CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 101 to 120 of 527

_id e72f
authors Dorta, Tomás and LaLande, Philippe
year 1998
title The Impact of Virtual Reality on the Design Process
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 138-163
summary Sketching, either hand or computer generated, along with other traditional visualization tools such as perspective drawing have difficulty in correctly representing three dimensional objects. Even physical models, in architecture, suffer in this regard because of inevitable scaling. The designer finds himself cut off from the reality of the object and is prone to misinterpretations of the object and its surrounding space and to resulting design errors. These are sometimes not perceived until too late, once the object has been constructed. Traditional tools use 2D media to represent 3D objects and only manage to introduce the third dimension in a limited manner (perspectives, not only tedious to construct, are static). This scenario affects the design process, particularly the cycle of proposal, verification and correction of design hypotheses as well as the cognitive aspects that condition the designer’s visualization of the designed object. In most cases, computer graphics mimic, through its interface, the traditional way of doing things. The architectural model is parametricized with little regard for visualization. No allowance is made for the change in the medium of graphic representation. Moreover, effort is not made to capitalize on the advantages of numerical calculation to propose new interfaces and new dimensions in object visualization. Virtual Reality (VR), seen not only as technology but as experience, brings the 3D object, abstractly viewed by traditional means, into clearer focus and provides us with these new dimensions. Errors due to abstracted representation are reduced since the interface is always three dimensional and the interactions intuitively made in real time thus allowing the designer to experience the presence of the designed object very quickly. At the École de design industriel of the Faculté d’aménagement, we have run tests using non-immersive VR–one passive (comprehension) and another active (design). This project, involving a group of 72 students during a period of six weeks (6h/week), aimed at analyzing the impact of VR as a visualization tool on the design process versus traditional tools. The results, described in this presentation, shed light on the effect of VR on the creative process as such, as well as on the quality of the results produced by that process.

series ACADIA
email dortat@ere.umontreal.ca, lalandep@ere.umontreal.ca
last changed 1998/12/16 07:27

_id 8ad1
authors Elsas, P.A. and Vergeest, J.S.M.
year 1998
title New functionality for computer-aided conceptual design: the displacement feature
source Design Studies 19 (1), pp. 81-102
summary Conceptual design using conventional 3D CAD systems is a controversial issue among industrial designers. Although one can produce complex, accurate, finished 3D models using these CAD systems, it is still difficult to use them during early, creative product design. In this paper, a method is described that allows the design of protrusions and depressions in sculptured surfaces in a flexible and interactive manner. Through interviews with industrial designers, the basic requirements for support of such functionality during conceptual design have been formulated. An implemented method based upon these requirements has been extensively evaluated by industrial designers, and these evaluations show that industrial designers find this functionality extremely useful during conceptual shape design.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 70a1
authors Elsasa, P.A. van and Vergeesta, J.S.M.
year 1998
title Displacement feature modelling for conceptual design
source Computer-Aided Design, Vol. 30 (1) (1998) pp. 19-27
summary Although the support of surface features, where a surface feature represents a local geometric detail imposed on a surface, is well-defined on prismatic objects, this is notthe case for sculptured surface models. Current methods often lead to data-explosion, high polynomial results, or procedural solutions. In this paper a method isdescribed that allows explicit modelling of protrusions and depressions in free-form B-spline surfaces. As this functionality is intended to be used by industrial designersduring conceptual design, distinct requirements are formulated to allow its use in this early stage of design. A method is described that calculates a blending geometryapproximating G1 cross-boundary smoothness effectively. Using these requirements and approximations, protrusions and depressions can be modelled with real-timeresponse, and with unprecedented flexibility.
keywords Surface Features, Conceptual Design, Curvature Continuity Approximating, B-Spline Patches
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:33

_id ddss9819
id ddss9819
authors Emdanat, S. S. and Vakalo, E.-G.
