CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 101 to 120 of 553

_id 6311
authors Rychter, Zenon
year 1998
title Event Driven Turtle as Pattern Generator
source Cyber-Real Design [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 83-905377-2-9] Bialystock (Poland), 23-25 April 1998, pp. 163-176
summary Computer programming is a powerful exploratory design tool. A simple algorithm can produce results of unexpected complexity, variety, and appeal. By mimicking evolution in nature, rich global states are gradually developed over time by iteration of elementary local rules. Fractal images and life-game simulations are two well known examples. This paper presents a pattern-generating application based on the walking turtle metaphor. The turtle has an intelligence of its own, can be randomly disturbed or directed interactively by the user. Several snapshots are shown of amazingly diverse patterns left by the turtle walking in various modes. Advantages of object-oriented visual programming environments for rapid application development are discussed.
series plCAD
last changed 1999/04/08 15:16

_id a5cd
authors Sasada, T., Yamaguchi, S., Morozumi, M., Kaga, A. and Homma, R. (Eds.)
year 1998
title CAADRIA ‘98 [Conference Proceedings]
source Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009 / Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, 482 p.
summary Recent progress in hardware and software technology for CAAD systems offer new challenges and opportunities to architects and design educators in aspects such as modeling systems for sketching and design evaluation; knowledge bases as a source of design thinking; network or CD-ROM image banks of design archives; video-conferencing to support geographically distributed interdisciplinary collaboration; etc. Despite expectations that CAAD system would support creative and productive design processes more effectively than those in a traditional design studio, their contributions to architectural design practice and design education still seem to be limited. The fault is, in part, that there are many designers and educators who have yet to experience designing in the medium (as opposed to simply drafting) and partly because digital design tools and technologies have still to be developed or to be integrated to a process of designers' activities. Clearly there are opportunities for further efforts to explore and develop better CAAD technologies as well as to demonstrate and prove possible impact of their application on design practice and design education.
series CAADRIA
email sasada@env.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:05

_id 62cc
authors Seebohm, T. and Wallace, W.
year 1998
title Rule-based representation of design in architectural practice
source Automation in Construction 8 (1) (1998) pp. 73-85
summary It is suggested that expert systems storing the design knowledge of particular offices in terms of stylistic and construction practice provide a means to take considerably more advantage of information technology than currently. The form of the knowledge stored by such expert systems is a building representation in the form of rules stating how components are placed in three-dimensional space relative to each other. By describing how Frank Lloyd Wright designed his Usonian houses it is demonstrated that the proposed approach is very much in the spirit of distinguished architectural practice. To illustrate this idea, a system for assembling three-dimensional architectural details is presented with particular emphasis on the nature of the rules and the form of the building components created by the rules to assemble typical details. The nature of the rules, which are a three-dimensional adaptation of Stiny's shape grammars, is described. In particular, it is shown how the rules themselves are structured into different classes, what the nature of these classes is and how specific rules can be obtained from more general rules. The rules embody a firm's collective design experience in detailing. As a conclusion, an overview is given of architectural practice using rule-based representations.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id 253a
authors Snyder, James Daniel
year 1998
title Conceptual modeling and application integration in CAD: the essential elements
source Camegie Mellon University, School of Architecture, Pittsburgh
summary A research focus in design research has been the exchange of information between different participants in the design process. While information system automation has occurred in various areas, known as islands of informafion, significant software integration has yet to emerge. A current belief among researchers in this area is that support for information sharing will require shared resources, and more specifically, shared descriptions of the information to be exchanged. If buildings are viewed as a product, the notion of a product and process modeling system ought to support the electronic exchange of information between various design process participants. While significant research has been done, no consensus has emerged as to a satisfactory solution to design information exchange. Many important contributions have been discovered, however, no overall strategy has emerged that embraces both the research issues as well as the practical issues surrounding information exchange. To address the above issues in a specific context, a series of experiments were conducted utilizing a prototype modeling framework that supports product modeling via the Object Model Language (Om). The results of these experiments along with a literature survey allowed for a comprehensive set of product/process modeling requirements. The resulting requirements were then formalized into a product /process modeling environment that includes a modeling language called SPROUT (supported by a compiler) and an associated software architecture that can be targeted toward many different hardware and software platforms. A particularly unique capability supported in this environment is formal support for integrating existing software systems. Given a schematic description in SPROUT, a formal specification can be used to generate computer programs that provably map data to and from the application program.
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id e031
authors Stannard, Sandy
year 1998
title Computers in Design Exploring Light and Time
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 26-35
summary Computers have helped bring architectural education to a digital crossroads. This new tool is effecting architectural education on numerous levels, from the simplest word processing of research papers to more complex interactive modeling. This casestudy paper will focus on the new and changing role of the computer in the design studio. In this case, the approach to integrating the computer into the studio revolves around its application simply as another tool for a designer’s use. Clearly, the use of computers in design studios is not a new development. However, as the computer’s use in design education is not yet widespread, a dialogue about methods of application is valuable for design educators. The intent behind computer use in this case was not to replace traditional design methods but to complement and enhance them. In this spirit, this case study focuses on the use of computers to investigate two aspects of design that are challenging to model: light and time. In the studios to be examined here, students were required to explore their designs with both traditional tools (sketches on trace, physical study models as well as final finish models, etc.) and with newer digital tools (lighting simulation programs, threedimensional modeling programs, and animation). Students worked in teams in most cases. The computer was used both as a design tool as well as a representational tool, with varying degrees of success, depending on the student’s expertise, comfort using the computer as a design tool and access to appropriate hardware and software. In the first studio case study, the “new” medium of the computer was a perfect complement for the focus of the studio, entitled “Space and Light.” In addition to utilizing large scale physical models traditionally used for lighting design, three-dimensional computer models using Lightscape enriched the design results. Both sets of tools were vital for the design processes of the studio assignments. In the second studio case study, a traditional fourth year studio was required to use the computer to explore the dimension of time in their designs, which in this case translated into animation modeling. Integrating the computer into the design studio promises to be a complex task. As these examples will illustrate, the advantages and the disadvantages require continual balancing. Philosophical disagreement, potential discomfort, or a general lack of knowledge of digital tools may inhibit design educators from testing the potential of these ever-changing tools. Despite the challenges, this case study reveals the educational value of continued experimental use of digital tools in the design studio.

