CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 21 to 40 of 544

_id 6afb
authors Chan, R., Jepson, W. and Friedmann, S.
year 1998
title Urban Simulation: An Innovative Tool for Interactive Planning and Consensus Building
source Proceedings of the 1998 National Planning Conference, American Planning Association, ACIP Press
summary Contributed by Susan Pietsch (spietsch@arch.adelaide.edu.au)
keywords 3D City Modeling, Development Control, Design Control
series other
more http://www.asu.edu/caed/proceedings98/Chan/chan.html
last changed 2001/06/04 18:27

_id 6602
authors Clayton, Mark J.
year 1998
title Computing in Civil Engineering 1998
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 17, no. 4, p. 7
summary Just before our ACADIA 98 conference, a conference was held in Boston addressing similar issues in the related profession of civil engineering. Sponsored by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), the conference was titled the International Computing Congress in Civil Engineering and was the fifteenth in the Computing in Civil Engineering series. Although the interests of civil engineers include nonarchitectural subjects such as traffic engineering, bridge building, and sanitation engineering, a large number of participants at the conference identify their area of interest as building engineering. Consequently, the conference addressed many issues of interest to architects. Sessions and presentations at the Congress paralleled those at ACADIA conferences. The World Wide Web was a topic of much discussion, just as it has been at ACADIA conferences. Civil engineering researchers are also exploring how to put courses on the Web, how to use the Internet to support collaboration, and how to distribute product data across the Web.Other papers addressed case-based reasoning, applications of object-oriented programming, expert systems, design education, automated building code checking, and product modeling. Not only did the Congress include a wide range of architecturally relevant topics, it was truly international, including participants from Asia, Europe, Australia, Africa and the Americas.
series ACADIA
email mark-clayton@tamu.edu
last changed 2002/12/14 08:21

_id ddss9813
id ddss9813
authors Cordan, Ozge and Besgen, Asu
year 1998
title No Times But Principles, A Case Study From Priene, Anatolia
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary To emphasise the reusing of the local identities and cultural effects on contemporary designs, this paper is believed to have an important role for architects and for further designs. In this paper design theories in 1000's BC from Priene is held. The theories in urban and architectural design took place. From the intersection point of Ancient Greek and Western Anatolia, a city named "Priene" is chosen as a point of view because of its speciallocation on the Aegean Sea Coasts; Asia Minor and its design principles on urban and housing scale which were used during 1000's and are still common. Also, in this paper, an analysis is done on urban and housing scale. The analysis has two main parts. In the first part, the important buildings in Priene and their settlement decisions take part. And in the second part, the houses of Priene are explained. The general outputs of the study can be put under two titles: urbanism and architecture. In terms of urbanism, those features of a city image reflecting onto today’s world have been examined and the city of Priene has been analysed in the content of Lynch’s elements ensuring formation of a city image. In terms of architecture, results obtained have been separately examined in the content of today’s architecture as public buildings reflecting unique characteristics of Hellenistic architecture and as settlements. In short, the result that it is wished to reach in terms of city scale of the city of Priene in this study isthe expression of the essence of the historical heritage using a modern language to ensure historical continuity.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ec84
authors Cote, Pierre
year 1999
title Québec City Churches
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 13-14
summary The following pictures come from a work in progress at the School of Architecture of Laval University, done in collaboration with the "Centre de développement économique et urbain de la Ville Québec" (CDEU). The 3D models from which the pictures were generated, have been created by students at the School of architecture (part of this work is illustrated). The project started at the beginning of the summer 97 by the modeling competition of Notre-Dame-de-Grâce Church, located in Québec City Saint-Sauveur neighborhood. The works continued during the summers of 1997 and 1998 and will resume this summer. To date, this ongoing project has given to nine students the opportunity to model 19 churches to a level of details useful to professionals.
series ACADIA
email pierre.cote@arc.ulaval.ca
last changed 2002/12/14 08:21

