CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 81 to 100 of 477

_id 6fdf
authors Emdanat, Samir S. and Vakalo, Emmanuel-G.
year 1998
title An Ontology for Conceptual Design in Architecture
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 425-434
summary This paper presents ongoing efforts to formulate an ontology for conceptual design on the basis of shape algebras. The ontology includes definitions for spatial elements such as points, lines, planes, and volumes, as well as, non-spatial elements such as material properties. The ontology is intended to facilitate sharing knowledge of shapes and their properties among independent design agents. This paper describes the formulation of the ontology and discusses some of its underlying classes, axioms, and relations.
keywords Ontologies, Knowledge Representation
series CAADRIA
email emdanat@umich.edu
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:12

_id 4942
authors Gardner, Brian M.
year 1998
title The Grid Sketcher: An AutoCAD Based Tool for Conceptual Design Processes
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 222-237
summary Sketching with pencil and paper is reminiscent of the varied, rich, and loosely defined formal processes associated with conceptual design. Architects actively engage such creative paradigms in their exploration and development of conceptual design solutions. The Grid Sketcher, as a conceptual sketching tool, presents one possible computer implementation for enhancing and supporting these processes. It effectively demonstrates the facility with which current technology and the computing environment can enhance and simulate sketching intents and expectations. One pervasive and troubling undercurrent, however, is the conceptual barrier between the variable processes of human thought and those indigenous to computing. Typically with respect to design, the position taken is that the two are virtually void of any fundamental commonality. A designer’s thoughts are intuitive, at times irrational, and rarely follow consistently identifiable patterns. Conversely, computing requires predictability in just these endeavors. Computing is strictly an algorithmic process while thought is not always so predictable. Given these dichotomous relationships, the computing environment, as commonly defined, cannot reasonably expect to mimic the typically human domain of creative design. In this context, this thesis accentuates the computer’s role as a form generator as opposed to a form evaluator. The computer, under the influence of certain contextual parameters can, however, provide the designer with a rich and elegant set of forms that respond through algorithmics to the designer’s creative intents. The software presented in this thesis is written in AutoLISP and exploits AutoCAD’s capacious 3D environment. Designs and productions respond to a bounded framework where user selected parametric variables of size, scale, proportion, and proximity, all which reflect contextual issues, determine the characteristics of a unit form. Designer selected growth algorithms then arbitrate the spatial relationships between the unit forms and their propagation through the developing design. While the Sketcher implements only the GRID as an organizational discipline, many other paradigms are possible. Within this grid structure a robust set of editing features, supported by the computer’s inherent speed, allows the designer to analyze successive productions while refining ever more complex solutions. Through creative manipulation of these algorithmic structures ideas eventually coalesce to formalize images that represent a given design problem’s solution set.

series ACADIA
email jvcarch@mcione.com
last changed 1998/12/16 08:41

_id 9bee
authors Gerzso, J. Michael
year 2001
title Automatic Generation of Layouts of an Utzon Housing System via the Internet
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 202-211
summary The article describes how architectural layouts can be automatically generated over the Internet. Instead of using a standard web server sending out HTML pages to browser client, the system described here uses an approach that has become common since 1998, known as three tier client/server applications. The server part of the system contains a layout generator using SPR(s), which stands for “Spatial Production Rule System, String Version”, a standard context- free string grammar. Each sentences of this language represents one valid Utzon house layout. Despite the fact that the system represents rules for laying out Utzon houses grammatically, there are important differences between SPR(s) and shape grammars. The layout generator communicates with Autocad clients by means of an application server, which is analogous to a web server. The point of this project is to demonstrate the idea that many hundreds or thousands of clients can request the generation of all of the Utzon layouts simultaneously over the Internet by the SPR(s) server, but the server never has to keep track when each client requested the generation of all of the layouts, or how many layouts each client has received.