series ACADIA
email sstan@uidaho.edu
last changed 1998/12/16 07:29

_id 9
authors Stipech, Alfredo
year 1998
title Un Nuevo Horizonte Arquitectonico, Productivo e Intelectual (A New Architectural, Productive and Intelectual Horizon)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 76-83
summary This work presents the pedagogical experience of a Design Workshop that investigated the impact of the digital and analogic means on the architectonic design process This work was based on the research of Dr. Arch. Julio BermÝdez who also directed this workshop in 1997. This class was part of the Training Program organized by the "Centro de Informatica y Diseho" (CID) at the "Universidad Nacional del Litoral" FADU (Facultad de Arquitectura Diseho y Urbanismo) Santa Fe, Argentina and made possible by the ongoing International Program of Academic Exchange between the FADU and the (University of Utah Graduate School of Architecture (IPAE Project NO 4). The experimental studio utilized an architectural problem to study the procedural, technical, interpretative and theoretical issues associated with the relationship of contemporary media and design process. The pedagogical vehicle was a program that expresses in itself the meeting or collision between two cultures competing for dominance at the end of the millennium: the immemorial material culture (corporeal, tectonic) and the new and everyday more influent virtual culture (information, nets, media, simulation). The premise for the design process, communication and criticism was the constant migration between the digital and analog representation systems. Within this theoretical-practical context semantic aspects containing different representation modalities were used such as physical and electronic models along with systematic and sensitive drawings (manuals, pixels and with CAD). Hybrid interfaces took a leading role in the process since they allowed the communication between analog and digital media through the creative and technical interaction between scanner, video and computer. This architectural and media context generated an intense pedagogic environment fostering the development of creativity and a critical attitude while allowing concrete breakthroughs in the teaching process and format design. Our work reflects on these results showing examples of stud-go works and providing a final evaluation of this unique experience in Argentina.
series SIGRADI
email arqasoc@satlink.com
last changed 2016/03/10 09:01

