CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 486

_id 12
authors Kolarevic, B., Schmitt, G., Hirschberg, U., Kurmann, D. and Johnson, B.
year 1998
title Virtual Design Studio - Multiplying Time: 3x8 H = 24 H
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 106-115
summary This paper describes a Virtual Design Studio exercise involving three academic institutions-University of Hong Kong, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Z¸rich, and University of Washington in Seattle-whereby teachers and students, obviously on three different continents and in three different time zones, roughly eight hours apart, tried to "multiply time". Students were asked to design a house for a Chinese painter and a Swiss writer on a small island in Puget Sound near Seattle. In a short and intensive design charrette, students explored in five different phases various dualities associated with the given design problem. In each phase students were asked to select someone else's design, thus implicitly forming design teams. The paper describes the structure and goals of the studio exercise, the methodologies applied, the resulting design processes, and the lessons learned.
series SIGRADI
email branko@pobox.upenn.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:54

_id 0ab6
authors Kolarevic, B., Schmitt., G., Hirschberg, U. and Kurmann, D.
year 1998
title Virtual Design Studio : Multiplying Time
source Computerised Craftsmanship [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Paris (France) 24-26 September 1998, pp. 123-130
summary This paper describes a Virtual Design Studio exercise involving three academic institutions-University of Hong Kong, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zürich, and University of Washington in Seattle-whereby teachers and students, obviously on three different continents and in three different time zones, roughly eight hours apart, tried to "multiply time". Students were asked to design a house for a Chinese painter and a Swiss writer on a small island in Puget Sound near Seattle. In a short and intensive design charrette, students explored in five different phases various dualities associated with the given design problem. In each phase students were asked to select someone else?s design, thus implicitly forming design teams. The paper describes the structure and goals of the studio exercise, the methodologies applied, the resulting design processes, and the lessons learned.
series eCAADe
email hirschberg@tugraz.at
more http://www.paris-valdemarne.archi.fr/archive/ecaade98/html/18kolarevic/index.htm
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id 1c8e
authors Schmitt, Gerhard
year 1998
title Shared Authorship in Design - Phase (X) and Multiplying time
source Computers in Design Studio Teaching [EAAE/eCAADe International Workshop Proceedings / ISBN 09523687-7-3] Leuven (Belgium) 13-14 November 1998, pp. 15-30
summary Information Technology allows us to conquer space, time and.. architecture. Information is increasingly tangible, so far as to become an architectural building material itself. Design is no longer restricted to the invention and construction of physical artifacts, it includes virtual worlds, mixed physical and virtual environments, interfaces between the real and the virtual. Design is no longer the responsibility of one single author, although single authorship has always been more of an ideal or a wish rather than a reality. We are now moving towards an increased awareness and acceptance of shared authorship - this is also true outside the field of architecture.
series eCAADe
email schmitt@sl.ethz.ch
more http://www.eaae.be/
last changed 2000/11/21 08:38

_id ebb2
authors Proctor, George
year 2000
title Reflections on the VDS, Pedagogy, Methods
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 15-16
summary After having conducted a Digital Media based design studio at Cal Poly for six years, we have developed a body of experience I feel is worth sharing. When the idea of conducting a studio with the exclusive use of digital tools was implemented at our college, it was still somewhat novel, and only 2 short years after the first VDS- Virtual Design Studio (UBC, UHK et.al.-1993). When we began, most of what we explored required a suspension of disbelief on the part of both the students and faculty reviewers of studio work. In a few short years the notions we examined have become ubiquitous in academic architectural discourse and are expanding into common use in practice. (For background, the digital media component of our curriculum owes much to my time at Harvard GSD [MAUD 1989-91] and the texts of: McCullough/Mitchell 1990, 1994; McCullough 1998; Mitchell 1990,1992,1996; Tufte 1990; Turkel 1995; and Wojtowicz 1993; and others.)
series ACADIA
email georger@cybertects.com
last changed 2002/12/15 15:37