year 1998
title Sharing Design Knowledge Using Shape Algebras
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary Recent work on shape algebras and the maximal element representation produced a uniform and composable representation of shapes. This paper presents ongoing work to formulate a framework for sharing design knowledge based on shape algebras. The shape algebraic definitions are translated into Ontolingua, a framework for representing ontologies. It provides forms for defining classes, relations, functions, objects, and theories that are part of a conceptualization. The paper discusses some of the axioms and definitions of this ontology. It discusses the factors that influenced its design and the selection of its representational abstractions.
series DDSS
email emdanat@umich.edu
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ga9811
id ga9811
authors Feuerstein, Penny L.
year 1998
title Collage, Technology, and Creative Process
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Since the turn of the twentieth century artists have been using collage to suggest new realities and changing concepts of time. Appropriation and simulation can be found in the earliest recycled scraps in Cubist collages. Picasso and Braque liberated the art world with cubism, which integrated all planes and surfaces of the artists' subjects and combined them into a new, radical form. The computer is a natural extension of their work on collage. The identifying characteristics of the computer are integration, simultaneity and evolution which are inherent in collage. Further, the computer is about "converting information". There is something very facinating about scanning an object into the computer, creating a texture brush and drawing with the object's texture. It is as if the computer not only integrates information but different levels of awareness as well. In the act of converting the object from atoms to bits the object is portrayed at the same conscious level as the spiritual act of drawing. The speed and malleability of transforming an image on the computer can be compared to the speed and malleability of thought processes of the mind. David Salle said, "one of the impulses in new art is the desire to be a mutant, whether it involves artificial intelligence, gender or robotic parts. It is about the desire to get outside the self and the desire to trandscend one's place." I use the computer to transcend, to work in different levels of awareness at the same time - the spiritual and the physical. In the creative process of working with computer, many new images are generated from previous ones. An image can be processed in unlimited ways without degradation of information. There is no concept of original and copy. The computer alters the image and changes it back to its original in seconds. Each image is not a fixed object in time, but the result of dynamic aspects which are acquired from previous works and each new moment. In this way, using the computer to assist the mind in the creative processes of making art mirrors the changing concepts of time, space, and reality that have evolved as the twentieth century has progressed. Nineteenth-century concepts of the monolithic truth have been replaced with dualism and pluralism. In other words, the objective world independent of the observer, that assumes the mind is separate from the body, has been replaced with the mind and body as inseparable, connected to the objective world through our perception and awareness. Marshall Mcluhan said, "All media as extensions of ourselves serve to provide new transforming vision and awareness." The computer can bring such complexities and at the same time be very calming because it can be ultrafocused, promoting a higher level of awareness where life can be experienced more vividly. Nicholas Negroponte pointed out that "we are passing into a post information age, often having an audience of just one." By using the computer to juxtapose disparate elements, I create an impossible coherence, a hodgepodge of imagery not wholly illusory. Interestingly, what separates the elements also joins them. Clement Greenberg states that "the collage medium has played a pivotal role in twentieth century painting and sculpture"(1) Perspective, developed by the renaissance archetect Alberti, echoed the optically perceived world as reality was replaced with Cubism. Cubism brought about the destruction of the illusionist means and effects that had characterized Western painting since the fifteenth century.(2) Clement Greenberg describes the way in which physical and spiritual realities are combined in cubist collages. "By pasting a piece of newspaper lettering to the canvas one called attention to the physical reality of the work of art and made that reality the same as the art."(3) Before I discuss some of the concepts that relate collage to working with computer, I would like to define some of the theories behind them. The French word collage means pasting, or gluing. Today the concept may include all forms of composite art and processes of photomontage and assemblage. In the Foreword on Katherine Hoffman's book on Collage Kim Levin writes: "This technique - which takes bits and pieces out of context to patch them into new contexts keeps changeng, adapting to various styles and concerns. And it's perfectly apt that interpretations of collage have varied according to the intellectual inquiries of the time. From our vantage point near the end of the century we can now begin to see that collage has all along carried postmodern genes."