A major shift occurred in 1997 with a number of student projects in which various computer technologies including VR were used in the whole of the design process. In 1998, the new Design Systems group started a design studio with the explicit aim to integrate VR in the whole design process. The teaching effort was combined with the research program that investigates VR as a design support environment. This has lead to increasing number of innovative student projects. The paper describes the context and history of VR in Eindhoven and presents the current set-UP of the studio. It discusses the impact of the technology on the design process and outlines pedagogical issues in the studio work.
keywords Virtual Reality, Design Studio, Student Projects
series eCAADe
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ddss9801
id ddss9801
authors Achten, Henri and Leeuwen, Jos van
year 1998
title A Feature-Based Description Technique for Design Processes: A Case Study
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary In order to develop appropriate tools for decision support in design processes, it is necessary to found them on an understanding of design. Analytical techniques of design processes that have a direct relationship with tool development can enhance design support systems development. The paper focuses on a design support system in the VR-DIS research program. The aim of this research program is to develop insight in the architectural design process and to establish design tools for architectsworking in Virtual Reality. The basic approach for data modelling in VR in this research is based on an extension of the Feature Based Modelling paradigm taken from design in mechanical engineering. The computer model of the design in the system is a Feature-based model. This paper describes design processes in terms of changes in the Feature-based model of the design. For this purpose, a case of a house design is used. Drawings in the conceptual design phase up to the preliminary design phase arestudied. Each state of the drawings is described in terms of a Feature-model. Particular design actions such as creation of spaces, definition of architectural elements, and changes during the design process can be expressed in terms of changes in the Feature-model. Because of the use of Features, the changes can be formalised in the VR-DIS system. The description in terms of Features offers an analytical toolthat leads to a functional brief for design support tools. The paper ends with a discussion of implications and future work.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ddss9802
id ddss9802
authors Akin, O., Aygen, Z., Cumming, M., Donia, M., Sen, R. and Zhang, Y.
year 1998
title Computational Specification of Building Requirements in theEarly Stages of Design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary We have been exploring computational techniques to help building designers to specify design requirements during the early stages of design. In the past, little has been accomplished in this area either in terms of innovative computational technologies or the improvement of design performance.The prospect of improving design productivity and creating a seamless process between requirements specification and formal design are our primary motivations. This research has been conducted as partof a larger project entitled SEED (Software Environment to Support Early Phases in Building Design). SEED features an open-ended modular architecture, where each module provides support for a design activity that takes place in early design stages. Each module is supported by a database to store and retrieve information, as well as a user interface to support the interaction with designers. The module described in this paper, SEED-Pro (the architectural programming module of SEED), is a workingprototype for building design requirements specification. It can be used by other modules in SEED or by design systems in other domains, such as mechanical engineering, civil engineering, industrial designand electrical engineering. Our approach to SEED-Pro is divided into two phases: core, and support functionalities. The core functionalities operate in an interactive mode relying on a case-based approach to retrieve and adapt complex specification records to the problem at hand. The supportfunctionalities include the case-base, the data-base, and the standards processing environment for building specification tasks. Our findings indicate that SEED-Pro: (1) is a tool that structures the unstructured domain of design requirements; (2) enables the integration of design requirements with the rest of the design process, (3) leads to the creation of complex case-bases and (4) enables the observation of their performance in the context of real world design problems.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id c304
authors Barber, T.and Hanna, R.
year 1998
title Appraisal of Design Studio Methodologies
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 21-30
summary This paper investigates the relationship between different design approaches and their effectiveness in the formulation of design concepts. This inquiry will focus on the computer as the sole design and developmental tool. The research employs a short design programme, a small building with a given urban site, as its investigative vehicle. Nineteen second year students of the Mackintosh School of Architecture were monitored and their design progress evaluated. They were split into two groups: one used CAD and AEC as the only drawing and modelling tool, tutorial and review, and another used conventional tools of drawing and model making (mixed media). Structured interviews and personal observations were used as a means for data collection. Questionnaires were administered to students and their response was analysed using the statistical programme SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences). The Mann-Whitney test was used to test the Null Hypothesis that different design approaches will not produce different design outcomes. Correlation, Regression and the X2 test of independence were also employed to screen data and identify patterns of relationships.

