CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 552

_id avocaad_2001_20
id avocaad_2001_20
authors Shen-Kai Tang
year 2001
title Toward a procedure of computer simulation in the restoration of historical architecture
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In the field of architectural design, “visualization¨ generally refers to some media, communicating and representing the idea of designers, such as ordinary drafts, maps, perspectives, photos and physical models, etc. (Rahman, 1992; Susan, 2000). The main reason why we adopt visualization is that it enables us to understand clearly and to control complicated procedures (Gombrich, 1990). Secondly, the way we get design knowledge is more from the published visualized images and less from personal experiences (Evans, 1989). Thus the importance of the representation of visualization is manifested.Due to the developments of computer technology in recent years, various computer aided design system are invented and used in a great amount, such as image processing, computer graphic, computer modeling/rendering, animation, multimedia, virtual reality and collaboration, etc. (Lawson, 1995; Liu, 1996). The conventional media are greatly replaced by computer media, and the visualization is further brought into the computerized stage. The procedure of visual impact analysis and assessment (VIAA), addressed by Rahman (1992), is renewed and amended for the intervention of computer (Liu, 2000). Based on the procedures above, a great amount of applied researches are proceeded. Therefore it is evident that the computer visualization is helpful to the discussion and evaluation during the design process (Hall, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998; Liu, 1997; Sasada, 1986, 1988, 1990, 1993, 1997, 1998). In addition to the process of architectural design, the computer visualization is also applied to the subject of construction, which is repeatedly amended and corrected by the images of computer simulation (Liu, 2000). Potier (2000) probes into the contextual research and restoration of historical architecture by the technology of computer simulation before the practical restoration is constructed. In this way he established a communicative mode among archeologists, architects via computer media.In the research of restoration and preservation of historical architecture in Taiwan, many scholars have been devoted into the studies of historical contextual criticism (Shi, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1995; Fu, 1995, 1997; Chiu, 2000). Clues that accompany the historical contextual criticism (such as oral information, writings, photographs, pictures, etc.) help to explore the construction and the procedure of restoration (Hung, 1995), and serve as an aid to the studies of the usage and durability of the materials in the restoration of historical architecture (Dasser, 1990; Wang, 1998). Many clues are lost, because historical architecture is often age-old (Hung, 1995). Under the circumstance, restoration of historical architecture can only be proceeded by restricted pictures, written data and oral information (Shi, 1989). Therefore, computer simulation is employed by scholars to simulate the condition of historical architecture with restricted information after restoration (Potier, 2000). Yet this is only the early stage of computer-aid restoration. The focus of the paper aims at exploring that whether visual simulation of computer can help to investigate the practice of restoration and the estimation and evaluation after restoration.By exploring the restoration of historical architecture (taking the Gigi Train Station destroyed by the earthquake in last September as the operating example), this study aims to establish a complete work on computer visualization, including the concept of restoration, the practice of restoration, and the estimation and evaluation of restoration.This research is to simulate the process of restoration by computer simulation based on visualized media (restricted pictures, restricted written data and restricted oral information) and the specialized experience of historical architects (Potier, 2000). During the process of practicing, communicates with craftsmen repeatedly with some simulated alternatives, and makes the result as the foundation of evaluating and adjusting the simulating process and outcome. In this way we address a suitable and complete process of computer visualization for historical architecture.The significance of this paper is that we are able to control every detail more exactly, and then prevent possible problems during the process of restoration of historical architecture.
series AVOCAAD
email tsk.aa88g@nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 215e
authors Bai, Rui-Yuan and Liu, Yu-Tung
year 1998
title Towards a Computerized Procedure for Visual Impact Analysis and Assessment - The Hsinchu Example
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 67-76
summary This paper examines the procedure of visual impact analysis and assessment proposed by Rahman and reviews the use of CAD applications in urban projects in the real world. A preliminary computerized procedure for visual impact analysis and assessment is proposed. An experiments was conducted in our laboratory to verify the preliminary procedure. In order to further study the revised procedure in real urban projects, it was also applied into the renew project of The Eastern Gate Plaza located in the center of city Hsinchu, Taiwan from 1996 to 1998. According to several face-to-face discussions with Hsinchu habitants, government officials, and professional designers, a final computerized procedure for visual impact analysis and assessment is concluded.
