CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 141 to 160 of 590

_id 9f59
authors Qian, Dongqiu and Gross, Mark D.
year 1999
title Collaborative Design with NetDraw
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 213-226
summary The paper describes NetDraw, a Java-based object oriented drawing program that employs a server-client architecture to provide a shared drawing environment for collaborative design. NetDraw goes beyond conventional shared whiteboard applications in its support for concurrency control, groups and constraints, and ephemeral gesture objects. Small and simple enough that users can learn it quickly, NetDraw is designed to run on small platforms such as handheld computers. We describe NetDraw's features and an early evaluation of its use.
keywords Synchronous Collaboration, Shared Drawing.
series CAAD Futures
email mdg@spot.colorado.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 4511
authors Ratti, Carlo and Richens, Paul
year 1999
title Urban Texture Analysis with Image Processing Techniques
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 49-64
summary A new paradigm for investigating the environmental consequences of urban texture is proposed. Using raster-based models and software algorithms derived from image processing, efficient methods of measuring geometric parameters and predicting radiation exchange are developed. The possibilities of generating synthetic urban textures, and integrating cellular automata, are explored. Results suggest the possibility of a raster-based urban model to inform planning and design.
keywords Urban Texture, Image Processing, Urban Environmental Analysis, Urban Morphology, Cellular Automata
series CAAD Futures
email paul.richens@arct.cam.ac.uk
more http://www.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/pubs/
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 53f0
authors Richens, Paul and Trinder, Michael
year 1999
title Exploiting the Internet to Improve Collaboration between Users and Design Team: The Case of the New Computer Laboratory at the University of Cambridge
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 31-47
summary Cambridge University and Microsoft are building a shared computer research and teaching laboratory on a green-field site to the west of the city. The clients wished to use internet based communication between themselves and their architects, including email, a web site and virtual reality. We explain how this is to be achieved, and describe experiences during the first six months of a two year project. Particularly successful has been the use of games software (Quake 11) for 3d presentation of the emerging building design.
keywords Collaborative Design, Internet, Virtual Reality
series CAAD Futures
email paul.richens@arct.cam.ac.uk
more http://www.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/pubs/
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 6883
authors Richens, Paul
year 1999
title The Piranesi System for Interactive Rendering
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 381-398
summary Photorealistic rendering requires special skills to achieve, but the result is not necessarily ideal for architectural communication. The Piranesi software provides an alternative way of producing a much wider range of images from the same geometrical model. Piranesi appears to be a 2d paint program for editing raster images, but its input includes a z-buffer. This allows painting and and pasting to reflect the perspective of the image, and many other depthrelated effects. The result is a new, and enjoyable, way of producing architectural images.
keywords Computer Graphics, Non-Photorealism, Painting, Interaction, Rendering
series CAAD Futures
email paul.richens@arct.cam.ac.uk
more http://www.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/pubs/
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 9dfa
authors Ries, R. and Mahdavi, A.
year 1999
title Environmental Life Cycle Assessment in an Integrated CAD Environment: The Ecologue Approach
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 351-363
summary Construction and operation of buildings is a major cause of resource depletion and environmental pollution. Computational performance evaluation tools could support the decision making process in environmentally responsive building design and play an important role in environmental impact assessment, especially when a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach is used. The building domain, however, presents notable challenges to the application of LCA methods. For comprehensive environmental impact analysis to be realized in a computational support tool for the building design domain, such tools must a) have an analysis method that considers the life cycle of building construction, operation, and decommissioning, b) have a representation that is able to accommodate the data and computability requirements of the analysis method and the analysis tool, and c) be seamlessly integrated within a multi-aspect design analysis environment that can provide data on environmentally relevant building operation criteria. This paper reviews the current state of assessment methods and computational support tools for LCA, and their application to building design. Then, the implementation of an application (ECOLOGUE) for comprehensive computational assessment of environmental impact indicators over the building life cycle is presented. The application is a component in a multi-aspect space-based CAD and evaluation environment (SEMPER). The paper describes the use and typical results of ECOLOGUE system via illustrative examples.
