CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 21 to 40 of 527

_id a136
authors Blaise, J.Y., Dudek, I. and Drap, P.
year 1998
title Java collaborative interface for architectural simulations A case study on wooden ceilings of Krakow
source International Conference On Conservation - Krakow 2000, 23-24 November 1998, Krakow, Poland
summary Concern for the architectural and urban preservation problems has been considerably increasing in the past decades, and with it the necessity to investigate the consequences and opportunities opened for the conservation discipline by the development of computer-based systems. Architectural interventions on historical edifices or in preserved urban fabric face conservationists and architects with specific problems related to the handling and exchange of a variety of historical documents and representations. The recent development of information technologies offers opportunities to favour a better access to such data, as well as means to represent architectural hypothesis or design. Developing applications for the Internet also introduces a greater capacity to exchange experiences or ideas and to invest on low-cost collaborative working platforms. In the field of the architectural heritage, our research addresses two problems: historical data and documentation of the edifice, methods of representation (knowledge modelling and visualisation) of the edifice. This research is connected with the ARKIW POLONIUM co-operation program that links the MAP-GAMSAU CNRS laboratory (Marseilles, France) and the Institute HAiKZ of Kraków's Faculty of Architecture. The ARKIW programme deals with questions related to the use of information technologies in the recording, protection and studying of the architectural heritage. Case studies are chosen in order to experience and validate a technical platform dedicated to the formalisation and exchange of knowledge related to the architectural heritage (architectural data management, representation and simulation tools, survey methods, ...). A special focus is put on the evolution of the urban fabric and on the simulation of reconstructional hypothesis. Our contribution will introduce current ARKIW internet applications and experiences: The ARPENTEUR architectural survey experiment on Wieża Ratuszowa (a photogrammetrical survey based on an architectural model). A Gothic and Renaissance reconstruction of the Ratusz Krakowski using a commercial modelisation and animation software (MAYA). The SOL on line documentation interface for Kraków's Rynek G_ówny. Internet analytical approach in the presentation of morphological informations about Kraków's Kramy Bogate Rynku Krakowskiego. Object-Orientation approach in the modelling of the architectural corpus. The VALIDEUR and HUBLOT Virtual Reality modellers for the simulation and representation of reconstructional hypothesis and corpus analysis.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id c11a
authors Campbell, D.A.
year 1998
title VRML In Architectural Construction Documents: A Case Study
source VRML 98 Monterey - Proceedings of the 1998 VRML Conference, pp. 115-120
summary The Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) and the World Wide Web (WWW) offer new opportunities to communicate an architect's design intent throughout the design process. We have investigated the use of VRML in the production and communication of construction documents, the final phase of architectural building design. A prototype, experimental Web site was set up and used to disseminate design data as VRML models and HTML text to the design client, contractor, and fabricators. In this paper, we discuss the way our construction documents were developed in VRML, the issues we faced implementing it, and critical feedback from the users of the Web space/site. Finally, we suggest ways to enhance the VRML specification which would enable its widespread use as a communication tool in the design and construction industries. CR Categories and Subject Descriptors: 1.3.5 [Computer Graphics]: Computational Geometry and Object Modeling - Curve, surface, solid, and object representations; 1.3.7 [Computer Graphics]: Three-Dimensional Graphics and Realism - Virtual Reality; J-6. [Computer Applications]: Computer-aided Engineering - Computer-aided design (CAD), Computer-aided manufacturing (CAM). Additional Keywords: architecture, construction, AEC, design, construction documentation, specifications, Internet, extranet, World Wide Web, VRML, virtual worlds, virtual environments
series other
email dcampbell@nbbj.com
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 1d83
authors Dodge, M., Doyle, S. and Smith, A.
year 1998
title Visual Communication in Urban Planning and Urban Design
source Working Paper 2; Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis Working Papers; London; June 1998
summary This Case Study documents the current status of visual communication in urban design and planning. Visual communication is examined through discussion of standalone and network media, specifically concentrating on visualisation on the World Wide Web (WWW). First, we examine the use of Solid and Geometric Modelling for visualising urban planning and urban design. This report documents and compares examples of the use of Virtual Reality Modelling Language (VRML) and proprietary WWW based Virtual Reality modelling software. Examples include the modelling of Bath and Glasgow using both VRML 1.0 and 2.0. The use of Virtual Worlds and their role in visualising urban form within multi-user environments is reviewed. The use of Virtual Worlds is developed into a study of the possibilities and limitations of Virtual Internet Design Arena's (ViDA's), an initiative undertaken at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis, University College London. The use of Virtual Worlds and their development towards ViDA's is seen as one of the most important developments in visual communication for urban planning and urban design since the development plan. Secondly, the role of photorealistic media in the process of communicating plans is examined. The process of creating photorealistic media is documented, and examples of the Virtual Streetscape and Wired Whitehall Virtual Urban Interface System are provided. The conclusion is that, although the use of photo-realistic media on the WWW provides a way to visually communicate planning information, its use is limited. The merging of photorealistic media and solid geometric modelling in the creation of Augmented Reality is reviewed. Augmented Reality is seen to provide an important step forward in the ability quickly and easily to visualise urban planning and urban design information. Third, the role of visual communication of planning data through GIS is examined in terms of desktop, three dimensional, and Internet based GIS. The evolution to Internet GIS is seen as a critical component in the development of virtual cities that will allow urban planners and urban designers to visualise and model the complexity of the built environment in networked virtual reality. Finally, a viewpoint is put forward of the Virtual City, linking Internet GIS with photorealistic multi-user Virtual Worlds. At present there are constraints on how far virtual cities can be developed, but a view is provided on how these networked virtual worlds are developing to aid visual communication in urban planning and urban design.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 203b
authors Jabi, Wassim M.
year 1998
title The Role of Artifacts in Collaborative Design
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 271-280
summary With the proliferation of digital technology, a new category of design artifacts, usually described with the term virtual, has emerged. Virtual artifacts have gained further prominence due to the advances made in collaboration software and networking technologies. These technologies have made it easier to communicate design intentions through the transfer and sharing of virtual rather than physical artifacts. This becomes particularly true in the case of long-distance or international collaborative efforts. This paper compares the two major categories of artifacts – the physical and the computer-based – and places them in relationship to an observed collaborative design process. In order to get at their specific roles in collaboration, two case studies were conducted in which designers in academic and professional settings were observed using a methodology which focused on participation in the everydayness of the designer as well as casual discussions, collection of artifacts, note-taking, and detailed descriptions of insightful events. The collected artifacts were then categorized according to the setting in which they were created and the setting in which they were intended to be used. These two attributes could have one of two values, private or public, which yield a matrix of four possible categories. It was observed that artifacts belonging in the same quadrant shared common qualities such as parsimony, completeness, and ambiguity. This paper finds that distinguishing between physical and virtual artifacts according to their material and imagined attributes is neither accurate nor useful. This research illustrates how virtual artifacts can obtain the qualities of their physical counterparts and vice versa. It also demonstrates how a new meta-artifact can emerge from the inclusion and unification of its material and imagined components. In conclusion, the paper calls for a seamless continuity in the representation and management of physical and virtual artifacts as a prerequisite to the success of: (1) computer-supported collaborative design processes, (2) academic instruction dealing with making and artifact building, and (3) executive policies in architectural practice addressing the management of architectural documents.
keywords Collaborative Design Process
series CAADRIA
email wj@writeme.com
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:28

