CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 81 to 100 of 547

_id c65d
authors Habraken, N.J. and Teicher, J (ed.)
year 1998
title The Structure of the Ordinary
source MIT Press, Cambridge, USA, pp. 73-76
summary According to N. J. Habraken, intimate and unceasing interaction between people and the forms they inhabit uniquely defines built environment. The Structure of the Ordinary, the culmination of decades of environmental observation and design research, is a recognition and analysis of everyday environment as the wellspring of urban design and formal architecture. The author's central argument is that built environment is universally organized by the Orders of Form, Place, and Understanding. These three fundamental, interwoven principles correspond roughly to physical, biological, and social domains. Historically, "ordinary" environment was the background against which architects built the "extraordinary." Drawing upon extensive examples from archaeological and contemporary sites worldwide, the author illustrates profound recent shifts in the structure of everyday environment. One effect of these transformations, Habraken argues, has been the loss of implicit common understanding that previously enabled architects to formally enhance and innovate while still maintaining environmental coherence. Consequently, architects must now undertake a study of the ordinary as the fertile common ground in which form- and place-making are rooted. In focusing on built environment as an autonomous entity distinct from the societies and natural environments that jointly create it, this book lays the foundation for a new dialogue on methodology and pedagogy, in support of a more
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id ddss9824
id ddss9824
authors Halin, G., Bignon, J.C.,Benali, K. and Godart, C.
year 1998
title Cooperation models in co-design: application to architectural design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary This paper focuses on cooperation concepts necessary for managing concurrent engineering. It reports on a research work being done in a project which establishes a connection between computer sciences, architecture, and telecommunications research1. Simple electronic cooperation paradigms (also called generic cooperation bricks) are found by analysing the current usage of human cooperation in the domainof AEC design environments. We introduce the principles of a middleware to build easily cooperative applications to assist cooperative design. In this approach, the design actors choose cooperation forms by instancing adapted generic cooperation bricks.
series DDSS
email halin@crai.archi.fr
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id e5d3
authors Hanna, R.
year 1998
title Can IT bridge the Gulf between Science and Architecture?
source Computerised Craftsmanship [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Paris (France) 24-26 September 1998, pp. 78-86
summary The integration of technology into design work has always been seen as one of the serious problems in design education. In architecture the weak integration between architectural science, a subject based on objective knowledge, and artistic design which is based on tacit knowledge and creativity is a problem that has been debated to great length, and an issue of great importance to both academics and professionals. This paper raises the question: can a proper use of IT, both as a design tool and/or as a performance analysis tool, foster better integration and strengthen design quality? This paper investigates the relationship between Science, Design and Computer Aided Design. It aims to both highlight the problems facing the integration between architectural science and design, and describe a framework within which they can be analysed. The paper critically examines the following: a) The perceived gulf between science and design b) The parallels between hypothesis in design and hypothesis in science c) The basis of architectural design: intuition or research? d) Architectural Science and Computer Aided Design (CAD) and the role they can play into bringing about a marriage between science and design.The paper concludes by developing a conceptual framework that can be used as a vehicle to build a CAD system for use during the design process.
series eCAADe
more http://www.paris-valdemarne.archi.fr/archive/ecaade98/html/01hanna/index.htm
last changed 1998/09/25 16:08

_id ddss9825
id ddss9825
authors Hartog, J. P. den, Koutamanis, A. and Luscuere, P. G.
year 1998
title Simulation and evaluation of environmental aspects throughout the designprocess
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary The evaluation of environmental aspects in architectural design has traditionally been performed by means of simple (and often simplistic) rule systems. These generally remain at the normative level of minimal control one encounters in building rules and regulations, thereby failing to provide sufficient information and clarity for design guidance. Despite this, evaluation results normally bound subsequent design decisions as fundamental, inflexible constraints. At much later design stages, whenarchitectural form has been largely crystallized and when environmental subsystems must be specified in detail, both the architect and the contributing engineers often realize the severe limitation of theinitial choices. A frequently voiced argument for such simplification in the guise of abstraction is the lack of detailed information on the form and functional content of a building in the early stages of the designprocess. This obviously presupposes a tabula rasa generative approach. The application of a priori knowledge in the form of types, cases, precedents and automated recognition permits direct transaction from the abstract to the specific at and between a number of predefined relevant abstraction levels in the representation. The combination of a priori knowledge at the typological level with multilevel representations permits the use of precise simulation techniques already in the early design stages and throughout thedesign process. The simulation results employ the dual representation principle of scientific visualization, thereby linking form with measurable performance. Feedback from the simulation provides the analysis and evaluation means for design guidance and for communication between thearchitect and the contributing engineers. A prerequisite to this is that the abstraction level in the representation constrains the analysis derived from the simulation, e.g., by means of grades of fuzziness applied to different zones in the representation on the basis of information specificity.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 0fbd
authors Hartog, J.P., Koutamanis, A. and Luscuere, P.G.
