CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 41 to 60 of 549

_id 203b
authors Jabi, Wassim M.
year 1998
title The Role of Artifacts in Collaborative Design
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 271-280
summary With the proliferation of digital technology, a new category of design artifacts, usually described with the term virtual, has emerged. Virtual artifacts have gained further prominence due to the advances made in collaboration software and networking technologies. These technologies have made it easier to communicate design intentions through the transfer and sharing of virtual rather than physical artifacts. This becomes particularly true in the case of long-distance or international collaborative efforts. This paper compares the two major categories of artifacts – the physical and the computer-based – and places them in relationship to an observed collaborative design process. In order to get at their specific roles in collaboration, two case studies were conducted in which designers in academic and professional settings were observed using a methodology which focused on participation in the everydayness of the designer as well as casual discussions, collection of artifacts, note-taking, and detailed descriptions of insightful events. The collected artifacts were then categorized according to the setting in which they were created and the setting in which they were intended to be used. These two attributes could have one of two values, private or public, which yield a matrix of four possible categories. It was observed that artifacts belonging in the same quadrant shared common qualities such as parsimony, completeness, and ambiguity. This paper finds that distinguishing between physical and virtual artifacts according to their material and imagined attributes is neither accurate nor useful. This research illustrates how virtual artifacts can obtain the qualities of their physical counterparts and vice versa. It also demonstrates how a new meta-artifact can emerge from the inclusion and unification of its material and imagined components. In conclusion, the paper calls for a seamless continuity in the representation and management of physical and virtual artifacts as a prerequisite to the success of: (1) computer-supported collaborative design processes, (2) academic instruction dealing with making and artifact building, and (3) executive policies in architectural practice addressing the management of architectural documents.
keywords Collaborative Design Process
series CAADRIA
email wj@writeme.com
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:28

_id 9480
authors Kan, J.W.T., Chow, B.K.M. and Tsou, J.-Y.
year 1999
title Visual Impact Evaluation of Electricity Substation Architecture
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 81-87
summary This paper presents a case study of the application of computer techniques for design communication and visual impact analysis. We were sponsored by China Light & Power Company Ltd. To simulate the design of a proposed electricity substation and its it is setting in a residential neighborhood. During a five-week intensive study, we took nearly one thousand photographs of the existing site. We also created a three-dimensional CAD model of the proposed substation, and produced perspectives from points of view analogous to the photographs. We applied Apple Quicktime VR technology to document the site environment with 360-degree panoramas. We then montaged the computer-generated panoramas with those taken from the real environment. A navigable virtual environment, architectural animation and set of still images were presented to the public in September 1998. The reactions from the regional council members and local residents nearby were recorded to provide evidence to measure the effectiveness of digital architectural design communication.
series CAADRIA
email waitakkan@cuhk.edu.hk, kaming@cuhk.edu.hk, jinyeutsou@cuhk.edu.hk
last changed 2000/01/13 10:10