_id ddss9856
id ddss9856
authors Suter, Georg and Mahdavi, Ardeshir
year 1998
title Generation and communication of design information:a building performance simulation perspective
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary There is general agreement that the process of design and construction of buildings typically involves multiple players. This has been the impetus to develop concepts for computational environments that would supportcollaborative design. While there has been considerable progress with regard to hardware and electronic communication, the underlying representations of design ideas and artifacts have not kept pace with thisprogress. In this paper we deal with this problem not from a global conceptual perspective, but rather from the specific point of view of those designers who use design representation toward extraction and manipulation of specialized technical information. For example, engineers in various fields of building technology require a rich representation of building information in terms of geometry (with special focus on topology), materials, systems attributes, etc. We argue that the current building analysis tools do not operate on the basis of such rich informational representations. Instead the needed information is often assembled on an ad hoc basis from various non-integrated informational sources. We review three representations as they are implemented in commercial or research systems and explore their potential for communicating design information to computational building analysis tools. Based on this review, we describe desirable characteristics of more sophisticated building representations.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 4f5d
authors Szewczyk, Jarostaw
year 1998
title Interface Problem in CAD Systems
source Cyber-Real Design [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 83-905377-2-9] Bialystock (Poland), 23-25 April 1998, pp. 215-225
summary A great number of graphic editors have very complicated desktop menu structures. Interface clarity and command structure can determine usefulness of the pro ram - its ability to aid design process and to create technical documentation. The paper examines connections between interface conception and conception of computer-aided design as a whole, and analyses evolution of computer - interface - architect communication process Subsequent detailed investigation of relations between three partakers in the mentioned process will be essential for creating an interactive, designer-friendly interface
series plCAD
last changed 1999/04/08 15:16

_id ga9804
id ga9804
authors Tang, Ming Xi
year 1998
title An Artificial Intelligence Approach to Industrial Design Support
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The process of Industrial Design extends from market analysis, conceptualization, form generation to performance prediction, engineering analysis and user analysis etc. This requires a wide range of design knowledge and techniques from different disciplines. Computer-based support to industrial design is limited because the majority of the CAD systems deal with only geometric models and representations. The recent advancement in generative techniques utilizing evolutionary computation methods provides an opportunity for the study of more creative and systematic ways of supporting the industrial design process. However, one of the problems associated with the existing generative techniques is the difficulty in evaluating a large number of solutions generated by a generative system. This paper addresses this problem by presenting a system framework for industrial design support through an integrated application of Artificial Intelligence techniques.
series other
email sdtang@polyu.edu.hk
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ddss9859
id ddss9859
authors Tonarelli, P., Delaporte, J.L., Tahon, C.
year 1998
title Geographical and logistical Information System for building management
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary Nowadays, most of building managers (e.g., companies, local communities, government agencies) have to face up a common set of problems. For instance, these problems are a deficient knowledge of ancient buildings and networks (e.g., gas, water), an inefficient management of green spaces, ora lack of communication between users (e.g., technical staff, suppliers, building end users). In addition, building and spaces to be managed may be shared among several distant areas. LAMIH works aim to achieve methodologies and computer tools for building management andassociated logistic. These works include two aspects we present in this paper:- a methodological one: the establishment of a project business plan, applied to building and logistic management,- a computer aspect: the design and implementation of a decision and management support system, the Geographical and Logistical Information System (G.L.I.S.). The project business plan includes the creation of a task force which has to lead the project and the description of the project plan.The G.L.I.S. is a software set which uses shared database. In particular, this set allows the different users to:- manage a patrimony as a whole, with the help of a Geographical Information System,- manage buildings and networks,- improve communication and logistic aspects with the help of a groupware tool. We present the achievement of these methodology and tools as part of a particular area: theUniversity of Valenciennes which is shared among four towns. The project takes into account existing buildings and those to be built, spaces which separates them, and the relationships betweenthe four different sites of the University. A task force is created as well as a specialised service, the Building Management Department. This department represents an interface between the task force,the LAMIH, and a centre of Information Technologies in construction (CERTIC) which is created as part of the SCENIC project (Support Centres Network for IT in Construction, Esprit project 21772).
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 6c98
authors Tsou, Jin-Yeu
year 1998
title Applying Computational Fluid Dynamics to Architectural Design Development - Strategy and Implementation
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 133-142
summary This paper presents the development process and preliminary results of several research projects that apply computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to architectural design. The CFD On-line Teaching project is developing a multimedia training course for architecture students to apply CFD simulation to their projects. Each lesson illus-trates basic principles regarding air flow in building design, and provides CFD sample files with pre-defined flow cells for students to test these concepts. The Chinese Temple project uses CFD simulation to study the wind resistance of a Tong Dynasty heavy timber structure, with particular attention to the roof form. Air flow information generated in the project includes the visual representation of the pressure distribution and velocity field on all slices through the temple, as well as particle tracks around and through the building.  The Urban Housing Air Duct project focuses on air duct design for the China Experimental Urban Housing Scheme. The visual representation of the pressure distribution and velocity field in the ducts provides vital information for helping the China Housing Research Center improve the current design.
keywords CFD, Scientific Visualization, Computer-Aided Architecture Design
series CAADRIA
email jinyeutsou@cuhk.edu.hk
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:41