year 1998
title Simulation and evaluation of environmental aspects throughout the design process
source 4th Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Conference. Eindhoven
summary The evaluation of environmental aspects in architectural design has traditionally been performed by means of simple (and often simplistic) rule systems. These generally remain at the normative level of minimal control one encounters in building rules and regulations, thereby failing to provide sufficient information and clarity for design guidance. Despite this, evaluation results normally bound subsequent design decisions as fundamental, inflexible constraints. At much later design stages, when architectural form has been largely crystallized and when environmental subsystems must be specified in detail, both the architect and the contributing engineers often realize the severe limitation of the initial choices. A frequently voiced argument for such simplification in the guise of abstraction is the lack of detailed information on the form and functional content of a building in the early stages of the design process. This obviously presupposes a tabula rasa generative approach. The application of a priori knowledge in the form of types, cases, precedents and automated recognition permits direct transaction from the abstract to the specific at and between a number of predefined relevant abstraction levels in the representation. The combination of a priori knowledge at the typological level with multilevel representations permits the use of precise simulation techniques already in the early design stages and throughout the design process. The simulation results employ the dual representation principle of scientific visualization, thereby linking form with measurable performance. Feedback from the simulation provides the analysis and evaluation means for design guidance and for communication between the architect and the contributing engineers. A prerequisite to this is that the abstraction level in the representation constrains the analysis derived from the simulation, e.g., by means of grades of fuzziness applied to different zones in the representation on the basis of information specificity.
series other
email A.Koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id ddss9826
id ddss9826
authors Hendricx, A., Geebelen, B., Geeraerts, B. and Neuckermans, H.
year 1998
title A methodological approach to object modelling in the architectural designprocess
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary The paper describes a first prototype constructed in search for a central object model. It presents all possible data, concepts and operations concerning the architectural design process in the early phases.A central model of the process of design is essential: going from one design phase into another, the model describes geometrical shapes, abstract concepts like space and activity, concrete physical building elements and the basic operations all these entities undertake. Emphasis is put on combining all these different viewpoints, thus enabling the designer to use a broad range of design strategies. The aim is to help him and not steer or even hamper his creative process. Information necessary toassist the user of the system concerning energy calculation, stability checks etc can be extracted. By means of appropriate interfaces not only those tests built on top of the system but also existing software packages can make use of the model’s object structure. The implemented object model is one of the cornerstones of the IDEA+ project, aiming to provide an Integrated Design Environment for Architecture.
keywords object model, building model, CAAD, IDEA+, MERODE
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id f448
authors Hermann, M., Kohler, N., Koenig, H. and Luetzkendorf, T.
year 1998
title CAAD System with Integrated Quantity Surveying, Energy Calculation, and LCA
source Proceedings: Green Building Challenge 98, Vancouver, Canada. Vol. 2, 68 - 75
summary In the framework of the German LEGOE project, an integrated tool is developed for computer aided architectural design (CAAD), quantity surveying (catalogue of building elements), life cycle cost calculation and estimation (construction and refurbishment), direct energy consumption (heating, hot-water, electri-city) and environmental impact assessment (mass flows and effect oriented evaluation). During the design process the architect works in his usual CAAD environment with building elements (e.g. one m2 of outer wall) which in turn are composed of detailed construction specifications, energy and mass flow coefficients and cost data. These elements are part of an independent catalogue of elements with all their relevant data. The different application programs use the same basic data and write the specific results into a project-specific database called a PDB which allows the comparison of these data to reference data from other projects. Evaluation and visualisation programs refer to the PDB only.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 8
authors Hermanson, Robert D.
