CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 629

_id 4caf
authors Van der Does, Jan and Giró, Héctor
year 1999
title IMAG(IN)ING, a fresh look at design, presentation and communication
source Simulation of Architectural Space - Color and Light, Methods and Effects [Proceedings of the 4rd European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 3-86005-267-5] Dresden (Germany), 29 September - 1 October 1999, pp. 12-20
summary The project focuses on the use of specific imaging media in the phase from the first sketches to the finished sketch design. We also considered the crucial role of verbal communication in the contact between the architect and the client.
series EAEA
email J.vanderDoes@bk.tudelft.nl
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 6480
authors Asanowicz, Aleksander
year 1999
title Computer in Creation of Architectural Form
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999,pp. 131-142
summary This paper considers graphic methods of presentation of ideas 'in the creation of architectural forms' and evolution of these methods, determined by the implementations of information technology. Drawings have been the main medium of expression since Leonardo da Vinci to the present-day. Graphic communication has always been treated as a main design tool, both - at the ending stage of design and at the early design stage. Implementation of computers in design doe not change this situation. The entire design process proceeds in a traditional way. While searching for the idea we use hand sketches and, after this, technical drawings are draught on a plotter, which replaces a drawing pen. Using computers at the early design stages encounters serious difficulties. The main thesis of this paper is that hardware and software inadequacy is not the problem, the problem is in the inadequacy of the design methods. This problem is to be reconceived as what a person can do with a program, rather than what is the capacity of a program. Contemporary computer techniques allow us to put an equation mark between the searching for idea, visualisation and its realisation in virtual space. This paper presents Sketching by scanning - an experimental method of using computer hardware and software for stimulating of searching of architectural's form.
series AVOCAAD
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 8171
authors Ataman, Osman
year 1999
title Facilitating Conceptual Change: Computers, Cognitive Processes and Architecture
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 275-279
summary Computers have gained universal acceptance as tools that designers use. However, computers are often not used to advance the design process but just to make drawings. Many architectural schools still focus on a production orientation which puts the highest value on information management, precise representations and drafting enhancements. Mostly, computer education is limited with button pushing and training manuals. It is the contention of the author that students in Design Studio courses can benefit greatly from computer based educational pedagogy designed to provide them with experiences they currently do not possess. In particular, little time in the computer courses (outside lectures) is spent applying concepts and features of digital tools in design studio environment. In architecture, computers cannot be simply defined as a presentation and production tools. As a cognitive tool, computers provide designers with intelligible and effective representational tools of thought and communication, changes the syntactic structure of design. Consequently, the conceptual structure of computers impacts the conceptual structure of the design project, fosters the analytical processes and facilitates conceptual changes. This paper describes the use of computers in a first year architectural design studio. It attempts to address the importance of developing a design process that is redefined by the use of computing, integrating concept and perception. Furthermore, it describes the theoretical foundations and the underlying cognitive processes that contribute designers' conceptual development.
series SIGRADI
email ataman@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id aef9
authors Brown, A., Knight, M. and Berridge, P. (Eds.)
year 1999
title Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [Conference Proceedings]
source eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7 / Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, 773 p.
summary The core theme of this book is the idea of looking forward to where research and development in Computer Aided Architectural Design might be heading. The contention is that we can do so most effectively by using the developments that have taken place over the past three or four decades in Computing and Architectural Computing as our reference point; the past informing the future. The genesis of this theme is the fact that a new millennium is about to arrive. If we are ruthlessly objective the year 2000 holds no more significance than any other year; perhaps we should, instead, be preparing for the year 2048 (2k). In fact, whatever the justification, it is now timely to review where we stand in terms of the development of Architectural Computing. This book aims to do that. It is salutary to look back at what writers and researchers have said in the past about where they thought that the developments in computing were taking us. One of the common themes picked up in the sections of this book is the developments that have been spawned by the global linkup that the worldwide web offers us. In the past decade the scale and application of this new medium of communication has grown at a remarkable rate. There are few technological developments that have become so ubiquitous, so quickly. As a consequence there are particular sections in this book on Communication and the Virtual Design Studio which reflect the prominence of this new area, but examples of its application are scattered throughout the book. In 'Computer-Aided Architectural Design' (1977), Bill Mitchell did suggest that computer network accessibility from expensive centralised locations to affordable common, decentralised computing facilities would become more commonplace. But most pundits have been taken by surprise by just how powerful the explosive cocktail of networks, email and hypertext has proven to be. Each of the ingredients is interesting in its own right but together they have presented us with genuinely new ways of working. Perhaps, with foresight we can see what the next new explosive cocktail might be.
