CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 590

_id 36d3
authors Af Klercker, Jonas
year 1999
title A CAVE-Interface in CAAD-Education?
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 313-323
summary The so called "CAVE-interface" is a very interesting and thrilling development for architects! It supports a better illusion of space by exposing almost a 270° view of a computer model than the 60° which can be viewed on an ordinary computer screen. At the Lund University we have got the possibility to experiment with a CAVE-installation, using it in research and the education of CAAD. The technique and three experiments are discribed. The possibilities are discussed and some problems and questions are put forward.
series CAADRIA
email jonas.af_klercker@caad.lth.se
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ae61
authors Af Klercker, Jonas
year 1999
title CAAD - Integrated with the First Steps into Architecture
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 266-272
summary How and when should CAAD be introduced in the curriculum of the School of Architecture? This paper begins with some arguments for starting CAAD education at the very beginning. At the School of Architecture in Lund teachers in the first year courses have tried to integrate CAAD with the introduction to architectural concepts and techniques. Traditionally the first year is divided by several subjects running courses separatly without any contact for coordination. From the academic year 96/97 the teachers of Aplied aestetics, Building Science, Architectural design and CAAD have decided to colaborate as much as possible to make the role of our different fields as clear as possible to the students. Therefore integrating CAAD was a natural step in the academic year 98/99. The computer techniques were taught one step in advance so that the students can practise their understanding of the programs in their tasks in the other subjects. The results were surprisingly good! The students have quickly learned to mix the manual and computer techniques to make expressive and interesting visual presentations of their ideas. Some students with antipaty to computers have overcome this handicap. Some interesting observations are discussed.
keywords Curriculum, First Year Studies, Integration, CAAD, Modelling
series eCAADe
email jonas.af_klercker@caad.lth.se
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id f154
authors Amor, Robert and Newnham, Leonard
year 1999
title CAD Interfaces to the ARROW Manufactured Product Server
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 1-11
summary The UK national project ARROW (Advanced Reusable Reliable Objects Warehouse) provides an Internet based framework through which it is possible to identify any of a range of manufactured products meeting specific design criteria. This open framework (based upon the IAI's IFCs) provides a mechanism for users to search for products from any participating manufacturer or supplier based both on specific attributes of a product or on any of the textual descriptions of the product. The service returns the closest matching products and allows the user to navigate to related information including manufacturer, suppliers, CAD details, VR displays, installation instructions, certificates, health and safety information, promotional information, costings, etc. ARROW also provides a toolkit to enable manufacturers and suppliers to more easily map and publish their information in the format utilised by the ARROW system. As part of the ARROW project we have examined the ability to interface from a design tool through to ARROW to automatically retrieve information required by the tool. This paper describes the API developed to allow CAD and simulation tools to communicate directly with ARROW and identify appropriate manufactured information. The demonstration system enables CAD systems to identify the closest matching manufactured product to a designed product and replacing the designed product with the details supplied by the manufacturer for the manufactured product as well as pulling through product attributes utilised by the design application. This paper provides a description of the ARROW framework and issues faced in providing information based upon standards as well as containing information not currently modelled in public standards. The paper looks at issues of enabling manufacturers and suppliers to move from their current world-view of product information to a more data-rich and user accessible information repository (even though this enables a uniform comparison across a range of manufacturer's products). Finally the paper comments on the likely way forward for ARROW like systems in providing quality information to end users.
keywords Computer-aided Design, Product Retrieval
series CAAD Futures
email trebor@cs.auckland.ac.nz
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 1071
authors Asanowicz, Aleksander
year 1999
title Evolution of Computer Aided Design: Three Generations of CAD
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 94-100
summary This paper describes the three generations of CAD systems. The first generation of (primarily analytical) computer programmes really aided designing. These programmes were the tools for finding a functional solution in different areas of designing, from flat plans to the space organisation of a hospital. One of the shortcomings of these programmes was the lack of graphic interface. With time, however, this kind of interface was developed. As a result of this second generation of CAD systems the computer was transformed into a drafting machine and CAD meant Computer Aided Drafting. The main thesis of this consideration is that only now we have the chance to return to the idea of Computer Aided Design. One of the examples of these trends is the AVOCAAD programme in which Added Value of CAAD is analysed. The development of the third generation of CAD systems will be possible in the near future. Aiding the process of designing will demand the elaboration of new methods of using the computer at the early stages of this process. The computer should be used not for generating variants of functional solutions only but for also for the creation of 3D forms by 3D sketching. For this, the computer should be transformed from a tool into a medium; only then will designing become true Designing in Cyber Space.