year 1998
title Re-Presentations: Media Inquiries Regarding Architecture
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 66-75
summary Within the framework of architectural practice as the academy, media supported worldwide interdependence and transient cultural waves are essential forces activating the current globalization phenomenon. Schools that have always engaged themselves in international dialogue, are now increasingly immersed in the rapidly developing media arena and global information networks. In this paper I propose a theoretical and pedagogical framework in which the concept of migration provides a useful model with which to investigate the transitory natures permeating cultures. These involve not only the literal moving from one physical world into another, but also the more abstract - from that of the so called "real" world into that of the "virtual". Through what I call re-presentations an experimental studio was conducted at the Universidad Nacional del Litorat in Santa Fe, Argentina involving multicultures (the USA and Argentina) and multi-disciplines (film/video and architecture). The conclusion suggests however, that such re-presentations posit paradoxical questions.
series SIGRADI
email hermanson@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id ddss9827
id ddss9827
authors Heylighen, A., Segers, R. and Neuckermans, H.
year 1998
title Prototype of an Interactive Case Library for Architectural Design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary Architects acquire an important part of their design knowledge from existing designs. Specific design projects from the past form an indispensable source of information and inspiration. Hence the idea todevelop a digital library of design cases that can be easily accessed during design. The paper describes a recently developed prototype of such a case library, intended to assist architecture students in the studio,yet with the potential of expansion into the office setting. When students enrol into a design project, they usually receive a reader with some relevant examples. At first sight, the digital case library only seems torepresent these examples into another medium, yet there are some important differences between both. Unlike the reader, the library has at its core an indexing-system which allows the easy retrieval of relevantinformation. By labelling projects with several features and making links between similar designs, the tool supports both directed search and browsing. A second difference is that the library is interactive. Studentsare not only able to consult interesting examples, but also to add other projects they consider relevant, to make links between them, to create extra indices etc. Finally, the tool allows to combine several media andto create links to external information sources.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 50a1
authors Hoffman, Donald
year 1998
title Visual Intelligence
source Norton Publishing, New York
summary After his stroke, Mr. P still had outstanding memory and intelligence. He could still read and talk, and mixed well with the other patients on his ward. His vision was in most respects normal---with one notable exception: He couldn't recognize the faces of people or animals. As he put it himself, "I can see the eyes, nose, and mouth quite clearly, but they just don't add up. They all seem chalked in, like on a blackboard ... I have to tell by the clothes or by the voice whether it is a man or a woman ...The hair may help a lot, or if there is a mustache ... ." Even his own face, seen in a mirror, looked to him strange and unfamiliar. Mr. P had lost a critical aspect of his visual intelligence. We have long known about IQ and rational intelligence. And, due in part to recent advances in neuroscience and psychology, we have begun to appreciate the importance of emotional intelligence. But we are largely ignorant that there is even such a thing as visual intelligence---that is, until it is severely impaired, as in the case of Mr. P, by a stroke or other insult to visual cortex. The culprit in our ignorance is visual intelligence itself. Vision is normally so swift and sure, so dependable and informative, and apparently so effortless that we naturally assume that it is, indeed, effortless. But the swift ease of vision, like the graceful ease of an Olympic ice skater, is deceptive. Behind the graceful ease of the skater are years of rigorous training, and behind the swift ease of vision is an intelligence so great that it occupies nearly half of the brain's cortex. Our visual intelligence richly interacts with, and in many cases precedes and drives, our rational and emotional intelligence. To understand visual intelligence is to understand, in large part, who we are. It is also to understand much about our highly visual culture in which, as the saying goes, image is everything. Consider, for instance, our entertainment. Visual effects lure us into theaters, and propel films like Star Wars and Jurassic Park to record sales. Music videos usher us before surreal visual worlds, and spawn TV stations like MTV and VH-1. Video games swallow kids (and adults) for hours on end, and swell the bottom lines of companies like Sega and Nintendo. Virtual reality, popularized in movies like Disclosure and Lawnmower Man, can immerse us in visual worlds of unprecedented realism, and promises to transform not only entertainment but also architecture, education, manufacturing, and medicine. As a culture we vote with our time and wallets and, in the case of entertainment, our vote is clear. Just as we enjoy rich literature that stimulates our rational intelligence, or a moving story that engages our emotional intelligence, so we also seek out and enjoy new media that challenge our visual intelligence. Or consider marketing and advertisement, which daily manipulate our buying habits with sophisticated images. Corporations spend millions each year on billboards, packaging, magazine ads, and television commercials. Their images can so powerfully influence our behavior that they sometimes generate controversy---witness the uproar over Joe Camel. If you're out to sell something, understanding visual intelligence is, without question, critical to the design of effective visual marketing. And if you're out to buy something, understanding visual intelligence can help clue you in to what is being done to you as a consumer, and how it's being done. This book is a highly illustrated and accessible introduction to visual intelligence, informed by the latest breakthroughs in vision research. Perhaps the most surprising insight that has emerged from vision research is this: Vision is not merely a matter of passive perception, it is an intelligent process of active construction. What you see is, invariably, what your visual intelligence constructs. Just as scientists intelligently construct useful theories based on experimental evidence, so vision intelligently constructs useful visual worlds based on images at the eyes. The main difference is that the constructions of scientists are done consciously, but those of vision are done, for the most part, unconsciously.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id ddss9828
id ddss9828
authors Holmberg, Stig C.