keywords Internet, Spatial-Production-Rules Grammars, Utzon
series ACADIA
email 104164.341@compuserve.com
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id 36
authors González, Carlos Guillermo
year 1998
title Una TecnologÌa Digital Para el Diseño: El Tde-Ac (A Digital Technology for Design: The Tde-Ac)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 274-279
summary TDE is a graphic language capable of notation of pure design operations, which offers an alternative to Monge and Perspective drawing. This language which was perfected and developed by Claudio Guerri in the late 80's, is originated in the Theory of Spatial Delimitation of CÈsar Janello (1974-1984). From 1995 onwards, and within the framework of the UBACyT AR025 Project (1995-1997), a software in order to apply the TDE through computer technology started to be developed. This work is carried out within the framework of the research program SPATIAL SEMIOTICS-DESIGN THEORY of the FADU-UBA directed by Claudio Guerri, and is continued in the UBACyT AR01 4 Project (1998-2000) "TDE-AC. Graphic language. TDE computer assisted". The computer tool TDE-AC, adds to this graphic language the power of the processing speed and a certain autonomy of interpretation and execution of design operations, which enables to visualize results with a remarkable speed in relation with manual or intellectual work in front of the drawing table. Trough the amplified projection on the screens of the program the stage of development and effectivity of TDE-AC will be demonstrated.
series SIGRADI
email gnzlz@satlink.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id cfad
authors Kurmann, David
year 1998
title Sculptor - How to Design Space?
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 317-326
summary Architects face a significant lack of computer tools that truly support them in the early, conceptual stages of design. In this paper, we take a look at the reasons for that and propose some solutions. We introduce new human-machine interaction methods that do differ from construction based approaches. We define new spatial interface paradigms as well as new objects and their behavior. Finally we present their implementation in ‘Sculptor’ - a modeling prototype to enable designing in space with space.
keywords Spatial Modeling, Human Computer Interface, Cooperative Design
series CAADRIA
email kurmann@arch.ethz.ch
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:22

_id ddss9840
id ddss9840
authors Mahdavi, A., Akin, Ö. and Zhang, Y.
year 1998
title Formalization of Concurrent Performance Requirementsin Building Problem Composition
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary Specification of performance requirements is an emerging area of research that promises to improve building design particularly during the early stages of design. Building problem decomposition and recomposition can be based on a number of requirement categories in order to group buildingfunctions into hierarchically organized groups. Traditionally this activity is known as stacking and blocking, or zoning; and limited to spatial requirements. Our long term objective is to broaden this set into a more comprehensive one, including thermal, acoustic, and daylighting; and improve the stateof- the-art in building performance specification. While domain information from various building performance areas may be applicable toward enriching the informational basis for stacking andblocking operations, this paper focuses primarily on the thermal and acoustic domain.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 9bbc
authors Miranda, V. and Park, T.
year 1998
title Representation of architectural concepts in the study of precedents: a concept-learning system
source Automation in Construction 8 (1) (1998) pp. 99-106
summary Learning architectural concepts through the study of precedents is a common activity in design studio. Traditionally, an instructor presents a design concept by showing selected examples using slides, photographs, drawings, texts and verbal analyses. This method relies on a linear mode of conveying design knowledge and is time bound. It emphasizes information retention and recall of facts rather than an understanding of information. If information on architectural precedents are represented digitally in a system designed to promote understanding of the material rather than just presentation of facts, then some disadvantages of the traditional method may be overcome and additional advantages may be achieved. This paper describes a computer-assisted lesson system designed to represent architectural concepts related to spatial composition in design by using graphic images and text and reports on its development, implementation and testing. The system relies on many characteristics, such as accessibility, interactivity, flexibility, rapid feedback, etc., which are known to foster effective concept learning. The paper also evaluates the viability and effectiveness of this system from a technological and logistical viewpoint as well as from a concept learning viewpoint, and concludes with a discussion on other potential applications.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 59
authors Ozel, Filiz
year 1998
title Geometric Modeling intThe Simulation of Fire - Smoke Spread in Buildings
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 438-445
summary Since the performance simulation of buildings, such as fire/smoke spread, energy loss/gain, acoustics, etc. greatly rely on building geometry, the way the physical environment is modeled can substantially effect the reliability of the predictions made by such simulations. Most computer models that simulate fire and smoke spread in buildings limit the computer representation of the building to simpler geometries and define rooms as rectangular spaces or as spaces with uniform crossections. Such a definition does not account for the variety of building elements that can exist in a building such as large overhangs, half height walls, etc. Existing simulations are typically developed as mathematical models and use the principles of thermodynamics to represent the spread of the elements of fire through space over a given time period. For example, in zone models each room is defined as a two tier space with heat and smoke exchange between lower and upper tiers as the fire progresses. On the other hand, field models divide the space into small contiguous units where thermodynamic state of each unit is calculated as the simulated fire progresses. Dynamic processes such as fire and smoke spread must recognize both intangible (i.e. voids) and tangible (i.e. solids such as walls, balconies, ceiling, etc.) architectural entities. This paper explores the potential of solid modeling techniques in generating geometric definitions for both solid and void architectural entities that can interact With mathematical models of fire/smoke spread in buildings. The implications of cellular spatial partitioning techniques for zone or field models of fire/smoke spread are investigated, and the methods of creating cellular decomposftion models for architectural spaces as well as for spatial boundaries such as walls are explored. The size of each cellular partition, i.e. the resolution of the partition, and the material and heat transfer attributes of each cell were found to be very critical in modeling the spread fire through voids as well as through solids in a building.
