CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id ddss9849
id ddss9849
authors Sariyildiz, S. Ciftcioglu, Ö. and Veer, Peter van der
year 1998
title Information Ordering for decision support in building design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary A systematic approach for the application of AI-based information processing for information ordering in architectural building design is described. For this purpose fuzzy associative memory (FAM) method is considered. In this system FAM is used for knowledge representation in building design concerning the functional & technical requirements information and its graded relevance to individuals concerned in the same context. A set of FAM rules having been established as a knowledge base for use, a pattern of information in the form of a fuzzy vector is fed to each FAM rule. Here, a decision support system is aimed to convey the information to the respective individuals and/or bodies involved, in a graded form, according to their capacity of involvement in the building design. By exploiting the binary logic, each FAM rule is fired in parallel but to a different degree so that each rule generates an m-dimensional output fuzzy vector Pi. The union of these vectors creates m-dimensional fuzzy decision vector D that provides the ordered information addressed to respective individuals and/or bodies mentioned. Using simulated data, a verification procedure for the performance of the approach is investigated and by means of the work, the role that artificial intelligence in architecture and building design might play, is pointed out.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9802
id ddss9802
authors Akin, O., Aygen, Z., Cumming, M., Donia, M., Sen, R. and Zhang, Y.
year 1998
title Computational Specification of Building Requirements in theEarly Stages of Design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary We have been exploring computational techniques to help building designers to specify design requirements during the early stages of design. In the past, little has been accomplished in this area either in terms of innovative computational technologies or the improvement of design performance.The prospect of improving design productivity and creating a seamless process between requirements specification and formal design are our primary motivations. This research has been conducted as partof a larger project entitled SEED (Software Environment to Support Early Phases in Building Design). SEED features an open-ended modular architecture, where each module provides support for a design activity that takes place in early design stages. Each module is supported by a database to store and retrieve information, as well as a user interface to support the interaction with designers. The module described in this paper, SEED-Pro (the architectural programming module of SEED), is a workingprototype for building design requirements specification. It can be used by other modules in SEED or by design systems in other domains, such as mechanical engineering, civil engineering, industrial designand electrical engineering. Our approach to SEED-Pro is divided into two phases: core, and support functionalities. The core functionalities operate in an interactive mode relying on a case-based approach to retrieve and adapt complex specification records to the problem at hand. The supportfunctionalities include the case-base, the data-base, and the standards processing environment for building specification tasks. Our findings indicate that SEED-Pro: (1) is a tool that structures the unstructured domain of design requirements; (2) enables the integration of design requirements with the rest of the design process, (3) leads to the creation of complex case-bases and (4) enables the observation of their performance in the context of real world design problems.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ddss9811
id ddss9811
authors Barbanente, A., Conte, E. and Monno, V.
year 1998
title Changing trends and approaches in human and computer modelling for social housing policies
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary The paper discusses conceptual issues, goals and preliminary results of an on-going research which aims at building a Decision Support System for public housing environmental oriented maintenance and management in a city in Southern Italy, Bari. Traditional post-war Italian housing policies are compared with more recent approaches in the field, pointing out the change from quantitative, aggregated, more simple building problems and relatedapproaches to qualitative, differentiated, complex ones integrating social, economic and environmental dimensions with the aim of regenerating deteriorated residential areas. The paper claims for the need shift, both in the human and computer areas, from traditional quantitative models to new approaches able to manage also qualitative variables, temporal dynamics, emergencies, and intentionality, since they appear key aspects of the real world to be modelled. The housing estate of Bari and its needs of maintenance and management are examined, eliciting essential related knowledge using the interview technique. The clear orientation towards sustainable policies for urban regeneration, at a local, national, and Community level, is also considered. The innovative and collaborative nature of such policies and the attention to be paid to the social aspects ofthe problem require a complex DSS, integrating various kind of hypertexts, information systems and case-based fuzzy expert systems, whose main aims, functions, software and general organisation are outlined in the paper.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id ddss9812
id ddss9812
authors Coomans, M.K.D. and Timmermans, H.J.P.
year 1998
title A VR-User Interface for Design by Features
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary We present the design of a Virtual Reality based user interface (VR-UI). It is the interface for the VR-DIS system, a design application for the Building and Construction industry (VRDIS stands for Virtual Reality - Design Information System). The interface is characterised by a mixedrepresentation of the task domain: an analogue “mock-up view” is being integrated with a descriptive “feature view”. It uses a Fish Tank VR configuration which integrates the virtual objects in the designer’s normal working environment. The issues underlying the design of the feature view are discussed, as well as the choice of input devices.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 1beb
authors Coomans, M.K.D. and Timmermans, H.J.P.