_id 0e00
authors Vásquez de Velasco, Guillermo P.
year 1999
title La Red Digital de Investigación ""Las Américas"": Una herramienta de colaboración (The Digital Research Network "Las Américas": A Tool for Collaboration)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 384-388
summary In 1998, thanks to the support of the Program to Enhance Scholarly and Creative Activities of Texas A&M University, the author was able to establish a digital research network that promotes and coordinates collaborative research and development projects at inter-continental level. The original objective was to establish a network of 5 schools of Architecture. This objective was largely surpassed. At the time of editing this paper, the Las Américas Digital Research Network brings together 17 schools of Architecture (from Canada to Argentina). See http://taz.tamu.edu/~americas/ In this collaborative framework, we have been able to identify a number of research and development opportunities. This paper reports on some of the on-going initiatives of the network, namely: a) The Las Americas Virtual Design Studio, b) The Las Americas Virtual Gallery of Visual Arts, c) The Las Americas Research Journal "Archi-Forum" and, d) The Las Americas Curriculum Harmonization Initiative. In addition to a report on current activities, this paper aims to promote new initiatives and identify potential sources of research & development funding. The paper ends with conclusions and a call for widespread participation.
series SIGRADI
email vasquez@archone.tamu.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 09:02

_id ce7a
authors Wojtowicz, Jerzy and Butelski, Kazimier
year 1998
title A Case Study of the Virtual Design Studio in Practice : The Olympic Stadium for Krakow 2006
source Computerised Craftsmanship [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Paris (France) 24-26 September 1998, pp. 253-261
summary Continually being redeveloped since its inception six years ago, Virtual Design Studio (VDS) represents a new method of practicing and teaching design. This paper focuses on a recent project which used VDS in a professional context: a design competition entry for the 2006 Winter Olympic Games. Separated by six time zones, the authors offer distinctive views of VDS, discussing the creative aspects of long-distance design collaboration using both synchronous and asynchronous modes of communication. The authors consider Information Technology (IT) as a facilitator for design collaboration, and examine in this paper the extent to which this new condition expands the possibilities of creative design work.
series eCAADe
email jw@architecture.ubc.ca, pabutels@cyf-kr.edu.pl
more http://www.paris-valdemarne.archi.fr/archive/ecaade98/html/21wojtowicz/index.htm
last changed 1998/09/25 16:59