year 1998
title Anticipation in Evaluation and Assessment of Urban and Regional Plans
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary In order to start a move toward better computer based supporting tools for the assessment of urban and regional plans, a new research and development endeavour is proposed. In so doing, anticipation andanticipatory computing, i.e. a technique applying modelling and simulation, is found to be an interesting and promising point of departure. Hence, a fuzzy cellular automata computer model (STF) for simulation and anticipation of geographical or physical space is constructed. The main idea is to map anurban plan onto the STF for its assessing. STF has a normalised and continuous, i.e. fuzzy, system variable while both the time and space dimensions take on discrete values. Further, while ordinary cellularautomata use local rules, global ones are employed in STF, i.e. there is a total interdependence among all the cells of the automata. Outcomes of STF can be interpreted more as possible future states than exact predictions. Preliminary results seem to be well in line with main characteristics of planned urban or regional geographical spaces. Further, for the managing of multi-criteria choice situations, a fuzzy procedure – the Ordered Weighted Average (OWA) procedure – with continuous control over the degree of ANDOR-ness and with independent control over the degree of tradeoff, is proposed.
keywords Geographical space, Anticipatory Computing, Cellular Automata, Spatio Temporal Fuzzy Model (STF)
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 1e73
authors Jeng, T. and Eastman, C.M.
year 1998
title A database architecture for design collaboration
source Automation in Construction 7 (6) (1998) pp. 475-483
summary The objective of this paper is to outline new facilities within an integrated environment supporting design collaboration. The details of the architecture and issues regarding explicit support for collaboration mechanisms are presented.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 1873
authors Ji, Guohua and Feng, Jinlong
year 1999
title Structural Approach to the Organization of Information: A Teaching Experiment at SEU
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 153-159
summary Design studio still plays a very important role in architectural design education today since teachers and students can exchange their thinking directly. In the whole teaching/learning process, there are a lot of information to be exchanged between the teachers and the students. How to organize the information and record the whole teaching/learning process is very interesting to us. The increasing use of CAD raises some problems with its advantages when the amount of compute-files becomes very big and they are in different formats. In the third year design studio teaching in the academic year 1998/99 at Department of Architecture in Southeast University, we try to use WWW techniques and features to organise the design information. We try to integrate the teaching programme, the project information, the reference material and the students' work together, to record and monitor the teaching process. Since the teaching programme is clearly organised, we could use some strategies and ideas to control the organisation of file storage and presentation. It creates the basis for the further development of applying network to aid the studio teaching.
series CAADRIA
last changed 2002/09/05 07:21

_id 9951
authors Johnson, R.E. and Clayton, M.J.
year 1998
title The impact of information technology in design and construction: the owner's perspective
source Automation in Construction 8 (1) (1998) pp. 3-14
summary This paper reports on findings of a November 1996 exploratory survey of architecture–engineering clients (Fortune 500 corporate facility managers). This research investigated how the practices of corporate facility managers are being influenced by rapid changes in information technology. The conceptual model that served as a guide for this research hypothesized that information technology acts as both an enabler (that is, information technology provides an effective mechanism for managers to implement desired changes), as well as a source of innovation (that is, new information technology innovations create new facility management opportunities). The underlying assumption of this research is that information technology is evolving from a tool that incrementally improves `back-office' productivity to an essential component of strategic positioning that may alter the basic economics, organizational structure and operational practices of facility management organizations and their interactions with service providers (architects, engineers, and constructors). The paper concludes with a discussion of researchable issues.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 146a
authors Johnson, Robert E.
