CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 61 to 80 of 526

_id 6db8
authors Iki, K., Shimoda, S., Miyazaki, T. and Homma, R.
year 1998
title On the Development and the Use of Network Based Cafm System
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 253-260
summary The purpose of this study to develop a prototype of the network based and distributed database integrated CAFM (Computer Aided Facility Management) system for spatial analysis and space planning of office building. This system developed for the FM (Facility Management) works of large company that owns many office buildings in wide spread area. This system has following characteristic capabilities; 1) data acquisition from distributed database 2) benchmark comparison among in-house offices, particular office and several outside office standards 3) analysis of POE database and spatial condition database 4) evaluation of space planning by using CAD database and POE database This paper reports these four points. 1) conceptual and functional frame work of the system 2) technical arrangement of the system development 3) case study of the system use in a FM works on spatial analysis and space planning 4) evaluation of the system
keywords CAFM, POE, Windows, Network
series CAADRIA
email iki@arch.kumamoto-u.ac.jp
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:30

_id 203b
authors Jabi, Wassim M.
year 1998
title The Role of Artifacts in Collaborative Design
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 271-280
summary With the proliferation of digital technology, a new category of design artifacts, usually described with the term virtual, has emerged. Virtual artifacts have gained further prominence due to the advances made in collaboration software and networking technologies. These technologies have made it easier to communicate design intentions through the transfer and sharing of virtual rather than physical artifacts. This becomes particularly true in the case of long-distance or international collaborative efforts. This paper compares the two major categories of artifacts – the physical and the computer-based – and places them in relationship to an observed collaborative design process. In order to get at their specific roles in collaboration, two case studies were conducted in which designers in academic and professional settings were observed using a methodology which focused on participation in the everydayness of the designer as well as casual discussions, collection of artifacts, note-taking, and detailed descriptions of insightful events. The collected artifacts were then categorized according to the setting in which they were created and the setting in which they were intended to be used. These two attributes could have one of two values, private or public, which yield a matrix of four possible categories. It was observed that artifacts belonging in the same quadrant shared common qualities such as parsimony, completeness, and ambiguity. This paper finds that distinguishing between physical and virtual artifacts according to their material and imagined attributes is neither accurate nor useful. This research illustrates how virtual artifacts can obtain the qualities of their physical counterparts and vice versa. It also demonstrates how a new meta-artifact can emerge from the inclusion and unification of its material and imagined components. In conclusion, the paper calls for a seamless continuity in the representation and management of physical and virtual artifacts as a prerequisite to the success of: (1) computer-supported collaborative design processes, (2) academic instruction dealing with making and artifact building, and (3) executive policies in architectural practice addressing the management of architectural documents.
keywords Collaborative Design Process
series CAADRIA
email wj@writeme.com
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:28