_id 0320
authors Lynn, G.
year 1998
title Animate Form
source Princeton Architectural Press, New York
summary Animate Form is a book and interactive CD-ROM of recent architectural projects designed by Form, the office of Greg Lynn. The projects documented here explore the potential of time-based animation techniques to inform architectural design. Historically, architecture has been considered static, fixed, and inert. Through the use of state-of-the-art animation and special-effects software, Lynn transforms space and form into highly plastic, flexible, and mutable entities. He uses topological geometries to bend, twist, deform, and differentiate structure, creating unprecedented departures from preconceived notions of architecture. In experimenting with these new methods and media, Lynn has charted an innovative direction in design. The book provides a theoretical context for the experimental projects through a collection of texts by Lynn, extensively illustrated in color. The CD-ROM is an interactive hypertext environment that fully documents the design processes used to generate the projects through animations, renderings, model photographs, videos, and texts. Using a virtual 3D interface, the viewer is able to navigate through space and select objects and animations to view at different scales.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 338a
authors Noble, Douglas and Hsu, Jason
year 1999
title Computer Aided Animation in Architecture: Analysis of Use and the Views of the Profession
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 109-114
summary A traditional way to present three-dimensional representations of architectural design has been through the use of manually drawn perspective drawings. The perspective representation assists in the comprehension of the forms and spaces, but is difficult to manually generate. The computer revolution made perspectives much easier to generate and led to a dramatically increased use of three-dimensional representation as a presentation technique. We are just now seeing substantial uses of animation as a communication and presentation tool in architecture. This paper documents the results of two surveys of the architectural profession that sought to discover the current and near future intentions for the use of computer animation. Our belief is that current levels of computer animation use are low, but that many firms intend to start using animation both as a design and presentation tool. In early 1998 we conducted a survey of the uses of computer animation by architectural firms. We posited a set of 14 related hypotheses. This paper represents the tabulated results from 82 completed surveys out of 620 requests. While some level of confidence can be obtained from this sample size, we are publishing in the hope of encouraging continued response to the survey.
series SIGRADI
email kensek@usc.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:56