keywords Environmental Simulation, Visual Impact Analysis and Assessment, Virtual Reality
series CAADRIA
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 6006
authors Liu, Yu-Tung and Bai, Rui-Yuan
year 2001
title The Hsinchu experience: a computerized procedure for visual impact analysis and assessment
source Automation in Construction 10 (3) (2001) pp. 337-343
summary This paper examines the procedure of visual impact analysis and assessment (VIAA) proposed by Rahman and reviews the use of computer-aided design (CAD) applications in urban projects in the real world. A preliminary computerized procedure for VIAA is proposed. An experiment was conducted in our laboratory to verify the preliminary procedure. In order to further study the revised procedure in real urban projects, it was also applied into the renew project of The Eastern Gate Plaza located in the center of Hsinchu, Taiwan from 1996 to 1998. Based on the face-to-face discussions with Hsinchu habitants, government officials, and professional designers, a final computerized procedure for VIAA is concluded.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id ddss9837
id ddss9837
authors Liu, Yu-Tung and Bai, Rui-Yuan
year 1998
title The roles of virtual reality, image processing, and multimedia in thedesign of public spaces: 1997 Hsinchu Project
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary This paper examines the procedure of visual impact analysis and assessment proposed by Rahman and reviews the use of CAD applications in urban projects in the real world. A preliminary computerized procedure for visual impact analysis and assessment is proposed. An experiments wasconducted in our laboratory to verify the preliminary procedure. In order to further study the revised procedure in real urban projects, it was also applied into the renew project of The Eastern Gate Plaza located in the center of city Hsinchu, Taiwan from 1996 to 1998. According to several face-to-face discussions with Hsinchu habitants, government officials, and professional designers, a final computerized procedure for visual impact analysis and assessment is concluded.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id avocaad_2001_19
id avocaad_2001_19
authors Shen-Kai Tang, Yu-Tung Liu, Yu-Sheng Chung, Chi-Seng Chung
year 2001
title The visual harmony between new and old materials in the restoration of historical architecture: A study of computer simulation
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In the research of historical architecture restoration, scholars respectively focus on the field of architectural context and architectural archeology (Shi, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1995; Fu, 1995, 1997; Chiu, 2000) or on architecture construction and the procedure of restoration (Shi, 1988, 1989; Chiu, 1990). How to choose materials and cope with their durability becomes an important issue in the restoration of historical architecture (Dasser, 1990; Wang, 1998).In the related research of the usage and durability of materials, some scholars deem that, instead of continuing the traditional ways that last for hundreds of years (that is to replace new materials with old ones), it might be better to keep the original materials (Dasser, 1990). However, unavoidably, some of the originals are much worn. Thus we have to first establish the standard of eliminating components, and secondly to replace identical or similar materials with the old components (Lee, 1990). After accomplishing the restoration, we often unexpectedly find out that the renewed historical building is too new that the sense of history is eliminated (Dasser, 1990; Fu, 1997). Actually this is the important factor that determines the accomplishment of restoration. In the past, some scholars find out that the contrast and conflict between new and old materials are contributed to the different time of manufacture and different coating, such as antiseptic, pattern, etc., which result in the discrepancy of the sense of visual perception (Lee, 1990; Fu, 1997; Dasser, 1990).In recent years, a number of researches and practice of computer technology have been done in the field of architectural design. We are able to proceed design communication more exactly by the application of some systematic softwares, such as image processing, computer graphic, computer modeling/rendering, animation, multimedia, virtual reality and so on (Lawson, 1995; Liu, 1996). The application of computer technology to the research of the preservation of historical architecture is comparatively late. Continually some researchers explore the procedure of restoration by computer simulation technology (Potier, 2000), or establish digital database of the investigation of historical architecture (Sasada, 2000; Wang, 1998). How to choose materials by the technology of computer simulation influences the sense of visual perception. Liu (2000) has a more complete result on visual impact analysis and assessment (VIAA) about the research of urban design projection. The main subjects of this research paper focuses on whether the technology of computer simulation can extenuate the conflict between new and old materials that imposed on visual perception.The objective of this paper is to propose a standard method of visual harmony effects for materials in historical architecture (taking the Gigi Train Station destroyed by the earthquake in last September as the operating example).There are five steps in this research: 1.Categorize the materials of historical architecture and establish the information in digital database. 2.Get new materials of historical architecture and establish the information in digital database. 3.According to the mixing amount of new and old materials, determinate their proportion of the building; mixing new and old materials in a certain way. 4.Assign the mixed materials to the computer model and proceed the simulation of lighting. 5.Make experts and the citizens to evaluate the accomplished computer model in order to propose the expected standard method.According to the experiment mentioned above, we first address a procedure of material simulation of the historical architecture restoration and then offer some suggestions of how to mix new and old materials.By this procedure of simulation, we offer a better view to control the restoration of historical architecture. And, the discrepancy and discordance by new and old materials can be released. Moreover, we thus avoid to reconstructing ¡§too new¡¨ historical architecture.