series eCAADe
email andygbp@liv.ac.uk, mknight@liv.ac.uk, p.berridge@liverpool.ac.uk
more http://www.ecaade.org
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 0dc3
authors Chambers, Tom and Wood, John B.
year 1999
title Decoding to 2000 CAD as Mediator
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 210-216
summary This paper will present examples of current practice in the Design Studio course of the BDE, University of Strathclyde. The paper will demonstrate an integrated approach to teaching design, which includes CAD among other visual communication techniques as a means to exploring design concepts and the presentation of complex information as part of the design process. It will indicate how the theoretical dimension is used to direct the student in their areas of independent study. Projects illustrated will include design precedents that have involved students in the review and assessment of landmarks in the history of design. There will be evidence of how students integrate DTP in the presentation of site analysis, research of appropriate design precedents and presentation of their design solutions. CADET underlines the importance of considering design solutions within the context of both our European cultural context and of assessing the environmental impact of design options, for which CAD is eminently suited. As much as a critical method is essential to the development of the design process, a historical perspective and an appreciation of the sophistication of communicative media will inform the analysis of structural form and meaning in a modem urban context. Conscious of the dynamic of social and historical influences in design practice, the student is enabled "to take a critical stand against the dogmatism of the school "(Gadamer, 1988) that inevitably insinuates itself in learning institutions and professional practice.
keywords Design Studio, Communication, Integrated Teaching
series eCAADe
email j.b.wood@strath.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 1ea1
authors Cheng, Nancy Yen-wen
year 1999
title Digital Design at UO
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 4, p. 18
summary University of Oregon Architecture Department has developed a spectrum of digital design from introductory methods courses to advanced design studios. With a computing curriculum that stresses a variety of tools, architectural issues such as form-making, communication, collaboration,theory-driven design, and presentation are explored. During the first year, all entering students are required to learn 3D modeling, rendering, image-processing and web-authoring in our Introduction to Architectural ComputerGraphics course. Through the use of cross-platform software, the two hundred beginning students are able to choose to work in either MacOS or Windows. Students begin learning the software by ‘playing’ with geometric elements and further develop their control by describing assigned architectural monuments. In describing the monuments, they begin with 2D diagrams and work up to complete 3D compositions, refining their modelswith symbol libraries. By visualizing back and forth between the drafting and modeling modes, the students quickly connect orthogonal plans and sections with their spatial counterparts. Such connections are an essential foundation for further learning.
series ACADIA
email nywc@darkwing.uoregon.edu
last changed 2002/12/14 09:04

_id ga9920
id ga9920
authors Daru, Roel
year 1999
title Hunting Design Memes in the Architectural Studio, student projects as a source of memetic analysis
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The current practice in design programming is to generate forms based on preconceptions of what architectural design is supposed to be. But to offer adequate morphogenetic programs for architectural design processes, we should identify the diversity of types of cultural replicators applied by a variety of architectural designers. In order to explore the variety of replicators actually used, around hundred 4th year architectural students were asked to analyse two or three of their own past design assignments. The students were invited to look for the occurrence of evolutionary design processes. They were requested to try and find some traces of 'transmission', 'variation' and 'selection' in their own design assignments. The paper will present an overview of their answers, the arguments applied and the diversity of the found types of verbal and visual design memes as cultural replicators. A discussion about the applicability of the found results in the genotypes and phenotypes of morphogenetic design software will conclude the presentation.
series other
email mdaru@iae.nl
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 837b
authors Elger, Dietrich and Russell, Peter
year 2000
title Using the World Wide Web as a Communication and Presentation Forum for Students of Architecture
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 61-64
summary Since 1997, the Institute for Industrial Building Production (ifib) has been carrying out upper level design studios under the framework of the Netzentwurf or Net-Studio. The Netzentwurf is categorized as a virtual design studio in that the environment for presentation, criticism and communication is web based. This allows lessons learned from research into Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) to be adapted to the special conditions indigenous to the architectural design studio. Indeed, an aim of the Netzentwurf is the creation and evolution of a design studio planing platform. In the Winter semester 1999-2000, ifib again carried out two Netzentwurf studios. involving approximately 30 students from the Faculty of Architecture, University of Karlsruhe. The projects differed from previous net studios in that both studios encompassed an inter-university character in addition to the established framework of the Netzentwurf. The first project, the re-use of Fort Kleber in Wolfisheim by Strasbourg, was carried out as part of the Virtual Upperrhine University of Architecture (VuuA) involving over 140 students from various disciplines in six institutions from five universities in France, Switzerland and Germany. The second project, entitled "Future, Inc.", involved the design of an office building for a scenario 20 years hence. This project was carried out in parallel with the Technical University Cottbus using the same methodology and program for two separate building sites.