_id ddss9845
id ddss9845
authors Reymen, Isabelle M.M.J.
year 1998
title Design in Architecture, Software Engineering and Mechanical EngineeringA comparative study
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary The awareness about the gap between general design theory and design practice is increasing. Design practice is not really served with the results of current design theory. To build a bridge between theory and practice, design researchers should know what is really going on in practice. To explore design practice and to find the most important characteristics of design situations, I have chosen an empirical approach based on case studies in which design projects in different disciplines are compared. In each case study, an individual designer is interviewed and the design documents are analysed. The results in this article are based on two architectural projects, two software-engineering projects and two mechanical-engineering projects. The cross-case analysis has resulted indescriptions of design situations in these disciplines. A preliminary design frame to describe design situations in different disciplines has been derived. Based on similarities and differences in the descriptions, conclusions concerning design theory, design education and design practice are given. The most important conclusions are the following. First, designers are often not aware of their design process, but focus mainly on the product. Second, software designers more often than architects andmechanical engineers use methods to structure their overall design process.
series DDSS
email isabelle@win.tue.nl
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9821
id ddss9821
authors Varghese, G., Dhingra, S.L. and Sikdar, P.K.
year 1998
title The Role of Expert Systems, and RDBMS Strategies in a DSSfor Urban Bus Transport Management
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary Efficient and well-managed urban bus transport systems supported by information systems with decision support capabilities developed within the framework of an advanced Relational Data Base Management System (RDBMS) can provide critical information at the right moment and assisttransport managers in conducting performance evaluations. This paper includes discussions on the use of the entity-relationship (E-R) model (a semantic data modeling technique) in the development of thestructure of the conceptual database for the information system planned to be implemented using RDBMS. The E-R data modeling approach enables database designers in obtaining the third normal forms of related databases for the efficient functioning of the information system. The inportance of decision tables in the development of DSS modules using Expert System shells are also discussed. The DSS modules will assist transport managers in the analysis of operational performance for bus depots or the organization as a whole. The E-R diagrams generated and the decision files developed will serve as important documents that can enhance the adaptability of the DSS to the changing needs ofthe organizations. The conceptualization of the information system to support decision-making in an RDBMS framework provides the advantage of a very low 'disk seek' time and facilitates frequent generation of reports.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id e336
authors Achten, H., Roelen, W., Boekholt, J.-Th., Turksma, A. and Jessurun, J.
year 1999
title Virtual Reality in the Design Studio: The Eindhoven Perspective
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 169-177
summary Since 1991 Virtual Reality has been used in student projects in the Building Information Technology group. It started as an experimental tool to assess the impact of VR technology in design, using the environment of the associated Calibre Institute. The technology was further developed in Calibre to become an important presentation tool for assessing design variants and final design solutions. However, it was only sporadically used in student projects. A major shift occurred in 1997 with a number of student projects in which various computer technologies including VR were used in the whole of the design process. In 1998, the new Design Systems group started a design studio with the explicit aim to integrate VR in the whole design process. The teaching effort was combined with the research program that investigates VR as a design support environment. This has lead to increasing number of innovative student projects. The paper describes the context and history of VR in Eindhoven and presents the current set-UP of the studio. It discusses the impact of the technology on the design process and outlines pedagogical issues in the studio work.
keywords Virtual Reality, Design Studio, Student Projects
series eCAADe
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 7a20
id 7a20
authors Carrara, G., Fioravanti, A.
year 2002
title SHARED SPACE’ AND ‘PUBLIC SPACE’ DIALECTICS IN COLLABORATIVE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN.
source Proceedings of Collaborative Decision-Support Systems Focus Symposium, 30th July, 2002; under the auspices of InterSymp-2002, 14° International Conference on Systems Research, Informatics and Cybernetics, 2002, Baden-Baden, pg. 27-44.
summary The present paper describes on-going research on Collaborative Design. The proposed model, the resulting system and its implementation refer mainly to architectural and building design in the modes and forms in which it is carried on in advanced design firms. The model may actually be used effectively also in other environments. The research simultaneously pursues an integrated model of the: a) structure of the networked architectural design process (operators, activities, phases and resources); b) required knowledge (distributed and functional to the operators and the process phases). The article focuses on the first aspect of the model: the relationship that exists among the various ‘actors’ in the design process (according to the STEP-ISO definition, Wix, 1997) during the various stages of its development (McKinney and Fischer, 1998). In Collaborative Design support systems this aspect touches on a number of different problems: database structure, homogeneity of the knowledge bases, the creation of knowledge bases (Galle, 1995), the representation of the IT datum (Carrara et al., 1994; Pohl and Myers, 1994; Papamichael et al., 1996; Rosenmann and Gero, 1996; Eastman et al., 1997; Eastman, 1998; Kim, et al., 1997; Kavakli, 2001). Decision-making support and the relationship between ‘private’ design space (involving the decisions of the individual design team) and the ‘shared’ design space (involving the decisions of all the design teams, Zang and Norman, 1994) are the specific topic of the present article.