(4) Computer, on the other hand is not another medium. It is a visual tool that may be used in the creative process. Patrick D. Prince's views are," Computer art is not concrete. There is no artifact in digital art. The images exist in the computer's memory and can be viewed on a monitor: they are pure visual information."(5) In this way it relates more to conceptual art such as performance art. Timothy Binkley explains that,"I believe we will find the concept of the computer as a medium to be more misleading than useful. Computer art will be better understood and more readily accepted by a skeptical artworld if we acknowledge how different it is from traditional tools. The computer is an extension of the mind, not of the hand or eye,and ,unlike cinema or photography, it does not simply add a new medium to the artist's repertoire, based on a new technology.(6) Conceptual art marked a watershed between the progress of modern art and the pluralism of postmodernism(7) " Once the art is comes out of the computer, it can take a variety of forms or be used with many different media. The artist does not have to write his/her own program to be creative with the computer. The work may have the thumbprint of a specific program, but the creative possibilities are up to the artist. Computer artist John Pearson feels that,"One cannot overlook the fact that no matter how technically interesting the artwork is it has to withstand analysis. Only the creative imagination of the artist, cultivated from a solid conceptual base and tempered by a sophisticsated visual sensitivity, can develop and resolve the problems of art."(8) The artist has to be even more focused and selective by using the computer in the creative process because of the multitude of options it creates and its generative qualities.
series other
email pennyf@mcs.net
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ddss9820
id ddss9820
authors Fukui, H.
year 1998
title An Example of Visualization for Urban Economic Scenery andUrban Modeling using GIS
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary This paper presents a zone-based urban model to forecast population distribution and land use transition. A GIS model has been suggested for urban economic scenery forecasting by using data related to an urban environment like Tokyo in Japan. The model has structural simplicity, visibility and applicability of policy analysis.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 9bee
authors Gerzso, J. Michael
year 2001
title Automatic Generation of Layouts of an Utzon Housing System via the Internet
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 202-211
summary The article describes how architectural layouts can be automatically generated over the Internet. Instead of using a standard web server sending out HTML pages to browser client, the system described here uses an approach that has become common since 1998, known as three tier client/server applications. The server part of the system contains a layout generator using SPR(s), which stands for “Spatial Production Rule System, String Version”, a standard context- free string grammar. Each sentences of this language represents one valid Utzon house layout. Despite the fact that the system represents rules for laying out Utzon houses grammatically, there are important differences between SPR(s) and shape grammars. The layout generator communicates with Autocad clients by means of an application server, which is analogous to a web server. The point of this project is to demonstrate the idea that many hundreds or thousands of clients can request the generation of all of the Utzon layouts simultaneously over the Internet by the SPR(s) server, but the server never has to keep track when each client requested the generation of all of the layouts, or how many layouts each client has received.
keywords Internet, Spatial-Production-Rules Grammars, Utzon
series ACADIA
email 104164.341@compuserve.com
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id dd16
authors Gibson, Kathleen
year 1999
title STUDIO @ CORNELL
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 18-21
summary Unique to the interior design program at Cornell University is a planned pedagogical approach requiring equal emphasis toward manual and digital graphic communication at the freshman level. Prior to 1998, computer-based instruction only occurred at the junior year of study. Recognizing that cultural and symbolic biases against digital media were formally being instituted by curriculum policy, faculty searched for a new perspective. Central to success was the removal of illogically placed boundaries, both mental and physical. In response, students are now encouraged to cultivate a fluid dexterity between traditional and digital methods, at times using various skills concurrently for design analysis and representation (Figures 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7). Course content for DEA115 ranges from basic orthographic drafting, paraline projection, and perspective drawing to color rendering and composition. Students utilize a full range of media: pencil, ink, marker, pastel, AutoCAD, 3DS/ MAX, and Photoshop in this graphics studio. Course meetings total six contact hours per week, constituting a three credit hour class. Assignments are purposefully created to shatter digital myths. For example, instead of a standard, rote drafting exercise, AutoCAD is used to explore design ideas through systemic object manipulation (Figures 8, 9).