year 1998
title A VR User Interface for Design by Features
source Timmermans (ed.) Proceedings of the 4th Conference on Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Maastricht
summary We present the design of a Virtual Reality based user interface (VR-UI). It is the interface for the VR-DIS system, a design application for the Building and Construction industry (VRDIS stands for Virtual Reality - Design Information System). The interface is characterised by a mixed representation of the task domain: an analogue "mock-up view" is being integrated with a descriptive "feature view". It uses a Fish Tank VR configuration which integrates the virtual objects in the designer's normal working environment. The issues underlying the design of the feature view are discussed, as well as the choice of input devices.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id a15e
authors Dijkstra, J. and Timmermans, H.J.P.
year 1998
title Conjoint Analysis and Virtual Reality - A Review
source Timmermans (ed.), 4 Ih Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Conference.
summary This paper describes a review of an ongoing research project which aims to develop a conjoint analysis and virtual reality (CA&VR) system as part of a design information system in virtual reality. The research project aims to develop a design system that can be used for interactive design and evaluation of design alternatives. A virtual environment model and dynamic virtual objects representing the different design aspects of interest can present a design. The different design aspects are called attributes. Each attribute level is a different state of the concerned virtual object. In the case of a virtual walk through a building design, the system can be viewed as a visual simulation of the environment. The CA&VR system has the potential advantage that individuals' preferences can be measured in designed hypothetical choice situations. As part of the ongoing research project, principles underlying the CA&VR system will be illustrated by simple examples. The status of this research project, both in retrospect and in prospect will be described.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id ddss9818
id ddss9818
authors Dijkstra, Jan and Timmermans, Harry J.P.
year 1998
title Conjoint Analysis and Virtual Reality – a Review
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary This paper describes a review of an ongoing research project which aims to develop a conjoint analysis and virtual reality (CA&VR) system as part of a design information system in virtual reality. The research project aims to develop a design system that can be used for interactive design and evaluation of design alternatives. A virtual environment model and dynamic virtual objects representing the different design aspects of interest can present a design. The different design aspects are called attributes. Each attribute level is a different state of the concerned virtual object. In the case of a virtual walk through a building design, the system can be viewed as a visual simulation of the environment. The CA&VR system has the potential advantage that individuals’ preferences can be measured indesigned hypothetical choice situations. As part of the ongoing research project, principles underlying the CA&VR system will be illustrated by simple examples. The status of this research project, both in retrospect and in prospect will be described.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9823
id ddss9823
authors Groot, E.H. de and Pernot, C.E.E.
year 1998
title Energy Impact Knowledge-based System project:Outcomes of the Netherlands Workshops
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary Overcoming barriers in the current building process that hinder the realisation of optimal energy efficiency in buildings is the aim of the Energy Impact Knowledge-based System [EIKS] project. During this project, a demo-version of a knowledge based assistive information and decision supportsystem was developed, considering the design and evaluation of integrated daylight and artificial lighting systems for office rooms. Twenty workshops with building experts were carried out in four European countries. The first set of sixteen workshops delivered the specifications of the system.During the second set of four workshops, this prototype was shown to some of the building experts who had attended one of the workshops of the first series. The outcomes of the first series EIKS workshops were very general and not really specifying the EIKS-prototype as expected. However, from the generally enthusiastic response of participants during the second workshop series it can be concluded that the prototype is a good basis for further development.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9825
id ddss9825
authors Hartog, J. P. den, Koutamanis, A. and Luscuere, P. G.
year 1998
title Simulation and evaluation of environmental aspects throughout the designprocess
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary The evaluation of environmental aspects in architectural design has traditionally been performed by means of simple (and often simplistic) rule systems. These generally remain at the normative level of minimal control one encounters in building rules and regulations, thereby failing to provide sufficient information and clarity for design guidance. Despite this, evaluation results normally bound subsequent design decisions as fundamental, inflexible constraints. At much later design stages, whenarchitectural form has been largely crystallized and when environmental subsystems must be specified in detail, both the architect and the contributing engineers often realize the severe limitation of theinitial choices. A frequently voiced argument for such simplification in the guise of abstraction is the lack of detailed information on the form and functional content of a building in the early stages of the designprocess. This obviously presupposes a tabula rasa generative approach. The application of a priori knowledge in the form of types, cases, precedents and automated recognition permits direct transaction from the abstract to the specific at and between a number of predefined relevant abstraction levels in the representation. The combination of a priori knowledge at the typological level with multilevel representations permits the use of precise simulation techniques already in the early design stages and throughout thedesign process. The simulation results employ the dual representation principle of scientific visualization, thereby linking form with measurable performance. Feedback from the simulation provides the analysis and evaluation means for design guidance and for communication between thearchitect and the contributing engineers. A prerequisite to this is that the abstraction level in the representation constrains the analysis derived from the simulation, e.g., by means of grades of fuzziness applied to different zones in the representation on the basis of information specificity.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 0fbd
authors Hartog, J.P., Koutamanis, A. and Luscuere, P.G.
