CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 541

_id e336
authors Achten, H., Roelen, W., Boekholt, J.-Th., Turksma, A. and Jessurun, J.
year 1999
title Virtual Reality in the Design Studio: The Eindhoven Perspective
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 169-177
summary Since 1991 Virtual Reality has been used in student projects in the Building Information Technology group. It started as an experimental tool to assess the impact of VR technology in design, using the environment of the associated Calibre Institute. The technology was further developed in Calibre to become an important presentation tool for assessing design variants and final design solutions. However, it was only sporadically used in student projects. A major shift occurred in 1997 with a number of student projects in which various computer technologies including VR were used in the whole of the design process. In 1998, the new Design Systems group started a design studio with the explicit aim to integrate VR in the whole design process. The teaching effort was combined with the research program that investigates VR as a design support environment. This has lead to increasing number of innovative student projects. The paper describes the context and history of VR in Eindhoven and presents the current set-UP of the studio. It discusses the impact of the technology on the design process and outlines pedagogical issues in the studio work.
keywords Virtual Reality, Design Studio, Student Projects
series eCAADe
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id c304
authors Barber, T.and Hanna, R.
year 1998
title Appraisal of Design Studio Methodologies
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 21-30
summary This paper investigates the relationship between different design approaches and their effectiveness in the formulation of design concepts. This inquiry will focus on the computer as the sole design and developmental tool. The research employs a short design programme, a small building with a given urban site, as its investigative vehicle. Nineteen second year students of the Mackintosh School of Architecture were monitored and their design progress evaluated. They were split into two groups: one used CAD and AEC as the only drawing and modelling tool, tutorial and review, and another used conventional tools of drawing and model making (mixed media). Structured interviews and personal observations were used as a means for data collection. Questionnaires were administered to students and their response was analysed using the statistical programme SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences). The Mann-Whitney test was used to test the Null Hypothesis that different design approaches will not produce different design outcomes. Correlation, Regression and the X2 test of independence were also employed to screen data and identify patterns of relationships.

series CAADRIA
email gtca09@udcf.gla.ac.uk
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 18
authors Castane, D., Leirado, E.R., Tessier, C. and Martinez.R.
year 1998
title El Docente y la Utilizacion de Sistemas Multimediales en Redes Telematicas Aplicados a la Ensenanza 3D en Diseno Arquitectonico (The Teacher and the use of Multimedia Systems in Telematicas Networks Applied to the Teaching of 3D in Architectonic Design)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 154-159
summary The remarkable advances in the technology of computer systems, including software, hardware, and networks, continuously give us new avenues to be utilized in education. The pedagogic strategy to be developed in the utilization of digital graphic systems applied to three-dimensional design in architecture (both in the design and virtual expression of objects or already designed architectural groups) is still changing with the times.Therefore, the Department, as an extension of its experience with this type of development and as a response to deal with special situations such as large numbers of students, develops this new proposal, which is currently being used. This project uses the implementation, structuring, and building of a virtual site as an informatics classroom, utilizing multimedia systems, to be used as a support for acquiring knowledge during the learning that takes place doing the coursework. This setting would allow for the feedback between the instructor and the student to be on-going, hence both groups being efficiently motivated through examples and opportunities of how to do the following: utilize appropriate technology, manipulate the right information, utilize the right kind of software programs and techniques, revamp the knowledge, and benefit from using the appropriate digital techniques for each specific case of architectural design and expression.
series SIGRADI
email dorcas@fadu.uba.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:48