_id c38b
authors Kunz, J.C., Christiansen, T.R., Cohen, G.P., Jin, Y. and Levitt, R.E.
year 1998
title The Virtual Design Team
source Communications of The ACM, Vol. 41, No. 11, November, 1998
summary The long range goal of the Virtual Design Team" (VDT) research program is to develop computational tools to analyze decision making and communication behavior and thereby to support true organizational (re)engineering. This article introduces the underlying theory, the implementation of the theory as a computational model, and results from industrial test cases. Organization theory traditionally describes organizations only at an aggregate-level, describing and predicting the behavior of entire organizations in terms of general qualitative predictions. We define and implement a "micro" theory of the structure and behavior of components of organizations, explicitly representing activities, groups of people called "actors," and organizational structure and policies for project teams. A VDT model can be "run" by a discrete event simulation. Emergent aggregate model output behaviors include the predicted time to complete a project, the total effort to do the project, and a measure of process quality. More detailed model behaviors include the time-varying backlog of individual actors and the "exceptions" associated with activities. The results are detailed and specific, so they can guide specific managerial interventions in a project team and can support sensitivity studies of the relative impact of different organizational changes. We conclude that such a theory is tractable and predictive for complex but relatively routine, project-oriented design tasks. The application for which VDT offers unique new kinds of insights is where an organization is striving to shrink time to market dramatically for a product that is similar to ones it has previously developed. Reducing time to market dramatically almost always requires that previously sequential activities are executed more concurrently. In this situation, experienced managers can still correctly identify the required activities and estimate their durations and skill requirements; but they almost always underestimate the increased workload arising from exponentially higher coordination needs and the propagation of rework between the now highly concurrent activities. The VDT framework, which explicitly models information dependency and failure propagation between concurrent activities, has proven to be far more accurate, and to incorporate a wider range of parameters, than CPM/PERT process models for these fast-paced development projects."
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id ga9809
id ga9809
authors Kälviäinen, Mirja
year 1998
title The ideological basis of generative expression in design
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary This paper will discuss issues concerning the design ideology supporting the use and development of generative design. This design ideology is based on the unique qualities of craft production and on the forms or ideas from nature or the natural characteristics of materials. The main ideology presented here is the ideology of the 1980´s art craft production in Finland. It is connected with the general Finnish design ideology and with the design ideology of other western countries. The ideology for these professions is based on the common background of design principles stated in 19th century England. The early principles developed through the Arts and Crafts tradition which had a great impact on design thinking in Europe and in the United States. The strong continuity of this design ideology from 19th century England to the present computerized age can be detected. The application of these design principles through different eras shows the difference in the interpretations and in the permission of natural decorative forms. The ideology of the 1980ïs art craft in Finland supports the ideas and fulfilment of generative design in many ways. The reasons often given as the basis for making generative design with computers are in very many respects the same as the ideology for art craft. In Finland there is a strong connection between art craft and design ideology. The characteristics of craft have often been seen as the basis for industrial design skills. The main themes in the ideology of the 1980´s art craft in Finland can be compared to the ideas of generative design. The main issues in which the generative approach reflects a distinctive ideological thinking are: Way of Life: The work is the communication of the maker´s inner ideas. The concrete relationship with the environment, personality, uniqueness, communication, visionary qualities, development and growth of the maker are important. The experiments serve as a media for learning. Taste and Aesthetic Education: The real love affair is created by the non living object with the help of memories and thought. At their best objects create the basis in their stability and communication for durable human relationships. People have warm relationships especially with handmade products in which they can detect unique qualities and the feeling that the product has been made solely for them. Counter-culture: The aim of the work is to produce alternatives for technoburocracy and mechanical production and to bring subjective and unique experiences into the customerïs monotonious life. This ideology rejects the usual standardized mass production of our times. Mythical character: There is a metamorphosis in the birth of the product. In many ways the design process is about birth and growth. The creative process is a development story of the maker. The complexity of communication is the expression of the moments that have been lived. If you can sense the process of making in the product it makes it more real and nearer to life. Each piece of wood has its own beauty. Before you can work with it you must find the deep soul of its quality. The distinctive traits of the material, technique and the object are an essential part of the metamorphosis which brings the product into life. The form is not only for formïs sake but for other purposes, too. You cannot find loose forms in nature. Products have their beginnings in the material and are a part of the nature. This art craft ideology that supports the ideas of generative design can be applied either to the hand made crafts production or to the production exploiting new technology. The unique characteristics of craft and the expression of the material based development are a way to broaden the expression and forms of industrial products. However, for a crafts person it is not meaningful to fill the world with objects. In generative, computer based production this is possible. But maybe the production of unique pieces is still slower and makes the industrial production in that sense more ecological. People will be more attached to personal and unique objects, and thus the life cycle of the objects produced will be longer.