series CAADRIA
email gtca09@udcf.gla.ac.uk
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 7436
authors Barría Chateau, H., Muñoz Viveros, C. and Cerda Brintrup, G.
year 1999
title Virtual Tour Through Modern Architecture in Conception
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 475-477
summary This paper describes the development of a project that was selected and sponsoured by the Regional Competition FONDART 1998 (Funds for the Development of Arts of the Regional Secretary of Education) that follows the aim of cultural diffusion. Towards the middle of the 30s, the city of Concepción developed an architecture distinctly colonial, neoclassical and eclectic. An earthquake in 1939 abruptly interrupted this scene, destroying the enterity of its most important buildings. The reconstruction of the city followed the manifestoes of Modern Architecture, consolidating the urban importance of buildings such us the Law Courts, the Railway Station and the Regional Government, that emerged as the new architectural and cultural heritage of the city. The project consisted on the modeling of eleven buildings of the modern architectural heritage, and on the generation of 42 virtual tours through the buildings that were finally edited on a 16' video. This video allows the spectator to make a virtual tour through the original modern heritage of the city, nowadays demolished, altered, and sometimes, even forgotten. This project pretends to widen the ways of comprehension of our cultural identity by using computer modelling and animation as a tool for the conservation of the architectural heritage; and creating a record that can be used as a reference and as an instrument of cultural difussion.
series SIGRADI
email mtrebilc@zeus.dci.ubiobio.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ddss9808
id ddss9808
authors Boelen, A.J.
year 1998
title Pattern Matching for Decision Support
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary In this paper is discussed how we can use pattern matching techniques in combination with object orientation to support decision makers in arranging offices and industrial and commercial facilities in existing urban areas. The method used is based on the findings of a Ph.D. project almost finishedwhen writing this. The tool under development is specifically useful for rehabilitation of deteriorated industrial or commercial areas.I consider such an area already occupied and surrounded with all kinds of urban objects and connected to all kinds of infrastructure. I can describe this area in available objects and facilities. Furthermore we can describe the areas capacity left within the infrastructure, the capacity in forexample work force or clients and the available band width in noise or pollution. By describing the area in terms of availability of capacity to absorb or produce flows of people, goods, energy and information we sketch the room available for certain types of industrial or commercial facilities. I developed a technique to describe industrial and commercial facilities in such a way that we enable the match between these and the characteristics of an area available. Pattern matching techniquesenable the system to generate best matches between available areas, locations and facilities. This model can be adapted in several object oriented geographical information systems and be integrated with other information systems that for example calculate the pollution of certain kinds of facilities. The rules to match with are partly based on objective, measurable data like available capacity on the electricity network and needed electrical power for certain facilities. Other matching rules are based on political norms on for example acceptable pollution levels and suggested pollution of facilities. The paper presents the problem area of industrial area rehabilitation, describes the architecture of the modeling technique and presents the first findings of implementation studies.
keywords Pattern matching, Object GIS, Urban object modeling, Facility planning
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 2796
authors Brown, Andy and Lee, Hwa, Ryong
year 1998
title A Mental Space Model
source Cyber-Real Design [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 83-905377-2-9] Bialystock (Poland), 23-25 April 1998, pp. 27-42
summary The architectural design process is often characterised a series of evolving ideas, and involving a cyclical process between design and visualisation. However, the nature of the internal representation still remains unclear. What is actually represented in a designers mental space and what drives and influences the mental design process? If we wish to programme a computer to mimic or work in tandem with the mental processes involved we need to make that representation and the associated cognitive processes explicit. The ways that designers form mental representations are so diverse, personal, and often transient that it is not easy to externalise and articulate them in explicit terms. In order to propose a mental model, we can take in a particular I psychological research approach; that of introspective observation from design drawing . In doing so, we posit an assumption that the designer's drawing can be seen as an extension of the internal mental feature, and hence internal representation could be inferred from the analysis of external representation - the drawing or sketch. This approach contrasts with the protocol analysis approach where mental operations are inferred from words, what could be termed thinking aloud.
series plCAD
email andygpb@liverpool.ac.uk
last changed 2003/05/17 08:01