_id e336
authors Achten, H., Roelen, W., Boekholt, J.-Th., Turksma, A. and Jessurun, J.
year 1999
title Virtual Reality in the Design Studio: The Eindhoven Perspective
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 169-177
summary Since 1991 Virtual Reality has been used in student projects in the Building Information Technology group. It started as an experimental tool to assess the impact of VR technology in design, using the environment of the associated Calibre Institute. The technology was further developed in Calibre to become an important presentation tool for assessing design variants and final design solutions. However, it was only sporadically used in student projects. A major shift occurred in 1997 with a number of student projects in which various computer technologies including VR were used in the whole of the design process. In 1998, the new Design Systems group started a design studio with the explicit aim to integrate VR in the whole design process. The teaching effort was combined with the research program that investigates VR as a design support environment. This has lead to increasing number of innovative student projects. The paper describes the context and history of VR in Eindhoven and presents the current set-UP of the studio. It discusses the impact of the technology on the design process and outlines pedagogical issues in the studio work.
keywords Virtual Reality, Design Studio, Student Projects
series eCAADe
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 56
authors Barron, Alicia and Chiarelli, Julia
year 1998
title Proyecto Para la Red de un Estudio de Arquitectura (Project for the Network of a Studio of Architecture)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 418-425
summary A consequence of the globalization on information processes in the way in which new technologies influence on design and production processes. There is no doubt that there is an increasingly and a big change in the areas of architecture design concerning to the operational and working methodology on graphic and alphanumeric information. Now a day it is not a far away Utopia, but a soon to come reality that architects interact in a virtual manner with their individual or institutional clients in their own country, as well as in foreign countries. Keeping these considerations in mind, we elaborated this Paper in order to present one of the existing criteria for the organization of graphic information jointly with its spatial relationship. The work presented herewith shows the development of an informatic net for an ideal mega-studio which in its professional and entrepreneurial profile covers tasks such as design, construction, graphic design and representation of foreign concerns. In the net design and in the selection of equipment for computing design area are covered all the variables at every instance.
series SIGRADI
email barron@ub.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 21
authors Barroso, Jorge
year 1998
title Reflexiones Sobre la EnseÒanza de la Arquitectura, la Informatica e Internet (Reflections on the Teaching of the Architecture, Computing and the Internet)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 174-179
summary This paper proposes a reflection upon the teaching of architecture as seen from the actual practice of the profession within the context of the changes caused by the widespread use of computers and Internet in recent years. This proposal designates the present time as "semic revolution", superseding denominations like post industrial" or information revolution", emphasizing that the "mental prosthesis" created by man represents the highest degree of exploitation of his innerness as a "semic subject". A brief epistemological framework serves to lay the foundation for the concepts of imagination, creation, and design, differentiating the creator by his characteristic of requiring or not, semic mediation in order to reach his goals. The dominant use of new instruments which serve to represent and operate the "primary virtual object" giving priority to the comprehension and function of the new tool over the acquisition of information and ability to use it, is proposed when carried over to the field of application. The integration of internal networks through email strives not only to facilitate document transmission, exercises, group work, etc. but to understand the new dimension in the intellectual activities of man.
series SIGRADI
email jbarroso@movi.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id bb72
authors Bourdot, P., Krus, M., Gherbi, R.
year 1998
title Cooperation Between Reactive 3D Objects and a Multimodal X Window Kernel for CAD
source Bunt, H., Beun, R.J., Borghuis, T. (Eds.). Multimodal Human-Computer Communication : Systems, Techniques, and Experiments. Berlin : Springer
summary From the early steps of sketching to final engineering, a frequent and very important activity in designing objects is to perform graphical and spatial simulations to solve the constraints on the objects which are being designed. But when we analyse work situations involving the use of CAD systems, it is today an acknowledged fact that these tools are not helpful to perform these types of simulations. While knowledge modeling based on form feature concepts already offers some possibilities for attaching behaviour to objects, the simulation activity requires in addition a `real time' and `intelligent' management of the interactions between the 3D virtual objects and the CAD user. Our general purpose is to study how future CAD systems could be improved to achieve the simulation steps of object design. In this context we present some issues concerning the cooperation between a model of reactive 3D objects and a multimodal X Window kernel. We have developed a prototype of a system where objects with reactive behaviour can be built, and with which the user can interact with a combination of graphical actions and vocal commands. This prototype is used to evaluate the feasability and the usefulness of the integration of such techniques in futur applications that would be used by object designers in a real working context. We describe the current state of this system and the planned improvements.
series other
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id a841
authors Brady, Darlene A.
year 1998
title Premise & Process: The Pedagogical Implications of Computing in Design
source Computers in Design Studio Teaching [EAAE/eCAADe International Workshop Proceedings / ISBN 09523687-7-3] Leuven (Belgium) 13-14 November 1998, pp. 31-39
summary Form is capable of communicating a profound idea only when it is linked to a more essential metaphorical intention. The design studio is a forum for addressing this relationship of idea and the means of expression. Computing offers the potential to enhance the design enquiry, but issues of how and when to integrate computer applications in the studio have significant pedagogical implications. It not only has an impact on the size, complexity and number of design projects, but also on whether architectural ideas or computer technology is the content of the studio. It is important to distinguish between the computer image and the process used to achieve the final result. Many computer-based studios focus on the final product which encourages technology to drive design. This paper addresses how design issues can determine the use of technology so that design ideas and computing can reinforce each other, rather than be competing issues. It examines how the unique strengths of computer modeling and animation is used to explore the relationship between visual expression and intention via the issues of metaphor, tectonic color, context and kinetics in several of my graduate and upper-level undergraduate computer-based design studios in the School of Architecture at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UI-UC). The studio topics are diverse in nature and include Normative Studio: Prototype as Formgiver; Urban Issues: Context, Color & Kinetics; and Virtual Metaphors: Literature as Formgiver.