series SIGRADI
email ozel@asu.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:57

_id 650c
authors Porada, S.
year 1998
title Ouvoir - Of the Potential Architecture
source Cyber-Real Design [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 83-905377-2-9] Bialystock (Poland), 23-25 April 1998, pp. 155-161
summary Calculations are used to forecast urban flows of population, development of various activities, demography, and many other architectural programme constrains, and have been spontaneously the first field of computer intervention in urban and architectural project design. By analogy to engineering where computation is the base of decision making, architectural design process is seen as a problem solving process. <> constrains computer aided computation is seen as Computer Aided Architectural Design, CAAD. This way, a technological utopia called CAD in architecture is born. Nevertheless, the review of architectural design methods has clearly shown that programmatic models, since they are only used to evaluate spatial hypothesis, and do not have in themselves space production potentialities. In spite of the powerful methodological movement of the sixties, that have established this design constellation, the misunderstanding persists until now. Architect is a gestural and visual being. By using simultaneously metaphor, gesture and calculation, he calls for all his experiences and sensibility to realise plastic and poetic synthesis of form. To remedy to the major problem of the form synthesis, graphical instruments have been proposed. Why not utilise tools used in the field of engineering as computer aided drafting ? And so, computer aided drafting triumphaly entered the architectural design process. But, computer aided drafting is commonly seen as an instrument used on the - projection - stage, where drawings are produced for an already designed object. A new myth that assimilate architectural design to the drawing production activity arrives with the <>, containing thousands of drawings. All this aimed to facilitate, as it is proclaimed, communication between all the intervening in the project.
series plCAD
last changed 1999/04/08 15:16

_id diss_prothero
id diss_prothero
authors Prothero, Jerrold D.
year 1998
title The Role of Rest Frames in Vection, Presence and Motion Sickness
source University of Washington, HIT-Lab
summary A framework is presented for comprehending partly participants' spatial percep- tion in virtual environments. Speci c hypotheses derived from that framework in- clude: simulator sickness should be reducible through visual background manipula- tions; and the sense of presence, or of \being in" a virtual environment, should be increased by manipulations that facilitate perception of a virtual scene as a perceptual rest frame. Experiments to assess the simulator sickness reduction hypothesis demon- strated that congruence between the visual background and inertial cues decreased reported simulator sickness and per-exposure postural instability. Experiments to assess the presence hypothesis used two measures: self-reported presence and visual- inertial nulling. Results indicated that a meaningful virtual scene, as opposed to a random one, increased both reported presence and the level of inertial motion re- quired to overcome perceived self-motion elicited by scene motion. The simulator sickness research implies that visual background manipulations may be a means to reduce the prevalent unwanted side-e ects of simulators. The presence research intro- duces a procedure, possibly based on brain-stem level neural processing, to measure the salience of virtual environments. Both lines of research are central to developing e ective virtual interfaces which have the potential to increase the human-computer bandwidth, and thus to partially address the information explosion.