keywords Virtual Design Studios, Architectural Graphics, Presentation Techniques
series eCAADe
email dietrich.elger@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id ga9928
id ga9928
authors Goulthorpe
year 1999
title Hyposurface: from Autoplastic to Alloplastic Space
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary By way of immediate qualification to an essay which attempts to orient current technical developments in relation to a series of dECOi projects, I would suggest that the greatest liberation offered by new technology in architecture is not its formal potential as much as the patterns of creativity and practice it engenders. For increasingly in the projects presented here dECOi operates as an extended network of technical expertise: Mark Burry and his research team at Deakin University in Australia as architects and parametric/ programmatic designers; Peter Wood in New Zealand as programmer; Alex Scott in London as mathematician; Chris Glasow in London as systems engineer; and the engineers (structural/services) of David Glover’s team at Ove Arup in London. This reflects how we’re working in a new technical environment - a new form of practice, in a sense - a loose and light network which deploys highly specialist technical skill to suit a particular project. By way of a second disclaimer, I would suggest that the rapid technological development we're witnessing, which we struggle to comprehend given the sheer pace of change that overwhelms us, is somehow of a different order than previous technological revolutions. For the shift from an industrial society to a society of mass communication, which is the essential transformation taking place in the present, seems to be a subliminal and almost inexpressive technological transition - is formless, in a sense - which begs the question of how it may be expressed in form. If one holds that architecture is somehow the crystallization of cultural change in concrete form, one suspects that in the present there is no simple physical equivalent for the burst of communication technologies that colour contemporary life. But I think that one might effectively raise a series of questions apropos technology by briefly looking at 3 or 4 of our current projects, and which suggest a range of possibilities fostered by new technology. By way of a third doubt, we might qualify in advance the apparent optimism of architects for CAD technology by thinking back to Thomas More and his island ‘Utopia’, which marks in some way the advent of Modern rationalism. This was, if not quite a technological utopia, certainly a metaphysical one, More’s vision typically deductive, prognostic, causal. But which by the time of Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis is a technological utopia availing itself of all the possibilities put at humanity’s disposal by the known machines of the time. There’s a sort of implicit sanction within these two accounts which lies in their nature as reality optimized by rational DESIGN as if the very ethos of design were sponsored by Modern rationalist thought and its utopian leanings. The faintly euphoric ‘technological’ discourse of architecture at present - a sort of Neue Bauhaus - then seems curiously misplaced historically given the 20th century’s general anti-, dis-, or counter-utopian discourse. But even this seems to have finally run its course, dissolving into the electronic heterotopia of the present with its diverse opportunities of irony and distortion (as it’s been said) as a liberating potential.1 This would seem to mark the dissolution of design ethos into non-causal process(ing), which begs the question of ‘design’ itself: who 'designs' anymore? Or rather, has 'design' not become uncoupled from its rational, deterministic, tradition? The utopianism that attatches to technological discourse in the present seems blind to the counter-finality of technology's own accomplishments - that transparency has, as it were, by its own more and more perfect fulfillment, failed by its own success. For what we seem to have inherited is not the warped utopia depicted in countless visions of a singular and tyrranical technology (such as that in Orwell's 1984), but a rich and diverse heterotopia which has opened the possibility of countless channels of local dialect competing directly with the channels of power. Undoubtedly such multiplicitous and global connectivity has sent creative thought in multiple directions…
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 399e
authors Kaga, A., Nakahama, K., Hamada, S., Yamaguchi, S., Yamanishi, H. and Sasada, T.
year 1999
title Collaborative Design System for Citizen Participation in Planning Public Road Projects
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 225-234
summary The realization of smooth execution of public street enterprise and good communication with inhabitants needs the way of easy and right explanation which the inhabitants understand the street planning, and the scheme of administration and inhabitants make the nice housing environment together. In this paper, the street planing presentation system for inhabitants established by using computer graphics. The applicability of the presentation system is made clear using in the real project.