_id 5cab
authors Jain, A., Kensek, K. and Noble, D.
year 1998
title An interactive Web-based teaching tool for simplified 3D analysis of solar rhythms
source Automation in Construction 8 (2) (1998) pp. 181-194
summary This case study presents the World Wide Web as an appropriate medium for architectural teaching. The prototypical tool VRSolar uses simple programming and existing Web resources to help in the teaching of topics related to the movement of the sun and its effects on the built environment. Using JavaScript, this tool is capable of generating real time Web content in html and VRML based on user input. Accessible on the Web from within a standard Web browser, this tool calculates the solar positions of any location on earth and indicates the solar access to a given site in the form of a three-dimensional Web page, which the user can view, navigate through, and animate.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id ee96
authors Johnson, Scott
year 1998
title Making Models Architectural: Protean Representations to Fit Architects’ Minds
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 354-365
summary A rich vocabulary has evolved for describing architecture. It serves not only as a means of communication, but also as an embodiment of concepts relating to form, space, structure, function, mood, and symbolism. We architects not only speak in terms of walls, rooms, roofs, arches, etc., we see in terms of them and think in terms of them, as well. Such concepts are integral to our ability to design. Typical CAD representations, however, are based on geometric/mathematical elements like points, lines, planes, and symbols. Even more experimental approaches like parametric shapes or procedural assemblies correspond poorly to architectural elements, and seldom lend themselves well to making conceptual changes that would allow exploration of design alternatives. Small wonder some architecture schools experience a division between computer and studio courses, or even between computer and studio faculty. Different ways of talking and thinking are involved. The concepts involved are often mutually exclusive. This paper discusses an attempt to address this conceptual mismatch, using what are termed “protean” (meaning “very changeable”) elements. These are high-level elements corresponding to architectural concepts like “wall,” or “dome.” They each have parameters appropriate for the particular type of element they represent, and produce the polyhedra necessary for graphics based on these parameters. A system is being implemented to allow models to be constructed using these elements. The protean elements form a loosely structured model, in which some elements hierarchically contain others, and some elements are essentially freestanding, being created and manipulated independently of other elements. Characteristics of protean element are discussed, including the underlying object-oriented structure, the relationship between elements and graphics, and functions associated with the objects. A scheme is explained whereby all parts of a design can be represented even when the design includes extremely unusual forms not conforming to predictable classes of elements. The necessary support framework is also discussed; general flow of the system and mechanisms for viewing the model and editing subcomponents are explained. The current status of the project, and intentions for future work are discussed. The project has been partially implemented, and the necessary framework to support the system is mostly complete.

series ACADIA
email sven@umich.edu
last changed 1998/12/16 07:39

_id 161c
authors Juroszek, Steven P.
year 1999
title Access, Instruction, Application: Towards a Universal Lab
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 141-150
summary In January 1998, the Montana State University School of Architecture embarked upon an initiative to successfully integrate computer technology into its design curriculum. At that time only a handful of student computers could be found in the design studio. By January 1999 over 95 students have and use computers in their courses. The increase in computer access and use is occurring through a five-phase initiative called the Universal Lab-a school-wide commitment to the full integration of computer technology into all design studios, support courses and architectural electives. The Universal Lab uses the areas of Access, Instruction and Application as the vehicles for appropriate placement and usage of digital concepts within the curriculum. The three-pronged approach allows each instructor to integrate technology using one, two or all three areas with varying degrees of intensity. This paper presents the current status of the Universal Lab-Phase I and Phase II-and describes the effect of this program on student work, course design and faculty instruction.
keywords Design, Access, Instruction, Application, Integration
series eCAADe
email stevej@montana.edu
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id a787
authors Kaga, A., Shimazu, Y., Yamauchi, T., Ishihara, H. And Sasada, T.
year 1998
title City Information Visualizer Using 3-D Model and Computer Graphics
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 193-202
summary 3-D models and computer graphics with its visual characteristics enables easier understanding of various information. Up until now 3-D models and computer graphics has not been used for the analysis of city information due to its high cost and the need for special techniques. Currently, we have discovered new technology in hyper medium based on network technology and lower costs. This paper focuses on the construction of an interactive and visual 3-D city information system, aiming at the ‘idea processor’ for research and analysis of city planning and market research. We have discovered the requirements necessary for the City Information Visualizer system. Using this technology we will construct the prototype system of the 3-D City Information Visualizer. This system is based on the personal computer and the Client/Server system. The system is then applied to practical city analysis. This paper presents the prototype system and its evaluation in a real project.
keywords City Planning, Computer Graphics, 3-D Model, VRML, JAVA
series CAADRIA
email kaga@hankyu.co.jp
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:36