series eCAADe
email architexture@earthlink.net
more http://www.eaae.be/
last changed 2000/11/21 08:10

_id caadria2003_a1-2
id caadria2003_a1-2
authors Bunyavipakul, Monchai and Charoensilp, Ekasidh
year 2003
title Designing the Virtual Design Studio System for Collaborative Work on Pda Collaborative Works Anytime, Anywhere
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 43-54
summary This research presents the collaboration in the VDS system through a microcomputer technology- a PDA (Personal Digital Assistants). Architect can collaborate anytime anyplace via VDS, a substitution to an old system that requires a specific location to work on. This research has studied and analyzed the format and the limitation of collaboration between PDA and Personal Computer, the wireless communication technology, and the Web Service technology, which enable different devices to share information through the Internet Network. The work process and the studied information have been used to develop a Web Application, a collaboration tool for a team of architect and designer. This Web Application has been tested in a renovation project, a clubhouse for a scuba diving place The objective of this research is to become a guideline of collaboration in architectural design work through Smart Object in order to serve the coming Ubiquitous era (Weiser, 1998)
series CAADRIA
email Tony_caad@hotmail.com
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id 07c5
authors Burry, Mark
year 1998
title Handcraft and Machine Metaphysics
source Computers in Design Studio Teaching [EAAE/eCAADe International Workshop Proceedings / ISBN 09523687-7-3] Leuven (Belgium) 13-14 November 1998, pp. 41-50
summary As the cost of 3D digitisers drops and PC price performance rises, opportunities for hand - computer co-operation improve. Architectural form may now be experimentally moulded or carved using manual techniques in close association with the computer. At any stage the model can be mechanically digitised and translated to a computer database for explorations that go beyond simple physical manipulation. In the virtual environment, the resulting forms can be rationalised using an ordering geometry or further de-rationalised. This potential for debasing intuitive, sensually haptic and responsive handwork through its translation into numerically cogent formulations is risky business. But it may also bring new and unlikely rewards. This paper considers the implications and aesthetics of negotiations between handcraft and consecutive or synchronous computer digitalisation of intentions. Two situations will be discussed and compared. The first is the nature of computer modelling and its representation per se, and the second is the relevance of using handcraft as a sponsor for computer-based manipulation and morphological experimenting.
series eCAADe
email mburry@deakin.edu.au
more http://www.eaae.be/
last changed 2000/11/21 08:11

_id maver_089
id maver_089
authors Chen, Y., Fram, I. and Maver, T.W.
year 1998
title A Virtual Studio Environment for Design Integration
source Advances in Engineering Software, vol 29, No 10, 787-800
summary In this paper the authors attempt to stress the social dimension of design and the role of explicit support for human-level interaction during design systems integration. A human-centred approach is proposed by taking design integration as the collaborative use of design artefacts, and a virtual studio environment (VSE) framework is presented as an integration vehicle to link the social and technical dimensions. A VSE consists of two subsystems: the VSE base system and the domain resources. While common generic facilities for human-human interaction are embedded within the VSE base system, the domain-specific resources are loosely coupled into VSE via resource agents. A VSE prototype for the domain of building design is described, and a demonstration of the use of the VSE prototype is presented. This is then followed by some discussion on related research and further work.
keywords Design Integration, Collaborative Design, Human-Human Interaction, Virtual Design Studio, Building Design
series journal paper
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/09/03 11:23