series thesis:MSc
more http://www.hitl.washington.edu/publications/r-98-11/
last changed 2003/11/28 06:35

_id acfc
authors Seo, Jongwon
year 1998
title Graphical Interface Design for Equipment Control in Unstructured Environments
source University of Texas at Austin, Dept. of Civil Engineering
summary This dissertation is concerned with graphical interfaces to improve equipment control in unstructured environments such as construction, demolition, mining, and facility/infrastructure maintenance. Initial evidence indicates that graphical representation of equipment and work environments would enhance equipment control by providing better spatial perception to the operator. Real-time simulation and task planning with graphical models can also ensure safe and reliable operation of equipment. In addition, graphical interfaces can assist the operator to plan, measure, and record work progress by integrating design or as-built CAD databases with graphical models of equipment and work environments. The use of graphical models for equipment control in unstructured environments, however, has limitations, because it is very difficult to generate exact graphical models in such a quickly changing environment. The main objectives of this study were to develop principles for design of, and to validate the usefulness of graphical interfaces for equipment control in unstructured environments. The design principles were derived based on general literature and case studies of the existing graphical control interface systems. The graphical control interface for a tele-operated clinker clearing robot was then designed and implemented based on the derived principles. The developed graphical interface was tested and evaluated, and the implementation was analyzed with respect to the derived principles. The quantitative test results of the graphical control interface for the tele-operated clinker clearing robot validated the usefulness of graphical interfaces for equipment control in unstructured environments. The design principles were also verified with the test results.
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id ddss9855
id ddss9855
authors Spinelli, Juçara and Krafta, Romulo
year 1998
title Urban Land Value Distribution UnderConfigurational Scrutiny
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary In the present study were evaluated land parceling problems under aspects of spatial configuration related to land value (lv). Paradoxical cases occur in urban spaces, such as low spatial differentiation and high lv, or vice-versa. Determined urban areas are identified as having high centrality, with intense land use and occupation, and, therefore, high market value. Conversely, other urban areas are identified as having low centrality value, certain degradation, or lack of infrastructure and urban equipment, and, consequently, low lv. Empirical studies have proved satisfactory results interms of the correlation between measures of configuration and lv. These studies verify the convenience of the models used to describe significant aspects of spatial differentiation. The complementation of the methodological proposal is identified, and other components of urban space are calculated (plot dimension, infrastructure, normative aspects, etc.). These are determinant measures that characterize the local factor associated with measures that determine the morphological differentiation.This differentiation demonstrated that land value distribution, besides following centrality, depends, in greater or lesser extent, on the local factor. The results obtained, through a model that combines measures of centrality with local characteristics, approached reality because the model incorporated a greater number of variables which allowed the verification of correlated socioeconomic and spatial matters related to parceling, value, and configuration.
series DDSS
email propur@vortex.ufrgs.br
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9814
id ddss9814
authors Van Raes, N., Cornelis, B. and Donney, J.P.
year 1998
title Decision Support for Improving Public Transport Network
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary When dealing with accessibility in a public transport network, isochronous maps are the common rule. Those maps are based on shortest distance algorithms run over simple or simplified networks. This contribution aims at representing the actual spatial distribution of the public transport offer in order to improve the usefulness to the urban community and to predict the evolution of the network according to the expected development of the agglomeration. The study combines the street (walking distance)and public transportation (buses) networks. The analyses rely on timetables and road maps completed by the public transportation company (TEC). Moreover, it makes use of built-up areas derived from satellite imagery. The processing requires raster- as well as vector-based procedures which have been achieved notably with the IDRISI software. Nevertheless the implementation of the decision rule relies on an original routine written by the authors. The area of interest concerns a part of the agglomeration of Liège (Belgium), including two secondary poles, highlighting their relation with the centre of the city and with each other. First the paper presents the typology of the public transport routes. Then the methodology elaborated for each transportation type is analysed; the shortestdistance routes and their alternatives are extracted and combined within a raster process. The obtained results and their operationality are finally presented and the paper concludes with possible improvements of the methodology.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id avocaad_2001_17
