CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 101 to 120 of 590

_id 0d5b
authors Latch Craig, David and Zimring, Craig
year 1999
title Practical Support for Collaborative Design Involving Divided Interests
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 126-137
summary Collaboration is common in design, yet relatively little is known about the cognitive reasoning processes that occur during collaboration. This paper discusses collaborative design, emphasizing the elaboration and transformations of the problem search space, and the roles that unstructured verbal communication and graphic communication can play in these processes. The paper discusses a prototype system called the Immersive Discussion Tool (IDT) that supports asynchronous design. IDT allows collaborators to mark-up 3-D models over the Internet using a variety of tools, including diagrammatic marks, dynamic simulations and text annotations. IDT relies on VRML to view the models, with an extensive Java-based interface on the backend powering the interactive construction and playback of graphical annotations, the management of threaded discussions, and the management of file input/output. The development of this tool has revealed the difficulty of constructing complex marks in a virtual 3-D space, and the initial implementation of IDT suggests several strategies for solving these problems.
series ACADIA
email david.craig@arch.gatech.edu
last changed 1999/12/02 07:48

_id e2ea
authors Lee, Hwa-Ryong
year 1999
title The Changing Face of Architectural Computing Research
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 11-17
summary This paper examines the existing commercial and on-going research computer applications for architectural design. It investigates their uses, predictions and limitations; and reviews the teleology, technologies and theories exploited for computerising design. Finally, I will discuss two trends in the developments of CAAD, and present the new directions in CAAD research. This study will be based on understanding the computer's roles in designing, and further on establishing a new theoretical paradigm for mediating a computer system.
keywords Historical Context, Theoretical Paradigms
series eCAADe
email hlee@moe.go.kr
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id dc5a
authors Luque, Manuel J.
year 1999
title Working with a CAAD's Spreadsheet
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 217-222
summary This paper shows the content of a subject imparted at the ETSAB (UPC). It describes the use of CAD systems in tasks that could not even be thought before new technology arrival and traditional methods had to be used. CAD systems potential to simultaneously work with constitutive objects and relations between them is taken into advantage. The definite design is not only the juxtaposition of some but the tight relation linking them. This work proposes CAD systems to be used in architectural design projects as spreadsheets to perform arithmetic calculations. The process to obtain an architectural model has ended in a logic sequence of formal operations, which uses completely defined objects as data. Any element of the project, data or operation, can be changed and model updating is automatically performed obtaining the new result. Finally a concrete exercise developed along the course is shown like a practical example.
keywords Teaching, CAD, Architectural Design, Planning
series eCAADe
email manuel.luque@ega1.upc.es
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id f2cf
authors Madrazo, Leandro
year 2001
title NETWORKING : a web environment for a collaborative education
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 169-182 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary NETWORKING is a teaching environment developed in close connection with the course "Sistemas de RepresentaciŰn", which has been carried out for the first time at the E.T.S. d'Arquitectura La Salle, Barcelona, in the academic year 1999/00. It is a web-based environment that promotes the exchange of ideas among students and their capacity to work collaboratively. There is a customized NETWORKING environment for each one of the six themes that made up the course: text, shape, object, image, space and light. In this paper we will discuss two of the six environments: OBJECT and SPACE.
series other
last changed 2001/09/14 19:30

_id 9c3e
authors Maher, M.L., Skow, B. and Cicognani, A.
year 1999
title Designing the virtual campus
source Design Studies, 20, 319-342
summary Virtual Worlds are networked environments that look like the physical world, and create a sense of place for the person communicating, navigating, and doing things in the virtual world. Virtual worlds have traditionally been developed as games, in fact, most virtual worlds today are games. A virtual campus has been developed in the Architecture Faculty at the University of Sydney that is based on some of the concepts of virtual worlds. The virtual campus is a place on the internet where students can go to take courses, meet with academic staff, and communicate with other students. The development of the virtual campus has been influenced by research in design science and is based on the conceptual metaphor of architectural design. The design of the virtual campus is considered at three levels: the implementation level, the representation level, and the interface level. Identifying these levels provides a basis for the design of virtual worlds for professional and educational environments. The consideration of the representation level results in a consistent use of a conceptual metaphor so that a person in the virtual campus can make use of the facilities in an intuitive manner.
