CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 527

_id a96f
id a96f
authors Clayton, M., Johnson, R., Song, Y and Al-Qawasmi, J.
year 1998
title Delivering Facility Documentation using Intranet Technology
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 240-253
summary Intranet technologies present new opportunities for delivering facility documentation for use in facility management. After the design stage, building documentation is reused to support construction and then facility operation. However, a common perception is that construction documents and as-built drawings are less than optimal for reuse to support operations. We have conducted a study of facility management processes and the information content of facility documentation in the context of information technologies that are emerging into the marketplace. The study provides guidance for facility managers who are implementing and fielding new information technology systems. A better understanding of information needs during operations may also help designers to better structure their own documents for reuse. An analysis of documents that are used throughout the life cycle of facilities has led us to a characterization of operations documents that are distinct from design drawings, record drawings or as-built drawings. From an analysis of facility management processes, we have identified different roles for facility documentation in those processes. Facility documentation may be used as a resource, as input, or as output. Furthermore, from interviews of facility management personnel, we identified facility information that was rated high in importance and low in satisfaction that might be targeted when implementing a facility information system. We prepared software demonstrations that show how the information may be extracted from drawings, entered into databases and then retrieved via Web and CAD interfaces. We suggest that operations documents consist of a variety of information types and require several kinds of information tools, including databases, CAD drawings and hypertext. Intranet technologies, databases and CAD software can be integrated to achieve facility management systems that address shortcomings in current facility management operations. In particular, intranet technologies provide improved accessibility to information for facility management customers and occasional users of the systems. Our study has produced recommendations based upon utility and ease-of-implementation for delivery of information from the design team to the owner, and among personnel during operation of the facility.

series ACADIA
email mark-clayton@tamu.edu
last changed 2003/12/06 07:44

_id ba1b
authors Schnier, T. and Gero, J.S.
year 1998
title From Frank Lloyd Wright to Mondrian: Transforming evolving representations
source I. Parmee (Ed.), Adaptive Computing in Design and Manufacture, Springer, London, pp. 207-219
summary If a computer is to create designs with the goal of following a certain style it has to have information about this style. Unfortunately, the most often used method of formal representations of style, shape grammars, does not lend itself to automated implementation. However, It has been shown how an evolutionary system with evolving representation can provide an alternative approach that allows a system to learn style knowledge automatically and without the need for an explicit representation. This paper shows how the applicability of evolved representation can be extended by the introduction of transformations of the representation. One such transformation allows mixing of style knowledge, similar to the cross-breeding of animals of different races, with the added possibility of controlling exactly what features are used from which source. This can be achieved through different ways of mixing representations learned from different examples and then using the new, combined representation to create new designs. In a similar manner, information learned in one application domain can be used in a different domain. To achieve this, either the representation or the genotype-phenotype transformation has to be adapted. The same operations also allow mixing of knowledge from different domains. As an example, we show how style information learned from a set of Mondrian paintings can be combined with style information from a Frank Lloyd Wright window design, to create new window designs. Also, we show how the combined style information can then be used to create three-dimensional objects, showing style features similar to the newly designed windows.
keywords Genetic Engineering, Learning
series other
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/04/06 07:02