keywords Generations of CAAD, Design Process, Creation, Medium
series eCAADe
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:46

_id ecc5
authors Bassanino, May Nahab
year 1999
title The perception of computer generated architectural images
source Liverpool University
summary The broad aim of the research is to examine the role of computer generated architectural images on the way different people perceive architecture, and within this field of interest I have established a list of specific tasks to define the specific points of interest to examine. The following list of the main research objectives served as a guide in designing the experimental tests undertaken as part of this research: (*) Study the effect of both representation techniques and the used media on perceiving architecture. (*) Establish the differences (if there are any) of perception between different groups of people; principally architects and non-architects, but also subsets of each of these two groups. (*) To suggest the appropriate technique for presenting architecture for a particular group in a particular stage in the design process. (*) To investigate the influence of CAAD in architectural education on the students’ perception for architectural images.
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id bbb9
authors Blaise, Jean-Yves and Dudek, Iwona
year 1999
title SOL: Spatial and Historical Web-Based Interface for On Line Architectural Documentation of Krakow's Rynek Gowny
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 700-707
summary Our paper presents recent developments of a co-operation program that links the MAP-GAMSAU CNRS laboratory (Marseilles, France), specialised in computer science and the HAiKZ Institute of Krakow's Faculty of Architecture, specialised in architectural heritage and conservation. Before undertaking any action to a listed building or interventions in its neighbourhood, it is vital to gain a clear understanding of the building in question. Numerous heterogeneous data detained by diverse institutions has to be handled. This process can be greatly eased by enhanced classification of the information. The development we present is a multidisciplinary platform independent information tool dedicated to education and research. SOL uses an http protocol centred computer architecture connecting a relational database, a VRML 2.0 representation module and a web search interface. It allows searches and updating of the database through a standard text based interface, a VRML 2.0 graphical module and a thematic interface. SOL is experienced on the urban fabric of the Main Square (Rynek Gówny) in Kraków. The choice of a web-centred development, both in the search and updating interface and in the representation module provides platform independence and distant access to the database, and enables successive contributions of students or researchers.
keywords Web Interface, Database, Architectural Heritage Environment, Information Module, Historical Evolutions
series eCAADe
email jyb@gamsau.archi.fr, idu@gamsau.archi.fr
more http://alberti.gamsau.archi.fr
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 3ac3
authors Devetakovic, Mirjana and Radojevic, Milan
year 1999
title The Electronic Communication as a Part of CAAD Educational Process
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 265-273
summary Considering demands of contemporary architectural practice to shift spatial and cultural barriers and became more global and more creative, this paper analyses the role of electronic communication within the process of CAAD (Computer Aided Architectural Design) education. After explaining Virtual Design Studio phenomena, represented by several worldwide university projects, this paper focuses on the reflection of those projects in rethinking the CAAD education approach at the Faculty of Architecture, University of Belgrade. The case illustrating the problem is The Virtual Group activity within the Course "The basics of Computer Application in Architecture". Some examples of student work are given as well as several conclusions based on two-year experience.
series AVOCAAD
email mirjana@arh.arh.bg.ac.yu
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 1ead
authors Dinand, Munevver Ozgur and Ozersay, Fevzi
year 1999
title CAAD Education under the Lens of Critical Communication Theories and Critical Pedagogy: Towards a Critical Computer Aided Architectural Design Education (CCAADE)
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 86-93
summary Understanding the dominant ethos of our age is imperative but not easy. However it is quite evident that new technologies have altered our times. Every discipline is now forced to be critical in developing new concepts according to the realities of our times. Implementing a critical worldview and consciousness is now more essential than ever. Latest changes in information technology are creating pressure on change both in societal and cultural terms. With its direct relation to these technologies, computer aided architectural design education, is obviously an outstanding / prominent case within contemporary debate. This paper aims to name some critical points related to computer aided architectural design education (CAADE) from the perspective of critical communication studies and critical education theories. It tries to relate these three areas, by introducing their common concepts to each other. In this way, it hopes to open a path for a language of critique. A critique that supports and promotes experimentation, negotiation, creativity, social consciousness and active participation in architectural education in general, and CAADE in specific. It suggests that CAADE might become critical and produce meta-discourses [1 ] in two ways. Firstly, by being critical about the context it exists in, that is to say, its relationships to the existing institutional and social structures and secondly by being critical about the content it handles; in other words by questioning its ideological dimensions. This study considers that analysing the role of CAADE in this scheme can provide architectural education with the opportunity to make healthy projections for the future.