series AVOCAAD
email tsk.aa88g@nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id ddss9828
id ddss9828
authors Holmberg, Stig C.
year 1998
title Anticipation in Evaluation and Assessment of Urban and Regional Plans
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary In order to start a move toward better computer based supporting tools for the assessment of urban and regional plans, a new research and development endeavour is proposed. In so doing, anticipation andanticipatory computing, i.e. a technique applying modelling and simulation, is found to be an interesting and promising point of departure. Hence, a fuzzy cellular automata computer model (STF) for simulation and anticipation of geographical or physical space is constructed. The main idea is to map anurban plan onto the STF for its assessing. STF has a normalised and continuous, i.e. fuzzy, system variable while both the time and space dimensions take on discrete values. Further, while ordinary cellularautomata use local rules, global ones are employed in STF, i.e. there is a total interdependence among all the cells of the automata. Outcomes of STF can be interpreted more as possible future states than exact predictions. Preliminary results seem to be well in line with main characteristics of planned urban or regional geographical spaces. Further, for the managing of multi-criteria choice situations, a fuzzy procedure – the Ordered Weighted Average (OWA) procedure – with continuous control over the degree of ANDOR-ness and with independent control over the degree of tradeoff, is proposed.
keywords Geographical space, Anticipatory Computing, Cellular Automata, Spatio Temporal Fuzzy Model (STF)
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id acadia16_140
id acadia16_140
authors Nejur, Andrei; Steinfeld, Kyle
year 2016
title Ivy: Bringing a Weighted-Mesh Representations to Bear on Generative Architectural Design Applications
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 140-151
summary Mesh segmentation has become an important and well-researched topic in computational geometry in recent years (Agathos et al. 2008). As a result, a number of new approaches have been developed that have led to innovations in a diverse set of problems in computer graphics (CG) (Sharmir 2008). Specifically, a range of effective methods for the division of a mesh have recently been proposed, including by K-means (Shlafman et al. 2002), graph cuts (Golovinskiy and Funkhouser 2008; Katz and Tal 2003), hierarchical clustering (Garland et al. 2001; Gelfand and Guibas 2004; Golovinskiy and Funkhouser 2008), primitive fitting (Athene et al. 2004), random walks (Lai et al.), core extraction (Katz et al.) tubular multi-scale analysis (Mortara et al. 2004), spectral clustering (Liu and Zhang 2004), and critical point analysis (Lin et al. 20070, all of which depend upon a weighted graph representation, typically the dual of a given mesh (Sharmir 2008). While these approaches have been proven effective within the narrowly defined domains of application for which they have been developed (Chen 2009), they have not been brought to bear on wider classes of problems in fields outside of CG, specifically on problems relevant to generative architectural design. Given the widespread use of meshes and the utility of segmentation in GAD, by surveying the relevant and recently matured approaches to mesh segmentation in CG that share a common representation of the mesh dual, this paper identifies and takes steps to address a heretofore unrealized transfer of technology that would resolve a missed opportunity for both subject areas. Meshes are often employed by architectural designers for purposes that are distinct from and present a unique set of requirements in relation to similar applications that have enjoyed more focused study in computer science. This paper presents a survey of similar applications, including thin-sheet fabrication (Mitani and Suzuki 2004), rendering optimization (Garland et al. 2001), 3D mesh compression (Taubin et al. 1998), morphin (Shapira et al. 2008) and mesh simplification (Kalvin and Taylor 1996), and distinguish the requirements of these applications from those presented by GAD, including non-refinement in advance of the constraining of mesh geometry to planar-quad faces, and the ability to address a diversity of mesh features that may or may not be preserved. Following this survey of existing approaches and unmet needs, the authors assert that if a generalized framework for working with graph representations of meshes is developed, allowing for the interactive adjustment of edge weights, then the recent developments in mesh segmentation may be better brought to bear on GAD problems. This paper presents work toward the development of just such a framework, implemented as a plug-in for the visual programming environment Grasshopper.