_id ca7b
authors Howes, Jaki
year 1999
title IT or not IT? An Examination of IT Use in an Experimental Multi-disciplinary Teamwork Situation
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 370-373
summary Leeds Metropolitan University is well placed to carry out research into multi-disciplinary team-working, as all the design and construction disciplines are housed in one faculty. Staff have set up an experimental project, TIME IT (Team-working in Multi-disciplinary Environments using IT) which examines ways of working in the design/construction process and how IT is used when there is no commercial pressure. Four groups of four students, one graduate diploma architect, and one final year student from each of Civil Engineering, Construction Management and Quantity Surveying have been working on feasibility studies for projects that are based on completed schemes or have been devised by collaborators in the Construction Industry. Students have been asked to produce a PowerPoint presentation, in up to five working days, of a design scheme, with costs, structural analysis and construction programme. The students are not assessed on the quality of the product, but on their own ability to monitor the process and use of IT. Despite this, aggressive competition evolved between the teams to produce the 'best' design. Five projects were run in the 1998/99 session. A dedicated IT suite has been provided; each group of students had exclusive use of a machine. They were not told how to approach the projects nor when to use the available technology, but were asked to keep the use of paper to a minimum and to keep all their work on the server, so that it could be monitored externally. Not so. They plotted the AO drawings of an existing building that had been provided on the server. They like paper - they can scribble on it, fold it, tear it and throw it at one another.
keywords IT, Multi-disciplinary, Teamwork
series eCAADe
email J.Howes@imu.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id acfc
authors Seo, Jongwon
year 1998
title Graphical Interface Design for Equipment Control in Unstructured Environments
source University of Texas at Austin, Dept. of Civil Engineering
summary This dissertation is concerned with graphical interfaces to improve equipment control in unstructured environments such as construction, demolition, mining, and facility/infrastructure maintenance. Initial evidence indicates that graphical representation of equipment and work environments would enhance equipment control by providing better spatial perception to the operator. Real-time simulation and task planning with graphical models can also ensure safe and reliable operation of equipment. In addition, graphical interfaces can assist the operator to plan, measure, and record work progress by integrating design or as-built CAD databases with graphical models of equipment and work environments. The use of graphical models for equipment control in unstructured environments, however, has limitations, because it is very difficult to generate exact graphical models in such a quickly changing environment. The main objectives of this study were to develop principles for design of, and to validate the usefulness of graphical interfaces for equipment control in unstructured environments. The design principles were derived based on general literature and case studies of the existing graphical control interface systems. The graphical control interface for a tele-operated clinker clearing robot was then designed and implemented based on the derived principles. The developed graphical interface was tested and evaluated, and the implementation was analyzed with respect to the derived principles. The quantitative test results of the graphical control interface for the tele-operated clinker clearing robot validated the usefulness of graphical interfaces for equipment control in unstructured environments. The design principles were also verified with the test results.
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 0453
authors McIntosh, Patricia G.
year 1998
title The Internet as Communication Medium and Online Laboratory For Architecture Research
source Computerised Craftsmanship [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Paris (France) 24-26 September 1998, pp. 151-157
summary This case study documents the experiences of two courses recently conducted on the Internet. The courses are a sequence of core methods courses offered to post-professional degree architecture students studying in a Computer Aided Design concentration in a Master of Science program. In these courses the students use the Internet as a communication medium and as a research tool using the Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML). The VRML interface in the Web browser serves as an online laboratory and presents new opportunities for communication and for studying distributed computing in a multimedia and multidimensional environment.
series eCAADe
email pgm@cox.net
more http://www.paris-valdemarne.archi.fr/archive/ecaade98/html/09mcintosh/index.htm
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id ddss9807
id ddss9807
authors Boelen, A.J. and Lugt, Hermen J. van der
year 1998
title Communication of design parameters within groups
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary This paper discusses the facilitation of worldwide concurrent design within the domains involved in environmental planning, urban design and civil engineering. Typical projects in these domains require the collaboration of many experts. Each of these has his reference framework for the taskat hand and for the variables used. The amount of variables makes it impossible for each project participant to take account for all possible impacts of proposed or planned actions. The typical project demands for a concurrent design process that enables all participants to concentrate ontheir domain of expertise. On the other hand the design process should enable them to have insight in the problems, within the domains of other experts. The system should provide a generic environment with the ability to attach domain specific knowledge. By providing this support thesystem integrates knowledge specific to various expert domains.In the PortPlan project within the LWI organization a system is being developed that supports the integration of various reference frameworks involved in environmental planning. We no longer need to develop a common language for the users. The system contains a dynamic set of scalebound reference objects for the domains involved. The system facilitates the communication of object characteristics. It also supports the presentation of these objects, in legends for each participant involved.We achieve the communication between participants using a dynamic legend. We also enable all participants to become informed on the interests of other participants. We achieve the technical communication using the exchange of interventions. We do not exchange results. This leads to alow "network traffic load" and thus enables the system to operate within the current Internet infrastructure. In this paper we present the problem area of concurrent design in environmental planning. We present this describing the background of our project, describing the overall architecture of the system and presenting the first findings of user studies.
keywords Concurrent Design, Interfaces, Legends
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 6602
authors Clayton, Mark J.
year 1998
title Computing in Civil Engineering 1998
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 17, no. 4, p. 7
summary Just before our ACADIA 98 conference, a conference was held in Boston addressing similar issues in the related profession of civil engineering. Sponsored by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), the conference was titled the International Computing Congress in Civil Engineering and was the fifteenth in the Computing in Civil Engineering series. Although the interests of civil engineers include nonarchitectural subjects such as traffic engineering, bridge building, and sanitation engineering, a large number of participants at the conference identify their area of interest as building engineering. Consequently, the conference addressed many issues of interest to architects. Sessions and presentations at the Congress paralleled those at ACADIA conferences. The World Wide Web was a topic of much discussion, just as it has been at ACADIA conferences. Civil engineering researchers are also exploring how to put courses on the Web, how to use the Internet to support collaboration, and how to distribute product data across the Web.Other papers addressed case-based reasoning, applications of object-oriented programming, expert systems, design education, automated building code checking, and product modeling. Not only did the Congress include a wide range of architecturally relevant topics, it was truly international, including participants from Asia, Europe, Australia, Africa and the Americas.
series ACADIA
email mark-clayton@tamu.edu
last changed 2002/12/14 08:21