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id a96f
id a96f
authors Clayton, M., Johnson, R., Song, Y and Al-Qawasmi, J.
year 1998
title Delivering Facility Documentation using Intranet Technology
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 240-253
summary Intranet technologies present new opportunities for delivering facility documentation for use in facility management. After the design stage, building documentation is reused to support construction and then facility operation. However, a common perception is that construction documents and as-built drawings are less than optimal for reuse to support operations. We have conducted a study of facility management processes and the information content of facility documentation in the context of information technologies that are emerging into the marketplace. The study provides guidance for facility managers who are implementing and fielding new information technology systems. A better understanding of information needs during operations may also help designers to better structure their own documents for reuse. An analysis of documents that are used throughout the life cycle of facilities has led us to a characterization of operations documents that are distinct from design drawings, record drawings or as-built drawings. From an analysis of facility management processes, we have identified different roles for facility documentation in those processes. Facility documentation may be used as a resource, as input, or as output. Furthermore, from interviews of facility management personnel, we identified facility information that was rated high in importance and low in satisfaction that might be targeted when implementing a facility information system. We prepared software demonstrations that show how the information may be extracted from drawings, entered into databases and then retrieved via Web and CAD interfaces. We suggest that operations documents consist of a variety of information types and require several kinds of information tools, including databases, CAD drawings and hypertext. Intranet technologies, databases and CAD software can be integrated to achieve facility management systems that address shortcomings in current facility management operations. In particular, intranet technologies provide improved accessibility to information for facility management customers and occasional users of the systems. Our study has produced recommendations based upon utility and ease-of-implementation for delivery of information from the design team to the owner, and among personnel during operation of the facility.

series ACADIA
email mark-clayton@tamu.edu
last changed 2003/12/06 07:44

_id a114
authors Faucher, Didier and Nivet, Marie-Laure
year 1998
title Playing with Design Intent: Integration of Physical and Urban Constraints in CAD
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 118-137
summary Our work deals with the exploration of a universe of forms that satisfy some design intents. That is, we substitute a “generate and test” approach for a declarative approach in which an object is created from its properties. In this paper we present an original method that takes into account design intents relative to sunlight, visibility and urban regulation. First of all we study how current CAD tools have considered these properties until now. Our conclusion is that the classical design / simulation / analysis process does not suit design practices, especially in the early stages. We think that an improved CAD system should offer the architect the option of manipulating abstract information such as design intents. We define an intent as a conceptual expression of constraints having an influence on the project. For instance, a visual intent will be stated with no reference to vision geometry: “ from this place, I want to see the front of the new building”. We show how to represent each of these constraints with a 3D volume associated to some characteristics. If some solutions exist, we are sure that they are included in these volumes. For physical phenomena we compute the volume geometry using the principles of inverse simulation. In the case of urban regulation we apply deduction rules. Design intents are solved by means of geometrical entities that represent openings or obstructions in the project. Computing constraint volumes is a way of guiding the architect in his exploration of solutions. Constraint volumes are new spaces that can restore the link between form and phenomenon in a CAD tool. Our approach offers the designer the possibility of manipulating design intents.