series CAADRIA
last changed 2000/01/13 11:08

_id 30c8
authors Koutamanis, A., Barendse, P.B74 and Kempenaar, J.W.
year 1999
title Web-based CAAD Instruction: The Delft Experience
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 159-168
summary In the early 1990s, the introduction of an extensive CAAD component in the compulsory curriculum of the Faculty of Architecture, Delft University of Technology, stimulated experimentation with computer-based instruction systems. The emergence of the World Wide Web presented new possibilities. Nevertheless, the reasons for investing in Web-based CAAD instruction were mostly pragmatic, i.e. a reaction to necessity, rather than an intention to explore, experiment and revolutionize. One of the problems addressed in our Web-based CAAD instruction is CAAD literacy. Help files and manuals that accompany software have proven to be unsuitable for introductory courses in design computing. This led to the development of a series of dynamic Web-based tutorials, in the form of interactive slide shows. The implementation of the tutorials is based on a cooperative framework that allows teachers and students to contribute at different levels of technical and methodical complexity. The use of the Web in CAAD education also stimulated a more active attitude among students. Despite the limited support and incentives offered by the Faculty, the Web-based CAAD courses became an invitation to intelligent and meaningful use of Web technologies by students for design presentation and communication. This is not only a useful addition to the opportunities offered by CAAD systems but also a prerequisite to new design communities.
keywords WWW Technologies, Teaching
series eCAADe
email a.koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 4ae4
authors Kvan, Th., Yip, A. and Vera, A.
year 1999
title Supporting Design Studio Learning: An investigation into design communication in computer-supported collaboration
source CSCL’99, Stanford, December 1999, pp. 328-332
summary Earlier studies suggest that benefits may be found in chat line communication rather than high bandwidth video-conferencing conditions when considering collaborative design learning. This paper draws together studies that look at this conjecture and concludes that chat line collaboration reduces fixation in problem space exploration. This encourages the participants to explore design opportunities in a different way than graphical or video based communication.
keywords Design Learning; Collaborative Design; Text Communication; Architectural Design
series other
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2002/11/15 17:29

_id 170f
authors Mora Padrón, Víctor Manuel
year 1999
title Integration and Application of Technologies CAD in a Regional Reality - Methodological and Formative Experience in Industrial Design and Products Development
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 295-297
summary The experience to present is begun and developed during the academic year 1998, together to the course of IV pupils level of the Industrial Design career in the Universidad del Bío-Bío, labor that I have continued assuming during the present year, with a new youths generation. We have accomplished our academic work taking as original of study and base, the industrial and economic situation of the VIII Region, context in the one which we outline and we commit our needs formative as well as methodological to the teaching of the discipline of the Industrial Design. Consequently, we have defined a high-priority factor among pupils and teachers to reach the objectives and activities program of the course, the one which envisages first of all a commitment of attitude and integrative reflection among our academic activity and the territorial human context in the one which we inhabit. In Chile the activity of the industrial designer, his knowledge and by so much his capacity of producing innovation, it has been something practically unknown in the industrial productive area. However, the current national development challenges and the search by widening our markets, they have created and established a conscience of the fact that the Chilean industrial product must have a modern and effective competitiveness if wants be made participates in segments of the international marketing. It is in this new vision where the design provides in decisive form to consider and add a commercial and cultural value in our products. To the university corresponds the role of transmitting the knowledge generated in his classrooms toward the society, for thus to promote a development in the widest sense of the word. Under this prism the small and median regional industry in their various areas, have not integrated in the national arrangement in what concerns to the design and development of new and integral products. The design and the innovation as motor concept for a competitiveness and permanency in new markets, it has not entered yet in the entrepreneurial culture. If we want to save this situation, it is necessary that the regional entrepreneur knows the importance of the Design with new models development and examples of application, through concrete cases and with demands, that serve of base to demonstrate that the alliance among Designer and Industry, opens new perspectives of growth upon offering innovation and value added factors as new competitiveness tools. Today the communication and the managing of the information is a strategic weapon, to the moment of making changes in a social dynamics, so much at local level as global. It is with this look that our efforts and objective are centered in forming to our pupils with an integration speech and direct application toward the industrial community of our region, using the communication and the technological information as a tool validates and effective to solve the receipt in the visualization of our projects, designs and solutions of products. As complement to the development of the proposed topic will be exhibited a series of projects accomplished by the pupils for some regional industries, in which the three dimensional modeling and the use of programs vectoriales demonstrate the efficiency of communication and comprehension of the proposals, its complexity and constructive possibilities.