keywords Critical Theories, Critical Pedagogy, Critical CAADE
series eCAADe
email F.Oversay@sheffield.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id c824
authors Fernández, Eduardo and Pi Gamba, Claudio
year 1999
title PCD. Un Asistente al desarrollo de Cursos a Distancia para Internet (PCD. An Assistant for the Development of Remote Courses for Internet)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 389-392
summary Internet is emerging as a leading technology for communication applications in the area of Educational Technology and Distance Education . A number of tools have been developed to help either the teachers in lecturing tasks, as well as the students in following them. PCD was created to bring together in the same environment the best of the existing products in the market. The present version offers these facilities: course assistant, html editor, a generator of automatic self assessment tasks, and a data base storage of the assessments for a later student control. The need of a friendly and powerful graphics interface was enforced during development, in order to simplify the dialog between the participants of the courses. In this paper these facilities are described, as well as current development areas.
series SIGRADI
email eduardof@fing.edu.uy
last changed 2016/03/10 08:51

_id 5266
authors Jakimowicz, Adam
year 1999
title An Intuitive CAAD
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 80-85
summary This paper presents the educational experiment, which emerged from the junction of different inspirations and needs. It joins the experiences from an individual research on intuitive 3d computer modelling, courses of traditional architectural composition and the idea of individualisation of the computer use in architectural design education. It shows how computers were used in part of architectural education in a non-computer-oriented course. The experiment was included to and further developed within the frame of AVOCAAD project.
series eCAADe
email jakima@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:46

_id 687c
authors Kosco, Igor
year 1999
title How the World Became Smaller
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 230-237
summary The world of computers became fruitful and independent before the new millennium started. New technologies and methods are giving us new tools and possibilities every day as well as the challenge how to use them. The advantage of architecture and namely of architects teaching at the universities or schools is remarkable: new techniques reflect the education, research and practice - and what is important - by one person. The links between practice and university from the point of view: how the computer technologies and CAAD influences methods of designing, managing and collaboration are very important in both directions. It grows with the number of students who left university with good computer skills on one side and number of architectural and engineering offices using computers on the other. Networks and Internet enables to exchange data but also experiences. Internet itself is not only a tool for surfing and enjoying or the source of information, but preferably like a powerful tool for collaboration, workgroups, virtual studios or long distance education. This paper describes experiences from research and educational projects between Slovak Technical University, IUG Grenoble, University of Newcastle and others and their influence on architectural education and practice.
keywords Long-Distance Education, Research, Practice
series eCAADe
email kosco@fastu.fa.stuba.sk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 30c8
authors Koutamanis, A., Barendse, P.B74 and Kempenaar, J.W.
year 1999
title Web-based CAAD Instruction: The Delft Experience
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 159-168
summary In the early 1990s, the introduction of an extensive CAAD component in the compulsory curriculum of the Faculty of Architecture, Delft University of Technology, stimulated experimentation with computer-based instruction systems. The emergence of the World Wide Web presented new possibilities. Nevertheless, the reasons for investing in Web-based CAAD instruction were mostly pragmatic, i.e. a reaction to necessity, rather than an intention to explore, experiment and revolutionize. One of the problems addressed in our Web-based CAAD instruction is CAAD literacy. Help files and manuals that accompany software have proven to be unsuitable for introductory courses in design computing. This led to the development of a series of dynamic Web-based tutorials, in the form of interactive slide shows. The implementation of the tutorials is based on a cooperative framework that allows teachers and students to contribute at different levels of technical and methodical complexity. The use of the Web in CAAD education also stimulated a more active attitude among students. Despite the limited support and incentives offered by the Faculty, the Web-based CAAD courses became an invitation to intelligent and meaningful use of Web technologies by students for design presentation and communication. This is not only a useful addition to the opportunities offered by CAAD systems but also a prerequisite to new design communities.