series ACADIA
last changed 2002/12/14 08:21

_id 64b8
authors Grabowski, M. and Barner, K.
year 1998
title Data Visualization Methods for the Blind using Force Feedback and Sonification
source Stein, M. (Ed.). Telemanipulator and Telepresence Technologies V. Vol. 3524
summary Research in the field of scientific visualization has begun to articulate systematic methods for mapping data to a perceivable form. Most work in this area has focused on the visual sense. For blind people in particular, systematic visualization methods which utilize other sense need further development. In this work we develop methods for adding aural feedback to an existing haptic force feedback interface to create a multimodal visualization system. We examine some fundamental components of a visualization system which include the following: characterization of the data, definition of user directives and interpretation aims, cataloging of sensual representations of information, and finally, matching the data and user interpretation aims with the appropriate sensual representations. We focus on the last two components as they relate to the aural and haptic sensor. Cataloging of sensual representations is drawn form current research in sonification and haptics. The matching procedure can be thought of as a type of encoding which should be the inverse of the decoding mechanism of our aural and haptic systems. Topics in human perception are discussed, and issues related to the interaction between the two sensor are addressed. We have implemented a visualization system in the from of a Windows NT application using a sound card and a 3 DOF point interaction haptic interface. The system present a 2D data set primarily as a polygonal haptic surface although other capabilities of the haptic sensor are utilized such as texture discernment. In addition, real time aural feedback is presented as the user explores the surface. Parameters of sound such as pitch and spectral content are used to convey information. Evaluation of the system's effectiveness as an assistive technology for the blind reveals that combining aural and haptic feedback improves visualization over using either of the two senses alone.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id ddss9822
id ddss9822
authors Gribnau, M.W., Verstijnen, I.M. and Hennessey, J.M.
year 1998
title Three Dimensional Object Orientation Using the Non-Dominant Hand
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary The paper presents the “Turntable”, a 3D input device for orienting objects using the non-dominant hand. The device supports two-handed manipulation by allowing the non-dominant hand to orient an object while leaving the dominant hand free to perform other actions. Two-handed input is a technique that can enhance the performance, simplicity and intuitiveness of CAD systems. These properties are obligatory for CAD systems dedicated to support the conceptual phase of the design process. Anexperiment has been conducted in which the performance of the Turntable was compared to that of a well known 3D orientation method, known in literature as the “virtual sphere”. The virtual sphere is operated with the mouse using the dominant hand and is documented to be easy to use and efficient. The experiment establishes that a performance gain can be expected from a two-handed user interface that employs the Turntable for 3D object orientation with the non-dominant hand. In a single-handedinterface users must switch between rotating and manipulating an object. In a two-handed interface however, task switching is unnecessary and an additional performance benefit can be achieved when there is temporal overlap in the execution of the two tasks. Experimental results show that the Turntable, operated by the non-dominant hand, is easy to learn and its performance and accuracy are nearly equal to that of the virtual sphere operated by the dominant hand. With these results it can now be expected that a two-handed interface utilizing the Turntable performs better than a single-handed one for manipulating objects in 3D.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id e537
authors Heylighen, A., Segers, R. and Neuckermans, H.