year 1998
title Simulation and evaluation of environmental aspects throughout the design process
source 4th Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Conference. Eindhoven
summary The evaluation of environmental aspects in architectural design has traditionally been performed by means of simple (and often simplistic) rule systems. These generally remain at the normative level of minimal control one encounters in building rules and regulations, thereby failing to provide sufficient information and clarity for design guidance. Despite this, evaluation results normally bound subsequent design decisions as fundamental, inflexible constraints. At much later design stages, when architectural form has been largely crystallized and when environmental subsystems must be specified in detail, both the architect and the contributing engineers often realize the severe limitation of the initial choices. A frequently voiced argument for such simplification in the guise of abstraction is the lack of detailed information on the form and functional content of a building in the early stages of the design process. This obviously presupposes a tabula rasa generative approach. The application of a priori knowledge in the form of types, cases, precedents and automated recognition permits direct transaction from the abstract to the specific at and between a number of predefined relevant abstraction levels in the representation. The combination of a priori knowledge at the typological level with multilevel representations permits the use of precise simulation techniques already in the early design stages and throughout the design process. The simulation results employ the dual representation principle of scientific visualization, thereby linking form with measurable performance. Feedback from the simulation provides the analysis and evaluation means for design guidance and for communication between the architect and the contributing engineers. A prerequisite to this is that the abstraction level in the representation constrains the analysis derived from the simulation, e.g., by means of grades of fuzziness applied to different zones in the representation on the basis of information specificity.
series other
email A.Koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id ddss9826
id ddss9826
authors Hendricx, A., Geebelen, B., Geeraerts, B. and Neuckermans, H.
year 1998
title A methodological approach to object modelling in the architectural designprocess
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary The paper describes a first prototype constructed in search for a central object model. It presents all possible data, concepts and operations concerning the architectural design process in the early phases.A central model of the process of design is essential: going from one design phase into another, the model describes geometrical shapes, abstract concepts like space and activity, concrete physical building elements and the basic operations all these entities undertake. Emphasis is put on combining all these different viewpoints, thus enabling the designer to use a broad range of design strategies. The aim is to help him and not steer or even hamper his creative process. Information necessary toassist the user of the system concerning energy calculation, stability checks etc can be extracted. By means of appropriate interfaces not only those tests built on top of the system but also existing software packages can make use of the model’s object structure. The implemented object model is one of the cornerstones of the IDEA+ project, aiming to provide an Integrated Design Environment for Architecture.
keywords object model, building model, CAAD, IDEA+, MERODE
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9840
id ddss9840
authors Mahdavi, A., Akin, Ö. and Zhang, Y.
year 1998
title Formalization of Concurrent Performance Requirementsin Building Problem Composition
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary Specification of performance requirements is an emerging area of research that promises to improve building design particularly during the early stages of design. Building problem decomposition and recomposition can be based on a number of requirement categories in order to group buildingfunctions into hierarchically organized groups. Traditionally this activity is known as stacking and blocking, or zoning; and limited to spatial requirements. Our long term objective is to broaden this set into a more comprehensive one, including thermal, acoustic, and daylighting; and improve the stateof- the-art in building performance specification. While domain information from various building performance areas may be applicable toward enriching the informational basis for stacking andblocking operations, this paper focuses primarily on the thermal and acoustic domain.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id c36a
authors Sariyildiz, S., Van der Veer, P., Schwenck, M. and Ciftcioglu, Ö.
year 1998
title Computer as a Valuable and Reliable Partner
source Cyber-Real Design [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 83-905377-2-9] Bialystock (Poland), 23-25 April 1998, pp. 177-188
summary As in any branches of the science, the newcoming technologies play always a role in each of the related specific disciplines. The developments of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) have an important impact on architectural design and the process of the design as well as it is a part of the other technological developments. Surely these rapidly ongoing developments will influence the way of designing and the design process. What will change in the building practice by the use of this technology? How should we use this technology to reach our goals? What will be the next step in future developments? In this paper we give an overview of the use the ICT in general for architectural design and the design process and focus on the future developments. The aspect of integration (tools and partners) and the development of Decision Support Environment in the building process by means of the Artificial Intelligence (Al) technologies are mentioned.