id avocaad_2001_17
authors Ying-Hsiu Huang, Yu-Tung Liu, Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yi-Ting Cheng, Yu-Chen Chiu
year 2001
title The comparison of animation, virtual reality, and scenario scripting in design process
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary Design media is a fundamental tool, which can incubate concrete ideas from ambiguous concepts. Evolved from freehand sketches, physical models to computerized drafting, modeling (Dave, 2000), animations (Woo, et al., 1999), and virtual reality (Chiu, 1999; Klercker, 1999; Emdanat, 1999), different media are used to communicate to designers or users with different conceptual levels¡@during the design process. Extensively employed in design process, physical models help designers in managing forms and spaces more precisely and more freely (Millon, 1994; Liu, 1996).Computerized drafting, models, animations, and VR have gradually replaced conventional media, freehand sketches and physical models. Diversely used in the design process, computerized media allow designers to handle more divergent levels of space than conventional media do. The rapid emergence of computers in design process has ushered in efforts to the visual impact of this media, particularly (Rahman, 1992). He also emphasized the use of computerized media: modeling and animations. Moreover, based on Rahman's study, Bai and Liu (1998) applied a new design media¡Xvirtual reality, to the design process. In doing so, they proposed an evaluation process to examine the visual impact of this new media in the design process. That same investigation pointed towards the facilitative role of the computerized media in enhancing topical comprehension, concept realization, and development of ideas.Computer technology fosters the growth of emerging media. A new computerized media, scenario scripting (Sasada, 2000; Jozen, 2000), markedly enhances computer animations and, in doing so, positively impacts design processes. For the three latest media, i.e., computerized animation, virtual reality, and scenario scripting, the following question arises: What role does visual impact play in different design phases of these media. Moreover, what is the origin of such an impact? Furthermore, what are the similarities and variances of computing techniques, principles of interaction, and practical applications among these computerized media?This study investigates the similarities and variances among computing techniques, interacting principles, and their applications in the above three media. Different computerized media in the design process are also adopted to explore related phenomenon by using these three media in two projects. First, a renewal planning project of the old district of Hsinchu City is inspected, in which animations and scenario scripting are used. Second, the renewal project is compared with a progressive design project for the Hsinchu Digital Museum, as designed by Peter Eisenman. Finally, similarity and variance among these computerized media are discussed.This study also examines the visual impact of these three computerized media in the design process. In computerized animation, although other designers can realize the spatial concept in design, users cannot fully comprehend the concept. On the other hand, other media such as virtual reality and scenario scripting enable users to more directly comprehend what the designer's presentation.Future studies should more closely examine how these three media impact the design process. This study not only provides further insight into the fundamental characteristics of the three computerized media discussed herein, but also enables designers to adopt different media in the design stages. Both designers and users can more fully understand design-related concepts.
series AVOCAAD
email yinghsiu@iaaa.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id avocaad_2001_16
id avocaad_2001_16
authors Yu-Ying Chang, Yu-Tung Liu, Chien-Hui Wong
year 2001
title Some Phenomena of Spatial Characteristics of Cyberspace
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary "Space," which has long been an important concept in architecture (Bloomer & Moore, 1977; Mitchell, 1995, 1999), has attracted interest of researchers from various academic disciplines in recent years (Agnew, 1993; Benko & Strohmayer, 1996; Chang, 1999; Foucault, 1982; Gould, 1998). Researchers from disciplines such as anthropology, geography, sociology, philosophy, and linguistics regard it as the basis of the discussion of various theories in social sciences and humanities (Chen, 1999). On the other hand, since the invention of Internet, Internet users have been experiencing a new and magic "world." According to the definitions in traditional architecture theories, "space" is generated whenever people define a finite void by some physical elements (Zevi, 1985). However, although Internet is a virtual, immense, invisible and intangible world, navigating in it, we can still sense the very presence of ourselves and others in a wonderland. This sense could be testified by our naming of Internet as Cyberspace -- an exotic kind of space. Therefore, as people nowadays rely more and more on the Internet in their daily life, and as more and more architectural scholars and designers begin to invest their efforts in the design of virtual places online (e.g., Maher, 1999; Li & Maher, 2000), we cannot help but ask whether there are indeed sensible spaces in Internet. And if yes, these spaces exist in terms of what forms and created by what ways?To join the current interdisciplinary discussion on the issue of space, and to obtain new definition as well as insightful understanding of "space", this study explores the spatial