keywords tool-building, design simulation, fabrication, computation, megalith
series ACADIA
type paper
email ksteinfe@berkeley.edu
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id 41
authors Peh, Calvin and Noble, Douglas
year 1998
title The Design of Computer Working and Teaching Environments
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 310-315
summary It is undeniable that the computer has affected every aspect of our lives. Many people work with computers on a daily basis, from writing e-mail or simply browsing the internet to hours of serious modeling and drafting for those in the architecture field. As we spend more time working with computers, research into improving computer teaching and working environments becomes more important. For those working in an architecture office, it almost certain that a major part of the day will be spent in front of a computer drafting. This research provides a preliminary set of guidelines that can be applied in the design of computer working/teaching environments. The on-going research is focussed in creating facilities geared toward user comfort and productivity and improving teaching environments. It covers issues regarding the position and orientation of the room, lighting aspect (including natural and artificial light), acoustics, user visual comfort, psychrometric conditions, furnishings, and the adaptability of the space for future changes. The project includes analysis of existing examples of computer-lecture rooms, noting the problems and suggesting improvements.
series SIGRADI
email dnoble@usc.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:57

_id dd16
authors Gibson, Kathleen
year 1999
title STUDIO @ CORNELL
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 18-21
summary Unique to the interior design program at Cornell University is a planned pedagogical approach requiring equal emphasis toward manual and digital graphic communication at the freshman level. Prior to 1998, computer-based instruction only occurred at the junior year of study. Recognizing that cultural and symbolic biases against digital media were formally being instituted by curriculum policy, faculty searched for a new perspective. Central to success was the removal of illogically placed boundaries, both mental and physical. In response, students are now encouraged to cultivate a fluid dexterity between traditional and digital methods, at times using various skills concurrently for design analysis and representation (Figures 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7). Course content for DEA115 ranges from basic orthographic drafting, paraline projection, and perspective drawing to color rendering and composition. Students utilize a full range of media: pencil, ink, marker, pastel, AutoCAD, 3DS/ MAX, and Photoshop in this graphics studio. Course meetings total six contact hours per week, constituting a three credit hour class. Assignments are purposefully created to shatter digital myths. For example, instead of a standard, rote drafting exercise, AutoCAD is used to explore design ideas through systemic object manipulation (Figures 8, 9).
series ACADIA
last changed 2002/12/14 08:21

_id ddss9856
id ddss9856
authors Suter, Georg and Mahdavi, Ardeshir
year 1998
title Generation and communication of design information:a building performance simulation perspective
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary There is general agreement that the process of design and construction of buildings typically involves multiple players. This has been the impetus to develop concepts for computational environments that would supportcollaborative design. While there has been considerable progress with regard to hardware and electronic communication, the underlying representations of design ideas and artifacts have not kept pace with thisprogress. In this paper we deal with this problem not from a global conceptual perspective, but rather from the specific point of view of those designers who use design representation toward extraction and manipulation of specialized technical information. For example, engineers in various fields of building technology require a rich representation of building information in terms of geometry (with special focus on topology), materials, systems attributes, etc. We argue that the current building analysis tools do not operate on the basis of such rich informational representations. Instead the needed information is often assembled on an ad hoc basis from various non-integrated informational sources. We review three representations as they are implemented in commercial or research systems and explore their potential for communicating design information to computational building analysis tools. Based on this review, we describe desirable characteristics of more sophisticated building representations.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 38
authors Combes., Leonardo and Saito, Keiko
year 1998
title Exploracion de Alternativas Formales de Edificios Ortogonales (Exploration of Formal Alternatives of Orthogonal Buildings)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 286-291
summary The shape of buildings determines the relationships between the contained spaces with the contained activities. As shapes are represented by their perimeter, the form and the length of building perimeters is of particular interest to architectural design. This paper presents a short computer program oriented to the exploration of modular floor plans related to their perimeter. The characteristics of a class of orthogonal configurations called polyminoes has been taken as a basis for the programming work. Polyminoes are briefly presented in the first part of the paper as well as some data concerning their geometrical structure. The operation of the computer program illustrated by some working examples, is described in the last part of the paper. The results obtained can be used for comparison between alternative shapes. Additional information about these modular shapes is given together with every particular form so as to ease the evaluation task. In these terms the program must be seen as a tool of assessment rather than as a designing procedure.