keywords Life Cycle Assessment, Integrated Computational Environmental Analysis
series CAAD Futures
email amahdavi@tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 2473
authors Rivas Cruces, Alfonso
year 1999
title El uso de la tecnología de información en el Rediseño de la práctica docente (The Use of Information Technology in the Redesign of the Teaching Practice)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 272-274
summary The accelerated rate of change that we live nowadays, demands professionals to develop new learning skills to cope with it the rampant development of information technology opens up new horizons and challenges in the way that a human being can be formed through education. In response to the technological progress and rapid rate of change, the Tecnológico de Monterrey System has redesigned its education model, focusing on learning rather than teaching. This means not only acquiring knowledge on theory and concepts, but also learning skills, attitudes, and values that make students be committed with their community & country needs. It also means to be competitive in their area of knowledge at the international level. A central element in the new educational strategy is the technological platform where the academic courses are developed. This platform helps students and professors to do a great deal of the course activities on a lap-top through the computer the interaction between students with students, or professor with students has increased. At the Tecnológico de Monterrey System the implantation of the educational strategy has meant the creation of training programs for teachers, and technological development & support to attend over 5,000 teachers and 70,000 students.
series SIGRADI
email arivas@campus.cem.itesm.mx
last changed 2016/03/10 08:58

_id 4aa9
authors Roberts, Andrew
year 1999
title Virtual Site Planning
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 442-447
summary This paper looks at the potential for the Virtual Reality to be used as a medium for the development of teaching tools in Architectural and Urban Design Education. It identifies examples and lessons learned from the development of teaching tools in other disciplines. The paper outlines a prototype system developed at Cardiff University to help Town Planning students understand the three dimensional nature of site planning and design. This was developed following difficulties encountered by students in using CAD which was seen as insufficiently intuitive to allow effective use within the short timespan available. The prototype system allows students to access their site through the familiar environment of a Web Browser. A number of 'Standard' house types are available which can be selected and inserted into the design space. Once in the space the houses can be viewed in three dimensions, moved and rotated in order to form any configuration that the students may wish. The system is easily customisable; it need not be limited to uses in urban design, but could be used in many situations where component parts are arranged in space.
keywords Virtual Reality, Teaching, Learning, Site Planning
series eCAADe
email robertsas@cf.ac.uk
more http://ctiweb.cf.ac.uk/Housing/
last changed 2002/11/23 13:44

_id 9cd2
authors Rodríguez, A., Barcia, J. and Diron, F.
year 1999
title Desarrollo de la Web del Departamento de Histología y Embriología (Development of the Web Site of the Department of Histology and Embriologiy)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 376-378
summary The computers changed in dramatic form the way in which the information spreads. The low cost of the personal computers, along with the development of Internet allows that the educative community is interconnected, with limitless access to the information what increases the administrative productivity , and modifying the process of education-learning in one interactive colaborative and, focused in the student. In our Department we have a Web site in construction that includes the following pages: a main one, with the presentation of the Department and links to: a) historical aspects of the discipline and biography of outstanding Professors; b)visitors Professors ; c) investigation; d) publications; e) colaborative and independent projects; f) courses and examinations; g) AIH; h) autoevaluation for students; i) email addresses; j) project: study of embryo malformations.
series SIGRADI
email airamana@adinet.com.uy
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

_id 4b44
authors Rodríguez, A., Barcia, J., Diron, F., Saralegui, P., Bages, M., Caetano, C. and Olagüe, C.
year 1999
title Atlas Interactivo Electrónico de Histología y Embriología (AIH) (Electronic Interactive Atlas of Histology and Embriology (AIH))
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 369-371
summary The technology allows to center the educative process in the student. The development of the multimedia systems and Internet facilitated this change, being tools that they make possible to create an atmosphere of interactive and colaborative learning. The remote education promotes three kinds of interactions: faculty-student, students to each other and students with other dynamic electronic resources. The Histology and the Embryology are based on the study of images. We are developing to an electronic atlas of histology and embryology with pictures of histologic material captured with a digital camera and an optical microscope. The pictures (resizables and with explanatory text) are classified by tissues or systems with optative access pages and a Link to an autoevaluation multiple option type test . There is a link to an English version. The AIH makes possible an immediate access of the images and autotesting acquired knowledgements.
series SIGRADI
email airamana@adinet.com.uy
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

_id sigradi2003_014
id sigradi2003_014
authors Russell, P., Jackson, M. and Dieckmann, A.
year 2003
title Separated at Birth
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary While distributed or collaborative design studios have a long pedigree (Donath 1999), there seldom arises the chance to test the limits of the concepts implied by the idea of the physically separated design team. The indigenous differences of culture, schedules and language accentuate this. The authors entered into an experimental design exercise that would seek to explore the range of dualities, which are often encumbered by such studios owing to their very nature. As an additional catalyst in the experiment, a design topic was chosen which reflected the nature of the studio thereby creating a Gödelian knot of self-referentiality.
keywords Virtual Design Studio; CSCW; Distributed Practice; Intensive Learning
series SIGRADI
email russell@caad.arch.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

_id b34d
authors Russell, P., Kohler, N., Forgber, U., Koch, V. and Rügemer, J.