series other
email mkalviai@kacd.pspt.fi
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ddss9837
id ddss9837
authors Liu, Yu-Tung and Bai, Rui-Yuan
year 1998
title The roles of virtual reality, image processing, and multimedia in thedesign of public spaces: 1997 Hsinchu Project
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary This paper examines the procedure of visual impact analysis and assessment proposed by Rahman and reviews the use of CAD applications in urban projects in the real world. A preliminary computerized procedure for visual impact analysis and assessment is proposed. An experiments wasconducted in our laboratory to verify the preliminary procedure. In order to further study the revised procedure in real urban projects, it was also applied into the renew project of The Eastern Gate Plaza located in the center of city Hsinchu, Taiwan from 1996 to 1998. According to several face-to-face discussions with Hsinchu habitants, government officials, and professional designers, a final computerized procedure for visual impact analysis and assessment is concluded.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id e947
authors Mahalingam, G.
year 1998
title Representing architectural design using virtual computers
source Automation in Construction 8 (1) (1998) pp. 25-36
summary The concept of the virtual computer is one of the most significant ideas to emerge in the field of computing. Computational models of architectural design, including state models and process models, have been based in the past on the von Neumann model of computer systems. Von Neumann systems are characterized by stored programs and data, and sequential processing on a single processor. The concept of the virtual computer enables us to break away from the von Neumann model in the representation of architectural design. Virtual computers can now be used to represent architectural design using concepts of parallel or networked systems. One of the limitations of modeling architectural design processes on the computer has been the representation of the processes as serial processes. Virtual computers can eliminate that bottleneck. This paper introduces the concept of representing architectural design using virtual computers. The application of the concept in an auditorium design system developed by the author is briefly examined.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id bf16
authors Mahdavi, A. and Suter, G.
year 1998
title On the implications of design process views for the development of computational design support tools
source Automation in Construction 7 (2-3) (1998) pp. 189-204
summary The empirical evidence indicates that the computational evaluation tools are not sufficiently and consistently used in the architectural design process. Various contributing factors have been suggested, most of which deal with tool deficiencies in terms of user communication features, stand-alone character, and informational complexity. Without questioning the potential impact of these factors, we suggest that circumstances pertaining to the representation and understanding of the design process must be taken into consideration, if a more in-depth understanding of the problem of tool deployment is to be achieved. Toward this end, we explore the possible impact of alternative design process views on the development of computational design evaluation tools. In particular, we describe how a nonconventional view of the design process can inform implementation efforts that lead to the emergence of new tools for active convergence support in design.
series journal paper
email amahdavi@tuwien.ac.at
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 0e41
authors Matthews, David and Temple, Stephen
year 1998
title A Pedagogy of Interdependent Technologies: An Experimental Studio for Synthesizing Digital and Mechanical Processes
source Computers in Design Studio Teaching [EAAE/eCAADe International Workshop Proceedings / ISBN 09523687-7-3] Leuven (Belgium) 13-14 November 1998, pp. 99-106
summary As computer technology is integrated into design curricula, significant shifts in pedagogy must be developed that acknowledge and incorporate alterations in teaching design process. This paper offers a critical analysis of the effects on design productivity of an experimental design studio that proposed and investigated an interdependent relationship of mechanical and digital technologies. A design studio was developed based on linking digital and physical technologies through systematic transformations of one technology into the other. Transformations were structured as a series of projects to test concepts of "making/building" in the form of abstracting/ making concrete, building/un-building, and un-making/making. Student permutations of the transforming operations revealed that design processes occurred as a mutuality, rather than an opposition, of the virtual and material. Design activity was revealed as a patterned flow of systematic formulations built on previous transformations. Key results of the studio indicated increased early development of conceptualization, increased refinement and integration of design issues throughout the project stages, and greater sensitivity to use of materials in a more holistic realization of concepts. Current curriculum structures that fragment technologies and subjugate ideas of craft, technology, and ideation into separate courses or educational issues, do so at the expense of substantive design refinement. The experimental studio of interdependent technologies offers digital and mechanical technologies as an holistic feature of design processes, thus indicating a greater integration of "support" courses into design studio and implicating an increased role of "hands-on constructing" such as that in wood/metal shops.