series plCAD
email I.S.Sariyildiz@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2003/05/17 08:01

_id ddss9856
id ddss9856
authors Suter, Georg and Mahdavi, Ardeshir
year 1998
title Generation and communication of design information:a building performance simulation perspective
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary There is general agreement that the process of design and construction of buildings typically involves multiple players. This has been the impetus to develop concepts for computational environments that would supportcollaborative design. While there has been considerable progress with regard to hardware and electronic communication, the underlying representations of design ideas and artifacts have not kept pace with thisprogress. In this paper we deal with this problem not from a global conceptual perspective, but rather from the specific point of view of those designers who use design representation toward extraction and manipulation of specialized technical information. For example, engineers in various fields of building technology require a rich representation of building information in terms of geometry (with special focus on topology), materials, systems attributes, etc. We argue that the current building analysis tools do not operate on the basis of such rich informational representations. Instead the needed information is often assembled on an ad hoc basis from various non-integrated informational sources. We review three representations as they are implemented in commercial or research systems and explore their potential for communicating design information to computational building analysis tools. Based on this review, we describe desirable characteristics of more sophisticated building representations.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9859
id ddss9859
authors Tonarelli, P., Delaporte, J.L., Tahon, C.
year 1998
title Geographical and logistical Information System for building management
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary Nowadays, most of building managers (e.g., companies, local communities, government agencies) have to face up a common set of problems. For instance, these problems are a deficient knowledge of ancient buildings and networks (e.g., gas, water), an inefficient management of green spaces, ora lack of communication between users (e.g., technical staff, suppliers, building end users). In addition, building and spaces to be managed may be shared among several distant areas. LAMIH works aim to achieve methodologies and computer tools for building management andassociated logistic. These works include two aspects we present in this paper:- a methodological one: the establishment of a project business plan, applied to building and logistic management,- a computer aspect: the design and implementation of a decision and management support system, the Geographical and Logistical Information System (G.L.I.S.). The project business plan includes the creation of a task force which has to lead the project and the description of the project plan.The G.L.I.S. is a software set which uses shared database. In particular, this set allows the different users to:- manage a patrimony as a whole, with the help of a Geographical Information System,- manage buildings and networks,- improve communication and logistic aspects with the help of a groupware tool. We present the achievement of these methodology and tools as part of a particular area: theUniversity of Valenciennes which is shared among four towns. The project takes into account existing buildings and those to be built, spaces which separates them, and the relationships betweenthe four different sites of the University. A task force is created as well as a specialised service, the Building Management Department. This department represents an interface between the task force,the LAMIH, and a centre of Information Technologies in construction (CERTIC) which is created as part of the SCENIC project (Support Centres Network for IT in Construction, Esprit project 21772).
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id e336
authors Achten, H., Roelen, W., Boekholt, J.-Th., Turksma, A. and Jessurun, J.
year 1999
title Virtual Reality in the Design Studio: The Eindhoven Perspective
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 169-177
summary Since 1991 Virtual Reality has been used in student projects in the Building Information Technology group. It started as an experimental tool to assess the impact of VR technology in design, using the environment of the associated Calibre Institute. The technology was further developed in Calibre to become an important presentation tool for assessing design variants and final design solutions. However, it was only sporadically used in student projects. A major shift occurred in 1997 with a number of student projects in which various computer technologies including VR were used in the whole of the design process. In 1998, the new Design Systems group started a design studio with the explicit aim to integrate VR in the whole design process. The teaching effort was combined with the research program that investigates VR as a design support environment. This has lead to increasing number of innovative student projects. The paper describes the context and history of VR in Eindhoven and presents the current set-UP of the studio. It discusses the impact of the technology on the design process and outlines pedagogical issues in the studio work.
keywords Virtual Reality, Design Studio, Student Projects
series eCAADe
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ddss9806
id ddss9806
authors Besio, M., Frixione, M. and Pedemonte, O.
year 1998
title GIS technologies in the transfer of theknowledge project to the plan projectmultiple representation of the environmental spaces
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary An analysis is made of the relation between the conceptualand paradigmatic level of GIS technologies and the new forms of plan, whichmake environment the center of attention. The intention is to study newcriteria for zoning able to give contextual representations of theterritorial, environmental and landscape aspects of the geographical space,and also to study new legislative principles, able to establish integratedrules for theprojecting of soil uses, the safeguarding and recovery ofenvironmental systems and the tutelage and boosting of the landscape. The experimentation of GIS (Geographical Information System)technologies aims at the construction of systems helping to make decisionsfor the control of the environmental and landscape aspects of theterritory. An analysis is made of the ways in which there are formulated thedescriptions of the various aspects of the environment: the conceptsthrough which knowledge is expressed, the languages used forrepresentations, the cognitive models adopted. GIS technologies have made it possible to represent in an explicitmanner the paradigms underlying the various models of knowledge.Specifically, the following cognitive models have been developed:- ecological models of nature- ecological models of human settlement- ecological models of inhabitants’ mental perceptions
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id ddss9808
id ddss9808
authors Boelen, A.J.