series journal paper
email mary@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id ga9917
id ga9917
authors Maia Jr., A., Valle, R. do, Manzolli, J. and Pereira, L.N.S.
year 1999
title Generative Polymodal Music Process
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary We present underlying ideas used to develop an Algorithmic Composition software named KYKLOS. It was designed to generate music based on generalised musical scales and modes. It is an interactive sonic device to be applied in composition as well in performance. The sonic output of the whole process can be described as generalised polymodal music since “synthetic scales” are generated by the algorithm. This environment can be used in a Computer Assisted Composition manner in order to generate MIDI files. On the other hand, it can equally be used as a performance environment in which a dynamic change of parameters enables a real time control of the sonic process. Recently, we advocated that several mathematical applications in Computer Music can be understood as Sound Functors [1]. In extension, we describe here a sound functor used to model scales and modes. As can be verified, part of early investigations on mathematical structures in music studied musical scales and modes using Combinatorics, Fibonacci Series and Golden Mean in order to understand compositional processes which use modal concepts. Using the Functor definition it is possible to enumerate n-scales as a sequence of integers. Each value in that sequence gives the distance (in half tones) between two consecutive tones. For example, the sequence 3:2:2:3 is interpreted as a pentatonic scale C-Eb-F-G-Bb, and as defined above it is a C mode. So, if we apply cyclical permutations, (n-1)-sequences of numbers should be interpreted as n-modes of tones. Our algorithmic implementation is described briefly. A n-mode is defined as an array with n-1 integers [a1, a2, ...an-1]. Each array generated at k-th step can be read as a number a1a2a3 ....an-1 in decimal representation, where ai is a integer between 1 and 9. We denote the number obtained at k-th step as (a1a2a3 ...an-1)(k) . The rules to implement the algorithm are the following:1) V0 = (1, 1, 1, 1 ......,1) (initial n-mode)2) ? ai ? 11 with i= 1, 2...n-1 (octave range constraint)3) Vk = (a1a2a3 ...an-1)(k) < (b1b2b3 ...bn-1)(k+1) = Vk+1 where aj ?bj , 1? j ? n-1.4) Vmax = (13 – n, 1, 1, ...,1)In this paper we start with a theoretical view and an introduction on the algorithmic mechanism used. Further, we present a concept of man ? machine interaction used to create the composition environment. We also describe the compositional graphic interface developed and general functions of the system. Finally there is a set of music examples generated by KYKLOS as MIDI files.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ga9905
id ga9905
authors Maldonado, Gabriel
year 1999
title Generating digital music with DirectCsound & VMCI
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary This paper concerns two computer-music programs: DirectCsound, a real-time version of the well-known sound-synthesis language Csound, and VMCI, a GUI program that allow the user to control DirectCsound in real-time. DirectCsound allows a total live control of the synthesis process. The aim of DirectCsound project is to give the user a powerful and low-cost workstation in order to produce new sounds and new music interactively, and to make live performances with the computer. Try to imagine DirectCsound being a universal musical instrument. VMCI (Virtual Midi Control Interface) is a program which allows to send any kind of MIDI message by means of the mouse and the alpha-numeric keyboard. It has been thought to be used together with DirectCsound, but it can also be used to control any MIDI instrument. It provides several panels with virtual sliders, virtual joysticks and virtual-piano keyboard. The newer version of the program (VMCI Plus 2.0) allows the user to change more than one parameter at the same time by means of the new Hyper-Vectorial-Synthesis control. VMCI supports seven-bit data as well as higher-resolution fourteen-bit data, all supported by the newest versions of Csound.
series other
email g.maldonado@tiscalinet.it
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id bd13
authors Martens, B., Turk, Z. and Cerovsek, T.