year 1998
title InterAction through Information
source Computerised Craftsmanship [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Paris (France) 24-26 September 1998, pp. 87-92
summary Past designs have been recognised as a significant source of knowledge in architectural design. IT offers the opportunity to represent these designs not only by text, graphics and images, but also by 3D-models, computer animation, sound and video. In spite of the growing availability of multimedia archives, libraries and case bases, their contribution to the development of students? ?design craftsmanship? so far seems to be limited. If IT wants to make a valuable contribution to this development, the challenge is not to passively provide students with information on past designs, but to (inter)actively support the dynamic interplay between these designs and the student?s design process. We are developing a tool that fundamentally attempts to explore this potential by using information as a vehicle to initiate, nurture and improve this interplay. The tool, which is intended to assist (student-)architects during the early conceptual stage of design, is conceived as a an (inter)active workhouse rather than a passive warehouse: it is interactively developed by and actively develops its users? knowledge. We have implemented a working prototype of the tool, at first stage for the design studio, yet with the potential of expansion into the office setting.
series eCAADe
email Ann.Heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
more http://www.paris-valdemarne.archi.fr/archive/ecaade98/html/08heylighen/index.htm
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id 5cab
authors Jain, A., Kensek, K. and Noble, D.
year 1998
title An interactive Web-based teaching tool for simplified 3D analysis of solar rhythms
source Automation in Construction 8 (2) (1998) pp. 181-194
summary This case study presents the World Wide Web as an appropriate medium for architectural teaching. The prototypical tool VRSolar uses simple programming and existing Web resources to help in the teaching of topics related to the movement of the sun and its effects on the built environment. Using JavaScript, this tool is capable of generating real time Web content in html and VRML based on user input. Accessible on the Web from within a standard Web browser, this tool calculates the solar positions of any location on earth and indicates the solar access to a given site in the form of a three-dimensional Web page, which the user can view, navigate through, and animate.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id ee96
authors Johnson, Scott
year 1998
title Making Models Architectural: Protean Representations to Fit Architects’ Minds
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 354-365
summary A rich vocabulary has evolved for describing architecture. It serves not only as a means of communication, but also as an embodiment of concepts relating to form, space, structure, function, mood, and symbolism. We architects not only speak in terms of walls, rooms, roofs, arches, etc., we see in terms of them and think in terms of them, as well. Such concepts are integral to our ability to design. Typical CAD representations, however, are based on geometric/mathematical elements like points, lines, planes, and symbols. Even more experimental approaches like parametric shapes or procedural assemblies correspond poorly to architectural elements, and seldom lend themselves well to making conceptual changes that would allow exploration of design alternatives. Small wonder some architecture schools experience a division between computer and studio courses, or even between computer and studio faculty. Different ways of talking and thinking are involved. The concepts involved are often mutually exclusive. This paper discusses an attempt to address this conceptual mismatch, using what are termed “protean” (meaning “very changeable”) elements. These are high-level elements corresponding to architectural concepts like “wall,” or “dome.” They each have parameters appropriate for the particular type of element they represent, and produce the polyhedra necessary for graphics based on these parameters. A system is being implemented to allow models to be constructed using these elements. The protean elements form a loosely structured model, in which some elements hierarchically contain others, and some elements are essentially freestanding, being created and manipulated independently of other elements. Characteristics of protean element are discussed, including the underlying object-oriented structure, the relationship between elements and graphics, and functions associated with the objects. A scheme is explained whereby all parts of a design can be represented even when the design includes extremely unusual forms not conforming to predictable classes of elements. The necessary support framework is also discussed; general flow of the system and mechanisms for viewing the model and editing subcomponents are explained. The current status of the project, and intentions for future work are discussed. The project has been partially implemented, and the necessary framework to support the system is mostly complete.

series ACADIA
email sven@umich.edu
last changed 1998/12/16 07:39

_id a787
authors Kaga, A., Shimazu, Y., Yamauchi, T., Ishihara, H. And Sasada, T.
year 1998
title City Information Visualizer Using 3-D Model and Computer Graphics
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 193-202
summary 3-D models and computer graphics with its visual characteristics enables easier understanding of various information. Up until now 3-D models and computer graphics has not been used for the analysis of city information due to its high cost and the need for special techniques. Currently, we have discovered new technology in hyper medium based on network technology and lower costs. This paper focuses on the construction of an interactive and visual 3-D city information system, aiming at the ‘idea processor’ for research and analysis of city planning and market research. We have discovered the requirements necessary for the City Information Visualizer system. Using this technology we will construct the prototype system of the 3-D City Information Visualizer. This system is based on the personal computer and the Client/Server system. The system is then applied to practical city analysis. This paper presents the prototype system and its evaluation in a real project.