year 1999
title Interactive Representation of Architectural Design: The Virtual Design Studio as an Architectural Graphics Laboratory
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 459-465
summary This paper introduces the Virtual Design Studio (VDS), an internet based design studio environment established by ifib. VDS transfers lessons learned through research projects in the field of Computer Supported Co-operative Work (CSCW) being carried out at ifib into design education. By training for interdisciplinary co-operation within the design process, the students will become better prepared for the flexibility and co-operability required in planning situations. Increasing the communication and co-operation in the planning process can be achieved through the implementation of IT based virtual workspaces. In the design studio setting, this is done through the use of available internet software and technologies. The methodology of the VDS is briefly described including specific assignments intended to focus student investigations into specific areas including the representation of their work using the world wide web. The pedagogical expectations are discussed and anecdotal evidence precedes an general evaluation of the teaching method. The authors postulate that one of the unintended by-products of the studio is the evolution of an effective use of interactivity in the presentation of design concepts, ideas and solutions. A handful of student work is presented to describe the different approaches taken in using the world wide web (WWW) to display project work. A description of the local evolution (VDS specific) of graphical methods and technologies is followed by a comparison with those used in traditional settings. Representation is discussed with focus on the ability of the WWW to replace, augment or corrupt other methods of presentation. The interactive nature of web based presentations induces alterations to the narration of architectural work and can enhance the spatial perception of design space. Space Perception can be enabled through geometrically true VRML representations, the inclusion of auditory sensations, the abstraction of representation through the use of advertising techniques as well as the introduction of non-linear narrative concepts. Examples used by students are shown. A critical assessment of these new representational methods and the place of current new media within the context of architectural representation is discussed.
keywords Virtual Design Studio, Architectural Graphics, Teaching
series eCAADe
email peter.russell@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id ecaade03_059_29_russel
id ecaade03_059_29_russel
authors Russell, P., Stachelhaus, T. and Elger, D.
year 2003
title CSNCW: Computer Supported Non-Cooperative Work Barriers to Successful Virtual Design Studios
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 59-66
summary The paper describes a design studio jointly undertaken by four Universities. With respect given to the groundbreaking work carried out by [Wojtowicz and Butelski (1998)] and [Donath et al 1999] and some of the problems described therein, the majority of the Studio partners had all had positive, if not exemplary experiences with co-operative studio projects carried out over the internet. The positive experience and development of concepts have been well documented in numerous publications over the last 5 years. A platform developed by one of the partners for this type of collaboration is in its third generation and has had well over 1000 students from 12 different universities in over 40 Projects. With this amount of experience, the four partners entered into the joint studio project with high expectations and little fear of failure. This experimental aspect of the studio, combined with the “well trodden” path of previous virtual design studios, lent an air of exploration to an otherwise well-worn format. Everything looked good, or so we thought. This is not to say that previous experiments were without tribulations, but the problems encountered earlier were usually spread over the studio partners and thus, the levels and distribution of frustration were more or less balanced. This raised a (theoretically) well-founded expectation of success. In execution, it was quite the opposite. In this case, the difficulties tended to be concentrated towards one or two of the partners. The partners spoke the same language, but came from different sets of goals, and hence, interpreted the agreements to suit their goals. This was not done maliciously, however the results were devastating to the project and most importantly, the student groups. The differing pedagogical methods of the various institutes played a strong role in steering the design critique at each school. Alongside these difficulties, the flexibility (or lack thereof) of each university’s calendar as well as national and university level holidays led to additional problems in coordination. And of course, (as if this was all not enough), the technical infrastructure, local capabilities and willingness to tackle technological problems were heterogeneous (to put it lightly).
keywords CSCW: Virtual Design Studio; Mistakes in Pedagogy
series eCAADe
email russell@bazillus.architektur.rwth-aachen.de
more http://caad.arch.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id db35
authors Schmitt, G.
year 1999
title Information Architecture: Basics of CAAD and its future
source Basel: Birkhaeuser
summary With increasing intensity, CAAD (Computer Aided Architectural Design) is determining the daily work of today's architectural offices. Computers allow complex designs to be visualised and altered with great speed and accuracy; three-dimensional models can be created with simulation and animation possibilities, and links to the World Wide Web provide access to a flow of information. The author develops his thesis that these aspects do not just enable the creative process to be optimised in a quantitative sense but also qualitatively. Alongside the spatial and time dimensions, the new electronic possibilities provide a fifth dimension in architecture.
series other
email gerhard.schmitt@sl.ethz.ch
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 693f
authors Schmitt, G.