phenomena in Internet. We hope that our findings would ultimately be also useful for contemporary architectural designers and scholars in their designs in the real world.As a preliminary exploration, the main objective of this study is to discover the elements involved in the creation/construction of Internet spaces and to examine the relationship between human participants and Internet spaces. In addition, this study also attempts to investigate whether participants from different academic disciplines define or experience Internet spaces in different ways, and to find what spatial elements of Internet they emphasize the most.In order to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the spatial phenomena in Internet and to overcome the subjectivity of the members of the research team, the research design of this study was divided into two stages. At the first stage, we conducted literature review to study existing theories of space (which are based on observations and investigations of the physical world). At the second stage of this study, we recruited 8 Internet regular users to approach this topic from different point of views, and to see whether people with different academic training would define and experience Internet spaces differently.The results of this study reveal that the relationship between human participants and Internet spaces is different from that between human participants and physical spaces. In the physical world, physical elements of space must be established first; it then begins to be regarded as a place after interaction between/among human participants or interaction between human participants and the physical environment. In contrast, in Internet, a sense of place is first created through human interactions (or activities), Internet participants then begin to sense the existence of a space. Therefore, it seems that, among the many spatial elements of Internet we found, "interaction/reciprocity" Ñ either between/among human participants or between human participants and the computer interface Ð seems to be the most crucial element.In addition, another interesting result of this study is that verbal (linguistic) elements could provoke a sense of space in a degree higher than 2D visual representation and no less than 3D visual simulations. Nevertheless, verbal and 3D visual elements seem to work in different ways in terms of cognitive behaviors: Verbal elements provoke visual imagery and other sensory perceptions by "imagining" and then excite personal experiences of space; visual elements, on the other hand, provoke and excite visual experiences of space directly by "mapping".Finally, it was found that participants with different academic training did experience and define space differently. For example, when experiencing and analyzing Internet spaces, architecture designers, the creators of the physical world, emphasize the design of circulation and orientation, while participants with linguistics training focus more on subtle language usage. Visual designers tend to analyze the graphical elements of virtual spaces based on traditional painting theories; industrial designers, on the other hand, tend to treat these spaces as industrial products, emphasizing concept of user-center and the control of the computer interface.The findings of this study seem to add new information to our understanding of virtual space. It would be interesting for future studies to investigate how this information influences architectural designers in their real-world practices in this digital age. In addition, to obtain a fuller picture of Internet space, further research is needed to study the same issue by examining more Internet participants who have no formal linguistics and graphical training.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id ddss9802
id ddss9802
authors Akin, O., Aygen, Z., Cumming, M., Donia, M., Sen, R. and Zhang, Y.
year 1998
title Computational Specification of Building Requirements in theEarly Stages of Design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary We have been exploring computational techniques to help building designers to specify design requirements during the early stages of design. In the past, little has been accomplished in this area either in terms of innovative computational technologies or the improvement of design performance.The prospect of improving design productivity and creating a seamless process between requirements specification and formal design are our primary motivations. This research has been conducted as partof a larger project entitled SEED (Software Environment to Support Early Phases in Building Design). SEED features an open-ended modular architecture, where each module provides support for a design activity that takes place in early design stages. Each module is supported by a database to store and retrieve information, as well as a user interface to support the interaction with designers. The module described in this paper, SEED-Pro (the architectural programming module of SEED), is a workingprototype for building design requirements specification. It can be used by other modules in SEED or by design systems in other domains, such as mechanical engineering, civil engineering, industrial designand electrical engineering. Our approach to SEED-Pro is divided into two phases: core, and support functionalities. The core functionalities operate in an interactive mode relying on a case-based approach to retrieve and adapt complex specification records to the problem at hand. The supportfunctionalities include the case-base, the data-base, and the standards processing environment for building specification tasks. Our findings indicate that SEED-Pro: (1) is a tool that structures the unstructured domain of design requirements; (2) enables the integration of design requirements with the rest of the design process, (3) leads to the creation of complex case-bases and (4) enables the observation of their performance in the context of real world design problems.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 2587