keywords City Planning, Computer Graphics, 3-D Model, VRML, JAVA
series CAADRIA
email kaga@hankyu.co.jp
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:36

_id 807b
authors Kalisperis, Loukas N. and Pehlivanidou-Liakata, Anastasia
year 1998
title Architectural Design Studio: Digital and Traditional
source Computers in Design Studio Teaching [EAAE/eCAADe International Workshop Proceedings / ISBN 09523687-7-3] Leuven (Belgium) 13-14 November 1998, pp. 73-81
summary The nature of the task of representing architecture alters to reflect the state of architecture at each period of time. In simulating architecture, the necessary conversion from that which is inhabitable, experiential, functional, and at times, indescribable to an abstraction in an entirely different media is often an imperfect procedure that centers on its translation rather than the actual design. The objective in visualizing any architectural design is to achieve a situational awareness that allows for meaningful criticism of the design. Computer-aided three-dimensional (3D) visualization technology has made available new representation techniques. Surpassing the traditional means of graphic illustration and scaled models, this technology has been primarily developed to decrease the amount of abstraction between architecture and its documentation. The general objective of this paper is to present a study carried out over the last six years in which the progress of students in a traditional studio was compared to the progress of similar students in a digital studio. We have assessed the effects of the tools over the six-year period (24 different projects) by evaluating solution-generation in trial-and-error process and learning problem-solving strategies based on the Cognitive Flexibility Theory paradigm. Students using the digital studio were found to generate more and various solutions consistently.
series eCAADe
email lnk@psu.edu
more http://www.eaae.be/
last changed 2000/11/21 08:14

_id ddss9831
id ddss9831
authors Kellett, Ronald and Girling, Cynthia
year 1998
title Informing Public Participation in Neighborhood ScalePlanning and Design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary Neighborhood scale planning and design in many areas of the United States has been evolving toward a system of negotiated priorities and agreements. Common models include public workshops and design 'charrettes' which bring diverse stakeholders (citizens, land owners, developers, consultantsand public officials, for example) together to develop a mutually acceptable plan. Crucial to the quality and effectiveness of the outcome are decision support tools that help this diverse audience understand, communicate, collaborate and make decisions about complex and often emotional issuesof land use and design. Net Energy Communities (NEC), the project summarized in this paper, creates a suite of computer based tools for this purpose. NEC links three types of computer software — the spatial data manipulation, modeling and visualization capabilities of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), the illustration and information retrieval capabilities of multimedia relational databases and, the simulation and comparison capabilities of spreadsheet-based calculation models;into four tools — a site modeller, an elements of neighborhood database, a scenario modeller and ascenario calculator. This paper reports on the NEC project as an example of decision support tools for public participation using illustrations and examples from a 420 acre demonstration neighborhood design in progress for the City of Corvallis, Oregon, USA.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id cd37
authors Kensek, Karen and Noble, Douglas
year 1998
title Digital Reconstruction: The Architecture of Raphael Soriano
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 11-12
summary With the research help of Wolfgang Wagener, the students in our computer graphics class are using form•Z, 3D Studio, and Premiere to document and interpret the work of Raphael Soriano. These images are from a class currently underway in fall semester, 1998, at USC. The students are responsible for modeling, rendering, and animating (with the help of GIFBuilder), their buildings in form•Z, with an emphasis on exterior form. Then they model, render, and animate their projects in 3D Studio concentrating on the interior and interpreting how the building might have been furnished. Other studies covered the use of QuickTime VR and Web page development. Additional work will be done to make the work more “realistic” in response to critiques by Wagener. The next stage of the project is to explain the important features of the building through the use of Premiere. Students may choose to use a purely documentary style or MTV approach or other presentation “style” as long as they clearly define the intent of the presentation and then execute it.