year 2001
title Digital Proceedings: Experiences regarding Creating and Using
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 25-29
summary This paper describes the developments of the CUMINCAD database since 1999 when it was first presented and some statistical information, how the service is being used. CUMINCAD started as a bibliographic database storing meta information about CAADrelated publications. Recently, full texts are being added. The process of creation of electronic copies of papers in pdf-format is described as well as decisions which were taken in this context. Over the last two years 20.000 users visited CUMINCAD. We present a brief analysis of their behavior and interaction patterns. This and the forthcoming possibility of a full-text-search will open up a new perspective for CAAD-research.
keywords CAAD-Related Publications, Web-Based Bibliographic Database, Searchable Index, Retrospective CAAD Research, Purpose Analysis
series eCAADe
email b.martens@tuwien.ac.at, ziga.turk@itc.fgg.uni-lj.si, tcerovse@fagg.uni-lj.si
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id de8c
authors Martens, Bob
year 1999
title MAKING LIGHT TANGIBLE: SIMULATION OF LIGHT DESIGN WITHIN ARCHITECTURAL EDUCATION
source Full-scale Modeling and the Simulation of Light [Proceedings of the 7th European Full-scale Modeling Association Conference / ISBN 3-85437-167-5] Florence (Italy) 18-20 February 1999, pp. 1-6
summary In times where computer-assisted representations dominate the “market” of visual simulation, the major strongholds of simulation in true size in conveying (artificial) light configurations have been observed. Though light cannot be “touched” due to its material absence the human eye reacts extremely sensitively to differing constellations. In matters of seconds differences are perceived and classified. Opening up a rift between the various simulation techniques, however, would not prove wise. The normal procedure still consists of trial positioning of lighting objects on site (i.e.: 1:1 simulation at building site). Regarding the effort this causes attempts as to gaining similar results by means of (partial) computer representations are worth considering. The degree of abstraction, however, might be too significant to make for conclusive decisions. In other words: Can the gap between imagination and translation thereof into reality be bridged? This contribution deals with the experimental implementation of artificial light in the full-scale lab and its possibilities regarding the 1:1 simulation at the Vienna University of Technology, with special attention to the didactic aspects related thereto.
keywords Lighting Design, Full-scale Modeling, Architectural Education, Simulation Dome, Visual Simulation, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
email b.martens@tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2004/05/04 09:28

_id caadria2005_b_4b_d
id caadria2005_b_4b_d
authors Martin Tamke
year 2005
title Baking Light: Global Illumination in VR Environments as architectural design tool
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 2, pp. 214-228
summary As proven in the past, immersive Virtual Environments can be helpful in the process of architectural design (Achten et al. 1999). But still years later, these systems are not common in the architectural design process, neither in architectural education nor in professional work. The reasons might be the high price of e.g. CAVEs, the lack of intuitive navigation and design tools in those environments, the absence of useful and easy to handle design workflows, and the quality constraints of real-time display of 3D models. A great potential for VR in the architectural workflow is the review of design decisions: Display quality, comfortable navigation and realistic illumination are crucial ingredients here. Light is one of the principal elements in architectural design, so design reviews must enable the architect to judge the quality of his design in this respect. Realistic light simulations, e.g. via radiosity algorithms, are no longer the domain of high-end graphic workstations. Today's off-the-shelf hardware and 3D-software provide the architect with high-quality tools to simulate physically correct light distributions. But the quality and impression of light is hard to judge from looking at still renderings. In collaboration with the Institute of Computer Graphics at our university we have established a series of regular design reviews in their immersive virtual environment. This paper describes the workflow that has emerged from this collaboration, the tools that were developed and used, and our practical experiences with global-light-simulations. We share results which we think are helpful to others, and we highlight areas where further research is necessary.
series CAADRIA
email m.tamke@tu-bs.de
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id maver_086
id maver_086
authors Maver, T.W.