year 2000
title The Impact of E-Commerce on the Design and Construction Industry
source Eternity, Infinity and Virtuality in Architecture [Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / 1-880250-09-8] Washington D.C. 19-22 October 2000, pp. 75-83
summary Historically, the design and construction industry has been slow to innovate. As a result, productivity in the construction industry has declined substantially compared to other industries. Inefficiencies in this industry are well documented. However, the potential for cost savings and increased efficiency through the use of the Internet and e-commerce may not only increase the efficiency of the design and construction industry, but it may also significantly change the structure and composition of the industry. This is suggested because effective implementations of e-commerce technologies are not limited to one aspect of one industry. E-commerce may be most effective when it is thought of and applied to multi-industry enterprises and in a global context. This paper continues the exploration of a concept that we have been working on for several years, namely that “…information technology is evolving from a tool that incrementally improves ‘backoffice’ productivity to an essential component of strategic positioning that may alter the basic economics, organizational structure and operational practices of facility management organizations and their interactions with service providers (architects, engineers and constructors).” (Johnson and Clayton 1998) This paper will utilize the case study methodology to explore these issues as they are affecting the AEC/FM industry.
series ACADIA
last changed 2002/08/03 05:50

_id 0a31
authors Johnson, Scott
year 1998
title Toward Making the Language of CAAD Match the Language of Architecture: A Protean Elements Approach
source Computerised Craftsmanship [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Paris (France) 24-26 September 1998, pp. 93-100
summary Both in education and in practice, architecture is experiencing a division between designers and "CAD specialists." One reason for the division may be the inherent division between design concepts and CAD concepts. In a very real sense, computer use and design utilize different languages. Becoming an expert in the "craft" of CAD means having to learn to recognize and manipulate a different set of conceptual elements than is used in design. The set of concepts we use affects our thought and behavior incredibly deeply, and translation from one set of concepts to another has significant cognitive cost. This paper discusses the mismatch between architectural and CAD concepts, and proposes protean elements as a solution to the problem. Protean elements are CAD system elements which correspond to architectural elements and have attributes appropriate for the elements they represent. They can be gradually refined in a top-down manner, without demands for certain pieces of missing data, or requirements for "correctness." The goal is to help CAD systems come closer to speaking the same language as architects. A test implementation of a system based on protean elements is currently underway, and aspects of this implementation are discussed.
series eCAADe
more http://www.paris-valdemarne.archi.fr/archive/ecaade98/html/02johnson/index.htm
last changed 1998/09/25 16:10

_id ee96
authors Johnson, Scott
year 1998
title Making Models Architectural: Protean Representations to Fit Architects’ Minds
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 354-365
summary A rich vocabulary has evolved for describing architecture. It serves not only as a means of communication, but also as an embodiment of concepts relating to form, space, structure, function, mood, and symbolism. We architects not only speak in terms of walls, rooms, roofs, arches, etc., we see in terms of them and think in terms of them, as well. Such concepts are integral to our ability to design. Typical CAD representations, however, are based on geometric/mathematical elements like points, lines, planes, and symbols. Even more experimental approaches like parametric shapes or procedural assemblies correspond poorly to architectural elements, and seldom lend themselves well to making conceptual changes that would allow exploration of design alternatives. Small wonder some architecture schools experience a division between computer and studio courses, or even between computer and studio faculty. Different ways of talking and thinking are involved. The concepts involved are often mutually exclusive. This paper discusses an attempt to address this conceptual mismatch, using what are termed “protean” (meaning “very changeable”) elements. These are high-level elements corresponding to architectural concepts like “wall,” or “dome.” They each have parameters appropriate for the particular type of element they represent, and produce the polyhedra necessary for graphics based on these parameters. A system is being implemented to allow models to be constructed using these elements. The protean elements form a loosely structured model, in which some elements hierarchically contain others, and some elements are essentially freestanding, being created and manipulated independently of other elements. Characteristics of protean element are discussed, including the underlying object-oriented structure, the relationship between elements and graphics, and functions associated with the objects. A scheme is explained whereby all parts of a design can be represented even when the design includes extremely unusual forms not conforming to predictable classes of elements. The necessary support framework is also discussed; general flow of the system and mechanisms for viewing the model and editing subcomponents are explained. The current status of the project, and intentions for future work are discussed. The project has been partially implemented, and the necessary framework to support the system is mostly complete.