Decisions taken in the ‘private design space’ of the design team or ‘actor’ are closely related to the type of support that can be provided by a Collaborative Design system: automatic checks performed by activating procedures and methods, reporting of 'local' conflicts, methods and knowledge for the resolution of ‘local’ conflicts, creation of new IT objects/ building components, who the objects must refer to (the ‘owner’), 'situated' aspects (Gero and Reffat, 2001) of the IT objects/building components.

Decisions taken in the ‘shared design space’ involve aspects that are typical of networked design and that are partially present in the ‘private’ design space. Cross-checking, reporting of ‘global’ conflicts to all those concerned, even those who are unaware they are concerned, methods for their resolution, the modification of data structure and interface according to the actors interacting with it and the design phase, the definition of a 'dominus' for every IT object (i.e. the decision-maker, according to the design phase and the creation of the object). All this is made possible both by the model for representing the building (Carrara and Fioravanti, 2001), and by the type of IT representation of the individual building components, using the methods and techniques of Knowledge Engineering through a structured set of Knowledge Bases, Inference Engines and Databases. The aim is to develop suitable tools for supporting integrated Process/Product design activity by means of a effective and innovative representation of building entities (technical components, constraints, methods) in order to manage and resolve conflicts generated during the design activity.

keywords Collaborative Design, Architectural Design, Distributed Knowledge Bases, ‘Situated’ Object, Process/Product Model, Private/Shared ‘Design Space’, Conflict Reduction.
series other
type symposium
email antonio.fioravanti@uniroma1.it
last changed 2005/03/30 14:25