series ACADIA
email kensek@usc.edu
last changed 2002/12/14 08:21

_id ad62
authors Klaus, R. and Urbaniak, A.
year 1998
title Safety algorithms for excavator engine control
source Automation in Construction 7 (5) (1998) pp. 391-400
summary The diesel engine without load and speed controller is a nonlinear astatic object. The torque and moment of internal friction (the diesel engine without load and governor) cross in the field of the engine's destruction (the speed limit was exceeded). Hence, the diesel engine is equipped with a speed governor. The main task of the governor is to counteract exceeding of the speed limit. We did a research on the engine with an injection pump wherein the conventional centrifugal governor was replaced by the microprocessor controller. This is because using a large number of electronic elements microcontroller has smaller reliability in comparison with mechanical governors. In order to protect the engine from the results of the controller's defect, we invented a safety system. The system guarantees the controlled stoppage of the engine's work in dangerous states. Information in this article are presented concerning protection and self-diagnostics of SW 400 engine control system that makes use of DP535 controller with Siemens 80C535 microcontroller. The presented control system is successfully tested in an excavator.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id cc90
authors Kolarevic, Branko
year 1998
title CAD@HKU
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 16-17
summary Since 1993, we have experimented with Virtual Design Studios (VDS) as an on-going research project that investigates the combination of current computer-aided design (CAD), computer networks (Internet), and computer supported collaborative work (CSCW) techniques to bring together studentsat geographically distributed locations to work in a virtual atelier. In 1993 the theme of the first joint VDS project was in-fill housing for the traditional Chinese walled village of Kat Hing Wai in the New Territories north of Hong Kong, and our partners included MIT and Harvard in Boston (USA), UBC in Vancouver (Canada), and Washington University in St. Louis (USA). In 1994 we were joined by Cornell (USA) and Escola Tecnica Superior d’Arquitectura de Barcelona (Spain) to re-design Li Long housing in Shanghai, and 1995 added the Warsaw Institute of Technology (Poland) for the ACSA/Dupont competition to design a Center for Cultural and Religious Studies in Japan. The 1996 topic was an international competition to design a monument located in Hong Kong to commemorate the return of Hong Kong to Chinese sovereignty in 1997. Communication was via e-mail, the WorldWide Web with limited attempts at VRML, and network video. Several teaching and research experiments conducted through these projects have demonstrated the viability and potential of using electronic, telecommunications, and videoconferencing technologies in collaborative design processes. Results of these VDS have been presented at conferences worldwide, explained in journal papers and published in Virtual Design Studio, edited by J. Wojtowicz, published by HKU Press.
series ACADIA
email branko@pobox.upenn.edu
last changed 2002/12/14 08:21

_id 7471
authors Kram, Reed
year 1999
title The Digital Sketch Workshop: a Core Course in Design with Computation
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 251-264
summary This paper summarizes DIGITAL SKETCH, a workshop that took place over the course of two weeks in September 1998 at Designskolen Kolding, Denmark. DIGITAL SKETCH was an attempt to create a foundation course in design for the digital medium for students with strong visual design skills, but little to no computer experience. Teaching design on computers is commonly thought of as detailing the current version of the latest commercial software. As long as this is the case, design on computers will (quite rightfully) continue to get little respect from those designers using more traditional design methods. How can we find the "core" of this medium when faced with the constant onslaught of operating system upgrades and version 11.2 of software Y83? For DIGITAL SKETCH, we tried to demystify the process of controlling the computer. In this workshop we examined the meanings of the term "sketch" as it applies to the design process on the computer. Our hope was that by revealing some of the unique characteristics of the digital medium, we might develop new design processes in tune with this medium.
series AVOCAAD
email kram@medialab.chalmers.se
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

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