series ACADIA
email sven@umich.edu
last changed 1998/12/16 07:39

_id 161c
authors Juroszek, Steven P.
year 1999
title Access, Instruction, Application: Towards a Universal Lab
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 141-150
summary In January 1998, the Montana State University School of Architecture embarked upon an initiative to successfully integrate computer technology into its design curriculum. At that time only a handful of student computers could be found in the design studio. By January 1999 over 95 students have and use computers in their courses. The increase in computer access and use is occurring through a five-phase initiative called the Universal Lab-a school-wide commitment to the full integration of computer technology into all design studios, support courses and architectural electives. The Universal Lab uses the areas of Access, Instruction and Application as the vehicles for appropriate placement and usage of digital concepts within the curriculum. The three-pronged approach allows each instructor to integrate technology using one, two or all three areas with varying degrees of intensity. This paper presents the current status of the Universal Lab-Phase I and Phase II-and describes the effect of this program on student work, course design and faculty instruction.
keywords Design, Access, Instruction, Application, Integration
series eCAADe
email stevej@montana.edu
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 4f90
authors Kalay, Y.E.
year 1998
title P3: Computational environment to support design collaboration
source Automation in Construction 8 (1) (1998) pp. 37-48
summary The work reported in this paper addresses the paradoxical state of the construction industry (also known as A/E/C, for Architecture, Engineering and Construction), where the design of highly integrated facilities is undertaken by severely fragmented teams, leading to diminished performance of both processes and products. The construction industry has been trying to overcome this problem by partitioning the design process hierarchically or temporally. While these methods are procedurally efficient, their piecemeal nature diminishes the overall performance of the project. Computational methods intended to facilitate collaboration in the construction industry have, so far, focused primarily on improving the flow of information among the participants. They have largely met their stated objective of improved communication, but have done little to improve joint decision-making, and therefore have not significantly improved the quality of the design project itself. We suggest that the main impediment to effective collaboration and joint decision-making in the A/E/C industry is the divergence of disciplinary `world-views', which are the product of educational and professional processes through which the individuals participating in the design process have been socialized into their respective disciplines. To maximize the performance of the overall project, these different world-views must be reconciled, possibly at the expense of individual goals. Such reconciliation can only be accomplished if the participants find the attainment of the overall goals of the project more compelling than their individual disciplinary goals. This will happen when the participants have become cognizant and appreciative of world-views other than their own, including the objectives and concerns of other participants. To achieve this state of knowledge, we propose to avail to the participants of the design team highly specific, contextualized information, reflecting each participant's valuation of the proposed design actions. P3 is a semantically-rich computational environment, which is intended to fulfill this mission. It consists of: (1) a shared representation of the evolving design project, connected (through the World Wide Web) to (2) individual experts and their discipline-specific knowledge repositories; and (3) a computational project manager makes the individual valuations visible to all the participants, and helps them deliberate and negotiate their respective positions for the purpose of improving the overall performance of the project. The paper discusses the theories on which the three components are founded, their function, and the principles of their implementation.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 807b
authors Kalisperis, Loukas N. and Pehlivanidou-Liakata, Anastasia
year 1998
title Architectural Design Studio: Digital and Traditional
source Computers in Design Studio Teaching [EAAE/eCAADe International Workshop Proceedings / ISBN 09523687-7-3] Leuven (Belgium) 13-14 November 1998, pp. 73-81
summary The nature of the task of representing architecture alters to reflect the state of architecture at each period of time. In simulating architecture, the necessary conversion from that which is inhabitable, experiential, functional, and at times, indescribable to an abstraction in an entirely different media is often an imperfect procedure that centers on its translation rather than the actual design. The objective in visualizing any architectural design is to achieve a situational awareness that allows for meaningful criticism of the design. Computer-aided three-dimensional (3D) visualization technology has made available new representation techniques. Surpassing the traditional means of graphic illustration and scaled models, this technology has been primarily developed to decrease the amount of abstraction between architecture and its documentation. The general objective of this paper is to present a study carried out over the last six years in which the progress of students in a traditional studio was compared to the progress of similar students in a digital studio. We have assessed the effects of the tools over the six-year period (24 different projects) by evaluating solution-generation in trial-and-error process and learning problem-solving strategies based on the Cognitive Flexibility Theory paradigm. Students using the digital studio were found to generate more and various solutions consistently.
series eCAADe
email lnk@psu.edu
more http://www.eaae.be/
last changed 2000/11/21 08:14

For more results click below:

show page 0show page 1show page 2show page 3this is page 4show page 5show page 6show page 7show page 8show page 9... show page 27HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_696735 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002