_id 807b
authors Kalisperis, Loukas N. and Pehlivanidou-Liakata, Anastasia
year 1998
title Architectural Design Studio: Digital and Traditional
source Computers in Design Studio Teaching [EAAE/eCAADe International Workshop Proceedings / ISBN 09523687-7-3] Leuven (Belgium) 13-14 November 1998, pp. 73-81
summary The nature of the task of representing architecture alters to reflect the state of architecture at each period of time. In simulating architecture, the necessary conversion from that which is inhabitable, experiential, functional, and at times, indescribable to an abstraction in an entirely different media is often an imperfect procedure that centers on its translation rather than the actual design. The objective in visualizing any architectural design is to achieve a situational awareness that allows for meaningful criticism of the design. Computer-aided three-dimensional (3D) visualization technology has made available new representation techniques. Surpassing the traditional means of graphic illustration and scaled models, this technology has been primarily developed to decrease the amount of abstraction between architecture and its documentation. The general objective of this paper is to present a study carried out over the last six years in which the progress of students in a traditional studio was compared to the progress of similar students in a digital studio. We have assessed the effects of the tools over the six-year period (24 different projects) by evaluating solution-generation in trial-and-error process and learning problem-solving strategies based on the Cognitive Flexibility Theory paradigm. Students using the digital studio were found to generate more and various solutions consistently.
series eCAADe
email lnk@psu.edu
more http://www.eaae.be/
last changed 2000/11/21 08:14

_id cd37
authors Kensek, Karen and Noble, Douglas
year 1998
title Digital Reconstruction: The Architecture of Raphael Soriano
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 11-12
summary With the research help of Wolfgang Wagener, the students in our computer graphics class are using form•Z, 3D Studio, and Premiere to document and interpret the work of Raphael Soriano. These images are from a class currently underway in fall semester, 1998, at USC. The students are responsible for modeling, rendering, and animating (with the help of GIFBuilder), their buildings in form•Z, with an emphasis on exterior form. Then they model, render, and animate their projects in 3D Studio concentrating on the interior and interpreting how the building might have been furnished. Other studies covered the use of QuickTime VR and Web page development. Additional work will be done to make the work more “realistic” in response to critiques by Wagener. The next stage of the project is to explain the important features of the building through the use of Premiere. Students may choose to use a purely documentary style or MTV approach or other presentation “style” as long as they clearly define the intent of the presentation and then execute it.
series ACADIA
email kensek@usc.edu
last changed 2002/12/14 08:21