_id d44c
authors Cheng, N.
year 1998
title Digital Identity in the Virtual Design Studio
source Constructing Identity: the Associated Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) 56th Annual Meeting Proceedings, Cleveland, Ohio
summary Internet tools most effectively connect diverse groups when individuals involved experience vital human connections. Online strangers are pulled into a community in which they can see a friendly face in the crowded stream of information. Strong self expression engages an audience and can result in personal interactions which reward getting beyond the technology. A group of individual profiles can coalesce to give colorful definition to team biases, strengths and weaknesses. This paper examines how the expression of identity has been a critical factor in the success of Internet design collaborations. First, it provides context on how these projects can improve architectural education by increasing relevance. Second, it identifies opportunities for individual and team expression gathered from a series of annual international design exercises known as the Virtual Design Studio. Third, it explains strategies for fostering student expression and interaction. Finally, it cites areas for future investigation.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id c88d
authors Dave, Bharat and Danahy, John
year 1998
title Virtual Study Abroad and Exchange Studio
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 100-115
summary The digital design studio has an area of application where conventional media are incapable of being used; collaboration in learning, design and dialogue with people in places other than where one lives. This distinctive opportunity has lead the authors to explore a form of design brief and virtual design studio (VDS) format not well addressed in the literature. Instead of sharing the same design brief, students in this alternative format design a project in the other students’ city and do not collaborate on the same design. Collaboration with other students takes the form of teaching each other about the city and culture served by the design. The authors discovered these studios produce a focus on site context that serves our pedagogical objectives–a blend of architectural, landscape architectural and urban design knowledge. Their students use a range of commercial CAD and computer supported collaborative work (CSCW) software common to that used in many VDS experiments reported on in the literature. However, this conventional use of technology is contrasted with a second distinctive characteristic of these studios, the use of custom software tools specifically designed to support synchronous and asynchronous three-dimensional model exchange and linked attribute knowledge. The paper analyzes some of the virtual design studio (VDS) work between the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, the University of Toronto, and the University of Melbourne. The authors articulate a framework of VDS dimensions that structures their teaching and research.

series ACADIA
email bdave@arbld.unimelb.edu.au, land@clr.utoronto.ca
last changed 1998/12/16 08:36

_id 8b38
authors Do, Ellen Yi-Luen and Gross, Mark D.
year 1998
title The Sundance Lab- "Design Systems of the Future"
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 8-10
summary The last thirty years have seen the development of powerful new tools for architects and planners: CAD, 3D modeling, digital imaging, geographic information systems, and real time animated walkthroughs. That’s just the beginning. Based on our experience with CAD tools, analysis of design practice, and an understanding of computer hardware and software, we’re out to invent the next generation of tools. We think architects should be shakers and makers, not just consumers, of computer aided design. We started the Sundance Lab (for Computing in Design and Planning) in 1993 with a few people and machines. We’ve grown to more than a dozen people (mostly undergraduate students) and a diverse interdisciplinary array of projects. We’ve worked with architects and planners, anthropologists, civil engineers, geographers, computer scientists, and electrical engineers. Our work is about the built environment: its physical form and various information involved in making and inhabiting places. We cover a wide range of topics – from design information management to virtual space, from sketch recognition to design rationale capture, to communication between designer and computer. All start from the position that design is a knowledge based and information rich activity. Explicit representations of design information (knowledge, rationale, and rules) enables us to engage in more intelligent dialogues about design. The following describes some of our projects under various rubrics.
series ACADIA
email ellendo@cmu.edu
last changed 2004/10/04 05:49

_id 2de0
authors Dobson, Adrian
year 1998
title Exploring Conceptual Design using CAD Visualisation and Virtual Reality Modelling
source Computerised Craftsmanship [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Paris (France) 24-26 September 1998, pp. 68-71
summary This paper evaluates the possibilities for the use of computer aided design and desktop virtual reality technologies as tools for architectural composition. An experimental teaching programme involving undergraduate architectural students at the University of Luton, in which aspects of compositional theory are explored through the direct creation of architectural form and space in digital formats is described. In the programme principles of architectural composition, based upon the ordering and organisation of typological architectural elements according to established rules of composition are introduced to the students through the study of recognised works of design theory. CAD and desktop virtual reality are then used to define and manipulate architectural elements, and to make formal and spatial evaluations of the environments created. The paper describes the theoretical context of the work, assesses the suitability of the software used for performing compositional manipulations, and evaluates the qualities of immersion and intuitive feedback which virtual reality based modelling can offer in the design visualisation process. The teaching programme utilises standard software packages, including AutoCAD, and 3D Studio, as well as Superscape VRT, a PC based desktop VR package.
series eCAADe
more http://www.paris-valdemarne.archi.fr/archive/ecaade98/html/13dobson/index.htm
last changed 1998/09/25 16:41