_id dbf3
authors Curcio, Esteban and Perera, Gonzalo
year 2001
title DEL MODELADO 3D AL PROTOTIPO INDUSTRIAL (From 3-D Modeling to the Industrial Prototype)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 77-79
summary From 3D modeling to industrial prototype Industrial Design first year students (UNLP), led by designers Esteban Curcio and Gonzalo Perera, presented OGU coffee table in the avant-garde furniture category in Salao Design Movelsul (Brasil, 1998). Description: As an extracurricular activity, students had to deal with production variables related in particular to automated technologies and its effect on product design, completing each piece 3D digital modeling and following the whole process from manufacturing through diffusion and marketing. Technologies: Models for aluminum smelting: CAD / CAM / CNC; Glass: CNC cut with diamond milling cutter; 1020 steel: Computerized laser cut.
series SIGRADI
email crimson@ciudad.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id 4233
authors Day, Alan K. and Radford, Antony D.
year 1998
title An Overview of City Simulation
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 183-192
summary The present state of development of city simulation is outlined, including the relationship between the physical city and the virtual city and the traditions and history which lies behind the development of computer simulations of cities.
keywords 3D City Modeling, Environmental Simulation, Geographic Information Systems, Cities, Urban Models
series CAADRIA
email aradford@arch.adelaide.edu.au
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 2001/06/04 12:19

_id 3d1d
authors De Vries, B. and Jessurun, A.J.
year 1998
title An Experimental Design System for the Very Early Design Stage
source Timmermans (ed.) Proceedings of the 4th Conference on Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Maastricht
summary The concepts of the experimental design system that are discussed are feature modeling and geometrical constraints. The main technique for creating the user environment is Virtual Reality. Feature modeling forms the basis for managing the design data. To start with, data storage is implemented in a Relational Data Base Management System. Along with this a (traditional) interface is developed for managing the data. Data management consists of feature type creation and feature type instancing. Features are used to define building elements, their relationships and additional constraints. Apart from the design data, geometrical data are stored. Possible design solutions can be limited using geometrical constraints. Specifying connection types between building elements result in a set of solutions for the position of the bounding boxes of the building elements in space.
series other
email b.d.vries@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 38af
authors Demirkan, H.
year 1998
title Integration of reasoning systems in architectural modeling activities
source Automation in Construction 7 (2-3) (1998) pp. 229-236
summary In the first phase of a design process, the designer understands the problem and assimilates it to a conceptual framework that is already known to him. Due to the nature of design problems, the reasoning methods and techniques for modeling are not uniform and clear. An integrated reasoning system is proposed for modeling the architectural processes. Such a system may help designers to make decisions based on past experiences as well as domain theory. The performance of the integration approach is compared with the pure case-based and rule-based reasoning systems to study the efficiency and effectiveness in the same domains. The study tried to identify the reasoning systems used by designers pertaining to the interior design applications.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 8b38
authors Do, Ellen Yi-Luen and Gross, Mark D.
year 1998
title The Sundance Lab- "Design Systems of the Future"
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 8-10
summary The last thirty years have seen the development of powerful new tools for architects and planners: CAD, 3D modeling, digital imaging, geographic information systems, and real time animated walkthroughs. That’s just the beginning. Based on our experience with CAD tools, analysis of design practice, and an understanding of computer hardware and software, we’re out to invent the next generation of tools. We think architects should be shakers and makers, not just consumers, of computer aided design. We started the Sundance Lab (for Computing in Design and Planning) in 1993 with a few people and machines. We’ve grown to more than a dozen people (mostly undergraduate students) and a diverse interdisciplinary array of projects. We’ve worked with architects and planners, anthropologists, civil engineers, geographers, computer scientists, and electrical engineers. Our work is about the built environment: its physical form and various information involved in making and inhabiting places. We cover a wide range of topics – from design information management to virtual space, from sketch recognition to design rationale capture, to communication between designer and computer. All start from the position that design is a knowledge based and information rich activity. Explicit representations of design information (knowledge, rationale, and rules) enables us to engage in more intelligent dialogues about design. The following describes some of our projects under various rubrics.
series ACADIA
email ellendo@cmu.edu
last changed 2004/10/04 05:49

