CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 81 to 100 of 527

_id 7436
authors Barría Chateau, H., Muñoz Viveros, C. and Cerda Brintrup, G.
year 1999
title Virtual Tour Through Modern Architecture in Conception
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 475-477
summary This paper describes the development of a project that was selected and sponsoured by the Regional Competition FONDART 1998 (Funds for the Development of Arts of the Regional Secretary of Education) that follows the aim of cultural diffusion. Towards the middle of the 30s, the city of Concepción developed an architecture distinctly colonial, neoclassical and eclectic. An earthquake in 1939 abruptly interrupted this scene, destroying the enterity of its most important buildings. The reconstruction of the city followed the manifestoes of Modern Architecture, consolidating the urban importance of buildings such us the Law Courts, the Railway Station and the Regional Government, that emerged as the new architectural and cultural heritage of the city. The project consisted on the modeling of eleven buildings of the modern architectural heritage, and on the generation of 42 virtual tours through the buildings that were finally edited on a 16' video. This video allows the spectator to make a virtual tour through the original modern heritage of the city, nowadays demolished, altered, and sometimes, even forgotten. This project pretends to widen the ways of comprehension of our cultural identity by using computer modelling and animation as a tool for the conservation of the architectural heritage; and creating a record that can be used as a reference and as an instrument of cultural difussion.
series SIGRADI
email mtrebilc@zeus.dci.ubiobio.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 487c
authors Blazquez, Oscar and Hardin, Mary
year 1998
title Balancing Computer Use and Design Content in Studio Projects
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 36-43
summary Particular design approaches must be taught in order to take advantage of the strengths of computers in design rather than attempting to make computers conform to methods developed as by-products of manual design techniques. For the last three years our team of faculty teaching the second year design studio has been trying different approaches to the use of computers in design, in order to find the advantages and opportunities especially suited to electronic media. There are several projects during the semester which use computers at different stages of the design process. One of these projects, called “A Spatial Sequence,” uses information from a previous project as well as the knowledge from the computer class in parallel to design studio. The project asked students to create spatial archetypes based on the work of well-known architects. They explore the following topics as represented in the work of one particular architect: relationships of major spaces/minor spaces, approach/entry, and transition/threshold. Following the analysis, they create digital models to explore the spaces formed by their archetypes. Before committing to a physical study model, they look at the transitions between spaces by creating a sequence using the digital model and producing a series of shots through the digital model to show the flow of spaces. The use of computer through the process accelerates the options available to explore a sequence of elements, while simultaneously giving them a window to look into the spaces they have created. This hybridized approach of precedent analysis, digital modeling, and physical modeling was uniquely suited to the studio problem.