_id 6b50
authors Ueng,W.-D., Lai, J.-Y. and Doong, J.L.
year 1998
title Sweep-surface reconstruction from three-dimensional measured data
source Computer-Aided Design, Vol. 30 (10) (1998) pp. 791-805
summary The purpose of this work was to present a surface fitting algorithm for sweep surface reconstruction from three-dimensional measured data. The sweeping ruleconsidered in this work was essentially translational sweeping in which the generators traverse about the directors to form the desired sweep surface. Thesweep-surface fitting was formulated as a nonlinear least-squares minimization problem for which an error expression was minimized which yields the optimizedgenerators, the directors and the parameter values corresponding to each measured data. An algorithm was presented also to convert the sweep surface model into acomposite spline surface which could be imported into most CAD/CAM systems. Effective experimental results were provided to illustrate the feasibility of theproposed strategy.
keywords Reverse Engineering, Sweep-Surface Fitting, Least-Squares Method
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:33

_id ddss9860
id ddss9860
authors Vakalo, E-G. and Fahmy, A.
year 1998
title A Theoretical Framework for the Analysis and Derivation of Orthogonal Building Plans and Sections
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary Architects are generally perceived as “Formgivers with an extraordinary gift” (Ackerman, 1980:12). Implicit in this statement is the belief that the operations that architects employ to compose their designs are the product of a creative faculty that is beyond the reach of rational discourse, and thereby cannot be subjected to logical investigation. This view is detrimental to the advancement of knowledge about architectural composition and adversely affects both practice and education in architecture. More specifically, it prevents the architectural community from acquiring of a more refined conception about how architects derive their designs. In contrast to this view, this study demonstrates that architectural form-making is amenable to logical analysis. In specific, this is to be done through a theoretical and computational framework that describe and explain the tasks involved in the making of orthogonal building plans and sections. In addition to illustrating the susceptibility of architectural form-making to logical analysis, the frameworks proposed in this study overcome the limitations of previously established theories thatdeal with architectural form-making. These can be divided into two categories: normative and positive theories.Normative theories include architectural treatises and manifestos. A major limitation of normativetheories is that they have limited explanatory power. Their concern is with promoting a specific aesthetic ideology and prescribing rules that can be used to derive compositions that conform to it. Therefore, they cannot be used to explain form-making in general. Positive frameworks, such asshape grammar, rely on rules to describe derivation and analysis processes. Nevertheless, they do not provide a comprehensive description of the tasks involved in architectural form-making. This causes the relation between the rules and compositional tasks to be ambiguous. It also affects adversely the ability of these frameworks to provide architects with a complete understanding of the role of compositional rules in derivation or analysis processes.
series DDSS
type normal paper
last changed 2010/05/16 07:11