_id 1d83
authors Dodge, M., Doyle, S. and Smith, A.
year 1998
title Visual Communication in Urban Planning and Urban Design
source Working Paper 2; Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis Working Papers; London; June 1998
summary This Case Study documents the current status of visual communication in urban design and planning. Visual communication is examined through discussion of standalone and network media, specifically concentrating on visualisation on the World Wide Web (WWW). First, we examine the use of Solid and Geometric Modelling for visualising urban planning and urban design. This report documents and compares examples of the use of Virtual Reality Modelling Language (VRML) and proprietary WWW based Virtual Reality modelling software. Examples include the modelling of Bath and Glasgow using both VRML 1.0 and 2.0. The use of Virtual Worlds and their role in visualising urban form within multi-user environments is reviewed. The use of Virtual Worlds is developed into a study of the possibilities and limitations of Virtual Internet Design Arena's (ViDA's), an initiative undertaken at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis, University College London. The use of Virtual Worlds and their development towards ViDA's is seen as one of the most important developments in visual communication for urban planning and urban design since the development plan. Secondly, the role of photorealistic media in the process of communicating plans is examined. The process of creating photorealistic media is documented, and examples of the Virtual Streetscape and Wired Whitehall Virtual Urban Interface System are provided. The conclusion is that, although the use of photo-realistic media on the WWW provides a way to visually communicate planning information, its use is limited. The merging of photorealistic media and solid geometric modelling in the creation of Augmented Reality is reviewed. Augmented Reality is seen to provide an important step forward in the ability quickly and easily to visualise urban planning and urban design information. Third, the role of visual communication of planning data through GIS is examined in terms of desktop, three dimensional, and Internet based GIS. The evolution to Internet GIS is seen as a critical component in the development of virtual cities that will allow urban planners and urban designers to visualise and model the complexity of the built environment in networked virtual reality. Finally, a viewpoint is put forward of the Virtual City, linking Internet GIS with photorealistic multi-user Virtual Worlds. At present there are constraints on how far virtual cities can be developed, but a view is provided on how these networked virtual worlds are developing to aid visual communication in urban planning and urban design.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 5477
authors Donath, D., Kruijff, E., Regenbrecht, H., Hirschberg, U., Johnson, B., Kolarevic, B. and Wojtowicz, J.
year 1999
title Virtual Design Studio 1998 - A Place2Wait
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 453-458
summary This article reports on the recent, geographically and temporally distributed, intercollegiate Virtual Design Studio based on the 1998 implementation Phase(x) environment. Students participating in this workshop had to create a place to wait in the form of a folly. This design task was cut in five logical parts, called phases. Every phase had to be finished within a specific timeframe (one day), after which the results would be stored in a common data repository, an online MSQL database environment which holds besides the presentations, consisting of text, 3D models and rendered images, basic project information like the descriptions of the phases and design process visualization tools. This approach to collaborative work is better known as memetic engineering and has successfully been used in several educational programs and past Virtual Design Studios. During the workshop, students made use of a variety of tools, including modeling tools (specifically Sculptor), video-conferencing software and rendering programs. The project distinguishes itself from previous Virtual Design Studios in leaving the design task more open, thereby focusing on the design process itself. From this perspective, this paper represents both a continuation of existing reports about previous Virtual Design Studios and a specific extension by the offered focus. Specific attention will be given at how the different collaborating parties dealt with the data flow and modification, the crux within a successful effort to cooperate on a common design task.
keywords Collaborative design, Design Process, New Media Usage, Global Networks
series eCAADe
email donath@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id c3e0
authors Dorsey, J. and McMillan, L.
year 1998
title Computer Graphics and Architecture: State of the Art and Outlook for the Future
source Computer Graphics, Vol 32, No 1, Feb 1998. pp. 45-48
summary During the three decades since Ivan Sutherland introduced the Sketchpad system, there has been an outpouring of computer graphics systems for use in architecture. In response to this development, most of the major architectural firms around the world have embraced the idea that computer literacy is mandatory for success. We would argue, however, that most of these recent developments have failed to tap the potential of the computer as a design tool. Instead, computers have been relegated largely to the status of drafting instruments, so that the "D" in CAD stands for drafting rather than design. It is important that future architectural design systems consider design as a continuous process rather than an eventual outcome.The advent of computer graphics technology has had an impact on the architectural profession. Computer graphics has revolutionized the drafting process, enabling the rapid entry and modification of designs. In addition, modeling and rendering systems have proven to be invaluable aids in the visualization process, allowing designers to walk through their designs with photorealistic imagery. Computer graphics systems have also demonstrated utility for capturing engineering information, greatly simplifying the analysis and construction of proposed designs. However, it is important to consider that all of these tasks occur near the conclusion of a larger design process. In fact, most of the artistic and intellectual challenges of an architectural design have already been resolved by the time the designer sits down in front of a computer. In seeking insight into the design process, it is generally of little use to revisit the various computer archives and backups. Instead, it is best to explore the reams of sketches and crude balsa models that fill the trash cans of any architectural studio.In architecture, as in most other fields, the initial success of computerization has been in areas where it frees humans from tedious and mundane tasks. This includes the redrawing of floor plans after minor modifications, the generation of largely redundant, yet subtly different engineering drawings and the generation of perspective renderings.We believe that there is a largely untapped potential for computer graphics as a tool in the earlier phases of the design process. In this essay, we argue that computer graphics might play a larger role via applications that aid and amplify the creative process.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 2d75
authors Entous, Marc
year 1998
title Developments in 3D Scanning and Digitizing: New Strategies for an Evolving Design Process
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 212-220
summary The computer is now a widely accepted tool in architecture as a production and business tool. Acceptance of digital technology as a design aid has been much slower, but continuing developments in ease of use, capabilities, and lower costs are encouraging the use of three-dimensional design modeling. As the demand for 3D design computing grows, peripheral digital technologies are also developing and being integrated. This paper describes on-going research into how current and near-future developments in three-dimensional scanning and digitizing technology that have the potential to substantially change processes of architectural design. Scanners, or digitizers, assist in transforming physical objects and models into digital representations. The capabilities of 3D scanners in architectural design have only begun to be explored. Existing and emerging 3D scanning technologies are briefly described followed by a discussion of sample existing, new, and potential uses of these capabilities as a design tool. An experiment is conducted to contrast the differences between stylus-based and laser-based digitizers in an architectural design environment.