_id 6279
id 6279
authors Carrara, G.; Fioravanti, A.
year 2002
title Private Space' and ‘Shared Space’ Dialectics in Collaborative Architectural Design
source InterSymp 2002 - 14th International Conference on Systems Research, Informatics and Cybernetics (July 29 - August 3, 2002), pp 28-44.
summary The present paper describes on-going research on Collaborative Design. The proposed model, the resulting system and its implementation refer mainly to architectural and building design in the modes and forms in which it is carried on in advanced design firms. The model may actually be used effectively also in other environments. The research simultaneously pursues an integrated model of the: a) structure of the networked architectural design process (operators, activities, phases and resources); b) required knowledge (distributed and functional to the operators and the process phases). The article focuses on the first aspect of the model: the relationship that exists among the various ‘actors’ in the design process (according to the STEP-ISO definition, Wix, 1997) during the various stages of its development (McKinney and Fischer, 1998). In Collaborative Design support systems this aspect touches on a number of different problems: database structure, homogeneity of the knowledge bases, the creation of knowledge bases (Galle, 1995), the representation of the IT datum (Carrara et al., 1994; Pohl and Myers, 1994; Papamichael et al., 1996; Rosenmann and Gero, 1996; Eastman et al., 1997; Eastman, 1998; Kim, et al., 1997; Kavakli, 2001). Decision-making support and the relationship between ‘private’ design space (involving the decisions of the individual design team) and the ‘shared’ design space (involving the decisions of all the design teams, Zang and Norman, 1994) are the specific topic of the present article.

Decisions taken in the ‘private design space’ of the design team or ‘actor’ are closely related to the type of support that can be provided by a Collaborative Design system: automatic checks performed by activating procedures and methods, reporting of 'local' conflicts, methods and knowledge for the resolution of ‘local’ conflicts, creation of new IT objects/ building components, who the objects must refer to (the ‘owner’), 'situated' aspects (Gero and Reffat, 2001) of the IT objects/building components.

Decisions taken in the ‘shared design space’ involve aspects that are typical of networked design and that are partially present in the ‘private’ design space. Cross-checking, reporting of ‘global’ conflicts to all those concerned, even those who are unaware they are concerned, methods for their resolution, the modification of data structure and interface according to the actors interacting with it and the design phase, the definition of a 'dominus' for every IT object (i.e. the decision-maker, according to the design phase and the creation of the object). All this is made possible both by the model for representing the building (Carrara and Fioravanti, 2001), and by the type of IT representation of the individual building components, using the methods and techniques of Knowledge Engineering through a structured set of Knowledge Bases, Inference Engines and Databases. The aim is to develop suitable tools for supporting integrated Process/Product design activity by means of a effective and innovative representation of building entities (technical components, constraints, methods) in order to manage and resolve conflicts generated during the design activity.

keywords Collaborative Design, Architectural Design, Distributed Knowledge Bases, ‘Situated’ Object, Process/Product Model, Private/Shared ‘Design Space’, Conflict Reduction.
series other
type symposium
email antonio.fioravanti@uniroma1.it
last changed 2012/12/04 06:53

_id cb42
authors Coates, Paul and Schmid, Claudia
year 1999
title Agent Based Modelling
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 652-661
summary This paper describes the work of students in Unit 6 of the Diploma school at the UEL during 1998-9. The unit in association with the MSc has been exploring ways of using the computer to explore the idea of emergent form as a way of generating designs, and a way of focussing the pedagogic process on a new and interesting set of determinants of form.
keywords Agent Based Modelling, Generative Modelling, Emergent Forms
series eCAADe
email p.s.coates@uel.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 624d
authors Coors, V. and Wiedmann, B.
year 1998
title Using Wearable GIS in outdoor applications
source Proceedings of the Symposium on Interactive Applications for Mobile Computing, IMC’98, Rostock, Germany, November 1998
summary Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are tools for acquiring, managing, analyzing, and presenting spatially related information. GIS represent parts of our world by digital maps or images. They facilitate the access to multimedial data using criteria such as geographic location or spatial proximity. Today, GIS are being used in all areas where spatial data need to be managed and analyzed. Three major application areas of GIS technology are - public administration, where GIS are used to generate and update spatially related data, - planning, where GIS support spatial decisions, e. g. in urban and regional planning, - research, where GIS help to analyze and describe spatial processes, e.g. in electoral research and environmental management.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id a114
authors Faucher, Didier and Nivet, Marie-Laure
year 1998
title Playing with Design Intent: Integration of Physical and Urban Constraints in CAD
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 118-137
summary Our work deals with the exploration of a universe of forms that satisfy some design intents. That is, we substitute a “generate and test” approach for a declarative approach in which an object is created from its properties. In this paper we present an original method that takes into account design intents relative to sunlight, visibility and urban regulation. First of all we study how current CAD tools have considered these properties until now. Our conclusion is that the classical design / simulation / analysis process does not suit design practices, especially in the early stages. We think that an improved CAD system should offer the architect the option of manipulating abstract information such as design intents. We define an intent as a conceptual expression of constraints having an influence on the project. For instance, a visual intent will be stated with no reference to vision geometry: “ from this place, I want to see the front of the new building”. We show how to represent each of these constraints with a 3D volume associated to some characteristics. If some solutions exist, we are sure that they are included in these volumes. For physical phenomena we compute the volume geometry using the principles of inverse simulation. In the case of urban regulation we apply deduction rules. Design intents are solved by means of geometrical entities that represent openings or obstructions in the project. Computing constraint volumes is a way of guiding the architect in his exploration of solutions. Constraint volumes are new spaces that can restore the link between form and phenomenon in a CAD tool. Our approach offers the designer the possibility of manipulating design intents.