_id 4b50
authors Vera, A., Kvan, T., West, R. and Lai, S.
year 1998
title Expertise, Collaboration and Bandwidth Usability of Groupware
source Proceedings of ACM CHI 98 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 1998 v.1 pp. 503-510
summary This paper describes the results of a study evaluating the effects of computer mediation on collaboratively solving architectural design problems. Pairs of graduate design students were asked to work on a landscape architecture design problem via computer terminals. In one condition they were allowed to communicate with an electronic whiteboard and a chat-line while in the other, the chat-line was substituted with video-conferencing (real-time video and audio). The protocols were evaluated according to two models. First, they were coded according to the pattern of collaboration, distinguishing meta-planning, negotiation, evaluation, and individual work. No differences were found between the two groups when coded this way. The protocols were also coded in terms of the problem-solving content, distinguishing task-related exchanges, interface-related exchanges, low-level design exchanges, and high-level design exchanges. The results showed that in the bandwidth-limited chat-line condition, participants cut down task and interface-related as well as low-level design exchanges but attempted to maintain the same amount of high-level design exchanges. When the final designs were evaluated by professional architects, no differences were found between two conditions indicating that chat-line participants implicitly compensate for the narrower bandwidth interface.
keywords Cognitive Models; Expertise; Collaboration; CSCW
series other
last changed 2002/07/07 14:01

_id f02d
authors Vries, B. de, Achten, H. and Jessurun, J.
year 1998
title What offers Virtual Reality to the Designer?
source Proceedings of Conference on Integrated Design & Process Technology, Berlin, Germany
summary Virtual Reality being a relatively new technology receives much attention in scientific research as well as in public news media. In the first case because of the technical problems that still have to be solved to offer the functionality and performance required by the application developers. In the second case because of the appealing interface between the application user and the computer system. Design in general and especially architectural design has a long-standing tradition in solving design problems by mixing artistic and scientific approaches. Research has resulted in design theories and methodologies in order to better understand the design process and from that to improve the quality of the designed product. Before applying Virtual Reality as an enabling technology for design, the characteristics of the technology and of the application must be specified. This is not an easy job since VR is not yet very 'stable' and design is a very complex process. From the knowledge and experience in the Calibre research group a first draft of a specification is presented so that we can draw some conclusions on the applicability of VR for design.
series other
email b.d.vries@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id caadria2006_633
id caadria2006_633
authors WAN-YU LIU
year 2006
title THE EMERGING DIGITAL STYLE: Attention shift in architectural style recognition
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 633-635
summary “Style” has long been an important index to observe the design thinking of designers in architecture. Gombrich (1968) defined style as a particular selection from the alternatives when doing things; Ackerman (1963) considered that a distiguishable ensemble of certain characteristics we call a style; Schapiro (1961) pointed out that style is constant forms, and sometimes the constant elements, qualities and expression; Kirsch (1998), Cha and Gero (1999) thought of style as a form element and shape pattern. As Simon and others referred to, style emerged from the process of problem solving, Chan (1994, 2001) ever devised a serious of experiments to set up the operational definitions of style, further five factors that relate to generating styles. Owing to that the greater part of sketches and drawings in the design process couldn’t be replaced by computer-aided design systems (Eisentraut, 1997), designers must shift between different problem-solving methods while facing different design problems. The purpose in this research is to discuss the influences of computer usage on style generation and style recognition: The employment of certain procedural factors that occurred in the design processes that using conventional media is different from the ones that using computer media? Do personal styles emerge while designers shifting between different media in the design processes? Does any unusual phenomenon emerge while accustomed CAD-systems designers recognizing a style?
series CAADRIA
email Giselle@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id caadria2006_569
id caadria2006_569
authors WEI-TSANG CHANG, TENG-WEN CHANG
year 2006
title FOLDING SPACE WITH TIME-BASED OPERATIONS
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 569-571
summary Folding is not only a design operation of shaping but also a philosophy theory from Deleuze (Deleuze 1988) which was adopted by architecture. Basically, folding constitutes to forming and topology, which often delivered a mathematical and philosophical expression in generating 3D architectural form. For instance, the work of Eisenman (Eisenman 2003), Libeskind and Lynn (Lynn 1998), they use folding as inspiration to explore the textural folding and bifurcation meaning in the process of form-making. While exploring the meaning of folding, their ideas are expressed by the form using computational tools. Therefore, if a suitable or inspirable tool like our Folding Space (FoS) could be available, such action –fold can be expressed further in the form exploration process.
series CAADRIA
email mile@mail.gcd.yuntech.edu.tw, tengwen@yuntech.edu.tw