series ACADIA
email blasquez@u.arizona.edu, mchardin@u.arizona.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 2873
authors Brin, S. and Page, L.
year 1998
title The Anatomy of a Large-Scale Hypertextual Web Search Engine
source Computer Science Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
summary In this paper, we present Google, a prototype of a large-scale search engine which makes heavy use of the structure present in hypertext. Google is designed to crawl and index the Web efficiently and produce much more satisfying search results than existing systems. The prototype with a full text and hyperlink database of at least 24 million pages is available at http://google.stanford.edu/ To engineer a search engine is a challenging task. Search engines index tens to hundreds of millions of web pages involving a comparable number of distinct terms. They answer tens of millions of queries every day. Despite the importance of large-scale search engines on the web, very little academic research has been done on them. Furthermore, due to rapid advance in technology and web proliferation, creating a web search engine today is very different from three years ago. This paper provides an in-depth description of our large-scale web search engine -- the first such detailed public description we know of to date. Apart from the problems of scaling traditional search techniques to data of this magnitude, there are new technical challenges involved with using the additional information present in hypertext to produce better search results. This paper addresses this question of how to build a practical large-scale system which can exploit the additional information present in hypertext. Also we look at the problem of how to effectively deal with uncontrolled hypertext collections where anyone can publish anything they want.
series other
email page@cs.stanford.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 0471
authors Bruton, B.
year 1998
title Grammars and Pedagogy - Towards new Media Art and Design Education Strategies
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 385-394
summary The impact of computational grammatical design on pedagogy has received little attention in art education due to the dominant modes of traditional approaches to art and design education. This paper explores the pedagogical implications of grammatical strategies using computers for judgements of design within an art educational setting. Grammatical strategies are studied for their effect on the judgements of novice artists in a new media educational context. It is argued that concepts of grammar and views of contingency are used in a variety of senses in the conception and form making of artists; that finding methods for discussing and utilising complex visual information is aided by grammatical formalisation; that these strategies are evidently effective at both early and mature stages of the realisation of a project. The research explores the relation between computer and art on three levels in which grammar is used: as a sense of grammar, as a computational paradigm and as a description of a kind of computer program. Grammatical formalism is apparent in two dimensional linear and non-linear animations using Photoshop, Premiere and Director, and in solid modelling programs such as Extreme 3D, Form Z, Strata Studio Pro, 3D Studio Max and SoftImage. Web site construction also impacts on the judgements of 2D and 3D design. Computational grammatical programs generate forms that reflect alternative understandings of art and design. Art practise is defined in terms of developing consistent and appropriate design language for the contingency at hand. Form making using grammatical tools, both recursive and array types, is discussed in terms of their applicability and educative value. Reference is made to formal qualities for critique and strategic capability of alternative pedagogy for generation of forms. Examples provided show how simple rule sets develop into complex derivational sequences that challenge traditional strategies for computer imaging. The paper demonstrates the value of a sense of grammars for novice art and design practitioners by using first hand examples of experimental work at the South Australian School of Art, University of South Australia. For novice artists and designers, grammars in conjunction with reflective practice is offered as a useful mind set that supports an interest in actively defining a new kind of art. Illustrations provided show the utility of a contingent sense of grammar for pedagogy and highlights the significant role of grammar in pedagogy.
keywords Grammar, Pedagogy, Computer, Art, Design
series CAADRIA
email d.bruton@unisa.edu.au
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:15

_id ec50
authors Bullock, D. and Heymsfield, E.
year 1998
title Innovative application of directional boring procedures for replacing failed inductive loop detectors
source Automation in Construction 8 (2) (1998) pp. 143-148
summary Actuated traffic signal controllers typically depend on inductive loop detectors to determine demand for a particular signal phase. The basic philosophy of these controllers is to only provide a green indication to a particular lane group when there is a vehicle waiting. If an inductive loop detector fails, it must be put in recall mode so that the lane group with the corresponding failed detector is serviced every cycle. When actuated controllers operate in this mode, the performance of the signalized intersection degenerates. Since the vast majority of actuated intersections operate with inductive loop detectors it is useful to have maintenance procedures that can be used to replace loop detectors that have failed due to pavement distress. This paper describes a procedure that has been developed using directional boring equipment to install a micro loop below the surface of the pavement where it is not subject to pavement distress. The authors believe this procedure will provide a cost effective method of restoring actuated control on approaches or lanes groups where the pavement condition makes it unfeasible to install or re-install a traditional saw cut loop detector.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 07c5
authors Burry, Mark
year 1998
title Handcraft and Machine Metaphysics
source Computers in Design Studio Teaching [EAAE/eCAADe International Workshop Proceedings / ISBN 09523687-7-3] Leuven (Belgium) 13-14 November 1998, pp. 41-50
summary As the cost of 3D digitisers drops and PC price performance rises, opportunities for hand - computer co-operation improve. Architectural form may now be experimentally moulded or carved using manual techniques in close association with the computer. At any stage the model can be mechanically digitised and translated to a computer database for explorations that go beyond simple physical manipulation. In the virtual environment, the resulting forms can be rationalised using an ordering geometry or further de-rationalised. This potential for debasing intuitive, sensually haptic and responsive handwork through its translation into numerically cogent formulations is risky business. But it may also bring new and unlikely rewards. This paper considers the implications and aesthetics of negotiations between handcraft and consecutive or synchronous computer digitalisation of intentions. Two situations will be discussed and compared. The first is the nature of computer modelling and its representation per se, and the second is the relevance of using handcraft as a sponsor for computer-based manipulation and morphological experimenting.
series eCAADe
email mburry@deakin.edu.au
more http://www.eaae.be/
last changed 2000/11/21 08:11