series ACADIA
email didier.faucher@cerma.archi.fr
last changed 2003/04/28 12:12

_id ca7b
authors Howes, Jaki
year 1999
title IT or not IT? An Examination of IT Use in an Experimental Multi-disciplinary Teamwork Situation
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 370-373
summary Leeds Metropolitan University is well placed to carry out research into multi-disciplinary team-working, as all the design and construction disciplines are housed in one faculty. Staff have set up an experimental project, TIME IT (Team-working in Multi-disciplinary Environments using IT) which examines ways of working in the design/construction process and how IT is used when there is no commercial pressure. Four groups of four students, one graduate diploma architect, and one final year student from each of Civil Engineering, Construction Management and Quantity Surveying have been working on feasibility studies for projects that are based on completed schemes or have been devised by collaborators in the Construction Industry. Students have been asked to produce a PowerPoint presentation, in up to five working days, of a design scheme, with costs, structural analysis and construction programme. The students are not assessed on the quality of the product, but on their own ability to monitor the process and use of IT. Despite this, aggressive competition evolved between the teams to produce the 'best' design. Five projects were run in the 1998/99 session. A dedicated IT suite has been provided; each group of students had exclusive use of a machine. They were not told how to approach the projects nor when to use the available technology, but were asked to keep the use of paper to a minimum and to keep all their work on the server, so that it could be monitored externally. Not so. They plotted the AO drawings of an existing building that had been provided on the server. They like paper - they can scribble on it, fold it, tear it and throw it at one another.
keywords IT, Multi-disciplinary, Teamwork
series eCAADe
email J.Howes@imu.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 203b
authors Jabi, Wassim M.
year 1998
title The Role of Artifacts in Collaborative Design
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 271-280
summary With the proliferation of digital technology, a new category of design artifacts, usually described with the term virtual, has emerged. Virtual artifacts have gained further prominence due to the advances made in collaboration software and networking technologies. These technologies have made it easier to communicate design intentions through the transfer and sharing of virtual rather than physical artifacts. This becomes particularly true in the case of long-distance or international collaborative efforts. This paper compares the two major categories of artifacts – the physical and the computer-based – and places them in relationship to an observed collaborative design process. In order to get at their specific roles in collaboration, two case studies were conducted in which designers in academic and professional settings were observed using a methodology which focused on participation in the everydayness of the designer as well as casual discussions, collection of artifacts, note-taking, and detailed descriptions of insightful events. The collected artifacts were then categorized according to the setting in which they were created and the setting in which they were intended to be used. These two attributes could have one of two values, private or public, which yield a matrix of four possible categories. It was observed that artifacts belonging in the same quadrant shared common qualities such as parsimony, completeness, and ambiguity. This paper finds that distinguishing between physical and virtual artifacts according to their material and imagined attributes is neither accurate nor useful. This research illustrates how virtual artifacts can obtain the qualities of their physical counterparts and vice versa. It also demonstrates how a new meta-artifact can emerge from the inclusion and unification of its material and imagined components. In conclusion, the paper calls for a seamless continuity in the representation and management of physical and virtual artifacts as a prerequisite to the success of: (1) computer-supported collaborative design processes, (2) academic instruction dealing with making and artifact building, and (3) executive policies in architectural practice addressing the management of architectural documents.
keywords Collaborative Design Process
series CAADRIA
email wj@writeme.com
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:28

_id cd37
authors Kensek, Karen and Noble, Douglas
year 1998
title Digital Reconstruction: The Architecture of Raphael Soriano
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 11-12
summary With the research help of Wolfgang Wagener, the students in our computer graphics class are using form•Z, 3D Studio, and Premiere to document and interpret the work of Raphael Soriano. These images are from a class currently underway in fall semester, 1998, at USC. The students are responsible for modeling, rendering, and animating (with the help of GIFBuilder), their buildings in form•Z, with an emphasis on exterior form. Then they model, render, and animate their projects in 3D Studio concentrating on the interior and interpreting how the building might have been furnished. Other studies covered the use of QuickTime VR and Web page development. Additional work will be done to make the work more “realistic” in response to critiques by Wagener. The next stage of the project is to explain the important features of the building through the use of Premiere. Students may choose to use a purely documentary style or MTV approach or other presentation “style” as long as they clearly define the intent of the presentation and then execute it.
series ACADIA
email kensek@usc.edu
last changed 2002/12/14 08:21

_id ddss9841
id ddss9841
authors Malkawi, Ali
year 1998
title Representing Collaborative Multi- Knowledge Agents as Generic Rules
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary This paper discusses the internal representation of a multi-knowledge agent decision support system that was developed for building thermal design. The system is able to provide designers with specific problem detection in thermal design without the use of rules of thumb. The paper describes how generic rules can be used as virtual agents and how these agents can interact using a blackboard model. The generic rules utilized use logical variables as a strategy to capture generality. This allows the rules todeal with variables that can be replaced by any possible term. In addition, it allows the rules to be equivalent to the infinite set of rules that could be obtained if the variables were replaced in all possible ways by terms. In the system, these terms include the building elements and systems that affect the thermal behavior of the building. Problems associated with agent conflicts and how they were resolved in such a model are described.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 489a
authors Matthews, K., Duff, S. and Corner, D.
year 1998
title A Model for Integrated Spatial and Structural Design of Buildings
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 123-132
summary Recent advances in computer graphics and 3D user interfaces have enabled the emergence of 3D sketch modeling as a viable approach to architectural design, especially in the early schematic phase. This paper describes how a system can be built and used which integrates the capabilities of a good structural analysis system in the user-friendly working environment of a design-oriented modeling program. The structure of a building model as seen by finite element algorithms is a schematic idealization of the building's physical structure into nodes, elements, internal releases, boundary conditions, and loads. The more familiar architectural model used for design visualization represents spatial elements such as roofs, floors, walls, and windows. Rather than treat these models independently, the structural model can be defined in relation to the architectural as a virtual model with inherited common characteristics and additional relational and attribute information, using feature-based geometry data structures to organize topological intelligence in the spatial model. This provides the basis for synchronous modification of structural and architectural aspects of the design.
keywords Structural Design, Spatial Design, Design Integration, Human-Computer Interaction, Feature-Based Modeling, Finite Element Analysis, Geometric Inference
series CAADRIA
email matthews@artifice.com
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:41