_id 4266
authors Hong, Namhee Kim and Hong, Sunggul
year 1998
title Entity-Based Models for Computer-Aided Design Systems
source Journal of Computing in Civil Engineering -- January 1998 -- Volume 12, Issue 1, pp. 30-41
summary Integrated computer-aided design systems manage, communicate, and process the information created by and used in a variety of planning and design activities. Formal models of both the design product and thedesign process are important conceptual steps in the development of an integrated system. This paper outlines an entity-based approach for representing both design information and activities in a consistent way.The entity-based approach is based on the concepts of semantic data models (i.e., entity-based concepts) and related abstraction mechanisms. In this paper the concept of an entity that was originally applied todesign information has been extended to include design activities. That is, entity-based product and process models in this paper organize design information and activities into corresponding entities. The formalmodeling concepts developed in this paper can be used as consistent formal tools for describing and organizing design information and activities in the development of new integrated computer-aided designsystems.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:45

_id 4942
authors Gardner, Brian M.
year 1998
title The Grid Sketcher: An AutoCAD Based Tool for Conceptual Design Processes
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 222-237
summary Sketching with pencil and paper is reminiscent of the varied, rich, and loosely defined formal processes associated with conceptual design. Architects actively engage such creative paradigms in their exploration and development of conceptual design solutions. The Grid Sketcher, as a conceptual sketching tool, presents one possible computer implementation for enhancing and supporting these processes. It effectively demonstrates the facility with which current technology and the computing environment can enhance and simulate sketching intents and expectations. One pervasive and troubling undercurrent, however, is the conceptual barrier between the variable processes of human thought and those indigenous to computing. Typically with respect to design, the position taken is that the two are virtually void of any fundamental commonality. A designer’s thoughts are intuitive, at times irrational, and rarely follow consistently identifiable patterns. Conversely, computing requires predictability in just these endeavors. Computing is strictly an algorithmic process while thought is not always so predictable. Given these dichotomous relationships, the computing environment, as commonly defined, cannot reasonably expect to mimic the typically human domain of creative design. In this context, this thesis accentuates the computer’s role as a form generator as opposed to a form evaluator. The computer, under the influence of certain contextual parameters can, however, provide the designer with a rich and elegant set of forms that respond through algorithmics to the designer’s creative intents. The software presented in this thesis is written in AutoLISP and exploits AutoCAD’s capacious 3D environment. Designs and productions respond to a bounded framework where user selected parametric variables of size, scale, proportion, and proximity, all which reflect contextual issues, determine the characteristics of a unit form. Designer selected growth algorithms then arbitrate the spatial relationships between the unit forms and their propagation through the developing design. While the Sketcher implements only the GRID as an organizational discipline, many other paradigms are possible. Within this grid structure a robust set of editing features, supported by the computer’s inherent speed, allows the designer to analyze successive productions while refining ever more complex solutions. Through creative manipulation of these algorithmic structures ideas eventually coalesce to formalize images that represent a given design problem’s solution set.