_id 5477
authors Donath, D., Kruijff, E., Regenbrecht, H., Hirschberg, U., Johnson, B., Kolarevic, B. and Wojtowicz, J.
year 1999
title Virtual Design Studio 1998 - A Place2Wait
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 453-458
summary This article reports on the recent, geographically and temporally distributed, intercollegiate Virtual Design Studio based on the 1998 implementation Phase(x) environment. Students participating in this workshop had to create a place to wait in the form of a folly. This design task was cut in five logical parts, called phases. Every phase had to be finished within a specific timeframe (one day), after which the results would be stored in a common data repository, an online MSQL database environment which holds besides the presentations, consisting of text, 3D models and rendered images, basic project information like the descriptions of the phases and design process visualization tools. This approach to collaborative work is better known as memetic engineering and has successfully been used in several educational programs and past Virtual Design Studios. During the workshop, students made use of a variety of tools, including modeling tools (specifically Sculptor), video-conferencing software and rendering programs. The project distinguishes itself from previous Virtual Design Studios in leaving the design task more open, thereby focusing on the design process itself. From this perspective, this paper represents both a continuation of existing reports about previous Virtual Design Studios and a specific extension by the offered focus. Specific attention will be given at how the different collaborating parties dealt with the data flow and modification, the crux within a successful effort to cooperate on a common design task.
keywords Collaborative design, Design Process, New Media Usage, Global Networks
series eCAADe
email donath@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id e72f
authors Dorta, Tomás and LaLande, Philippe
year 1998
title The Impact of Virtual Reality on the Design Process
source Digital Design Studios: Do Computers Make a Difference? [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-07-1] Québec City (Canada) October 22-25, 1998, pp. 138-163
summary Sketching, either hand or computer generated, along with other traditional visualization tools such as perspective drawing have difficulty in correctly representing three dimensional objects. Even physical models, in architecture, suffer in this regard because of inevitable scaling. The designer finds himself cut off from the reality of the object and is prone to misinterpretations of the object and its surrounding space and to resulting design errors. These are sometimes not perceived until too late, once the object has been constructed. Traditional tools use 2D media to represent 3D objects and only manage to introduce the third dimension in a limited manner (perspectives, not only tedious to construct, are static). This scenario affects the design process, particularly the cycle of proposal, verification and correction of design hypotheses as well as the cognitive aspects that condition the designer’s visualization of the designed object. In most cases, computer graphics mimic, through its interface, the traditional way of doing things. The architectural model is parametricized with little regard for visualization. No allowance is made for the change in the medium of graphic representation. Moreover, effort is not made to capitalize on the advantages of numerical calculation to propose new interfaces and new dimensions in object visualization. Virtual Reality (VR), seen not only as technology but as experience, brings the 3D object, abstractly viewed by traditional means, into clearer focus and provides us with these new dimensions. Errors due to abstracted representation are reduced since the interface is always three dimensional and the interactions intuitively made in real time thus allowing the designer to experience the presence of the designed object very quickly. At the École de design industriel of the Faculté d’aménagement, we have run tests using non-immersive VR–one passive (comprehension) and another active (design). This project, involving a group of 72 students during a period of six weeks (6h/week), aimed at analyzing the impact of VR as a visualization tool on the design process versus traditional tools. The results, described in this presentation, shed light on the effect of VR on the creative process as such, as well as on the quality of the results produced by that process.

series ACADIA
email dortat@ere.umontreal.ca, lalandep@ere.umontreal.ca
last changed 1998/12/16 07:27

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