_id 220b
authors Potier, S., Malret, J.-L-. and Zoller, J.
year 1998
title Computer Graphics: Assistance for Archaeological Hypotheses
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 366-383
summary This paper is a contribution to the domain of computer tools for architectural and archeological restitution of ancient buildings. We describe an application of these tools to the modeling of the 14th century AD. Thermae of Constantin in Arles, south of France. It was a diploma project in School of Architecture of MarseilleLuminy, and took place in a context defined in the European ARELATE project. The general objective of this project is to emphasize the archeological and architectural heritage of the city of Arles; it aims, in particular, to equip the museum of ancient Arles with a computer tool enabling the storage and consultation of archaeological archives, the communication of information and exchange by specialized networks, and the creation of a virtual museum allowing a redescription of the monuments and a “virtual” visit of ancient Arles. Our approach involves a multidisciplinary approach, calling on architecture, archeology and computer science. The archeologist’s work is to collect information and interpret it; this is the starting point of the architect’s work who, using these elements, suggests an architectural reconstruction. This synthesis contains the functioning analysis of the structure and building. The potential provided by the computer as a tool (in this case, the POV-Ray software) with access to several three-dimensional visualizations, according to hypotheses formulated by the architect and archaeologists, necessitates the use of evolutive models which, thanks to the parametrization of dimensions of a building and its elements, can be adapted to all the changes desired by the architect. The specific contribution of POV-Ray in architectural reconstruction of thermae finds its expression in four forms of this modeling program, which correspond to the objectives set by the architect in agreement with archeologists: (a) The parametrization of dimensions, which contributes significantly in simplifying the reintervention process of the architectural data base; (b) Hierarchy and links between variables, allowing “grouped” modifications of modelized elements in order to preserve the consistency of the architectural building’s morphology; (c) The levels of modeling (with or without facing, for example), which admit of the exploration of all structural and architectural trails (relationship form/ function); and, (d) The “model-type,” facilitating the setting up of hypotheses by simple scaling and transformation of these models (e.g., roofing models) on an already modelled structure. The methodological validation of this modeling software’s particular use in architectural formulation of hypotheses shows that the software is the principal graphical medium of discussion between architect and archaeologist, thus confirming the hypotheses formulated at the beginning of this project.

series ACADIA
email stephane.potier@wanadoo.fr, jlm@marseille.archi.fr, jz@gamsau.archi.fr
last changed 1998/12/16 07:40