series ACADIA
email jvcarch@mcione.com
last changed 1998/12/16 08:41

_id 6db8
authors Iki, K., Shimoda, S., Miyazaki, T. and Homma, R.
year 1998
title On the Development and the Use of Network Based Cafm System
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 253-260
summary The purpose of this study to develop a prototype of the network based and distributed database integrated CAFM (Computer Aided Facility Management) system for spatial analysis and space planning of office building. This system developed for the FM (Facility Management) works of large company that owns many office buildings in wide spread area. This system has following characteristic capabilities; 1) data acquisition from distributed database 2) benchmark comparison among in-house offices, particular office and several outside office standards 3) analysis of POE database and spatial condition database 4) evaluation of space planning by using CAD database and POE database This paper reports these four points. 1) conceptual and functional frame work of the system 2) technical arrangement of the system development 3) case study of the system use in a FM works on spatial analysis and space planning 4) evaluation of the system
keywords CAFM, POE, Windows, Network
series CAADRIA
email iki@arch.kumamoto-u.ac.jp
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:30

_id 9951
authors Johnson, R.E. and Clayton, M.J.
year 1998
title The impact of information technology in design and construction: the owner's perspective
source Automation in Construction 8 (1) (1998) pp. 3-14
summary This paper reports on findings of a November 1996 exploratory survey of architecture–engineering clients (Fortune 500 corporate facility managers). This research investigated how the practices of corporate facility managers are being influenced by rapid changes in information technology. The conceptual model that served as a guide for this research hypothesized that information technology acts as both an enabler (that is, information technology provides an effective mechanism for managers to implement desired changes), as well as a source of innovation (that is, new information technology innovations create new facility management opportunities). The underlying assumption of this research is that information technology is evolving from a tool that incrementally improves `back-office' productivity to an essential component of strategic positioning that may alter the basic economics, organizational structure and operational practices of facility management organizations and their interactions with service providers (architects, engineers, and constructors). The paper concludes with a discussion of researchable issues.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 7346
authors Peyret, F.
year 1998
title A new facility for testing accurate positioning systems for road construction robotics
source Automation in Construction 8 (2) (1998) pp. 209-221
summary The first part of the paper gives a definition of positioning in the context of road work sites and stresses the advantages offered by the new generation of positioning systems. A logical classification of these systems is also proposed. The `global positioning system' (GPS) technique, as one of the most promising techniques, is detailed. The main point of the paper is the presentation of a new test facility for positioning systems which has been set up at the `Laboratoire Central des Ponts et Chaussées' (Central Laboratory of Roads and Bridges). First, its principle is described, based on the re-construction of a 6D reference trajectory to which the measurements of the system in test are compared. Then, the operation of the facility and the post-treatment software which has been specially developed for it are described. Finally, the results of some recent studies are given, results which would have been hard to obtain without using the SESSYL facility. During the first study, the facility was used to establish an accurate time-model of the vertical error and this model allowed us to propose an innovative method for improving the vertical accuracy. During the second study, SESSYL proved its capability of differentiating several state-of-the-art GPS receivers of the same category.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id fb22
authors Chien, Sheng-Fen
year 1998
title Supporting information navigation in generative design systems
source Camegie Mellon University, School of Architecture
summary Generative design systems make it easier for designers to generate and explore design altematives, but the amount of information generated during a design session can become very large. Intelligent navigation aids are needed to enable designers to access the information with ease. Such aids may improve the usability of generative design systems and encourage their use in architectural practice. This dissertation presents a comprehensive approach to support navigation in generative design systems. This approach takes account of studies related to human spatial cognition, wayfinding in physical environments, and information navigation in electronic media. It contains a general model of design space, basic navigation operations, and principles for designing navigation support. The design space model describes how the space may grow and evolve along predictable dimensions. The basic operations facilitate navigation activities in this multi-dimensional design space. The design principles aim at guiding system developers in creating navigation utilities tailored to the needs of individual design systems. This approach is validated through prototype implementations and limited pilot usability studies. The validity of the design space model and basic navigation operations is examined through the development of a design space navigation framework that encapsulates the model and operations in a software environment and provides the infrastructure and mechanisms for supporting navigation. Three prototype navigation tools are implemented using this framework. These tools are subjected to usability studies. The studies show that these tools are easy to leam and are efficient in assisting designers locating desired information. In summary, it can be demonstrated that through the prototype implementations and usability studies, this approach offers sufficient support for the design and implementation of navigation aids in a generative design system. The research effort is a pioneer study on navigation support in generative design systems. It demonstrates why navigation support is necessary; how to provide the support; and what types of user interaction it can offer. This research contributes to information navigation studies not only in the specific domain of generative design system research, but also in the general field of human-computer interaction.