series ACADIA
email didier.faucher@cerma.archi.fr
last changed 2003/04/28 12:12

_id cad3
authors Gero, J.S.
year 1998
title Conceptual designing as a sequence of situated acts
source I. Smith (Ed.), Artificial Intelligence in Structural Engineering, Springer, Berlin, pp. 165-177
summary This paper introduces conceptual designing within an F-B-S framework. It then goes on to describe a number of models of designing before introducing the notions of situatedness and situated acts. The remainder of the paper describes the role of situatedness and situated acts in conceptual designing. It attempts to show that a number of otherwise difficult design phenomena are modelable using situatedness and situated acts. A demonstration example concludes the paper along with some of the research issues this view of designing brings with it.
keywords Conceptual Designing, Situatedness
series other
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/04/06 07:01

_id 161c
authors Juroszek, Steven P.
year 1999
title Access, Instruction, Application: Towards a Universal Lab
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 141-150
summary In January 1998, the Montana State University School of Architecture embarked upon an initiative to successfully integrate computer technology into its design curriculum. At that time only a handful of student computers could be found in the design studio. By January 1999 over 95 students have and use computers in their courses. The increase in computer access and use is occurring through a five-phase initiative called the Universal Lab-a school-wide commitment to the full integration of computer technology into all design studios, support courses and architectural electives. The Universal Lab uses the areas of Access, Instruction and Application as the vehicles for appropriate placement and usage of digital concepts within the curriculum. The three-pronged approach allows each instructor to integrate technology using one, two or all three areas with varying degrees of intensity. This paper presents the current status of the Universal Lab-Phase I and Phase II-and describes the effect of this program on student work, course design and faculty instruction.
keywords Design, Access, Instruction, Application, Integration
series eCAADe
email stevej@montana.edu
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 0beb
authors Koch, Volker and Russell, Peter
year 2000
title VuuA.Org: The Virtual Upperrhine University of Architecture
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 23-25
summary In 1998, architecture schools in the three nation region of the upper Rhine came together to undertake a joint design studio. With the support of the Center for Entrepeneurship in Colmar, France, the schools worked on the reuse of the Kuenzer Mill situated near Herbolzheim, Germany. The students met jointly three times during the semester and then worked on the project at their home universities usng conventional methods. This project was essential to generating closer ties between the participating students, tutors and institutions and as such, the results were quite positive. So much so, that the organisers decided to repeat the exercise one year later. However, it became clear that although the students had met three times in large groups, the real success of a co-operative design studio would require mechanisms which allow far more intimate interaction among the participants, be they students, teachers or outside experts. The experiences from the Netzentwurf at the Institut für Industrielle Bauproduktion (ifib) showed the potential in a web based studio and the addition of ifib to the three nation group led to the development of the VuuA platform. The first project served to illuminate the the differences in teaching concepts among the partner institutions and their teaching staff as well as problems related to the integration of students from three countries with two languages and four different faculties: landscape architecture, interior design, architecture and urban planning. The project for the Fall of 1999 was the reuse of Fort Kléber in Wolfisheim by Strasbourg, France. The students again met on site to kick off the Semester but were also instructed to continue their cooperation and criticism using the VuuA platform.
keywords Virtual Design Studio, CSCW, International Cooperation, Planning Platform
series eCAADe
email volker.koch@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de, peter.russell@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
more http://www.vuua.org
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 3d97
authors Li, H. and Love, P.E.D.
year 1998
title Design concept as a model for modelling design process and its knowledge
source The Int. Journal of Construction IT 6(2), pp. 87-103
summary The strategy of decomposing a design problem into subproblems is commonly used in engineering design. One difficulty in applying this strategy to computer-based design systems is the assembly of subproblem solutions to construct a whole solution. Despite its advantages, this design strategy suffers two major problems. First, as constraints are ill defined and implicitly exist among design objects, it is very difficult to articulate and represent design constraints in computable forms. Second, as design subproblems are designated separately in computer-based design systems, the inherent relationships among subproblems are not considered in contriving these subproblems. As a result, recomposing subproblem solutions is hard to do. This paper presents a model for modelling design processes and the knowledge involved. The model is called ‘design concept’, which represents empirical interconnections of design attributes and intraconnections of design subproblems. Topological relations are represented using decomposition trees. The advantages and disadvantages of integratively using decomposition trees and design concepts in facilitating conceptual design are discussed
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:45