year 1999
title Basis and Future of CAAD
source Birkhauser, Basel.
summary The IT Revolution in Architecture; a small new series, reflecting on the effects the virtual dimension is having on architects and architecutre in general. In this edition Schmitt illustrates a number of aspects of the territory of CAAD, and demonstrates how this pool of information accumlated in the data basis could be exploited and elaborated as the "5th" dimension of architecture.
series other
email gerhard.schmitt@sl.ethz.ch
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 160c
authors Selles, Pascual
year 1999
title RGB Winds are Blowing in the Design Studio
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 286-291
summary This paper presents the results of two design studio elective courses offered to students in their second and third semester of studies at the Design Studio Department, "Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, UPV." Classes are based on a methodology that directly relates the language of architectural form and space, to the language of the specific software being used. Our focus is not only to discover what may be represented, but most important what may not, and why. We aim to point out the differences between architecture as perceived and experienced by a human being, and its digital representation as a computer data structure. At the Digital Design Studio, students are faced with a sequence of two projects so as to learn the basics of architecture, while developing their skill to build a digital representation of it. The first exercise within this CAD sequence is reading and analyzing a built project: a study of precedent. With this exercise we aim at two goals: to decipher the keys or parameters of architectural design, from drawings and pictures, trying to recognize an "architectural language"; and to learn a particular syntax of digital modeling. The second exercise is a project of a single family house within a narrow rectangular site and with only one street elevation. With this project we focus on the strong impact of stairs on the organization of functions and circulation, the illumination and ventilation of spaces with double heights and patios, and study the power of the section to express clearly the organization of spaces.
keywords Computer Aided Design, Studio, Education
series eCAADe
email pselles@upv.es
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 7b68
authors Shounai, Y., Morozumi, M., Homma , R. and Murakami, Y.
year 1999
title On the Development of Group Work CAD for Network PC: GW-CAD III
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 473-481
summary The number of Virtual Design Studio experiments that use a Digital Pin-up Board (WWW) and video conferencing tools is rapidly increasing. As we see that several schools have introduced group-ware to support asynchronous communication of their projects, it is possible to regard that techniques for asynchronous communication have already been developed to some extent. However, participants of those projects still have difficulty with synchronous communication. For example, though designers often desire to exchange models among members to get critical feedback and achieve fast problem solving while working at their desks, there are few CADs that can support concurrent synchronous design communication among members. The first half of this paper discusses a model of synchronous design communication that uses CAD models, and then proposes a prototype of tools that use Microsoft NetMeeting and AutoCAD R14: GW-CAD III. In the middle, a user interface system that enables designers to conveniently model and exchange separate sets of models necessary to elaborate different aspects of design is proposed: "Network Clipboard" "Modeling Space", "Plan Face", and "Section Face". Finally, this paper discusses the results of several experiments that used the prototype.
keywords Synchronous Collaboration, Internet, CAD, Prototype, Schematic Design
series eCAADe
email moro@arch.kumamoto-u.ac.jp
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 647f
authors Smith, A.
year 1999
title Teaching in Virtual Worlds: Innovation and Interaction
source Design Education, Habitat 7, Spring
summary The aims of research carried out at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis (CASA) under the umbrella of 'Online Planning' have been two fold. Firstly, to examine how new technologies can be used for the development of an Internet based planning system and secondly, how such technologies can enhance planning education. There has been considerable overlap between these two aims when real world applications have been introduced into the education environment. Teaching methods on a number of different courses at University College London, including the MSc in Virtual Environments, the MPhil in Town Planning and the BSc in Geography, have been developed to incorporate new technologies. This article describes progress to date and suggests possible uses of Internet based technologies for the teaching of topics relating to the design of the built environment.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id b761
authors Snyder, James and Flemming, Ulrich
year 1999
title Information Sharing in Building Design
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 165-183
summary We address information modeling and exchange in asynchronous, distributed collaboration between software applications or design agents that are heterogeneous, that is, developed independently based on application- specific data models. We identify the requirements an integration environment must satisfy if it is to support the semantically correct exchange of selected, locally generated information between the agents. These requirements are distilled from both the literature and our own experiments with the Object Modeling Language OML. The resulting requirements were then formalized into an information modeling and exchange environment constructed around the modeling language called SPROUT (supported by a compiler) and an associated software architecture that can be targeted toward many different hardware and software platforms. A unique capability supported in this environment is formal support for integrating existing applications: Given a schematic description in SPROUT, a formal specification can be used to generate computer programs that provably map data to and from the applications.
keywords Building Models, Conceptual Modeling, Product Modeling, Information Modeling, Design Tool Integration
series CAAD Futures
email ujf@cmu.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:23

_id 76ff
authors Sorby, S.A.