series ACADIA
email entous@usc.edu
last changed 1998/12/16 08:40

_id ddss9820
id ddss9820
authors Fukui, H.
year 1998
title An Example of Visualization for Urban Economic Scenery andUrban Modeling using GIS
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary This paper presents a zone-based urban model to forecast population distribution and land use transition. A GIS model has been suggested for urban economic scenery forecasting by using data related to an urban environment like Tokyo in Japan. The model has structural simplicity, visibility and applicability of policy analysis.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 46bb
authors Gerzso, J. Michael
year 1998
title Speculations on a Machine-Understandable Language for Architecture
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 302-314
summary One of the objectives of research in computer-aided design in architecture has been to make computer tools or instruments for architectural design, not just drafting. There has been work presented at ACADIA and other conferences related to artificial intelligence, data bases, shape grammars, among others. In all of these cases, existence of a computer language in one form or another is implied. The purpose of this paper is to argue that the progress in the development of intelligent design systems (IDS) is closely linked to the progress of the languages used to implement such systems. In order to make the argument, we will adopt an approach of first specifying the characteristics of an IDS in terms of a conceptual framework of computer languages in a CAD system in general, and what it means to develop a machine-understandable language for architectural CAD in particular. The framework is useful for classifying research projects and for structuring a research agenda in architectural CAD.
series ACADIA
email 104164.341@compuserve.com
last changed 1998/12/16 07:38

_id 9bee
authors Gerzso, J. Michael
year 2001
title Automatic Generation of Layouts of an Utzon Housing System via the Internet
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 202-211
summary The article describes how architectural layouts can be automatically generated over the Internet. Instead of using a standard web server sending out HTML pages to browser client, the system described here uses an approach that has become common since 1998, known as three tier client/server applications. The server part of the system contains a layout generator using SPR(s), which stands for “Spatial Production Rule System, String Version”, a standard context- free string grammar. Each sentences of this language represents one valid Utzon house layout. Despite the fact that the system represents rules for laying out Utzon houses grammatically, there are important differences between SPR(s) and shape grammars. The layout generator communicates with Autocad clients by means of an application server, which is analogous to a web server. The point of this project is to demonstrate the idea that many hundreds or thousands of clients can request the generation of all of the Utzon layouts simultaneously over the Internet by the SPR(s) server, but the server never has to keep track when each client requested the generation of all of the layouts, or how many layouts each client has received.
keywords Internet, Spatial-Production-Rules Grammars, Utzon
series ACADIA
email 104164.341@compuserve.com
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id ac21
id ac21
authors Giddings B, Horne M
year 2008
title The Changing Patterns of Architectural Design Education
source Architecture and Modern Information Technologies, Vol. 3, No. 4. ISSN-1998-4839
summary Digital technologies have been introduced to students of architecture for over two decades and at present it could be argued that students are producing some of the highest quality designs, and some of the most interesting forms ever to come from University Schools. The value of computer aided design (CAD) is also being demonstrated in architectural practice, with high profile, large budget, bespoke and iconic buildings designed by internationally renowned architects. This paper reviews the changing patterns of architectural design education and considers the contribution digital technologies could make to buildings with more commonplace uses. The study offers a perspective on different kinds of buildings and considers the influence that emerging technologies are having on building form. It outlines digital technologies, alongside students’ application for architectural design and considers the role they could play in the future, in developing a shared architectural language. It is suggested that some of the biggest opportunities for future research will be in the design of external spaces, often a neglected part of architectural design education.
keywords architectural design education, digital technologies
series other
type normal paper
email m.horne@unn.ac.uk
more http://www.marhi.ru/AMIT
last changed 2008/11/02 19:38