_id caadria2003_a1-2
id caadria2003_a1-2
authors Bunyavipakul, Monchai and Charoensilp, Ekasidh
year 2003
title Designing the Virtual Design Studio System for Collaborative Work on Pda Collaborative Works Anytime, Anywhere
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 43-54
summary This research presents the collaboration in the VDS system through a microcomputer technology- a PDA (Personal Digital Assistants). Architect can collaborate anytime anyplace via VDS, a substitution to an old system that requires a specific location to work on. This research has studied and analyzed the format and the limitation of collaboration between PDA and Personal Computer, the wireless communication technology, and the Web Service technology, which enable different devices to share information through the Internet Network. The work process and the studied information have been used to develop a Web Application, a collaboration tool for a team of architect and designer. This Web Application has been tested in a renovation project, a clubhouse for a scuba diving place The objective of this research is to become a guideline of collaboration in architectural design work through Smart Object in order to serve the coming Ubiquitous era (Weiser, 1998)
series CAADRIA
email Tony_caad@hotmail.com
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id c11a
authors Campbell, D.A.
year 1998
title VRML In Architectural Construction Documents: A Case Study
source VRML 98 Monterey - Proceedings of the 1998 VRML Conference, pp. 115-120
summary The Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) and the World Wide Web (WWW) offer new opportunities to communicate an architect's design intent throughout the design process. We have investigated the use of VRML in the production and communication of construction documents, the final phase of architectural building design. A prototype, experimental Web site was set up and used to disseminate design data as VRML models and HTML text to the design client, contractor, and fabricators. In this paper, we discuss the way our construction documents were developed in VRML, the issues we faced implementing it, and critical feedback from the users of the Web space/site. Finally, we suggest ways to enhance the VRML specification which would enable its widespread use as a communication tool in the design and construction industries. CR Categories and Subject Descriptors: 1.3.5 [Computer Graphics]: Computational Geometry and Object Modeling - Curve, surface, solid, and object representations; 1.3.7 [Computer Graphics]: Three-Dimensional Graphics and Realism - Virtual Reality; J-6. [Computer Applications]: Computer-aided Engineering - Computer-aided design (CAD), Computer-aided manufacturing (CAM). Additional Keywords: architecture, construction, AEC, design, construction documentation, specifications, Internet, extranet, World Wide Web, VRML, virtual worlds, virtual environments
series other
email dcampbell@nbbj.com
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id c0e0
authors Campbell, Dace
year 1998
title Architectural Construction Documents on the Web: VRML as a Case Study
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 266-275
summary The Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) and the World Wide Web (WWW) offer new opportunities to communicate an architect’s design intent throughout the design process. We have investigated the use of VRML in the production and communication of construction documents, the final phase of architectural building design. A prototype, experimental Web site was set up and used to disseminate design data as VRML models and HTML text to the design client, contractor, and fabricators. In this paper, we discuss the way our construction documents were developed in VRML, the issues we faced implementing it, and critical feedback from the users of the Web space/site. We analyze the usefulness of VRML as a communication tool for the design and construction industries. Finally, we discuss technical, social, and legal issues the AEC industry faces as it shifts to embrace widespread use of a “paperless” Web-based communications infrastructure for design documentation.
series ACADIA
email dcampbell@nbbj.com
last changed 1998/12/16 08:42

_id 7a20
id 7a20
authors Carrara, G., Fioravanti, A.
year 2002
title SHARED SPACE’ AND ‘PUBLIC SPACE’ DIALECTICS IN COLLABORATIVE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN.
source Proceedings of Collaborative Decision-Support Systems Focus Symposium, 30th July, 2002; under the auspices of InterSymp-2002, 14° International Conference on Systems Research, Informatics and Cybernetics, 2002, Baden-Baden, pg. 27-44.
summary The present paper describes on-going research on Collaborative Design. The proposed model, the resulting system and its implementation refer mainly to architectural and building design in the modes and forms in which it is carried on in advanced design firms. The model may actually be used effectively also in other environments. The research simultaneously pursues an integrated model of the: a) structure of the networked architectural design process (operators, activities, phases and resources); b) required knowledge (distributed and functional to the operators and the process phases). The article focuses on the first aspect of the model: the relationship that exists among the various ‘actors’ in the design process (according to the STEP-ISO definition, Wix, 1997) during the various stages of its development (McKinney and Fischer, 1998). In Collaborative Design support systems this aspect touches on a number of different problems: database structure, homogeneity of the knowledge bases, the creation of knowledge bases (Galle, 1995), the representation of the IT datum (Carrara et al., 1994; Pohl and Myers, 1994; Papamichael et al., 1996; Rosenmann and Gero, 1996; Eastman et al., 1997; Eastman, 1998; Kim, et al., 1997; Kavakli, 2001). Decision-making support and the relationship between ‘private’ design space (involving the decisions of the individual design team) and the ‘shared’ design space (involving the decisions of all the design teams, Zang and Norman, 1994) are the specific topic of the present article.