_id 18
authors Castane, D., Leirado, E.R., Tessier, C. and Martinez.R.
year 1998
title El Docente y la Utilizacion de Sistemas Multimediales en Redes Telematicas Aplicados a la Ensenanza 3D en Diseno Arquitectonico (The Teacher and the use of Multimedia Systems in Telematicas Networks Applied to the Teaching of 3D in Architectonic Design)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 154-159
summary The remarkable advances in the technology of computer systems, including software, hardware, and networks, continuously give us new avenues to be utilized in education. The pedagogic strategy to be developed in the utilization of digital graphic systems applied to three-dimensional design in architecture (both in the design and virtual expression of objects or already designed architectural groups) is still changing with the times.Therefore, the Department, as an extension of its experience with this type of development and as a response to deal with special situations such as large numbers of students, develops this new proposal, which is currently being used. This project uses the implementation, structuring, and building of a virtual site as an informatics classroom, utilizing multimedia systems, to be used as a support for acquiring knowledge during the learning that takes place doing the coursework. This setting would allow for the feedback between the instructor and the student to be on-going, hence both groups being efficiently motivated through examples and opportunities of how to do the following: utilize appropriate technology, manipulate the right information, utilize the right kind of software programs and techniques, revamp the knowledge, and benefit from using the appropriate digital techniques for each specific case of architectural design and expression.
series SIGRADI
email dorcas@fadu.uba.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:48

_id 3542
authors Cha, M.Y. and Gero, J.S.
year 1998
title Shape pattern recognition using a computable shape pattern representation
source J.S. Gero and F. Sudweeks (eds), Artificial Intelligence in Design '98, Kluwer, Dordrecht, pp. 169-188
summary Properties of shapes and shape patterns are investigated in order to represent shape pattern knowledge for supporting shape pattern recognition. It is based on the notion that shape patterns are classified in terms of similarity of spatial relationships as well as physical properties. Methods for shape pattern recognition are explained and examples from an implementation are presented.
keywords Shape Patterns, Shape Representation
series other
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/04/06 06:57

_id ab2e
authors Cheng, Nancy Yen-Wen
year 1998
title Wayfinding In Cyberspace - Negotiating Connections between Sites
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 83-92
summary As the number of 3D virtual worlds grow, the distributed nature of the Internet will juxtapose many different kinds of spatial environments. Moving between these environments can be disorienting due to the lack of structural continuity. How can we create an easily navigable experience in a realm so different from the stable, natural world that we inhabit? This paper provides background about navigating virtual worlds, discusses the boundary gaps and describes efforts in how to bridge these gaps. Using examples from an academic exercise, archetypes of negotiated connections between sites are proposed.
keywords Electronic Design Media, Virtual Reality, Precedence and Prototypes
series CAADRIA
email nywc@darkwing.uoregon.edu
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:45