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id 7e80
authors Yee, S. (et al.)
year 1998
title The Kumamoto-Kyoto-MIT Collaborative Project: a case study of the Design Studio of the Future
source N.A. Streiz, S. Konomi, and H. Burkardt (eds), Cooperative Buildings: Interpreting Organization, and Architecture, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, pp. 80–93
summary The Department of Architecture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has conducted a series of experimental design studios, as part of a larger ongoing research endeavour called The Design Studio of the Future, an interdisciplinary effort focusing on geographically distributed computer-mediated design and work group collaboration issues. A recent exploration was a collaborative design project joining geographically dispersed design students, faculty, researchers, and practitioners from Kumamoto University, Kyoto Institute of Technology, and MIT to examine the nature of computer networked collaborative environments and advanced computer-aided design technologies to support architectural education and practice. This paper will describe this project, which provided the students and faculty members with practical experience in the use of emerging technologies for collaboration, design, and communication in both the day-to-day activities of distributed groupwork as well as in the more formalized reviews.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id cf9d
authors Yeung, C., Cheung, L., Yen, J. and Cheng, C.
year 1998
title Virtual Classroom for Architecture
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 93-102
summary Over the past few years, we have seen that the evolution of the Internet and World Wide Web technologies have significantly enhanced the global communication and collaboration. People, no matter where they are, are virtually getting closer and closer. The barriers that came from time and distance have been partially removed by the use of such technologies. Internet and WWW are not just technology, they are an environment or space. With such breakthrough in technologies, a new paradigm in education is there. The education very differently from what we have now. This paper presents an Internet-based environment to support teaching and learning in architecture education. We will discuss the design concept and how to integrate the technology and knowledge-based techniques to implement the learning environment for architecture students. Architecture is a very specific discipline which consists of the knowledge from arts, sciences, engineering, and more. One of the focuses in architecture education is to teach how to express and communicate design ideas with the multimedia or other technologies, such as, virtual reality (VR). A case study presented in this paper is about how to deliver and present the ancient Chinese temples and its bracket set systems from the server to the browsers to support distance teaching. That is, students and teachers may not be in the same location, but they are able to watch the same objects and to exchange ideas. We will discuss how to use multimedia technologies to illustrate how a temple and its bracket set differ from dynasties to dynasties and introduce its basic properties to the viewers. Moreover, we will discuss how we organize and handle 3-dimensional objects with such system. Many people are still arguing about whether Internet-based teaching or a real classroom setting is better. We are not implying that Internet-based teaching is superior or predicting that it will dominate the teaching in the near future. However, we strongly believe that it is just another alternative to express and represent architectural thinking to over some of the barriers that come from time and distance. We believe, that it is always true, that the Internet-based teaching may provide both teachers and learners greater flexibility and to support more International collaboration. That is, regardless where the students or teachers are, they can always participate in learning or teaching and make teaching and learning much more rich and interesting.
keywords Virtual Classroom
series CAADRIA
email csky@eee.hku.hk
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:44

_id 4f8e
authors Yeung, C., Kan, C., Bradford, J. and Wong, R.
year 1998
title Campus Guided Tour VR System for the University of Hong Kong
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 77-82
summary Virtual Reality has been an ideal environment for visualizing three-dimensional models as well as implementing simulation systems such as flight training and surgery preparation. In such a system, the user can be familiar himself/herself with a particular environment or the procedure of a task even before going into the real site or actually performing a task. In this project, we are trying to implement a Guided Tour System inside a Virtual Reality Environment. Basically, a three-dimensional model of the campus of the University of Hong Kong will be built in the Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML). It is now possible to have a 3D visualization of the model in any Web browser. A non-directed graph can be built based on the 3D model with every branch representing a path, and every node represents a specific location inside the campus. Based on this graph, we can calculate all possible routes between any two nodes and deduce the shortest path between them. The guided tour system is designed in such a way that whenever the user attempts to move to a new place inside the campus, he/she will be brought to there in the quickest way automatically with just a few “mouse-click”. In this project, the Cosmo VRML player will be used as the browser’s plugin, and other associated tasks are developed in Javascript.
keywords Virtual Reality, Guided Tour
series CAADRIA
email csky@eee.hku.hk
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:46

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