series SIGRADI
email vmora@pegasus.dci.ubiobio.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id 338a
authors Noble, Douglas and Hsu, Jason
year 1999
title Computer Aided Animation in Architecture: Analysis of Use and the Views of the Profession
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 109-114
summary A traditional way to present three-dimensional representations of architectural design has been through the use of manually drawn perspective drawings. The perspective representation assists in the comprehension of the forms and spaces, but is difficult to manually generate. The computer revolution made perspectives much easier to generate and led to a dramatically increased use of three-dimensional representation as a presentation technique. We are just now seeing substantial uses of animation as a communication and presentation tool in architecture. This paper documents the results of two surveys of the architectural profession that sought to discover the current and near future intentions for the use of computer animation. Our belief is that current levels of computer animation use are low, but that many firms intend to start using animation both as a design and presentation tool. In early 1998 we conducted a survey of the uses of computer animation by architectural firms. We posited a set of 14 related hypotheses. This paper represents the tabulated results from 82 completed surveys out of 620 requests. While some level of confidence can be obtained from this sample size, we are publishing in the hope of encouraging continued response to the survey.
series SIGRADI
email kensek@usc.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:56

_id b34d
authors Russell, P., Kohler, N., Forgber, U., Koch, V. and Rügemer, J.
year 1999
title Interactive Representation of Architectural Design: The Virtual Design Studio as an Architectural Graphics Laboratory
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 459-465
summary This paper introduces the Virtual Design Studio (VDS), an internet based design studio environment established by ifib. VDS transfers lessons learned through research projects in the field of Computer Supported Co-operative Work (CSCW) being carried out at ifib into design education. By training for interdisciplinary co-operation within the design process, the students will become better prepared for the flexibility and co-operability required in planning situations. Increasing the communication and co-operation in the planning process can be achieved through the implementation of IT based virtual workspaces. In the design studio setting, this is done through the use of available internet software and technologies. The methodology of the VDS is briefly described including specific assignments intended to focus student investigations into specific areas including the representation of their work using the world wide web. The pedagogical expectations are discussed and anecdotal evidence precedes an general evaluation of the teaching method. The authors postulate that one of the unintended by-products of the studio is the evolution of an effective use of interactivity in the presentation of design concepts, ideas and solutions. A handful of student work is presented to describe the different approaches taken in using the world wide web (WWW) to display project work. A description of the local evolution (VDS specific) of graphical methods and technologies is followed by a comparison with those used in traditional settings. Representation is discussed with focus on the ability of the WWW to replace, augment or corrupt other methods of presentation. The interactive nature of web based presentations induces alterations to the narration of architectural work and can enhance the spatial perception of design space. Space Perception can be enabled through geometrically true VRML representations, the inclusion of auditory sensations, the abstraction of representation through the use of advertising techniques as well as the introduction of non-linear narrative concepts. Examples used by students are shown. A critical assessment of these new representational methods and the place of current new media within the context of architectural representation is discussed.
keywords Virtual Design Studio, Architectural Graphics, Teaching
series eCAADe
email peter.russell@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id e336
authors Achten, H., Roelen, W., Boekholt, J.-Th., Turksma, A. and Jessurun, J.
year 1999
title Virtual Reality in the Design Studio: The Eindhoven Perspective
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 169-177
summary Since 1991 Virtual Reality has been used in student projects in the Building Information Technology group. It started as an experimental tool to assess the impact of VR technology in design, using the environment of the associated Calibre Institute. The technology was further developed in Calibre to become an important presentation tool for assessing design variants and final design solutions. However, it was only sporadically used in student projects. A major shift occurred in 1997 with a number of student projects in which various computer technologies including VR were used in the whole of the design process. In 1998, the new Design Systems group started a design studio with the explicit aim to integrate VR in the whole design process. The teaching effort was combined with the research program that investigates VR as a design support environment. This has lead to increasing number of innovative student projects. The paper describes the context and history of VR in Eindhoven and presents the current set-UP of the studio. It discusses the impact of the technology on the design process and outlines pedagogical issues in the studio work.