_id 032b
authors Cicognani, Anna
year 1998
title A linguistic characterisation of design in text-based virtual worlds
source University of Sydney
summary In this research, it is suggested that design in text-based virtual worlds can be identified as a series of interactions between users and the virtual environment, and that these interactions for design can be approached using a linguistic perspective. The main assumption of this research is that a parallel can be drawn between the performance of design commands, and the one of speech acts in the physical world. Design in text-based virtual environments can then be articulated using a restricted set of speech acts, as design commands. Virtual worlds, represented as spaces, can be constructed following an architectural design metaphor. This metaphor provides a framework for the organisation of virtual entity relationships, and for the choice of words used to design. A linguistic characterisation is presented, by means of design activities, prototypes and scenarios, which derive from the architectural design metaphor. The characterisation of design is then validated by the analysis of an existing text-based virtual world.
keywords Virtual Reality; Human-Computer Interaction; Computer-Aided Design; Programming Languages (Electronic Computers); Semantics; Programming Languages (Electronic Computers); Design
series thesis:PhD
email anna@arch.su.edu.au
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id ddss9813
id ddss9813
authors Cordan, Ozge and Besgen, Asu
year 1998
title No Times But Principles, A Case Study From Priene, Anatolia
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary To emphasise the reusing of the local identities and cultural effects on contemporary designs, this paper is believed to have an important role for architects and for further designs. In this paper design theories in 1000's BC from Priene is held. The theories in urban and architectural design took place. From the intersection point of Ancient Greek and Western Anatolia, a city named "Priene" is chosen as a point of view because of its speciallocation on the Aegean Sea Coasts; Asia Minor and its design principles on urban and housing scale which were used during 1000's and are still common. Also, in this paper, an analysis is done on urban and housing scale. The analysis has two main parts. In the first part, the important buildings in Priene and their settlement decisions take part. And in the second part, the houses of Priene are explained. The general outputs of the study can be put under two titles: urbanism and architecture. In terms of urbanism, those features of a city image reflecting onto today’s world have been examined and the city of Priene has been analysed in the content of Lynch’s elements ensuring formation of a city image. In terms of architecture, results obtained have been separately examined in the content of today’s architecture as public buildings reflecting unique characteristics of Hellenistic architecture and as settlements. In short, the result that it is wished to reach in terms of city scale of the city of Priene in this study isthe expression of the essence of the historical heritage using a modern language to ensure historical continuity.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9815
id ddss9815
authors Cutler, Lorraine M.
year 1998
title Prototypical Laboratory Design to Support Learning and Teaching
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary Collaboration between designers and scientists is an unusual combination to undertake the prototypical design of a teaching laboratory funded by Howard Hughes Medical Institute. The zoologists are developing a cooperative learning and interactive teaching pedagogy to make learningscience a process of critical inquiry and discovery. The industrial and interior designers are paying attention to the design issues of function and environmental support for teaching and doing the work required in a three-hour, hands-on beginning science learning space. Using both qualitative andquantitative research methods, the designers are able to determine a framework for making design decisions in prototypical beginning science environments. This framework is being developed as a guideline for designing similar environments at other institutions of higher learning. Videotape analysis precedes the research to uncover the underlying problems of the existing space and to formulate the questions for the research. Elements of a case study and an evaluative study integratewith the design process to form the basis of an intensive investigation of design issues for a beginning science teaching laboratory. Using two pretests as a baseline, the posttest data evaluates the success orfailure of the prototypical design. Both the pretests and the posttest evaluate the physical attributes of the old and new learning environment related to a beginning laboratory course in Zoology at Arizona State University.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id eac5
authors Damski, J. and Gero, J.S.
year 1998
title Object representation and reasoning using halfplanes and logic
source J.S. Gero and F. Sudweeks (eds), Artificial Intelligence in Design '98, Kluwer, Dordrecht, pp. 107-126
summary Shapes and objects represent important ways with which to perceive and reason about the world. This paper develops a framework which uniformly encompasses both planar and non-planar surfaces to represent graphical objects in three dimensions. Based on the concept of halfspaces this framework allows the representation of volumes as predicates in logic. This representation is applied to demonstrate object concepts associated with reasoning about the topology of objects as individuals as well as groups of objects at the early, conceptual phase of designing. The example shows how both planar and non-planar boundaries of objects are treated uniformly.
keywords Shape Reasoning, Logic Models
series other
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/04/06 06:59