_id ad62
authors Klaus, R. and Urbaniak, A.
year 1998
title Safety algorithms for excavator engine control
source Automation in Construction 7 (5) (1998) pp. 391-400
summary The diesel engine without load and speed controller is a nonlinear astatic object. The torque and moment of internal friction (the diesel engine without load and governor) cross in the field of the engine's destruction (the speed limit was exceeded). Hence, the diesel engine is equipped with a speed governor. The main task of the governor is to counteract exceeding of the speed limit. We did a research on the engine with an injection pump wherein the conventional centrifugal governor was replaced by the microprocessor controller. This is because using a large number of electronic elements microcontroller has smaller reliability in comparison with mechanical governors. In order to protect the engine from the results of the controller's defect, we invented a safety system. The system guarantees the controlled stoppage of the engine's work in dangerous states. Information in this article are presented concerning protection and self-diagnostics of SW 400 engine control system that makes use of DP535 controller with Siemens 80C535 microcontroller. The presented control system is successfully tested in an excavator.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 0beb
authors Koch, Volker and Russell, Peter
year 2000
title VuuA.Org: The Virtual Upperrhine University of Architecture
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 23-25
summary In 1998, architecture schools in the three nation region of the upper Rhine came together to undertake a joint design studio. With the support of the Center for Entrepeneurship in Colmar, France, the schools worked on the reuse of the Kuenzer Mill situated near Herbolzheim, Germany. The students met jointly three times during the semester and then worked on the project at their home universities usng conventional methods. This project was essential to generating closer ties between the participating students, tutors and institutions and as such, the results were quite positive. So much so, that the organisers decided to repeat the exercise one year later. However, it became clear that although the students had met three times in large groups, the real success of a co-operative design studio would require mechanisms which allow far more intimate interaction among the participants, be they students, teachers or outside experts. The experiences from the Netzentwurf at the Institut für Industrielle Bauproduktion (ifib) showed the potential in a web based studio and the addition of ifib to the three nation group led to the development of the VuuA platform. The first project served to illuminate the the differences in teaching concepts among the partner institutions and their teaching staff as well as problems related to the integration of students from three countries with two languages and four different faculties: landscape architecture, interior design, architecture and urban planning. The project for the Fall of 1999 was the reuse of Fort Kléber in Wolfisheim by Strasbourg, France. The students again met on site to kick off the Semester but were also instructed to continue their cooperation and criticism using the VuuA platform.
keywords Virtual Design Studio, CSCW, International Cooperation, Planning Platform
series eCAADe
email volker.koch@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de, peter.russell@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
more http://www.vuua.org
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id cc90
authors Kolarevic, Branko
year 1998
title CAD@HKU
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 16-17
summary Since 1993, we have experimented with Virtual Design Studios (VDS) as an on-going research project that investigates the combination of current computer-aided design (CAD), computer networks (Internet), and computer supported collaborative work (CSCW) techniques to bring together studentsat geographically distributed locations to work in a virtual atelier. In 1993 the theme of the first joint VDS project was in-fill housing for the traditional Chinese walled village of Kat Hing Wai in the New Territories north of Hong Kong, and our partners included MIT and Harvard in Boston (USA), UBC in Vancouver (Canada), and Washington University in St. Louis (USA). In 1994 we were joined by Cornell (USA) and Escola Tecnica Superior d’Arquitectura de Barcelona (Spain) to re-design Li Long housing in Shanghai, and 1995 added the Warsaw Institute of Technology (Poland) for the ACSA/Dupont competition to design a Center for Cultural and Religious Studies in Japan. The 1996 topic was an international competition to design a monument located in Hong Kong to commemorate the return of Hong Kong to Chinese sovereignty in 1997. Communication was via e-mail, the WorldWide Web with limited attempts at VRML, and network video. Several teaching and research experiments conducted through these projects have demonstrated the viability and potential of using electronic, telecommunications, and videoconferencing technologies in collaborative design processes. Results of these VDS have been presented at conferences worldwide, explained in journal papers and published in Virtual Design Studio, edited by J. Wojtowicz, published by HKU Press.
series ACADIA
email branko@pobox.upenn.edu
last changed 2002/12/14 08:21