keywords WWW Technologies, Teaching
series eCAADe
email a.koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 7e64
authors Koutamanis, Alexander
year 1999
title Approaches to the Integration of CAAD Education in the Electronic Era: Two Value Systems
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 238-243
summary In recent years the democratization of information and communication technologies (ICT) has become the greatest influence on the structure of CAAD education. While the content of the CAAD courses simply had to absorb the new technological possibilities, the structure of the courses and in particular their relationship to the rest of the curriculum has become the subject of speculation and experimentation. Integration of CAAD education in an architectural curriculum occurs either by (a) placing emphasis on designing in CAAD courses, or by (b)  integrating computing in design courses. Both approaches respond to the democratization of ICT by making design computing widely available and acceptable. Further improvement is possible if the student becomes the carrier of integration. This is based on the long-term amplification of two value systems. The first refers to personal cognition: rather than rewarding a student with the teacher's approval, educational goals should be translated into individual skills and knowledge. The second system addresses the values of the peer group: such groups support learning by comparison to other individuals and emerging communal characteristics, either as a result of competition or for reasons of assimilation.
keywords Education, Democracy, Personal Cognition
series eCAADe
email a.koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id a25e
authors Loy, Hollis A.
year 1999
title Foundation for a Thorough CAAD Education
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 301-308
summary The birth and development of computing is considered by most as one of the greatest technological achievements of the twentieth century. Since the integration of computers in the built environment, over two decades ago, computing methods developed into efficient designing and calculating tools. In contrast, accelerating advancements in computing technology have created generation gaps amongst architects. There are inexperienced, novice, intermediate and advanced computer-capable architects. If each group was asked to define CAAD, some would still describe it as a computer program for technical draughting. Others may define CAAD (Computer Aided Architectural Design) as a vast array of digital media in CAD, multimedia and DTP, assisting architects in compiling visual presentations. Currently, most architectural schools are capable of instructing most, if not all, facets of CAAD (2D & 3D CAD, model rendering, photo montage, brochure layouts, etc.). However, this knowledge is accumulated at random throughout the course of study. "Computer Graphics for Architects" is the latest educational development in Europe bridging generation gaps with senior architects and serving as an introductory CAAD seminar to beginning architecture students. This book and lecture presents a gallery of recent architectural CAD, multimedia, and DTP presentations practiced in Europe´s second largest architectural firm. The terminology is user-friendly and its content concentrates on responding to the most often posed questions by CAAD beginners relating to: (1) Terminology (2) Appearance (3) Time Consumption (4) Cost Techniques introduced are independent of any platform. The goal is to summarize quickly and effectively the countless possibilities of presentations applicable in architecture practice. "Computer Graphics for Architects" provides a direction for future presentations and motivates students to excel in CAAD.
series eCAADe
email Loy.In.Germany@t-online.de
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 7c87
authors Mahdavi, A., Ilal, M.E. Mathew, O., Ries, R. and Suter, G.
year 1999
title Aspects of S2
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 185-196
summary We present in this paper the essential aspects of the S2 system. This is the internet realization of SEMPER, an active, multi-domain, space-based, object oriented design environment for integrated building performance modeling. The key features of the S2 environment are as follows: A user can access the system regardless of the computer hardware, operating system or the location on a network; geographically distributed users can asynchronously generate a building model through the user interface; this building model can then be simultaneously evaluated with multiple simulation applications running on remote simulation servers; persistent storage is provided for project data and evaluation results; designers using the system have access to multiple libraries that contain building information such as material data, construction types, schedules, and weather data.
keywords Building Performance Simulation, Distributed System, Internet
series CAAD Futures
email amahdavi@tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 81f3
authors Martens, Bob and Turk, Ziga
year 1999
title Working Experiences with a Cumulative Index on CAD: "CUMINCAD"
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 327-333
summary To researchers in every discipline, Internet is quickly becoming the dominating environment to do literature studies. Commercial bibliographic databases tend to be too general, are not up-to-date and require special skills and effort to be searched. On the other hand researchers also publish on the Web and collaboratively that can create indexes of relevant publications. CUMINCAD is a bibliographic index that compiles papers related to computer aided architectural design. Implemented with a database, it allows searching and browsing in the ways usual on the Web. It provides a "historical evolution" to learn from previous efforts and draws attention to older original works that could have been ignored because they could not be found on the Web otherwise. The authors believe that CUMINCAD will help focus future CAAD research and improve the education. CUMINCAD work started in 1998 and is available at www.fagg.uni-lj.si/cumincad/. This paper focusses on the design and development of the database and presents some ideas concerning its advanced use in the analysis of research efforts.