series thesis:PhD
email schien@mail.ntust.edu.tw
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id ga9921
id ga9921
authors Coates, P.S. and Hazarika, L.
year 1999
title The use of genetic programming for applications in the field of spatial composition
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Architectural design teaching using computers has been a preoccupation of CECA since 1991. All design tutors provide their students with a set of models and ways to form, and we have explored a set of approaches including cellular automata, genetic programming ,agent based modelling and shape grammars as additional tools with which to explore architectural ( and architectonic) ideas.This paper discusses the use of genetic programming (G.P.) for applications in the field of spatial composition. CECA has been developing the use of Genetic Programming for some time ( see references ) and has covered the evolution of L-Systems production rules( coates 1997, 1999b), and the evolution of generative grammars of form (Coates 1998 1999a). The G.P. was used to generate three-dimensional spatial forms from a set of geometrical structures .The approach uses genetic programming with a Genetic Library (G.Lib) .G.P. provides a way to genetically breed a computer program to solve a problem.G. Lib. enables genetic programming to define potentially useful subroutines dynamically during a run .* Exploring a shape grammar consisting of simple solid primitives and transformations. * Applying a simple fitness function to the solid breeding G.P.* Exploring a shape grammar of composite surface objects. * Developing grammarsfor existing buildings, and creating hybrids. * Exploring the shape grammar of abuilding within a G.P.We will report on new work using a range of different morphologies ( boolean operations, surface operations and grammars of style ) and describe the use of objective functions ( natural selection) and the "eyeball test" ( artificial selection) as ways of controlling and exploring the design spaces thus defined.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id de62
authors Eriksson, Joakim
year 1998
title Planning of Environments for People with Physical Disabilities Using Computer Aided Design
source Lund Institute of Technology, School of Architecture
summary In the area of environment adaptations for people with physical disabilities, it is of vital importance that the design is optimized considering the human-environment interactions. All involved persons in such a planning process must be given sufficient support in understanding the information, so that everyone can participate actively. There is an apparent risk that discussions will be kept between experts, due to difficulties in understanding the complex and technical adaptation issues. This thesis investigates the use of computer-based tools for planning/designing environments for physically disabled people. A software prototype, and a method to use such a tool in the planning process, was developed and evaluated, based on the findings from six case studies of real planning situations. The case studies indicated that although such a tool would support the design, as well as the dialog between the participants, a certain level of technical and economical efficiency must be obtained. To facilitate the professional planner's work, an important issue is to maintain a large library of 3D objects. With the latest prototype implementation, it was found that such a planning tool can be produced, even when using consumer-oriented computers. One previous critical factor, interactive manipulation of 3D objects, can now be achieved if utilizing modern graphic cards with 3D acceleration. A usability test was performed to evaluate the prototype's basic operations, involving two groups of future users: five occupational therapist students, and four persons with major physical impairments. It was found that although the usability was satisfactory for the basic tasks, several items needed to be improved or added in future versions. It is important with an integrated support for manikins, in order to evaluate, e.g., wheelchair accessibility, reach ability, positioning of handrails, etc. This thesis reviews and compiles published anthropometrical and biomechanical data into a uniform segment-by-segment structure, in order to aid the design and modifications of manikins. The compilation was implemented as a spreadsheet document. An MRI investigation of the neck-shoulder region was performed on 20 healthy Scandinavian, female volunteers, measuring various musculoskeletal properties. These measurements can be used for further refinements of manikin specifications and biomechanical models.
keywords Rehabilitation; Disability; Adaptation; Participatory Planning; Design Tool; 3D Graphics; Computer Aided Design; Virtual Reality; Manikin; Anthropometry; Biomechanics; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Cervical Spine Kinematics
series thesis:PhD
email joakim.eriksson@design.lth.se
more http://www.lub.lu.se/cgi-bin/show_diss.pl?db=global&fname=tec_250.html
last changed 2003/02/26 08:21