year 1996
title A Tale of Three Cities
source VR News. Proceedings of Virtual Heritage Conference 1995 (Bath [UK], Nov 22)
summary The ABACUS Group has been active for some years in the use of computer graphics and multimedia to represent past, present and future buildings in both urban and rural settings. The three cities discussed during the presentation are Split, in former Yugoslavia - a graphical account of the development of Split from its origin in the Diocletian Palace of the Venetian Empire up to the present day; Edinburgh - a multimedia interface to a large-scale three dimensional computer model of Edinburgh Old Town; and Glasgow - Virtual City developments in the run up to the City of Architecture and Design celebrations in 1999. The presentation concludes with a report on the IMAGEA project - an international initiative to construct an Interactive Multimedia Archive of Great European Architecture.
series other
type normal paper
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2006/09/11 05:29

_id e6fb
authors McFadzean, Jeanette
year 1999
title Computational Sketch Analyser (CSA): Extending the Boundaries of Knowledge in CAAD
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 503-510
summary This paper focuses on the cognitive problem-solving strategies of professional architectural designers and their use of external representations for the production of creative ideas. Using a new form of protocol analysis (Computational Sketch Analysis), the research has analysed five architects' verbal descriptions of their cognitive reasoning strategies during conceptual designing. It compares these descriptions to a computational analysis of the architects' sketches and sketching behaviour. The paper describes how the current research is establishing a comprehensive understanding of the mapping between conceptualisation, cognition, drawing, and complex problem solving. The paper proposes a new direction for Computer Aided Architectural Design tools (CAAD). It suggests that in order to extend the boundaries of knowledge in CAAD an understanding of the complex nature of architectural conceptual problem-solving needs to be incorporated into and supported by future conceptual design tools.
keywords Computational Sketch Analysis, Conceptual Design
series eCAADe
email j.mcfadzean@open.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 6b7d
authors Mishima, Yoshitaka and Szalapaj, Peter
year 1999
title ADMIRE: an Architectural Design Multimedia Interaction Resource for Education
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 201-209
summary This paper describes the development of a multimedia system called ADMIRE (an Architectural Design Multimedia Interaction Resource for Education), which enables undergraduate students to understand how to analyse existing buildings dynamically, as well as to develop their own initial architectural design theories. The system contains architectural information in the form of fully rendered models, conceptual illustrations created with a range of CAD software, and multimedia presentations showing various design theoretic analyses. Buildings are described with CAD generated images, and architects with profiles and theories. In addition to rendered designs, there are also conceptual models of each building in the system. Conceptual models are simplified forms of original designs in order to support an analytical understanding of buildings according to various analyses, such as structure, light, circulation, unit to whole, geometry, etc. Each conceptual model constitutes a different analysis of each building. The ADMIRE system links each piece of information to another, so that students can explore architecture and learn about it in a dynamic way. This system demonstrates a new way of learning about architectural analysis through dynamic multimedia computer interaction.
keywords Dynamic Multimedia System, Analytical Models, Interactive Pedagogical Resource
series eCAADe
email ARP95YM@sheffield.ac.uk, p.szalapaj@sheffield.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id d438
authors Moloney, Jules
year 1999
title Charcoal, Bits and Balsa: Cross Media Tactics in the Foundation Design Studio
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 110-115
summary This paper investigates the space between the computer and traditional design media. The focus is the identification of strategies for extending creativity in the foundation year design studio via tactics of cross media working. The integration of computers into the design studio are described within a particular drawing culture at the University of Auckland. Creativity is related to a pedagogy of 'pattern' developed by M. Linzey. The cross media tactics are based on practical adaptation of the advantages of computing to the context of the foundation design studio (12 weeks / 80 students / 24 computers)
keywords Education, Media, Studio, Creativity
series eCAADe
email j.moloney@auckland.ac.nz
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id c991
authors Moorhouse, Jon and Brown,Gary
year 1999
title Autonomous Spatial Redistribution for Cities
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 678-684
summary The paper investigates an automated methodology for the appropriate redistribution of usable space in distressed areas of inner cities. This is achieved by categorising activity space and making these spaces morphologically mobile in relation to the topography within a representative artificial space. The educational module has been influenced by theories from the natural environment, which possess patterns that have inherent evolutionary programmes in which the constituents are recyclable, Information is strategically related to the environment to produce forms of growth and behaviour. Artificial landscape patterns fail to evolve, the inhabited landscape needs a means of starting from simplicity and building into the most complex of systems that are capable of re-permutation over time. The paper then describes the latest methodological development in terms of a shift from the use of the computer as a tool for data manipulation to embracing the computer as a design partner. The use of GDL in particular is investigated as a facilitator for such generation within a global, vectorial environment.