series SIGRADI
email labsist@herrera.unt.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id ddss9829
id ddss9829
authors De Hoog, J., Hendriks, N.A. and Rutten, P.G.S.
year 1998
title Evaluating Office Buildings with MOLCA(Model for Office Life Cycle Assessment)
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary MOLCA (Model for Office Life Cycle Assessment) is a project that aims to develop a tool that enables designers and builders to evaluate the environmental impact of their designs (of office buildings) from a environmental point of view. The model used is based on guidelinesgiven by ISO 14000, using the so-called Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) method. The MOLCA project started in 1997 and will be finished in 2001 resulting in the aforementioned tool. MOLCA is a module within broader research conducted at the Eindhoven University of Technology aiming to reduce design risks to a minimum in the early design stages.Since the MOLCA project started two major case-studies have been carried out. One into the difference in environmental load caused by using concrete and steel roof systems respectively and the role of recycling. The second study focused on biases in LCA data and how to handle them. For the simulations a computer-model named SimaPro was used, using the world-wide accepted method developed by CML (Centre for the Environment, Leiden, the Netherlands). With this model different life-cycle scenarios were studied and evaluated. Based on those two case studies and a third one into an office area, a first model has been developed.Bottle-neck in this field of study is estimating average recycling and re-use percentages of the total flow of material waste in the building sector and collecting reliable process data. Another problem within LCA studies is estimating the reliability of the input data and modelling uncertainties. All these topics will be subject of further analysis.
keywords Life-Cycle Assessment, Office Buildings, Uncertainties in LCA
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 0374
authors De Vecchi, Antonio and Navarra, Laura
year 1998
title Verification of Building Assemblage Compatability
source Computerised Craftsmanship [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Paris (France) 24-26 September 1998, pp. 234-238
summary A computer program is being elaborated as an aid in designing assembled parts whose assembly presents high degrees of complexity. The newly created program, once incorporated in the CAD sector to increase its potential applications, will facilitate the analysis of reciprocal relationhips between pieces of the assemblage; this will enhance optimum decision-making in terms of geometric and functional characteristics with respect to the previously conceived assembly sequence. The program will automatically create images in three different ways: instantaneous images of assembly stages for each piece of the assembled part; exploded axonometric view of the whole structure with indications of necessary procedures for inserting or connecting the assembled part;sequenced procedures for connecting the assembled part. The different methods of visualization listed above will allow for project verification of the part by means of simultaneous visual analysis of the images and rapid updating should any changes in their properties arise. These types of visualization include simulations of piece by piece assemblage, which will facilitate an "optimal assemblage", meaning a set of components which are assembled in a specific sequence according to their "structural compatibility" and taking into consideration "particular assembly requirements".
series eCAADe
more http://www.paris-valdemarne.archi.fr/archive/ecaade98/html/28de_vecchi/index.htm
last changed 2003/03/05 12:15

_id a15e
authors Dijkstra, J. and Timmermans, H.J.P.
year 1998
title Conjoint Analysis and Virtual Reality - A Review
source Timmermans (ed.), 4 Ih Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Conference.
summary This paper describes a review of an ongoing research project which aims to develop a conjoint analysis and virtual reality (CA&VR) system as part of a design information system in virtual reality. The research project aims to develop a design system that can be used for interactive design and evaluation of design alternatives. A virtual environment model and dynamic virtual objects representing the different design aspects of interest can present a design. The different design aspects are called attributes. Each attribute level is a different state of the concerned virtual object. In the case of a virtual walk through a building design, the system can be viewed as a visual simulation of the environment. The CA&VR system has the potential advantage that individuals' preferences can be measured in designed hypothetical choice situations. As part of the ongoing research project, principles underlying the CA&VR system will be illustrated by simple examples. The status of this research project, both in retrospect and in prospect will be described.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id ddss9818
id ddss9818
authors Dijkstra, Jan and Timmermans, Harry J.P.