series eCAADe
email s_temple@uncg.edu
more http://www.eaae.be/
last changed 2000/11/21 08:18

_id 6814
authors Maver, T.W.
year 1998
title From Virtual Reality to Real Virtuality
source Design Computing Conference, Sydney
summary The history of CAAD spans a short but eventful 30 years. This paper initially takes stock of the outcomes over this period by focusing sequentially on the modelling of the functional behaviour of building and on the modelling of the formal characteristics of building and cities. It conlcudes with a view of the way forward.
series other
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/04/16 10:28

_id 0453
authors McIntosh, Patricia G.
year 1998
title The Internet as Communication Medium and Online Laboratory For Architecture Research
source Computerised Craftsmanship [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Paris (France) 24-26 September 1998, pp. 151-157
summary This case study documents the experiences of two courses recently conducted on the Internet. The courses are a sequence of core methods courses offered to post-professional degree architecture students studying in a Computer Aided Design concentration in a Master of Science program. In these courses the students use the Internet as a communication medium and as a research tool using the Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML). The VRML interface in the Web browser serves as an online laboratory and presents new opportunities for communication and for studying distributed computing in a multimedia and multidimensional environment.
series eCAADe
email pgm@cox.net
more http://www.paris-valdemarne.archi.fr/archive/ecaade98/html/09mcintosh/index.htm
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id sigradi2007_af88
id sigradi2007_af88
authors Medero Rocha, Isabel Amalia
year 2007
title ZOOM IN/ZOOM OUT - Architectural Scale in the Visualization and Representation of Architecture [ZOOM IN/ZOOM OUT - Escala arquitetônica na visualização e representação da arquitetura]
source SIGraDi 2007 - [Proceedings of the 11th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] México D.F. - México 23-25 October 2007, pp. 102-106
summary The generation of ideas and the development of architectural design are affected by the actions of graphic software computer operators. This study is focused on the ZOOM instruction of CAD softwares as one of these operators, in an analogy to the concept of Architectural Scale. The terms ZOOM IN / ZOOM OUT were first used by us in 1998 in a methodology proposal developed in a MSc thesis – The Design Process in the Computer Environment – An Analogy between Computer and Design Operators, and subsequently implemented in a virtual design workshop, with the aim to use computer tools in the development of architectural knowledge.
keywords Design process; Computational commands; Architectural scale
series SIGRADI
email isabelmr@unisinos.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id 24
authors PayssÈ, M., Piperno, P., Grompone, J. and Somma, P.
year 1998
title ReconstrucciÛn Virtual de la Colonia del Sacramento de 1762 (Virtual Reconstruction of "Colonia del Sacramento" of 1762)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 192-197
summary Colonia del Sacramento (capital of Colonia department, in Uruguay) has been registered in the list of the Convention Heritage concerning the protection of worldwide cultural and natural heritage. The registration on this list (December 6th 1995) confirms the exceptional and universal value of a cultural or natural places which deserves protection for the whole humanity. The ancient Colonia del Sacramento founded in 1680 by Portugal, was a commercial and military site leading role of the historical controversy between Spain and Portugal. Main place of wars and treaties during a century, it keeps an urban design, unique in the area and valuable architectonical testimonies of different periods of this rich past, with a simple, popular profile. This work has been effected within the Clemente Estable Found 1996, which is promoted by National Council of Scientific and Technical Research (CONICYT). Through virtual reality techniques, a three-dimensional model of Colonia del Sacramento city was built as it was in its period of prosperity (around 1762). For the achievement of this digital maquette, a great deal of written and graphic information was compiled and processed. This information was organized in an inventory way (with numerous readings and searches). The inventory and the digital maquette were joined in a multimedia application (CD-ROM) which allows potential users to move through virtual city and friendly and interactively consult images, graphics and texts.
series SIGRADI
email idise@montevideo.com.uy
last changed 2016/03/10 08:57

_id c5bc
authors Popova, Mina
year 1998
title Model of Design Parts and its Use to the Design Team
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 233-242
summary This paper discusses the impact of the choice of representation on the final result in design and construction projects. Representation is an integrated part of the design process used by architects as a communication tool to help them present a concept to their clients and other consultants. The representation choice, in addition, reflects the professional’s perception of the design process and the architectural artefact. Architects’ offices work with a wide range of problems - aesthetic and spatial issues, detailing, choice of materials, and systems design. The multiplicity of representations enriches the understanding of these issues. Today, the model-oriented approach in design is common among both architects and leading software producers for the construction industry. While STEP (Standard for the Exchange of Product Data) aims at developing very comprehensive product models, we examine the possibility of building up a small-scale model responding to the information needs of a design team. In our research work, we view a model of design parts as a suitable carrier of information allowing the designers to store data reflecting their accumulated and refined professional knowledge and experience. Besides, the team of architects can later easily retrieve information needed for future design reuse from the model. To reuse design solutions and learn from previous work is an essential part of the professional culture. The construction industry as a whole has been slow in implementing information technology to improve the work methods. Neither have architects’ offices used the full potential of this technology to structure information and rationalize the design process. The objective of this study is to examine whether information technology makes it possible to organize all the design information in an office archive. The proposed model of design parts relates to national standards and universal models for product data representation and exchange, such as STEP. Today, the construction sector is becoming increasingly aware of the potential of the model-oriented approach both to rationalize the design and construction process and offer designers new options to store, broaden and reuse professional knowledge. We have used the information modelling language EXPRESS to describe our concept.
keywords Design and Construction Process, Model-oriented Approach, Representation, Information Technology, STEP
series CAADRIA
email mina@arch.chalmers.se
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:32