keywords Animated, Urban, Programme, Education, Visual Database
series eCAADe
email Jonhat@aol.com
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id ga0010
id ga0010
authors Moroni, A., Zuben, F. Von and Manzolli, J.
year 2000
title ArTbitrariness in Music
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Evolution is now considered not only powerful enough to bring about the biological entities as complex as humans and conciousness, but also useful in simulation to create algorithms and structures of higher levels of complexity than could easily be built by design. In the context of artistic domains, the process of human-machine interaction is analyzed as a good framework to explore creativity and to produce results that could not be obtained without this interaction. When evolutionary computation and other computational intelligence methodologies are involved, every attempt to improve aesthetic judgement we denote as ArTbitrariness, and is interpreted as an interactive iterative optimization process. ArTbitrariness is also suggested as an effective way to produce art through an efficient manipulation of information and a proper use of computational creativity to increase the complexity of the results without neglecting the aesthetic aspects [Moroni et al., 2000]. Our emphasis will be in an approach to interactive music composition. The problem of computer generation of musical material has received extensive attention and a subclass of the field of algorithmic composition includes those applications which use the computer as something in between an instrument, in which a user "plays" through the application's interface, and a compositional aid, which a user experiments with in order to generate stimulating and varying musical material. This approach was adopted in Vox Populi, a hybrid made up of an instrument and a compositional environment. Differently from other systems found in genetic algorithms or evolutionary computation, in which people have to listen to and judge the musical items, Vox Populi uses the computer and the mouse as real-time music controllers, acting as a new interactive computer-based musical instrument. The interface is designed to be flexible for the user to modify the music being generated. It explores evolutionary computation in the context of algorithmic composition and provides a graphical interface that allows to modify the tonal center and the voice range, changing the evolution of the music by using the mouse[Moroni et al., 1999]. A piece of music consists of several sets of musical material manipulated and exposed to the listener, for example pitches, harmonies, rhythms, timbres, etc. They are composed of a finite number of elements and basically, the aim of a composer is to organize those elements in an esthetic way. Modeling a piece as a dynamic system implies a view in which the composer draws trajectories or orbits using the elements of each set [Manzolli, 1991]. Nonlinear iterative mappings are associated with interface controls. In the next page two examples of nonlinear iterative mappings with their resulting musical pieces are shown.The mappings may give rise to attractors, defined as geometric figures that represent the set of stationary states of a non-linear dynamic system, or simply trajectories to which the system is attracted. The relevance of this approach goes beyond music applications per se. Computer music systems that are built on the basis of a solid theory can be coherently embedded into multimedia environments. The richness and specialty of the music domain are likely to initiate new thinking and ideas, which will have an impact on areas such as knowledge representation and planning, and on the design of visual formalisms and human-computer interfaces in general. Above and bellow, Vox Populi interface is depicted, showing two nonlinear iterative mappings with their resulting musical pieces. References [Manzolli, 1991] J. Manzolli. Harmonic Strange Attractors, CEM BULLETIN, Vol. 2, No. 2, 4 -- 7, 1991. [Moroni et al., 1999] Moroni, J. Manzolli, F. Von Zuben, R. Gudwin. Evolutionary Computation applied to Algorithmic Composition, Proceedings of CEC99 - IEEE International Conference on Evolutionary Computation, Washington D. C., p. 807 -- 811,1999. [Moroni et al., 2000] Moroni, A., Von Zuben, F. and Manzolli, J. ArTbitration, Las Vegas, USA: Proceedings of the 2000 Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference Workshop Program – GECCO, 143 -- 145, 2000.