_id e947
authors Mahalingam, G.
year 1998
title Representing architectural design using virtual computers
source Automation in Construction 8 (1) (1998) pp. 25-36
summary The concept of the virtual computer is one of the most significant ideas to emerge in the field of computing. Computational models of architectural design, including state models and process models, have been based in the past on the von Neumann model of computer systems. Von Neumann systems are characterized by stored programs and data, and sequential processing on a single processor. The concept of the virtual computer enables us to break away from the von Neumann model in the representation of architectural design. Virtual computers can now be used to represent architectural design using concepts of parallel or networked systems. One of the limitations of modeling architectural design processes on the computer has been the representation of the processes as serial processes. Virtual computers can eliminate that bottleneck. This paper introduces the concept of representing architectural design using virtual computers. The application of the concept in an auditorium design system developed by the author is briefly examined.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 1c6b
authors Mase, K., Sumi, Y. and Nishimoto, K.
year 1998
title Informal conversation environment for collaborative concept formation
source Community Computing: Collaboration over Global Information Networks, eds. T. Ishida. John Wiley & Sons
summary This chapter focuses on facilitating the early stages of community formation. We spend a great deal of time every day in informal conversations, which are very important for the early stages of forming various kinds of communities. People engaged in conversation will not only share information, but also try to listen to and understand others, and as well as work together to find common objectives. In the early stages of forming the communities, agreement on a common concept through such a process is an essential element in the bonding of the group. Conversation environments on networked computers, e.g., via e-mail, online chat, and news groups, eliminate the spatial and temporal constraints of forming these communities but allow for the reuse of accumulated dialogs from previous interactions. Moreover, a computerized environment can directly support information sharing and mutual understanding. Conventional computerized conversation support systems, however, often force their users to follow some predetermined conversation model, prepared by designers beforehand. Thus, it can be difficult to apply these systems to informal conversations. We are developing a system called AIDE (Augmented Informative Discussion Environment) that facilitates our informal daily conversations. It does not require users to provide additional information in designated forms during a conversation, but rather it provides functionality to enhance and support the informal conversation. AIDE features three main functions: the discussion viewer, the conversationalist agent and the personal desktop. Using these functions, the participants can attain mutual understanding, crystallize ideas, and share common concepts. AIDE is considered to be not only a tool for supporting informal conversation but also useful Communityware, especially for facilitating the initial stage of community formation. This chapter first discusses a model of the group thinking process and applies it to community formation. Then, the structure of the AIDE system is presented using a few example conversations to illustrate how the AIDE system can support communication between people. AIDE displays potential as communityware.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

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