_id 220b
authors Potier, S., Malret, J.-L-. and Zoller, J.
year 1998
title Computer Graphics: Assistance for Archaeological Hypotheses
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 366-383
summary This paper is a contribution to the domain of computer tools for architectural and archeological restitution of ancient buildings. We describe an application of these tools to the modeling of the 14th century AD. Thermae of Constantin in Arles, south of France. It was a diploma project in School of Architecture of MarseilleLuminy, and took place in a context defined in the European ARELATE project. The general objective of this project is to emphasize the archeological and architectural heritage of the city of Arles; it aims, in particular, to equip the museum of ancient Arles with a computer tool enabling the storage and consultation of archaeological archives, the communication of information and exchange by specialized networks, and the creation of a virtual museum allowing a redescription of the monuments and a “virtual” visit of ancient Arles. Our approach involves a multidisciplinary approach, calling on architecture, archeology and computer science. The archeologist’s work is to collect information and interpret it; this is the starting point of the architect’s work who, using these elements, suggests an architectural reconstruction. This synthesis contains the functioning analysis of the structure and building. The potential provided by the computer as a tool (in this case, the POV-Ray software) with access to several three-dimensional visualizations, according to hypotheses formulated by the architect and archaeologists, necessitates the use of evolutive models which, thanks to the parametrization of dimensions of a building and its elements, can be adapted to all the changes desired by the architect. The specific contribution of POV-Ray in architectural reconstruction of thermae finds its expression in four forms of this modeling program, which correspond to the objectives set by the architect in agreement with archeologists: (a) The parametrization of dimensions, which contributes significantly in simplifying the reintervention process of the architectural data base; (b) Hierarchy and links between variables, allowing “grouped” modifications of modelized elements in order to preserve the consistency of the architectural building’s morphology; (c) The levels of modeling (with or without facing, for example), which admit of the exploration of all structural and architectural trails (relationship form/ function); and, (d) The “model-type,” facilitating the setting up of hypotheses by simple scaling and transformation of these models (e.g., roofing models) on an already modelled structure. The methodological validation of this modeling software’s particular use in architectural formulation of hypotheses shows that the software is the principal graphical medium of discussion between architect and archaeologist, thus confirming the hypotheses formulated at the beginning of this project.

series ACADIA
email stephane.potier@wanadoo.fr, jlm@marseille.archi.fr, jz@gamsau.archi.fr
last changed 1998/12/16 07:40

_id 888a
authors Sariyildiz, S. and Ozsariyildiz, S.
year 1998
title The Future of Architectural Design Practice within ICT Development
source Computerised Craftsmanship [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Paris (France) 24-26 September 1998, pp. 228-233
summary Design in general is analyzed and the use of ICT tools in architectural design practice in the design process explained. The place of the designer in the history and the future of the designer within the ongoing development of the ICT overviewed. The influence of the new technologies on the design and its process therefore the impact on ICT use in the practice clarified. The future perspectives of an architect as a profession and the place of the architect in the whole design process speculated. Architect as designer, as a product and process architect mentioned. Finally the influence of these changes on the architectural education reflected.
series eCAADe
email I.S.Sariyildiz@bk.tudelft.nl
more http://www.paris-valdemarne.archi.fr/archive/ecaade98/html/30sariyildiz/index.htm
last changed 2003/05/16 19:36

_id c36a
authors Sariyildiz, S., Van der Veer, P., Schwenck, M. and Ciftcioglu, Ö.
year 1998
title Computer as a Valuable and Reliable Partner
source Cyber-Real Design [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 83-905377-2-9] Bialystock (Poland), 23-25 April 1998, pp. 177-188
summary As in any branches of the science, the newcoming technologies play always a role in each of the related specific disciplines. The developments of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) have an important impact on architectural design and the process of the design as well as it is a part of the other technological developments. Surely these rapidly ongoing developments will influence the way of designing and the design process. What will change in the building practice by the use of this technology? How should we use this technology to reach our goals? What will be the next step in future developments? In this paper we give an overview of the use the ICT in general for architectural design and the design process and focus on the future developments. The aspect of integration (tools and partners) and the development of Decision Support Environment in the building process by means of the Artificial Intelligence (Al) technologies are mentioned.
series plCAD
email I.S.Sariyildiz@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2003/05/17 08:01