_id 1de5
authors Darken, R.P., Allard, T. and Achille, L.B.
year 1998
title Spatial Orientation and Wayfinding in Large Scale Virtual Spaces
source Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, 7 (2), pp. 101-107
summary Just as the Pathfinder used the lake and the oak tree to reconstruct his environment, so do we structure our environment with streets and houses, landmarks and guiding principles to aid spatial orientation and wayfinding. The basic process of navigation-extracting information, forming mental representations, and using that representation for route planning and moving about-transcends the physical elements of the environment itself. In practice, we use whatever the environment gives us to solve navigation problems as they arise, in the process, continually refining and updating our internal model of the external environment. Although the virtual environments we speak of may be vastly different in their appearance from the Pathfinder's world, the principles underlying spatial orientation and wayfinding in large-scale virtual spaces have many commonalities.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id c721
authors Dauner, J., Landauer, E. and Fraunhofer, I.
year 1998
title 3D Product Presentation Online: The Virtual Design Exhibition
source VRML 98 - Third Symposium on the Virtual Reality Modeling Language. S. N. Spencer. Monterey, CA, ACM: 57-62
summary VRML offers a high potential for product presentation: Instead of regarding flat, static pictures, configurable and animated 3D models embedded in entertaining environments provide a new way of product presentation. But seriously using VRML for this application domain means facing several challenges. We discuss these issues by using the Virtual Design Exhibition as a showcase. In this exhibition seven interior design companies show products with high aesthetic quality. We discuss how these aesthetics influence the VRML presentation and give some guidelines resulting from our experience. CR Categories and Subject Descriptors: H.5.1 [Information Interfaces and Presentation] Multimedia Information; Systems - Artificial realities H.5.2 [Information Interfaces and Presentation] User Interfaces - Screen design; I.3.6 [Computer Graphics] Methodology and Techniques - Interaction techniques
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id ddss9829
id ddss9829
authors De Hoog, J., Hendriks, N.A. and Rutten, P.G.S.
year 1998
title Evaluating Office Buildings with MOLCA(Model for Office Life Cycle Assessment)
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary MOLCA (Model for Office Life Cycle Assessment) is a project that aims to develop a tool that enables designers and builders to evaluate the environmental impact of their designs (of office buildings) from a environmental point of view. The model used is based on guidelinesgiven by ISO 14000, using the so-called Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) method. The MOLCA project started in 1997 and will be finished in 2001 resulting in the aforementioned tool. MOLCA is a module within broader research conducted at the Eindhoven University of Technology aiming to reduce design risks to a minimum in the early design stages.Since the MOLCA project started two major case-studies have been carried out. One into the difference in environmental load caused by using concrete and steel roof systems respectively and the role of recycling. The second study focused on biases in LCA data and how to handle them. For the simulations a computer-model named SimaPro was used, using the world-wide accepted method developed by CML (Centre for the Environment, Leiden, the Netherlands). With this model different life-cycle scenarios were studied and evaluated. Based on those two case studies and a third one into an office area, a first model has been developed.Bottle-neck in this field of study is estimating average recycling and re-use percentages of the total flow of material waste in the building sector and collecting reliable process data. Another problem within LCA studies is estimating the reliability of the input data and modelling uncertainties. All these topics will be subject of further analysis.
keywords Life-Cycle Assessment, Office Buildings, Uncertainties in LCA
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 3d1d
authors De Vries, B. and Jessurun, A.J.
year 1998
title An Experimental Design System for the Very Early Design Stage
source Timmermans (ed.) Proceedings of the 4th Conference on Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Maastricht
summary The concepts of the experimental design system that are discussed are feature modeling and geometrical constraints. The main technique for creating the user environment is Virtual Reality. Feature modeling forms the basis for managing the design data. To start with, data storage is implemented in a Relational Data Base Management System. Along with this a (traditional) interface is developed for managing the data. Data management consists of feature type creation and feature type instancing. Features are used to define building elements, their relationships and additional constraints. Apart from the design data, geometrical data are stored. Possible design solutions can be limited using geometrical constraints. Specifying connection types between building elements result in a set of solutions for the position of the bounding boxes of the building elements in space.