series other
email artemis@ia.cti.br
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id b7ff
authors Mullins, Michael and Van Zyl, Douw
year 2000
title Self-Selecting Digital Design Students
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 85-88
summary Recent years have seen the increasing use of digital media in undergraduate architectural education at UND, and which has been fuelled by students themselves taking up the tools available to practising architects. This process of self-selection may hold valuable lessons for the development of architectural curricula. An experimental design studio offered as an elective to UND undergraduates in 1999 has indicated that the design work produced therein, most often differed remarkably from the previous work of the same students using only traditional media. In so far as digital environments rapidly provide new and strange objects and images for students to encounter, those students are driven to interpret, transform or customise that environment in innovative ways, thereby making it their own. It is clear that the full integration of digital environments into architectural education will profoundly effect the outcomes of student work. We have observed that some self-selecting students struggle in expressing ideas through repre-sentative form in traditional studios. The question arises whether these students are "onto something" which they intuitively understand as better suited to their abilities, or whether in fact they are see digital tools as a means to avoid those areas in design in which they experience difficulties. Through observation of a group of "self-selectors" the authors attempt to lead useful generalisations; to develop a theory and method for facilitators to deal with specific students; and to work toward the development of suitable curricula for these cases.
keywords Architectural Education, Digital Media, Learning Styles
series eCAADe
email mullins@gwise.mc.und.ac.za, vanzyl@gwise.mc.und.ac.za
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id f9f7
authors Mullins, Michael
year 1999
title Forming, Planning, Imaging and Connecting
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 178-185
summary This paper sets out to define aspects of the architectural design process, using historical precedent and architectural theory, and tests the relationship of those aspects to the application of computers in architectural design, particularly in an educational context. The design process sub-sets are defined as: Forming, Planning, Imaging and Connecting. Historical precedents are uncovered in Classical, Modern, Postmodern and Contemporary architecture. The defined categories of the design process are related to current usages of computers in architectural education towards elucidating the strengths and weaknesses of digital media in those areas. Indications of their concurrent usage in digital design will be demonstrated in analysis of design studio programs presented at recent ACADIA conferences. An example of a current design studio programme set at the School of Architecture University of Natal, South Africa in which the above described categories give an underlying structure to the introduction of 3D digital modelling to undergraduates through design process. The definition of this set of design activities may offer a useful method for other educators in assessing existing and future design programs where digital tools are used.
keywords Design-Process, Digital-Media, Design-Programmes
series eCAADe
email madura@iafrica.com
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id b0b0
authors Murison, Alison
year 1999
title Less is More - Enhancing CAD Instruction by Enabling Student Centred Learning, a Case Study for Learning 2000
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 262-265
summary This paper describes a structured programme of instruction in the use and application of CAD to architectural design, where programmed lectures and seminars were abandoned to be replaced by student centred learning and appropriate support. The Third Year CAD course at Edinburgh College of Art was reshaped completely. Only one lecture was given to outline the course, thereafter all attendance was optional, and a variety of learning methods were offered. Student reaction was recorded and the learning outcome assessed. Final student marks showed a definite improvement.
keywords Learning, CAAD, Student Centred
series eCAADe
email a.murison@eca.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 38cf
authors Murty, Paul, Chase, Scott, and Nappa, Joseph
year 1999
title Evaluating the Complexity of CAD Models in Education and Practice
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 105-114
summary When educators or students estimate the complexity of proposed CAD projects, in order to judge feasibility, two conceptions of complexity may be considered. The first, design complexity, based on visible features of the object to be modelled, is the easier to assess beforehand, but is not very reliable. The second, CAD complexity, based on the actual CAD embodiment of the design, is suggested as potentially a more useful guide, in spite of evident difficulties with assessment in advance. Clearer articulation of this under utilised concept is proposed for both educational and more general reasons, and this becomes the focus of the paper.
series CAADRIA
email paul@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2000/01/13 10:21

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