year 1998
title Pattern Matching for Decision Support
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary In this paper is discussed how we can use pattern matching techniques in combination with object orientation to support decision makers in arranging offices and industrial and commercial facilities in existing urban areas. The method used is based on the findings of a Ph.D. project almost finishedwhen writing this. The tool under development is specifically useful for rehabilitation of deteriorated industrial or commercial areas.I consider such an area already occupied and surrounded with all kinds of urban objects and connected to all kinds of infrastructure. I can describe this area in available objects and facilities. Furthermore we can describe the areas capacity left within the infrastructure, the capacity in forexample work force or clients and the available band width in noise or pollution. By describing the area in terms of availability of capacity to absorb or produce flows of people, goods, energy and information we sketch the room available for certain types of industrial or commercial facilities. I developed a technique to describe industrial and commercial facilities in such a way that we enable the match between these and the characteristics of an area available. Pattern matching techniquesenable the system to generate best matches between available areas, locations and facilities. This model can be adapted in several object oriented geographical information systems and be integrated with other information systems that for example calculate the pollution of certain kinds of facilities. The rules to match with are partly based on objective, measurable data like available capacity on the electricity network and needed electrical power for certain facilities. Other matching rules are based on political norms on for example acceptable pollution levels and suggested pollution of facilities. The paper presents the problem area of industrial area rehabilitation, describes the architecture of the modeling technique and presents the first findings of implementation studies.
keywords Pattern matching, Object GIS, Urban object modeling, Facility planning
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id ddss9809
id ddss9809
authors Brondino, Nair Cristina Margarido and Da Silva, Antônio Nélson Rodrigues
year 1998
title A comparison of land valuation methods supported by GIS
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary The purpose of this work was to study three different strategies for the appraisal of urban land. The first, a theoretical strategy created by the authors of this study to reproduce the common conditions of Brazilian cities, uses increments and reductions in the value of a square meter of land according to each lot’s individual features. The second method, based on Multiple Regression techniques, is widely used for valuation purposes. Finally, the effectiveness of Artificial Neural Networks to deal with thiskind of problem is studied. A sample of 157 lots was collected from several neighbourhoods of a small Brazilian city for the case study. The lot features recorded were area, width, shape, distance to the downtown district of the city through the street network, existence of fences and paved sidewalks, and market price. Prediction errors have been estimated for each of the three methods in order to compare their results. Predicted and error values, added to Geographical Information Systems, may be used to build thematic maps and to check how each strategy applies to different areas of the city. The analyses of error values conducted in this study showed that Artificial Neural Networks presented the best performance as a land appraisal method for the case studied.
series DDSS
email anelson@sc.usp.br
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 18
authors Castane, D., Leirado, E.R., Tessier, C. and Martinez.R.
year 1998
title El Docente y la Utilizacion de Sistemas Multimediales en Redes Telematicas Aplicados a la Ensenanza 3D en Diseno Arquitectonico (The Teacher and the use of Multimedia Systems in Telematicas Networks Applied to the Teaching of 3D in Architectonic Design)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 154-159
summary The remarkable advances in the technology of computer systems, including software, hardware, and networks, continuously give us new avenues to be utilized in education. The pedagogic strategy to be developed in the utilization of digital graphic systems applied to three-dimensional design in architecture (both in the design and virtual expression of objects or already designed architectural groups) is still changing with the times.Therefore, the Department, as an extension of its experience with this type of development and as a response to deal with special situations such as large numbers of students, develops this new proposal, which is currently being used. This project uses the implementation, structuring, and building of a virtual site as an informatics classroom, utilizing multimedia systems, to be used as a support for acquiring knowledge during the learning that takes place doing the coursework. This setting would allow for the feedback between the instructor and the student to be on-going, hence both groups being efficiently motivated through examples and opportunities of how to do the following: utilize appropriate technology, manipulate the right information, utilize the right kind of software programs and techniques, revamp the knowledge, and benefit from using the appropriate digital techniques for each specific case of architectural design and expression.
series SIGRADI
email dorcas@fadu.uba.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:48

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