series other
email b.d.vries@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id e5a2
authors Debevec, P.
year 1998
title Rendering synthetic objects into real scenes: Bridging traditional and image-based graphics with global illumination and high dynamic range photography
source Proc. ACM SIGGRAPH 98, M. Cohen, Ed., 189–198
summary We present a method that uses measured scene radiance and global illumination in order to add new objects to light-based models with correct lighting. The method uses a high dynamic range imagebased model of the scene, rather than synthetic light sources, to illuminate the newobjects. To compute the illumination, the scene is considered as three components: the distant scene, the local scene, and the synthetic objects. The distant scene is assumed to be photometrically unaffected by the objects, obviating the need for re- flectance model information. The local scene is endowed with estimated reflectance model information so that it can catch shadows and receive reflected light from the new objects. Renderings are created with a standard global illumination method by simulating the interaction of light amongst the three components. A differential rendering technique allows for good results to be obtained when only an estimate of the local scene reflectance properties is known. We apply the general method to the problem of rendering synthetic objects into real scenes. The light-based model is constructed from an approximate geometric model of the scene and by using a light probe to measure the incident illumination at the location of the synthetic objects. The global illumination solution is then composited into a photograph of the scene using the differential rendering technique. We conclude by discussing the relevance of the technique to recovering surface reflectance properties in uncontrolled lighting situations. Applications of the method include visual effects, interior design, and architectural visualization.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 2de0
authors Dobson, Adrian
year 1998
title Exploring Conceptual Design using CAD Visualisation and Virtual Reality Modelling
source Computerised Craftsmanship [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Paris (France) 24-26 September 1998, pp. 68-71
summary This paper evaluates the possibilities for the use of computer aided design and desktop virtual reality technologies as tools for architectural composition. An experimental teaching programme involving undergraduate architectural students at the University of Luton, in which aspects of compositional theory are explored through the direct creation of architectural form and space in digital formats is described. In the programme principles of architectural composition, based upon the ordering and organisation of typological architectural elements according to established rules of composition are introduced to the students through the study of recognised works of design theory. CAD and desktop virtual reality are then used to define and manipulate architectural elements, and to make formal and spatial evaluations of the environments created. The paper describes the theoretical context of the work, assesses the suitability of the software used for performing compositional manipulations, and evaluates the qualities of immersion and intuitive feedback which virtual reality based modelling can offer in the design visualisation process. The teaching programme utilises standard software packages, including AutoCAD, and 3D Studio, as well as Superscape VRT, a PC based desktop VR package.
series eCAADe
more http://www.paris-valdemarne.archi.fr/archive/ecaade98/html/13dobson/index.htm
last changed 1998/09/25 16:41

_id 8fa8
authors Dolinsek, B. and Duhovnik, J.
year 1998
title Robotic assembly of rebar cages for beams and columns
source Automation in Construction 8 (2) (1998) pp. 195-207
summary In the paper, the design and method of operation of a robot cell for the assembly of rebar cages for beams and columns is described. The input elements are pre-manufactured rebars, and the output consists of rebar cages. Inside the robot cell, assembly is performed by robots equipped with tools for grasping the rebars, tools for bending the stirrups, and tools for welding the stirrups to the longitudinal bars. Various mechanisms for supplying the robots with rebars and supporting them during the assembly process have also been designed. Because of the specific nature of the assembly process, where robots have to successfully avoid various obstacles, mass-produced robots cannot be used for the assembly of rebar cages. For this reason, special robot configurations have to be designed. The robot cell described in this paper is at present at the design stage. It was modelled and simulated using the program 3 for robot simulation, which makes it possible to study, optimise, and design in detail the proposed robot systems. The figures in the paper describing how such a system works have also been taken from this simulation.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

For more results click below:

show page 0show page 1show page 2show page 3this is page 4show page 5show page 6show page 7show page 8show page 9... show page 26HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_643810 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002