keywords Virtual Reality, Design Studio, Student Projects
series eCAADe
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 4d95
authors Alvarado, Rodrigo Garcia and Maver, Tom
year 1999
title Virtual Reality in Architectural Education: Defining Possibilities
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 7-9
summary Introduction: virtual reality in architecture Virtual Reality (VR) is an emergent computer technology for full 3D-simulations, which has a natural application in the architectural work, due that activity involves the complete definition of buildings prior to its construction. Although the profession has a long tradition and expertise in the use of 2D-plans for the design of buildings, the increasing complexity of projects and social participation requires better media of representation. However, the technological promise of Virtual Reality involves many sophisticated software and hardware developments. It is based on techniques of 3D-modelling currently incorporated in the majority of drawing software used in architecture, and also there are several tools for rendering, animation and panoramic views, which provide visual realism. But other capabilities like interactivity and sense of immersion are still complex, expensive and under research. These require stereoscopic helmets, 3D pointers and trackers with complicated configurations and uncomfortable use. Most advanced installations of Virtual-Reality like CAVEs involve much hardware, building space and restrictions for users. Nevertheless, diverse developers are working in Virtual-Reality user-friendly techniques and there are many initial experiences of architectural walk-throughs showing advantages in the communication and development of designs. Then we may expect an increasing use of Virtual Reality in architecture.
series ACADIA
email rgarcia@ubiobio.cl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 93a8
authors Anders, P.
year 1999
title Envisioning Cyberspace: Designing 3D Electronic Spaces
source McGraw-Hill, NY
summary Free of the constraints of physical form and limited only by imagination, new environments spring to life daily in a fantastic realm called cyberspace. The creators of this new virtual world may be programmers, designers, architects, even children. In this invigorating exploration of the juncture between cyberspace and the physical world, architect Peter Anders brings together leading-edge cyberspace art and architecture ... inspiring new techniques and technologies ... unexpected unions of reality and virtuality ... and visions of challenges and opportunities as yet unexplored. More than an invitation to tour fantastic realms and examine powerful tools, this book is a hard-eyed look at cyberspace's impact on physical, cultural, and social reality, and the human-centered principles of its design. This is a book that will set designers and architects thinkingNand a work of importance to anyone fascinated with the fast-closing space between the real and the virtual.
series other
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 2c4a
authors Aroztegui, Carmen
year 1999
title The Architect's Use of the Internet - Study of the Architectural Presentation Possibilities
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 363-368
summary The Internet media is opening new horizons in communication and representation in architecture. However, its use today is superficial, limited, and without creativity. This study will explore theories, methods and examples of how the virtual space of the Internet can be used in its full potential. That means to present ways of observing, understanding, interacting, and communicating the space without precedents in architecture. The existent presentations made by architects in the Internet are in general poor and static. Through the comparative analysis of two presentations of the same architectural space in the Internet and the use of state of the art technology in the Internet, this study will show innovations that will make the exploration of the architectural space more attractive, dynamic and interactive. The main issues will be on one hand, the improvement in the communication of the design through the use of the Internet, and on the other hand, the rise of the standards in the quality of the architectural presentations. This work will project possible implications of the Internet in architecture.
series SIGRADI
email arozteguic@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 2fe1
authors Arroyo, Julio and Chiarella, Mauro
year 1999
title Infographic: Its Incorporation and Relativity in Architectural Design Process
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 313-318
summary This paper is about an architectural design workshop regularly held at a public university in Santa Fe, Argentina. The class is about 150 students large, with different informatic capabilities and hardware facilities. The design problem of the workshop, which is one year long, is the relationship between architectural project and the construction of the urbanity. This implies both a physical intervention and a cultural expression. Pedagogy seeks students to overcome individualism, characteristic that is hardly induced by PCs, making a socialized design experience. A complementary and simultaneous use of graphic and infographic data is one of the main criteria of the workshop. The idea is to look for students to reach a wide vision by means of the use of different representation systems and means of information. Digital graphic is introduced early in the design process as an electronic model of urban context. It is considered as a one among many other graphic resources and is used together with ordinary models, geometric drawings, aerial and regular photography and hand made sketches. This paper relates the results that have been obtained when students were asked to make an analytic and sensitive approach to the relationship site - urban situation. This relationship has a great importance for the workshop since its goal is to make students to understand the the value of designing in and for the city.
series SIGRADI
email jarroyo@fadu.unl.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

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