_id b796
authors Krishnamurthy, B.K., Tserng, H.-P., Schmitt, R.L., Russell, J.S., Bahia, H.U. and Hanna, A.S.
year 1998
title AutoPave: towards an automated paving system for asphalt pavement compaction operations
source Automation in Construction 8 (2) (1998) pp. 165-180
summary Asphalt pavement density from roller compaction is a crucial factor in ensuring satisfactory pavement performance. Proper and uniform compaction of the pavement mat is essential in achieving the desired final compacted density. There is a necessity to investigate existing pavement construction practices, and provide more cost-effective modifications to the current scenario. Automation of the paving operation can increase the efficiency and quality of the operation, lead to reductions in overall project costs and time, and enhance pavement life. A system can be developed through algorithmic planning and real-time guidance strategies, and the development of a semi-automated path-planning and real-time guidance system that aims towards automating the paving operation. This system accepts relevant paving project inputs, generates appropriate path plans for the compactor, performs a graphical visualization of the generated path plan, and offers real-time guidance capabilities using Global Positioning Systems (GPS) technology. This system, named AUTOPAVE (v1.0), was developed in Microsoft Visual Basic™ programming language and offers a user-friendly and interactive graphical interface. The proposed new system will incorporate state-of-the-art GPS technology to standardize paving operations that are more amenable to rigorous quality control, and can result in considerable reductions in cost and time involved in asphalt pavement construction projects. This system was tested on several actual paving projects, and many operational issues related to the functioning of the system were successfully overcome.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id c125
authors LaViola, J., Holden, L.S., Forsberg, A.S., Bhuphaibool, D.S. and Zeleznik, R.C.
year 1998
title Collaborative Conceptual Modeling Using the SKETCH Framework
source Proceedings of IASTED International Conference on Computer Graphics and Imaging, 154-158
summary This paper introduces NetSketch, an application that supports distributed conceptual design by providing tools for modelessly creating, manipulating and viewing 3D models in a shared virtual space. Inherent problems exist with collaborative design tools because of the simultaneous group interaction required for users to smoothly and effectively work together in the same virtual space. With NetSketch, we provide solutions to these problems by providing a fast and direct gesture-based user interface, a set of visual effects that better enable a user's awareness of operations done by other participants, and a set of tools for enhancing visual communication between participants.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 446f
authors Mcintyre, B. and Feiner, S.
year 1998
title A Distributed 3D Graphics Library
source SIGGRAPH 98 Conference Proceedings, Computer Graphics Proceedings, Annual Conference Series, 1998, ACM SIGGRAPH
summary We present Repo-3D, a general-purpose, object-oriented library for developing distributed, interactive 3D graphics applications across a range of heterogeneous workstations. Repo-3D is designed to make it easy for programmers to rapidly build prototypes using a familiar multi-threaded, object-oriented programming paradigm. All data sharing of both graphical and non-graphical data is done via general-purpose remote and replicated objects, presenting the illusion of a single distributed shared memory. Graphical objects are directly distributed, circumventing the "duplicate database" problem and allowing programmers to focus on the application details. Repo-3D is embedded in Repo, an interpreted, lexically-scoped, distributed programming language, allowing entire applications to be rapidly prototyped. We discuss Repo-3D's design, and introduce the notion of local variations to the graphical objects, which allow local changes to be applied to shared graphical structures. Local variations are needed to support transient local changes, such as highlighting, and responsive local editing operations. Finally, we discuss how our approach could be applied using other programming languages, such as Java.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id caadria2006_569
id caadria2006_569
authors WEI-TSANG CHANG, TENG-WEN CHANG
year 2006
title FOLDING SPACE WITH TIME-BASED OPERATIONS
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 569-571
summary Folding is not only a design operation of shaping but also a philosophy theory from Deleuze (Deleuze 1988) which was adopted by architecture. Basically, folding constitutes to forming and topology, which often delivered a mathematical and philosophical expression in generating 3D architectural form. For instance, the work of Eisenman (Eisenman 2003), Libeskind and Lynn (Lynn 1998), they use folding as inspiration to explore the textural folding and bifurcation meaning in the process of form-making. While exploring the meaning of folding, their ideas are expressed by the form using computational tools. Therefore, if a suitable or inspirable tool like our Folding Space (FoS) could be available, such action –fold can be expressed further in the form exploration process.
series CAADRIA
email mile@mail.gcd.yuntech.edu.tw, tengwen@yuntech.edu.tw
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

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