year 1998
title Conjoint Analysis and Virtual Reality – a Review
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary This paper describes a review of an ongoing research project which aims to develop a conjoint analysis and virtual reality (CA&VR) system as part of a design information system in virtual reality. The research project aims to develop a design system that can be used for interactive design and evaluation of design alternatives. A virtual environment model and dynamic virtual objects representing the different design aspects of interest can present a design. The different design aspects are called attributes. Each attribute level is a different state of the concerned virtual object. In the case of a virtual walk through a building design, the system can be viewed as a visual simulation of the environment. The CA&VR system has the potential advantage that individuals’ preferences can be measured indesigned hypothetical choice situations. As part of the ongoing research project, principles underlying the CA&VR system will be illustrated by simple examples. The status of this research project, both in retrospect and in prospect will be described.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 1d83
authors Dodge, M., Doyle, S. and Smith, A.
year 1998
title Visual Communication in Urban Planning and Urban Design
source Working Paper 2; Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis Working Papers; London; June 1998
summary This Case Study documents the current status of visual communication in urban design and planning. Visual communication is examined through discussion of standalone and network media, specifically concentrating on visualisation on the World Wide Web (WWW). First, we examine the use of Solid and Geometric Modelling for visualising urban planning and urban design. This report documents and compares examples of the use of Virtual Reality Modelling Language (VRML) and proprietary WWW based Virtual Reality modelling software. Examples include the modelling of Bath and Glasgow using both VRML 1.0 and 2.0. The use of Virtual Worlds and their role in visualising urban form within multi-user environments is reviewed. The use of Virtual Worlds is developed into a study of the possibilities and limitations of Virtual Internet Design Arena's (ViDA's), an initiative undertaken at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis, University College London. The use of Virtual Worlds and their development towards ViDA's is seen as one of the most important developments in visual communication for urban planning and urban design since the development plan. Secondly, the role of photorealistic media in the process of communicating plans is examined. The process of creating photorealistic media is documented, and examples of the Virtual Streetscape and Wired Whitehall Virtual Urban Interface System are provided. The conclusion is that, although the use of photo-realistic media on the WWW provides a way to visually communicate planning information, its use is limited. The merging of photorealistic media and solid geometric modelling in the creation of Augmented Reality is reviewed. Augmented Reality is seen to provide an important step forward in the ability quickly and easily to visualise urban planning and urban design information. Third, the role of visual communication of planning data through GIS is examined in terms of desktop, three dimensional, and Internet based GIS. The evolution to Internet GIS is seen as a critical component in the development of virtual cities that will allow urban planners and urban designers to visualise and model the complexity of the built environment in networked virtual reality. Finally, a viewpoint is put forward of the Virtual City, linking Internet GIS with photorealistic multi-user Virtual Worlds. At present there are constraints on how far virtual cities can be developed, but a view is provided on how these networked virtual worlds are developing to aid visual communication in urban planning and urban design.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id a114
authors Faucher, Didier and Nivet, Marie-Laure
year 1998
title Playing with Design Intent: Integration of Physical and Urban Constraints in CAD
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 118-137
summary Our work deals with the exploration of a universe of forms that satisfy some design intents. That is, we substitute a “generate and test” approach for a declarative approach in which an object is created from its properties. In this paper we present an original method that takes into account design intents relative to sunlight, visibility and urban regulation. First of all we study how current CAD tools have considered these properties until now. Our conclusion is that the classical design / simulation / analysis process does not suit design practices, especially in the early stages. We think that an improved CAD system should offer the architect the option of manipulating abstract information such as design intents. We define an intent as a conceptual expression of constraints having an influence on the project. For instance, a visual intent will be stated with no reference to vision geometry: “ from this place, I want to see the front of the new building”. We show how to represent each of these constraints with a 3D volume associated to some characteristics. If some solutions exist, we are sure that they are included in these volumes. For physical phenomena we compute the volume geometry using the principles of inverse simulation. In the case of urban regulation we apply deduction rules. Design intents are solved by means of geometrical entities that represent openings or obstructions in the project. Computing constraint volumes is a way of guiding the architect in his exploration of solutions. Constraint volumes are new spaces that can restore the link between form and phenomenon in a CAD tool. Our approach offers the designer the possibility of manipulating design intents.