keywords CAAD-related Publications, Web-based Bibliographic Database, Searchable Index, Retrospective CAAD Research
series eCAADe
email b.martens@tuwien.ac.at, ziga.turk@ikpir.fagg.uni-lj.si
last changed 2001/02/11 19:22

_id 046b
authors Martens, Bob
year 1999
title Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 761-769
summary The aim and object of this account is to elaborate on the role of eCAADe within the present worldwide "CAAD-activities". Each of the associations dedicated to the field of CAAD has taken its very own course of development, many cases of overlap and interaction have resulted, some of them, however, merely based on personal contacts. The purpose of eCAADe is to promote the sharing of ideas and collaboration in matters relating to Computer Aided Architectural Design. This, jointly drafted paper outlines these global aims within a worldwide context. The eCAADe umbrella covers both Europe and its periphery. Including the Middle East and North Africa. Though this does not apply as a kind of "territorial claim ", the primary affiliation of regions to at least one of the current international associations is sought. Historically, the early eighties are to be regarded as the period of first encounters with computers of larger proportions of people involved in architecture, simultaneously with the rise of personal computers. Thus various university sites acted as the forerunners in this field. Implementation of CAAD in teaching and research soon called for channeling the exchanges of experience via a suitable platform. The founding of ACADIA (the North American Organisation) in 1981, however, seems to have set the stage, as shortly thereafter the foundations for a European movement were laid.
series eCAADe
email b.martens@tuwien.ac.at
more http:www.ecaade.org
last changed 2001/02/11 19:38

_id 6024
authors McCall, Raymond
year 1999
title A Web-centric CAD System for Collaborative Design
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 65-79
summary Web-PHIDIAS is a hypermedia-based, intelligent CAD system that delivers both CAD functionality and design information to anyone with Web access. This system is above all designed to facilitate collaborative architectural design. It provides both private (individual) and collaborative (group) drawing and text authoring spaces, with a variety of types of authoring and viewing privileges for groups. This enables a single designer to work in privacy on one piece of a design and later "publish" it to a supervisor or a group. It also enables a group to work in privacy and later publish its work to a different or larger group. This notion of "levels of privacy/publication" is a crucial but too- often missing component of collaborative design systems. With WebPHIDIAS, all drawings are stored in a central repository accessible from the group server. This means that they are accessible from anywhere in the world to any viewer who has the required viewing and/or authoring privileges. This enables designers to access and modify stored drawings while travelling or when out on the site, even if the site is in another country. It also enables them to create new drawings and store them in the central repository from anywhere in the world. Web-PHIDIAS consists of an interactive Web-based client that serves as an interface to the PHIDIAS hypermedia server. This client, which is implemented in Java, provides basic, 2D graphical editing functionality and as well as display of 3D views. It also provides access to multimedia information useful for whatever design task is at hand. This information includes text and graphical descriptions of design precedents as well as various issues in design of a particular type of building.
keywords Net-Centric, Web-Centric, Hypertext, Hypermedia, CAD, HyperCAD, Knowledge-Based Critics, Collaboration, Executable Content, Argumentative Design, IBIS, PHI, Design Rationale
series CAAD Futures
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 41d4
authors Medjdoub, Benachir
year 1999
title Interactive 2D Constraint-Based Geometric Construction System
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 197-212
summary This paper presents a 2D Constraint-Based Geometric Construction System where positioning and manipulating geometry is very precise. An unusually simple interface makes this system particularly interactive and easy to use. In our approach, the geometry types supported are: points, lines, circles, ellipses, circular arcs and b-spline curves. All the fundamental topologic constraints, i.e. tangent, parallel, perpendicular, coincident and concentric, are provided. Metric constraints, i.e. dividing the shapes into equal parts or fixing the geometric parameters, are also provided. These constraints are automatically applied by the application in response to the implied intentions of the end- user. Dynamic modifications of partially dimensioned models are supported, whereby the design is modified while enforcing the constraints. A graph-constructive approach is used to solve the model. As we are dealing with partial modifications, this resolution technique is quite sufficient, and makes our system stable and flexible. Our approach focuses highly on interactivity. Positioning a shape constrained to another is made directly through the graphic interface. Constraint relaxation is also done by direct manipulations. Modifications are made by dragging the geometry, or by typing into a numerical panel displaying the free shape parameters. Again, existing constraints are maintained as those numbers are applied. Well -constrained and under-constrained problems are discussed. This approach was developed in Java, JDK 3.0.1 of SGI's Java software.
keywords Sketching, Geometric Constraints, Interactivity, Geometric construction, Dynamic Modifications
series CAAD Futures
email Benachir.Medjdoub@nottingham.ac.uk
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

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