_id 7ad1
authors Giordano, Rubén F. and Tosello, María Elena
year 1999
title Laberinto: Una Biblioteca para la Virtualidad. Reflexiones y Acontecimientos en el Cyberespacio (Labyrinth: A Library for Virtuality. Reflections and Events in Cyberspace)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 83-86
summary This project investigates in the limits of the word like only means of structuring of the thought, before the appearance of new paradigms: the multimedias and the ciber-space that have transformed so much the language written as the architectural one causing unpublished situations: 1.) The transformation of a concrete container to other virtual. 2.) The transformation of the design object, of one static material to another that is a process. 3.) The transformation in the traditional ways of thinking (reversible as the formal logic of the mathematics) to new imaginarys epistemologicals. // These non alone events have caused changes in the forms of to know and to communicate the reality but rather the same one suffers a dilation process. We present for their exploration, a road synthesized in some hypotheses that were elaborated with reason of the International Competition of ACADIA 1998: 1.) The new communication systems (cibercomunication) they generate a new territory that should be colonized. This territory this conformed by objects related by infinite bonds (hipertext). 2.) The topographical form is not lineal and sequential, this it is multidirectional and multiradial. The phenomenon of the blow-up and the dilation are the mechanisms with those that the new objects are generated. 3.) These related fields generate interstitial empty spaces where it appears the desire. The interstice like existential space.
series SIGRADI
email mtosello@fadu.unl.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id 36
authors González, Carlos Guillermo
year 1998
title Una TecnologÌa Digital Para el Diseño: El Tde-Ac (A Digital Technology for Design: The Tde-Ac)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 274-279
summary TDE is a graphic language capable of notation of pure design operations, which offers an alternative to Monge and Perspective drawing. This language which was perfected and developed by Claudio Guerri in the late 80's, is originated in the Theory of Spatial Delimitation of CÈsar Janello (1974-1984). From 1995 onwards, and within the framework of the UBACyT AR025 Project (1995-1997), a software in order to apply the TDE through computer technology started to be developed. This work is carried out within the framework of the research program SPATIAL SEMIOTICS-DESIGN THEORY of the FADU-UBA directed by Claudio Guerri, and is continued in the UBACyT AR01 4 Project (1998-2000) "TDE-AC. Graphic language. TDE computer assisted". The computer tool TDE-AC, adds to this graphic language the power of the processing speed and a certain autonomy of interpretation and execution of design operations, which enables to visualize results with a remarkable speed in relation with manual or intellectual work in front of the drawing table. Trough the amplified projection on the screens of the program the stage of development and effectivity of TDE-AC will be demonstrated.
series SIGRADI
email gnzlz@satlink.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id 67f0
authors Heng, L.
year 1998
title Petri net as a formalism to assist process improvement in the construction industry
source Automation in Construction 7 (4) (1998) pp. 349-356
summary One major reason that hinders the implementation of process improvement principles in the construction industry is the lack of a powerful formalism to model and analyze the existing and new workflow processes. This paper proposes a framework which is based on the use of Petri nets for modeling and analyzing workflow processes in construction. The paper starts with an overview of current developments in the Petri nets theory. The paper then presents an example to demonstrate how to use the Petri net based framework to assist important steps of process improvement.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

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