Decisions taken in the ‘private design space’ of the design team or ‘actor’ are closely related to the type of support that can be provided by a Collaborative Design system: automatic checks performed by activating procedures and methods, reporting of 'local' conflicts, methods and knowledge for the resolution of ‘local’ conflicts, creation of new IT objects/ building components, who the objects must refer to (the ‘owner’), 'situated' aspects (Gero and Reffat, 2001) of the IT objects/building components.

Decisions taken in the ‘shared design space’ involve aspects that are typical of networked design and that are partially present in the ‘private’ design space. Cross-checking, reporting of ‘global’ conflicts to all those concerned, even those who are unaware they are concerned, methods for their resolution, the modification of data structure and interface according to the actors interacting with it and the design phase, the definition of a 'dominus' for every IT object (i.e. the decision-maker, according to the design phase and the creation of the object). All this is made possible both by the model for representing the building (Carrara and Fioravanti, 2001), and by the type of IT representation of the individual building components, using the methods and techniques of Knowledge Engineering through a structured set of Knowledge Bases, Inference Engines and Databases. The aim is to develop suitable tools for supporting integrated Process/Product design activity by means of a effective and innovative representation of building entities (technical components, constraints, methods) in order to manage and resolve conflicts generated during the design activity.

keywords Collaborative Design, Architectural Design, Distributed Knowledge Bases, ‘Situated’ Object, Process/Product Model, Private/Shared ‘Design Space’, Conflict Reduction.
series other
type symposium
email antonio.fioravanti@uniroma1.it
last changed 2005/03/30 14:25

_id 6279
id 6279
authors Carrara, G.; Fioravanti, A.
year 2002
title Private Space' and ‘Shared Space’ Dialectics in Collaborative Architectural Design
source InterSymp 2002 - 14th International Conference on Systems Research, Informatics and Cybernetics (July 29 - August 3, 2002), pp 28-44.
summary The present paper describes on-going research on Collaborative Design. The proposed model, the resulting system and its implementation refer mainly to architectural and building design in the modes and forms in which it is carried on in advanced design firms. The model may actually be used effectively also in other environments. The research simultaneously pursues an integrated model of the: a) structure of the networked architectural design process (operators, activities, phases and resources); b) required knowledge (distributed and functional to the operators and the process phases). The article focuses on the first aspect of the model: the relationship that exists among the various ‘actors’ in the design process (according to the STEP-ISO definition, Wix, 1997) during the various stages of its development (McKinney and Fischer, 1998). In Collaborative Design support systems this aspect touches on a number of different problems: database structure, homogeneity of the knowledge bases, the creation of knowledge bases (Galle, 1995), the representation of the IT datum (Carrara et al., 1994; Pohl and Myers, 1994; Papamichael et al., 1996; Rosenmann and Gero, 1996; Eastman et al., 1997; Eastman, 1998; Kim, et al., 1997; Kavakli, 2001). Decision-making support and the relationship between ‘private’ design space (involving the decisions of the individual design team) and the ‘shared’ design space (involving the decisions of all the design teams, Zang and Norman, 1994) are the specific topic of the present article.

Decisions taken in the ‘private design space’ of the design team or ‘actor’ are closely related to the type of support that can be provided by a Collaborative Design system: automatic checks performed by activating procedures and methods, reporting of 'local' conflicts, methods and knowledge for the resolution of ‘local’ conflicts, creation of new IT objects/ building components, who the objects must refer to (the ‘owner’), 'situated' aspects (Gero and Reffat, 2001) of the IT objects/building components.

Decisions taken in the ‘shared design space’ involve aspects that are typical of networked design and that are partially present in the ‘private’ design space. Cross-checking, reporting of ‘global’ conflicts to all those concerned, even those who are unaware they are concerned, methods for their resolution, the modification of data structure and interface according to the actors interacting with it and the design phase, the definition of a 'dominus' for every IT object (i.e. the decision-maker, according to the design phase and the creation of the object). All this is made possible both by the model for representing the building (Carrara and Fioravanti, 2001), and by the type of IT representation of the individual building components, using the methods and techniques of Knowledge Engineering through a structured set of Knowledge Bases, Inference Engines and Databases. The aim is to develop suitable tools for supporting integrated Process/Product design activity by means of a effective and innovative representation of building entities (technical components, constraints, methods) in order to manage and resolve conflicts generated during the design activity.

keywords Collaborative Design, Architectural Design, Distributed Knowledge Bases, ‘Situated’ Object, Process/Product Model, Private/Shared ‘Design Space’, Conflict Reduction.
series other
type symposium
email antonio.fioravanti@uniroma1.it
last changed 2012/12/04 06:53