_id ddss9849
id ddss9849
authors Sariyildiz, S. Ciftcioglu, Ö. and Veer, Peter van der
year 1998
title Information Ordering for decision support in building design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary A systematic approach for the application of AI-based information processing for information ordering in architectural building design is described. For this purpose fuzzy associative memory (FAM) method is considered. In this system FAM is used for knowledge representation in building design concerning the functional & technical requirements information and its graded relevance to individuals concerned in the same context. A set of FAM rules having been established as a knowledge base for use, a pattern of information in the form of a fuzzy vector is fed to each FAM rule. Here, a decision support system is aimed to convey the information to the respective individuals and/or bodies involved, in a graded form, according to their capacity of involvement in the building design. By exploiting the binary logic, each FAM rule is fired in parallel but to a different degree so that each rule generates an m-dimensional output fuzzy vector Pi. The union of these vectors creates m-dimensional fuzzy decision vector D that provides the ordered information addressed to respective individuals and/or bodies mentioned. Using simulated data, a verification procedure for the performance of the approach is investigated and by means of the work, the role that artificial intelligence in architecture and building design might play, is pointed out.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 62cc
authors Seebohm, T. and Wallace, W.
year 1998
title Rule-based representation of design in architectural practice
source Automation in Construction 8 (1) (1998) pp. 73-85
summary It is suggested that expert systems storing the design knowledge of particular offices in terms of stylistic and construction practice provide a means to take considerably more advantage of information technology than currently. The form of the knowledge stored by such expert systems is a building representation in the form of rules stating how components are placed in three-dimensional space relative to each other. By describing how Frank Lloyd Wright designed his Usonian houses it is demonstrated that the proposed approach is very much in the spirit of distinguished architectural practice. To illustrate this idea, a system for assembling three-dimensional architectural details is presented with particular emphasis on the nature of the rules and the form of the building components created by the rules to assemble typical details. The nature of the rules, which are a three-dimensional adaptation of Stiny's shape grammars, is described. In particular, it is shown how the rules themselves are structured into different classes, what the nature of these classes is and how specific rules can be obtained from more general rules. The rules embody a firm's collective design experience in detailing. As a conclusion, an overview is given of architectural practice using rule-based representations.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id 39
authors Serrentino, Roberto and Borsetti, Ricardo
year 1998
title Los Teselados Periodicos de M. C. Escher (The Periodic Teselates of M.C. Escher)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 292-299
summary A modular designing strategy is proposed employing the periodic tessellations used by Dutch artist M.C. Escher as source of inspiration. It consists in modifying a bidimensional shape to fit geometrically programmatic requirements of an architectural project operating as an insertion support of 3D forms. The procedures followed by the artist are analysed, specially those using figures that tessellate the plane periodically, applying different symmetry rules. Once the rules to generate shapes of tiles are known, we work within area and perimeter to satisfy modularity requirements and to convert the tiling as a geometric precise support for the insertion of architectural objects that follow predetermined dimensional patterns. An example of grouping repeatable habitation units is presented.
series SIGRADI
email labsist@herrera.unt.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 09:00

_id 4d85
authors Shimokawa, Y., Morozumi, M., Iki, K. and Homma, R.
year 1998
title Replacement and Transformation as a Key to Schematic Design Thinking - 3-D Modeling System which Supports Design Thinking
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 365-374
summary This paper analyses a prototype of a 3D modeling system that can support schematic design development and begins with very abstract representation elaborates it step by step into a detailed representation. Using Mitchell's concept of a TOPDOWN system for 2D sketches as the basis, the authors proposed a design process model and a prototype that allows both bottom up additive processes in exploring the design frame and top down processes for the design refinement of each building element. Various utilities of replacing and transforming graphic objects as well as those that can control shapes and the location of those objects with construction lines have been proposed. The authors discussed possible use of the system and topics for future study by reviewing case studies.
keywords Replacement Operation, Modeling System, Schematic Design, Design Thinking
series CAADRIA
email shimo@neptune.kanazawa-it.ac.jp
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1998/12/02 13:16