authors Gong, Yihong
year 1998
title Intelligent image databases
source Boston, Kluwer
summary Intelligent Image Databases: Towards Advanced Image Retrieval addresses the image feature selection issue in developing content-based image retrieval systems. The book first discusses the four important issues in developing a complete content-based image retrieval system, and then demonstrates that image feature selection has significant impact on the remaining issues of system design. Next, it presents an in-depth literature survey on typical image features explored by contemporary content-based image retrieval systems for image matching and retrieval purposes. The goal of the survey is to determine the characteristics and the effectiveness of individual features, so as to establish guidelines for future development of content-based image retrieval systems. Intelligent Image Databases: Towards Advanced Image Retrieval describes the Advanced Region-Based Image Retrieval System (ARBIRS) developed by the authors for color images of real-world scenes. They have selected image regions for building ARBIRS as the literature survey suggests that prominent image regions, along with their associated features, provide a higher probability for achieving a higher level content-based image retrieval system. A major challenge in building a region-based image retrieval system is that prominent regions are rather difficult to capture in an accurate and error-free condition, particularly those in images of real-world scenes. To meet this challenge, the book proposes an integrated approach to tackle the problem via feature capturing, feature indexing, and database query. Through comprehensive system evaluation, it is demonstrated how these systematically integrated efforts work effectively to accomplish advanced image retrieval. Intelligent Image Databases: Towards Advanced Image Retrieval serves as an excellent reference and may be used as a text for advanced courses on the topic.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id f448
authors Hermann, M., Kohler, N., Koenig, H. and Luetzkendorf, T.
year 1998
title CAAD System with Integrated Quantity Surveying, Energy Calculation, and LCA
source Proceedings: Green Building Challenge 98, Vancouver, Canada. Vol. 2, 68 - 75
summary In the framework of the German LEGOE project, an integrated tool is developed for computer aided architectural design (CAAD), quantity surveying (catalogue of building elements), life cycle cost calculation and estimation (construction and refurbishment), direct energy consumption (heating, hot-water, electri-city) and environmental impact assessment (mass flows and effect oriented evaluation). During the design process the architect works in his usual CAAD environment with building elements (e.g. one m2 of outer wall) which in turn are composed of detailed construction specifications, energy and mass flow coefficients and cost data. These elements are part of an independent catalogue of elements with all their relevant data. The different application programs use the same basic data and write the specific results into a project-specific database called a PDB which allows the comparison of these data to reference data from other projects. Evaluation and visualisation programs refer to the PDB only.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 1e73
authors Jeng, T. and Eastman, C.M.
year 1998
title A database architecture for design collaboration
source Automation in Construction 7 (6) (1998) pp. 475-483
summary The objective of this paper is to outline new facilities within an integrated environment supporting design collaboration. The details of the architecture and issues regarding explicit support for collaboration mechanisms are presented.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 31
authors Leal, Miriam
year 1998
title Propuesta Que Integra Sig-Multimedia Para Ser Aplicado Al Patrimonio Cultural Unsj-Ar (Proposal that Integrates GIS-Multimedia for Application on the Cultural Patrimony Unsj-Ar)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 238-243
summary The proper knowledge and appraisal of our cultural inheritance as well as its consistent diffusion are respected and powerful tools to safeguard it. The possibilities offered by a georeferenced of our cultural inheritance by means of GIS as well as its integration with multimedial resources such as images, animation,digitized video,voice an sound of aregional scope constitute a valuable tool having a significant potential in the study, protection and diffusion of our cultural inheritance. The objective of the present proposal is to show by way of a GIS application that presents georeferenced information of the province of San Juan, an integration of written documents, sound documents (popular music), folkloric elements (images) and digitized videos about the cultural inheritance of eminent places of the province of San Juan, that we are more committed ourselves to preserve due to their peculiar aridity characteristics and highly seismical risk. Some personalized icons displaying the afore mentioned resources are incorporated into the GIS application. The GIS-database presents an field destined to give data regarding the information source consulted about the inheritance.
series SIGRADI
email mleal@unsj.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:54

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