_id e629
authors Sariyildiz, Sevil and Van der Veer, Peter
year 1998
title The role of ICT as a partner in Architectural Design Education
source Computers in Design Studio Teaching [EAAE/eCAADe International Workshop Proceedings / ISBN 09523687-7-3] Leuven (Belgium) 13-14 November 1998, pp. 139-146
summary Design education in general is analyzed and the existing tools in the design process are explained. The design education in the past as well as the design education for the future is mentioned. The influence of new technologies on the design and the impact of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) use in the education are clarified. Finally the future perspectives of an architectural education and the preparation of future professionals to the practice is worked out. Further speculations about the role of ICT in the education and practice is done. The form and the infrastructure of ICT education for architects are discussed.
keywords ICT, Architectural Design, Architectural Education, Knowledge Integration Tools, Decision Support Tools, Design Tool, Internet, JAVA, Collaborative Design
series eCAADe
email i.s.Sariyildiz@bk.tudelft.nl
more http://www.eaae.be/
last changed 2000/11/21 08:22

_id a5cd
authors Sasada, T., Yamaguchi, S., Morozumi, M., Kaga, A. and Homma, R. (Eds.)
year 1998
title CAADRIA ‘98 [Conference Proceedings]
source Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009 / Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, 482 p.
summary Recent progress in hardware and software technology for CAAD systems offer new challenges and opportunities to architects and design educators in aspects such as modeling systems for sketching and design evaluation; knowledge bases as a source of design thinking; network or CD-ROM image banks of design archives; video-conferencing to support geographically distributed interdisciplinary collaboration; etc. Despite expectations that CAAD system would support creative and productive design processes more effectively than those in a traditional design studio, their contributions to architectural design practice and design education still seem to be limited. The fault is, in part, that there are many designers and educators who have yet to experience designing in the medium (as opposed to simply drafting) and partly because digital design tools and technologies have still to be developed or to be integrated to a process of designers' activities. Clearly there are opportunities for further efforts to explore and develop better CAAD technologies as well as to demonstrate and prove possible impact of their application on design practice and design education.
series CAADRIA
email sasada@env.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:05

_id ddss9853
id ddss9853
authors Sidjanin, Predrag and Gerhardt, Waltraud
year 1998
title A design tool for analysis and visual quality control of urbanenvironments supported by object databases
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary In the paper, the main concepts about a design tool supported by an object database system will be described. The design tool should improve architectural design with respect to analysis and improving existing and planned urban environments regarding several quality criteria, especially those associated with visual aspects. Preconditions for defining the design tool's purpose are the determination of the "well-situated" urban elements, their impact on cognitive mapping, and the exploitation of thisknowledge on cognitive mapping for the improvement of urban environments. Cognitive mapping is a kind of representation of schematic knowledge that a person has about familiar environments. A cognitive map is stored information or knowledge about the purpose and function of the environment. This leads to the conclusion that an urban environment design which takes of the process of cognitive mapping into consideration, will be experienced by most of the people in the same way. Investigationsof this process result in a theoretical model of elements of urban environments, their relationships and their dependencies. The theoretical platform of the tool is based on design theory, cognitive science andcomputer science. Design theory and cognitive science will be used to develop the theoretical model. This theoretical model together with computer science will be the basis for tool development. The tooluses a schematic representation of urban environment, based partly on Lynch's theory of "urban form". Lynch's theory is crucial for the tool because it explains almost all elements of urban environments. Systematic investigation of urban environments and their characteristics are important for theoretical modeling as well as for the later computational modeling of the tool. The main computational support for the tool will be provided by an object database system, which helps to represent and to handle all the urban elements with their properties and relationships, with their natural semantics. The information represented in the database will be used to analyze urban environments as well as to improve andcontrol their visual quality.
series DDSS
email p.sidjanin@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id bcdc
authors Streitz, Norbert A.
year 1998
title Integrated Design of Real Architectural Spaces and Virtual Information Spaces
source Proceedings of ACM CHI 98 Conference on Human Factors in ComputingSystems (Summary) 1998 v.2 pp. 263-264
summary This paper presents an introduction to the Suite "Integrated design of real architectural spaces and virtual information spaces". It discusses the affordances of architectural spaces serving as information spaces and vice versa. As a consequence, it argues for a two-way augmentation of these two worlds were are living in. It concludes with an overview of the papers of this Suite.
keywords Augmented Reality; Physical Space; Architecture; Virtual Space; Ambient Information; Workspace Design
series other
last changed 2002/07/07 14:01

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