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id ee24
authors Chien, S.-F., Magd, D., Snyder, J. and Tsa, W.-J.
year 1998
title SG-Clips: A System to Support the Automatic Generation of Designs From Grammars
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 445-454
summary SG-CLIPS is a computer tool that supports the automatic generation of designs from a predefined set of grammar rules that encapsulate the composition principles of a certain style of design. It is an open system that accepts any grammar conforming to the conventions described in this paper. We demonstrate the system through an example and discuss the relation to shape grammars and limitations.
keywords Generative Systems, Shape Grammars, Rule-based Design Tools, CLIPS
series CAADRIA
email schien+@cmu.edu
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:09

_id fb22
authors Chien, Sheng-Fen
year 1998
title Supporting information navigation in generative design systems
source Camegie Mellon University, School of Architecture
summary Generative design systems make it easier for designers to generate and explore design altematives, but the amount of information generated during a design session can become very large. Intelligent navigation aids are needed to enable designers to access the information with ease. Such aids may improve the usability of generative design systems and encourage their use in architectural practice. This dissertation presents a comprehensive approach to support navigation in generative design systems. This approach takes account of studies related to human spatial cognition, wayfinding in physical environments, and information navigation in electronic media. It contains a general model of design space, basic navigation operations, and principles for designing navigation support. The design space model describes how the space may grow and evolve along predictable dimensions. The basic operations facilitate navigation activities in this multi-dimensional design space. The design principles aim at guiding system developers in creating navigation utilities tailored to the needs of individual design systems. This approach is validated through prototype implementations and limited pilot usability studies. The validity of the design space model and basic navigation operations is examined through the development of a design space navigation framework that encapsulates the model and operations in a software environment and provides the infrastructure and mechanisms for supporting navigation. Three prototype navigation tools are implemented using this framework. These tools are subjected to usability studies. The studies show that these tools are easy to leam and are efficient in assisting designers locating desired information. In summary, it can be demonstrated that through the prototype implementations and usability studies, this approach offers sufficient support for the design and implementation of navigation aids in a generative design system. The research effort is a pioneer study on navigation support in generative design systems. It demonstrates why navigation support is necessary; how to provide the support; and what types of user interaction it can offer. This research contributes to information navigation studies not only in the specific domain of generative design system research, but also in the general field of human-computer interaction.
series thesis:PhD
email schien@mail.ntust.edu.tw
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 38
authors Combes., Leonardo and Saito, Keiko
year 1998
title Exploracion de Alternativas Formales de Edificios Ortogonales (Exploration of Formal Alternatives of Orthogonal Buildings)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 286-291
summary The shape of buildings determines the relationships between the contained spaces with the contained activities. As shapes are represented by their perimeter, the form and the length of building perimeters is of particular interest to architectural design. This paper presents a short computer program oriented to the exploration of modular floor plans related to their perimeter. The characteristics of a class of orthogonal configurations called polyminoes has been taken as a basis for the programming work. Polyminoes are briefly presented in the first part of the paper as well as some data concerning their geometrical structure. The operation of the computer program illustrated by some working examples, is described in the last part of the paper. The results obtained can be used for comparison between alternative shapes. Additional information about these modular shapes is given together with every particular form so as to ease the evaluation task. In these terms the program must be seen as a tool of assessment rather than as a designing procedure.
series SIGRADI
email labsist@herrera.unt.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id acdf
authors Dijkstra, J., Timmermans, H. and Roelen, W.
year 1998
title Eye Tracking as a User Behavior Registration Tool in Virtual Environments
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 57-66
summary Registration of user behavior in a virtual environment is a particular aspect of an ongoing research project which aims to develop a conjoint analysis - virtual reality system. In this paper, the registration of user behavior by eye tracking techniques will be described. It will be advocated that eye-tracking techniques offer interesting possibilities for recording user behavior.
keywords User Behavior, Conjoint Analysis, Virtual Reality, Decision Making
series CAADRIA
email J.Dijkstra@bwk.tue.nl
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:47