_id 7471
authors Kram, Reed
year 1999
title The Digital Sketch Workshop: a Core Course in Design with Computation
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 251-264
summary This paper summarizes DIGITAL SKETCH, a workshop that took place over the course of two weeks in September 1998 at Designskolen Kolding, Denmark. DIGITAL SKETCH was an attempt to create a foundation course in design for the digital medium for students with strong visual design skills, but little to no computer experience. Teaching design on computers is commonly thought of as detailing the current version of the latest commercial software. As long as this is the case, design on computers will (quite rightfully) continue to get little respect from those designers using more traditional design methods. How can we find the "core" of this medium when faced with the constant onslaught of operating system upgrades and version 11.2 of software Y83? For DIGITAL SKETCH, we tried to demystify the process of controlling the computer. In this workshop we examined the meanings of the term "sketch" as it applies to the design process on the computer. Our hope was that by revealing some of the unique characteristics of the digital medium, we might develop new design processes in tune with this medium.
series AVOCAAD
email kram@medialab.chalmers.se
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id b796
authors Krishnamurthy, B.K., Tserng, H.-P., Schmitt, R.L., Russell, J.S., Bahia, H.U. and Hanna, A.S.
year 1998
title AutoPave: towards an automated paving system for asphalt pavement compaction operations
source Automation in Construction 8 (2) (1998) pp. 165-180
summary Asphalt pavement density from roller compaction is a crucial factor in ensuring satisfactory pavement performance. Proper and uniform compaction of the pavement mat is essential in achieving the desired final compacted density. There is a necessity to investigate existing pavement construction practices, and provide more cost-effective modifications to the current scenario. Automation of the paving operation can increase the efficiency and quality of the operation, lead to reductions in overall project costs and time, and enhance pavement life. A system can be developed through algorithmic planning and real-time guidance strategies, and the development of a semi-automated path-planning and real-time guidance system that aims towards automating the paving operation. This system accepts relevant paving project inputs, generates appropriate path plans for the compactor, performs a graphical visualization of the generated path plan, and offers real-time guidance capabilities using Global Positioning Systems (GPS) technology. This system, named AUTOPAVE (v1.0), was developed in Microsoft Visual Basic™ programming language and offers a user-friendly and interactive graphical interface. The proposed new system will incorporate state-of-the-art GPS technology to standardize paving operations that are more amenable to rigorous quality control, and can result in considerable reductions in cost and time involved in asphalt pavement construction projects. This system was tested on several actual paving projects, and many operational issues related to the functioning of the system were successfully overcome.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id c125
authors LaViola, J., Holden, L.S., Forsberg, A.S., Bhuphaibool, D.S. and Zeleznik, R.C.
year 1998
title Collaborative Conceptual Modeling Using the SKETCH Framework
source Proceedings of IASTED International Conference on Computer Graphics and Imaging, 154-158
summary This paper introduces NetSketch, an application that supports distributed conceptual design by providing tools for modelessly creating, manipulating and viewing 3D models in a shared virtual space. Inherent problems exist with collaborative design tools because of the simultaneous group interaction required for users to smoothly and effectively work together in the same virtual space. With NetSketch, we provide solutions to these problems by providing a fast and direct gesture-based user interface, a set of visual effects that better enable a user's awareness of operations done by other participants, and a set of tools for enhancing visual communication between participants.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 40f8
authors Lee, E., Woo, .S., Shiosaka, Y. and Sasada, T.
year 1998
title Alternative Design Comparative System in Collaborative Design
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 327-335
summary The evaluation of alternative design sets is important phase for quick design decision and new design conception, and it is repeatedly processed. To proceed design process in standard, the repetition is reduced to minimum. And design must be optimized in limited cost and time. For smooth and fast process lots of alternative design sets are provided within the limit of possibility and it must be evaluated appropriately. It's possible to evaluate alternative design sets using various media. This paper describes the characteristics of various media which have been used for evaluation of alternative design sets, and propose alternative design comparative system based on the findings of case studies.
keywords Collaborative Design, VRML, JavaScript, Java, Communication
series CAADRIA
email ejlee@env.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:21

_id c837
authors Lee, Jia-Her
year 1998
title Modelling Mondrian's Design Processes and Their Architectural Associations Using Multilayer Neural Networks
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 455-464
summary Can artificial intelligence be used for design behavior of human beings? Human designer’s behavior and design thinking are extremely complicated. There is still argument about the relationship between the two until now. Therefore, this research only investigates regular and common design behavior. This essay is taking Mondrian of Neo-Plasticism as an example and neural networks systems as a tool to illustrate the core idea. It is hoped that we can simulate the design thinking ability, such as memory association and recognition of human designers. Computation of neural networks systems, as a result and the difference between human designers and computer, can be discussed too. Also, since the work of Neo-Plasticism Mondrian influences contemporary architecture design, industrial design, andvisual design directly or indirectly, floorplans of architect John Hejduk’s works were taken as an example to discuss the application of Neural networkss in the design field.
keywords Neural Networks, Design Processes, Neo-Plasticism, Architectural Floorplans
series CAADRIA
email animal@iaa.nctu.edu.tw
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:09