series ACADIA
email didier.faucher@cerma.archi.fr
last changed 2003/04/28 12:12

_id aac0
authors Garcia, Renato
year 1998
title Structural Feel or Feelings for Structure? - Stirring Emotions through the Computer Interface in Behaviour Analysis of Building Structures
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 163-171
summary The use of computers in the analysis of architectural structures has at present become indispensable and fairly routine. Researchers & professionals in architecture and engineering have taken advantage of current computer technology to develop richer and more comprehensive interactive interfaces in systems designed to analyse structural behaviour. This paper discusses a research project which attempts to further enrich such computer interfaces by embodying emotion or mood (affective) components into them and assessing the effects of incorporating these into multimodal learning modules for students of architecture at the University of Hong Kong. Computer structural analysis is most often used to determine the final state of a structure after full loading, but can also be used very ably to depict the time-history behaviour of a structure. The time-dependent nature of this process of behaviour provides an excellent opportunity to incorporate emotion cues for added emphasis and reinforcement. Studying time-history behaviour of structures is a vital part of classroom learning in structures and this why such emotion cues can have significant impact in such an environment. This is in contrast to the confines of professional engineering practices where these cues may not be as useful or desirable because oftentimes intermediate time history data is bypassed as a blackbox and focus is placed primarily on bottomline analysis results. The paper will discuss the fundamental basis for the establishment of emotional cues in this project as well as it's implementation-which consists mainly of two parts. The first involves 'personifying' the structure by putting in place a structure monitoring system analogous to human vital signs. The second involves setting up a 'ladder' of emotion states (which vary from feelings of serenity to those of extreme anxiety) mapped to the various states of a structures stability or condition. The paper will further elaborate on how this is achieved through the use of percussion, musical motifs, and chord progression in resonance with relevant graphical animations. Initially in this project, emotion cues were used to reinforce two structural behaviour tutoring systems developed by this author (3D Catenary Stuctures module & Plastic Behaviour of Semi-rigid Steel Frames module). These modules were ideal for implementing these cues because both depicted nonlinear structural behaviour in a mainly time-history oriented presentation. A brief demonstration of the actual learning modules used in the project study will also be presented together with a discussion of the assessment of it's effectiveness in actual classroom teaching.
keywords Affective Interfaces, Human-Computer Interaction, Computer-Aided-Engineering
series CAADRIA
email rjgarcia@hku.hk
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:38

_id 64b8
authors Grabowski, M. and Barner, K.
year 1998
title Data Visualization Methods for the Blind using Force Feedback and Sonification
source Stein, M. (Ed.). Telemanipulator and Telepresence Technologies V. Vol. 3524
summary Research in the field of scientific visualization has begun to articulate systematic methods for mapping data to a perceivable form. Most work in this area has focused on the visual sense. For blind people in particular, systematic visualization methods which utilize other sense need further development. In this work we develop methods for adding aural feedback to an existing haptic force feedback interface to create a multimodal visualization system. We examine some fundamental components of a visualization system which include the following: characterization of the data, definition of user directives and interpretation aims, cataloging of sensual representations of information, and finally, matching the data and user interpretation aims with the appropriate sensual representations. We focus on the last two components as they relate to the aural and haptic sensor. Cataloging of sensual representations is drawn form current research in sonification and haptics. The matching procedure can be thought of as a type of encoding which should be the inverse of the decoding mechanism of our aural and haptic systems. Topics in human perception are discussed, and issues related to the interaction between the two sensor are addressed. We have implemented a visualization system in the from of a Windows NT application using a sound card and a 3 DOF point interaction haptic interface. The system present a 2D data set primarily as a polygonal haptic surface although other capabilities of the haptic sensor are utilized such as texture discernment. In addition, real time aural feedback is presented as the user explores the surface. Parameters of sound such as pitch and spectral content are used to convey information. Evaluation of the system's effectiveness as an assistive technology for the blind reveals that combining aural and haptic feedback improves visualization over using either of the two senses alone.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

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