_id c3e0
authors Dorsey, J. and McMillan, L.
year 1998
title Computer Graphics and Architecture: State of the Art and Outlook for the Future
source Computer Graphics, Vol 32, No 1, Feb 1998. pp. 45-48
summary During the three decades since Ivan Sutherland introduced the Sketchpad system, there has been an outpouring of computer graphics systems for use in architecture. In response to this development, most of the major architectural firms around the world have embraced the idea that computer literacy is mandatory for success. We would argue, however, that most of these recent developments have failed to tap the potential of the computer as a design tool. Instead, computers have been relegated largely to the status of drafting instruments, so that the "D" in CAD stands for drafting rather than design. It is important that future architectural design systems consider design as a continuous process rather than an eventual outcome.The advent of computer graphics technology has had an impact on the architectural profession. Computer graphics has revolutionized the drafting process, enabling the rapid entry and modification of designs. In addition, modeling and rendering systems have proven to be invaluable aids in the visualization process, allowing designers to walk through their designs with photorealistic imagery. Computer graphics systems have also demonstrated utility for capturing engineering information, greatly simplifying the analysis and construction of proposed designs. However, it is important to consider that all of these tasks occur near the conclusion of a larger design process. In fact, most of the artistic and intellectual challenges of an architectural design have already been resolved by the time the designer sits down in front of a computer. In seeking insight into the design process, it is generally of little use to revisit the various computer archives and backups. Instead, it is best to explore the reams of sketches and crude balsa models that fill the trash cans of any architectural studio.In architecture, as in most other fields, the initial success of computerization has been in areas where it frees humans from tedious and mundane tasks. This includes the redrawing of floor plans after minor modifications, the generation of largely redundant, yet subtly different engineering drawings and the generation of perspective renderings.We believe that there is a largely untapped potential for computer graphics as a tool in the earlier phases of the design process. In this essay, we argue that computer graphics might play a larger role via applications that aid and amplify the creative process.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id e72f
authors Dorta, Tomás and LaLande, Philippe
year 1998
title The Impact of Virtual Reality on the Design Process
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 138-163
summary Sketching, either hand or computer generated, along with other traditional visualization tools such as perspective drawing have difficulty in correctly representing three dimensional objects. Even physical models, in architecture, suffer in this regard because of inevitable scaling. The designer finds himself cut off from the reality of the object and is prone to misinterpretations of the object and its surrounding space and to resulting design errors. These are sometimes not perceived until too late, once the object has been constructed. Traditional tools use 2D media to represent 3D objects and only manage to introduce the third dimension in a limited manner (perspectives, not only tedious to construct, are static). This scenario affects the design process, particularly the cycle of proposal, verification and correction of design hypotheses as well as the cognitive aspects that condition the designer’s visualization of the designed object. In most cases, computer graphics mimic, through its interface, the traditional way of doing things. The architectural model is parametricized with little regard for visualization. No allowance is made for the change in the medium of graphic representation. Moreover, effort is not made to capitalize on the advantages of numerical calculation to propose new interfaces and new dimensions in object visualization. Virtual Reality (VR), seen not only as technology but as experience, brings the 3D object, abstractly viewed by traditional means, into clearer focus and provides us with these new dimensions. Errors due to abstracted representation are reduced since the interface is always three dimensional and the interactions intuitively made in real time thus allowing the designer to experience the presence of the designed object very quickly. At the École de design industriel of the Faculté d’aménagement, we have run tests using non-immersive VR–one passive (comprehension) and another active (design). This project, involving a group of 72 students during a period of six weeks (6h/week), aimed at analyzing the impact of VR as a visualization tool on the design process versus traditional tools. The results, described in this presentation, shed light on the effect of VR on the creative process as such, as well as on the quality of the results produced by that process.

series ACADIA
email dortat@ere.umontreal.ca, lalandep@ere.umontreal.ca
last changed 1998/12/16 07:27

_id 2d75
authors Entous, Marc
year 1998
title Developments in 3D Scanning and Digitizing: New Strategies for an Evolving Design Process
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 212-220
summary The computer is now a widely accepted tool in architecture as a production and business tool. Acceptance of digital technology as a design aid has been much slower, but continuing developments in ease of use, capabilities, and lower costs are encouraging the use of three-dimensional design modeling. As the demand for 3D design computing grows, peripheral digital technologies are also developing and being integrated. This paper describes on-going research into how current and near-future developments in three-dimensional scanning and digitizing technology that have the potential to substantially change processes of architectural design. Scanners, or digitizers, assist in transforming physical objects and models into digital representations. The capabilities of 3D scanners in architectural design have only begun to be explored. Existing and emerging 3D scanning technologies are briefly described followed by a discussion of sample existing, new, and potential uses of these capabilities as a design tool. An experiment is conducted to contrast the differences between stylus-based and laser-based digitizers in an architectural design environment.

series ACADIA
email entous@usc.edu
last changed 1998/12/16 08:40

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