_id ddss9863
id ddss9863
authors Yaakup, A., Johar, F. and Yusof, I.M.
year 1998
title Development Control System and GIS for Local Authority in Malaysia:A Case of Kuala Lumpur City Hall
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary This paper examines the functions of local authority particularly in the context of planning and development control. The process of development control involves a technique for the systematic compilation of expert quantitative analysis and qualitative assessment of a project's land use and development viability, including its effect on the surrounding area, andthe presentation of results in a way which enables the importance of the predicted results, and the scope for modifying or mitigating them, to be properly evaluated by the relevant decision making body before a planning application decision is rendered. Taking Kuala Lumpur as an example this paper will demonstrate the development of database and its application for development and building control. The application indicates that thefunctionality of GIS can be enhanced, i.e. by adding new model and analytical tools to existing systems and by using the GIS toolkit to best effect. Consequently it will be used to assist decision-making, taking into account among other things, the current scenarios of the proposed development, physical constraint and future impacts.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 67b0
authors Young, Robert A.
year 1998
title Climatic Factors in Regional Design: An Interactive Tool for Design Education
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 188-201
summary This paper describes the development of an interactive computerized module developed as a digital resource for architectural design students that incorporates the premise of using architectural form as a primary environmental control system in a building. The first in a series of such modules, Climactic Factors in Regional Design illustrates the factors involved in regional design strategies. With the recognition that many design practices of the latter twentieth century are not environmentally sustainable, this module is to be used in a curriculum which recognizes that sustainable architecture begins by using architectural form as the primary environmental control system and the mechanical and electrical systems supplement that system not dominate it. With recent advances in recognizing sustainability issues, the country is now more willing to embrace environmental stewardship. The path to reduce environmental problems is through the integration of practices recognize architectural form as a primary environmental control system. As such, the latest generation of designers must view design comprehensively. If future building designers are to succeed, environmental control integration needs to be included pro-actively within the initial design rather than reactively appended to the end. Climatic Factors in Regional Design is designed to foster this paradigm shift and is divided into several topics and subtopic sections which include Introduction, Regional Design, Microclimate, Regional Guidelines, Design Strategies, Glossary, and Sample Examination. The module contains 260 screen displays and more than 250 illustrations, figures, and diagrams. Users can progress through the module in any sequence as their needs warrant. The module was developed using the academic version of Authorware Star by Macromedia.

series ACADIA
email young@arch.utah.edu
last changed 1998/12/16 07:42

_id 38
authors Combes., Leonardo and Saito, Keiko
year 1998
title Exploracion de Alternativas Formales de Edificios Ortogonales (Exploration of Formal Alternatives of Orthogonal Buildings)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 286-291
summary The shape of buildings determines the relationships between the contained spaces with the contained activities. As shapes are represented by their perimeter, the form and the length of building perimeters is of particular interest to architectural design. This paper presents a short computer program oriented to the exploration of modular floor plans related to their perimeter. The characteristics of a class of orthogonal configurations called polyminoes has been taken as a basis for the programming work. Polyminoes are briefly presented in the first part of the paper as well as some data concerning their geometrical structure. The operation of the computer program illustrated by some working examples, is described in the last part of the paper. The results obtained can be used for comparison between alternative shapes. Additional information about these modular shapes is given together with every particular form so as to ease the evaluation task. In these terms the program must be seen as a tool of assessment rather than as a designing procedure.
series SIGRADI
email labsist@herrera.unt.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id 40d7
authors Dalyrmple, Michael and Gerzso, Michael
year 1998
title Executable Drawings: The Computation of Digital Architecture
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 172-187
summary Architectural designs are principally represented by drawings. Usually, each drawing corresponds to one design or aspects of one design. On the other hand, one executable drawing corresponds to a set of designs. These drawings are the same as conventional drawings except that they have computer code or programs embedded in them. A specific design is the result of the computer executing the code in a drawing for a particular set of parameter values. If the parameters are changed, a new design or design variation is produced. With executable drawings, a CAD system is also a program editor. A designer not only designs by drawing but also programming. It fuses two activities: the first, drawing, is basic in architectural practice; and the second, progamming, or specifying the relation of outputs from inputs, is basic in computer system development. A consequence of executable drawings is that architectural form is represented by graphical entities (lines or shapes) as well as computer code or programs. This type of architecture we call digital architecture. Two simple examples are presented: first, the design of a building in terms of an executable drawing of the architects, Sangallo the Younger and Michelangelo, and second, a description of an object oriented implementation of a preliminary prototype of an executable drawing system written in 1997 which computes a simple office layout.
series ACADIA
email michael.dalyrmple@usa.net, 104164.341@compuserve.com
last changed 1998/12/16 07:42

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