year 1999
title Developing 3-D Spatial Visualization Skills
source Engineering Design Graphics Journal, vol. 63, no. 2 (Spring): 21-32
summary This article brings up the point that 3-D spatial visualization skills are vital to graphics education. Instructors of graphics education, even though they have highly advanced spatial skills, rarely have the proper training on what spatial skills are or how the development of spatial skills takes place. As a result one must try to have a better understanding of spatial abilities. There are many interpretations as to what spatial skills really are and there is in therefore no one universal definition. As a way to better understand spatial abilities, Maier places them into five categories. The categories are spatial perception, spatial visualization, mental rotations, spatial rotations, and spatial orientation. These categories are vast. As a result of their vastness many of the categories overlap. Another step towards better understanding spatial skills involves differentiating how spatial skills are used while completing a task. Tartre makes a classification for how spatial skills are used while performing a task. The spatial skills are either used as spatial visualization that involves mentally moving the object, or as spatial orientation, which involves mentally moving the object. If the task involves spatial visualization then mental rotation can take place, which involves the entire object, or mental transformation can occur, which only involves part of an object. Visual thinking is a way to understand spatial skills. McKim offers the viewpoint that visual thinking occurs by three kinds of imagery. They are what one sees, what one can imagine, and what one can draw. All of these images interact with one another. Spatial skills are developed primarily in three different stages. This can be see be Piaget's theory on development. In the first stage, two dimensional, topological, skills are acquired. In the second stage, an understanding of 3-D objects, projective skills, from different viewpoints is achieved. Finally in the third stage, there is an understanding of area, volume, distance, translation, rotation and reflection, which is combined with projective skills. Spatial skills are evaluated in a variety of ways. There are tests that assess a person's projective skill level. Examples of these would be the Mental Cutting Test and the Differential Aptitude Test: Spatial Relation. Other tests assess mental rotation. Examples of mental rotation tests are the Purdue Spatial Visualization Test and the Mental Rotation Test. Results of these evaluations show mixed results as to whether there are gender differences in spatial skills. In order to enhance spatial skills, one must not only work with 3-D images, but they must also use concrete models and sketching. Overall I thought this article was very informative. It presented the information in a clear and concise manner. I summarized the information that I thought was especially useful for this class. The article really made me think how important it is not only to have spatial skills, but also to have an understanding of them.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 1419
authors Spitz, Rejane
year 1999
title Dirty Hands on the Keyboard: In Search of Less Aseptic Computer Graphics Teaching for Art & Design
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 13-18
summary In recent decades our society has witnessed a level of technological development that has not been matched by that of educational development. Far from the forefront in the process of social change, education has been trailing behind transformations occurring in industrial sectors, passively and sluggishly assimilating their technological innovations. Worse yet, educators have taken the technology and logic of innovations deriving predominantly from industry and attempted to transpose them directly into the classroom, without either analyzing them in terms of demands from the educational context or adjusting them to the specificities of the teaching/learning process. In the 1970s - marked by the effervescence of Educational Technology - society witnessed the extensive proliferation of audio-visual resources for use in education, yet with limited development in teaching theories and educational methods and procedures. In the 1980s, when Computers in Education emerged as a new area, the discussion focused predominantly on the issue of how the available computer technology could be used in the school, rather than tackling the question of how it could be developed in such a way as to meet the needs of the educational proposal. What, then, will the educational legacy of the 1990s be? In this article we focus on the issue from the perspective of undergraduate and graduate courses in Arts and Design. Computer Graphics slowly but surely has gained ground and consolidated as part of the Art & Design curricula in recent years, but in most cases as a subject in the curriculum that is not linked to the others. Computers are usually allocated in special laboratories, inside and outside Departments, but invariably isolated from the dust, clay, varnish, and paint and other wastes, materials, and odors impregnating - and characterizing - other labs in Arts and Design courses.In spite of its isolation, computer technology coexists with centuries-old practices and traditions in Art & Design courses. This interesting meeting of tradition and innovation has led to daring educational ideas and experiments in the Arts and Design which have had a ripple effect in other fields of knowledge. We analyze these issues focusing on the pioneering experience of the Núcleo de Arte Eletrônica – a multidisciplinary space at the Arts Department at PUC-Rio, where undergraduate and graduate students of technological and human areas meet to think, discuss, create and produce Art & Design projects, and which constitutes a locus for the oxygenation of learning and for preparing students to face the challenges of an interdisciplinary and interconnected society.
series SIGRADI
email rejane@rdc.puc-rio.br
last changed 2016/03/10 09:01

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