_id ddss9836
id ddss9836
authors Lee, Jia-Her and Liu, Yu-Tung
year 1998
title Modelling Mondrians Design Processes and TheirArchitectural Associations Using Multilayer NeuralNetworks
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary Can artificial intelligence be used for design behavior of human beings? Human designer’s behavior and design thinking are extremely complicated. There is still argument about the relationship between the two until now. Therefore, this research only investigates regular and common design behavior. This essay is taking Mondrian of Neo-Plasticism as an example and neural networks systems as a tool to illustrate the core idea. It is hoped that we can simulate the design thinking ability, such as memoryassociation and recognition of human designers. Computation of neural networks systems, as a result and the difference between human designers and computer, can be discussed too. Also, since the work of Neo-Plasticism Mondrian influences contemporary architecture design, industrial design, andvisual design directly or indirectly, floorplans of architect John Hejduk’s works were taken as an example to discuss the application of Neural networkss in the design field.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 3d97
authors Li, H. and Love, P.E.D.
year 1998
title Design concept as a model for modelling design process and its knowledge
source The Int. Journal of Construction IT 6(2), pp. 87-103
summary The strategy of decomposing a design problem into subproblems is commonly used in engineering design. One difficulty in applying this strategy to computer-based design systems is the assembly of subproblem solutions to construct a whole solution. Despite its advantages, this design strategy suffers two major problems. First, as constraints are ill defined and implicitly exist among design objects, it is very difficult to articulate and represent design constraints in computable forms. Second, as design subproblems are designated separately in computer-based design systems, the inherent relationships among subproblems are not considered in contriving these subproblems. As a result, recomposing subproblem solutions is hard to do. This paper presents a model for modelling design processes and the knowledge involved. The model is called ‘design concept’, which represents empirical interconnections of design attributes and intraconnections of design subproblems. Topological relations are represented using decomposition trees. The advantages and disadvantages of integratively using decomposition trees and design concepts in facilitating conceptual design are discussed
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:45

_id 6eb1
authors Lloyd, P. and Deasley, P.
year 1998
title Ethnographic description of design networks
source Automation in Construction 7 (2-3) (1998) pp. 101-110
summary One of the central themes of a commercial design process is communication. Complex design artefacts, rather than being rationally thought out by individuals, evolve through designers negotiating and bargaining with clients and peers alike. Problems are resolved through discussion and explanation. The 'design process,' as a reified entity, cannot be apprehended by any individual. Understanding of the process is spread over a social network, and through the narratives and discourses that are forged from day to day. This is design as a social process. The focus of the present paper is twofold. First, we wish to establish the field of ethnography as a particularly useful method of describing design in its social form. Secondly, we describe the results of a design case study we have carried out, using ethnographic methods, in an aerospace manufacturing company. We observe informal structures determining work activity, and the use of subtle `role' playing in problem-solving.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 12fd
authors Lorenc, S.J. and Bernold, L.E.
year 1998
title Excavator-mounted ordnance locating system using electromagnetic sensing technology
source Automation in Construction 7 (4) (1998) pp. 243-258
summary There are in excess of 20 million acres of bomb and artillery ranges under the control of the Department of Defense (DoD). Each year some 800,000 to 2,000,000 km2 are turned over to civilian (private or commercial) use. Some of this land is contaminated with buried unexploded ordnance (UXO). These UXOs present a safety hazard and raise many environmental concerns. In addition to inaccurate locating, one of the most difficult aspects for the operator of an excavator is the inability to see the target ordnance while it is covered with soil and debris. This paper presents a system which is mounted to the arm of an excavator and is capable of detecting a buried UXO located in the path of an excavator's bucket. Also, the system is able to determine the precise location of the ordnance relative to the excavator's bucket. This information will allow the operator not only to avoid striking the ordnance during the digging operation, but also to expose the object by removing the soil around it. This technology is also capable of locating small UXO which can be buried within the spoil material. This technology has the potential to result in savings of millions of dollars in operating costs and prevent the damage or loss of equipment.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

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