CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 21 to 40 of 590

_id 5222
authors Moloney, Jules
year 1999
title Bike-R: Virtual Reality for the Financially Challenged
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 410-413
summary This paper describes a 'low tech' approach to producing interactive virtual environments for the evaluation of design proposals. The aim was to produce a low cost alternative to such expensive installations as CAVE virtual reality systems. The system utilises a library of pre-rendered animation, video and audio files and hence is not reliant on powerful hardware to produce real time simulation. The participant sits astride a bicycle exercise machine and animation is triggered by the pedal revolution. Navigation is achieved by steering along and around the streets of the animated design. This project builds on the work of Desmond Hii. ( Hii, 1997) The innovations are the bicycle interface and the application to urban scale simulation.
keywords Virtual, Design, Interface, Urban
series eCAADe
email j.moloney@auckland.ac.nz
last changed 2002/11/22 17:34

_id 2c63
authors QaQish, Ra'Ed and Tarazi, Khaled
year 1999
title Formulating a Computer-Aided Architectural Design (CAAD) Program Model in Distance Education (DE) at Open Universities (OU)
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 189-204
summary This paper reports on a project that aims to formulate a CAAD program model in Distance Education (Learning/Teaching) framework, to be applied and implemented in future settings at Open Universities worldwide. The methodology used to establish the CAAD program model consisted of a worldwide literature review on the subject of Distance Education and Open Universities. It also involved an assessment of the methods and means used in the delivery of materials to students enrolled at Open Universities, together with an analysis of the current program of study and subject related courses. The methods of this investigation consisted of a comparative analysis between the existing models of teaching process at Open Universities and how it relates to CAAD in architecture schools. The study endeavored to examine several issues that were found to be key factors in any Open University system, namely: the methods of study, program of study, student type/body, academic/degree requirements, and residency/academic calendars. While attempting to establish a conceptual CAAD program model, this study investigated several questions concerning the efficiency of CAAD teaching in Distance Education. One of the study objectives was to determine which factors were mostly needed to effectively integrate CAAD in DE as a new program in Open Universities. In addition, how would these factors affect the design of CAAD courses in OU systems as a new DE program area? And what structural elements would be most affected by these factors? Another objective of this study was to determine to what extent the new CAAD program model in tandem with staff, learning environment, and administered materials would be effective in generating supplementary strategies in the virtual design studio. A third objective was to evaluate the personal computer station as an alternative design studio space in future settings of schools of architecture. Consequently, the principle objective of this study was to develop and establish a CAAD program model to be adopted by Open Universities as a new subject area in DE. Mainly, the study attempted to locate the areas where CAAD teaching excels in the context of virtual design studio of OU system.
series AVOCAAD
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 13f7
authors QaQish, Ra'Ed K.
year 1999
title Evaluation as a Key Tool to Bridge CAAD and Architecture Education
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 279-285
summary This paper reports on the findings of a study carried out at Glasgow University which proposes a framework for the evaluation of architecture curriculum once integrated with CAAD. This study investigated the evaluation of CAAD teaching methods (CTM) and the effectiveness of CAAD integration (CI) and explored CAAD employment suitability in the design studio, and what influences does it have on the design process tuition using the Kirkpatrick model as a vehicle. The related CAAD evaluation variables investigated were: CAAD Tutor, Course Materials & Contents, Class Environment, Use of Media, Delivery Methodologies, Administrative Briefs, and Overall Effectiveness of CAAD event. Several other variables investigated were the levels of students' performance, attitudes, knowledge, new-stand, creativity and skills. The paper covered briefly some of the findings of the case studies acquired over two years at MSA; both observations and questionnaire surveys were used as methods of data collection. Evaluation deficiency postulates the weaknesses of CAAD in architecture schools. Evaluation of CAAD tuition should be a fundamental approach to address CAAD integration efficiency and problems, to achieve effectiveness and productivity amongst architecture schools.
keywords Evaluation, Integration, Effectiveness
series eCAADe
email r.qaqish@index.com.jo
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 1570
authors Sowizral, H.A. and Deering, M.F.
year 1999
title The Java 3D API and Virtual Reality
source IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, May/June
summary Java 3D proves a natural choice for any Java programmer wanting to write an interactive 3D graphics program. A programmer constructs a scene graph containing graphic objects, lights, sounds, environmental effects objects, and behavior objects that handle interactions or modify other objects in the scene graph. The programmer then hands that scene graph to Java 3D for execution. Java 3D starts rendering objects and executing behaviors in the scene graph. Virtual reality applications go through an identical writing process. However, before a user can use such an application, Java 3D must additionally know about the user's physical characteristics (height, eye separation, and so forth) and physical environment (number of displays, their location, trackers, and so on). Not surprisingly, such information varies from installation to installation and from user to user. So Java 3D lets application developers separate their application's operation from the vagaries of the user's final display environment. The Java 3D application programmer's interface (API) provides a very flexible platform for building a broad range of graphics applications. Developers have already used Java 3D to build applications in a variety of domains including mechanical CAD, molecular visualization, scientific visualization, animation previews, geographic information systems, business graphics, 3D logos, and educational offerings. Virtual reality applications have included immersive workbench applications, headtracked shutter-glass-based desktop applications, and portals (a cave-like room with multiple back-projected walls).
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id c232
authors Trinder, Michael
year 1999
title The Computer's Role in Sketch Design: A Transparent Sketching Medium
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 227-244
summary Starting from an analysis of the current unsuitability of computers for sketching, three key requirements are identified, in particular the notion that re-drawing or over-drawing are more important than editing and tweaking. These requirements are encapsulated in the broad concept of Transparency, understood both literally and metaphorically. Two experiments in implementing aspects of Transparency are described. One subverts the Macintosh window manager to provide windows with variable transparency, so that tracing between applications becomes a practical possibility. The other implements a graphical interface that requires no on-screen palettes or sliders to control it, allowing uninterrupted concentration on the design in hand. User tests show that the tool can be learnt quickly, is engaging to use, and most importantly, has character.
keywords Sketching, Sketch Design, User-Interface, Transparency, Immersion, Computer Aided Design
series CAAD Futures
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 2355
authors Tweed, Christopher and Carabine, Brendan
year 1999
title CAAD in the Future Perfect
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 18-24
summary The history of CAAD research is largely one of generic computing techniques grafted on to existing design practices. The motivation behind such research, on different occasions, has been to automate some or all of the design process, to provide design assistance, to check designs for compliance against some predefined criteria, or more recently to enable people to experience designs as realistically as possible before they are built. But these goals remain unexamined, and their fulfilment is assumed to be a self-evident benefit. In the worst cases, they are examples of barely concealed technology-push. Few researchers have stated in detail what they want computers to do for architectural design, most choosing instead to focus on what computers can do, rather than what is needed. This paper considers what we want CAAD systems to do for us. However, this will be a modest effort, a beginning, a mere sketch of possible directions for CAAD. But it should open channels for criticism and serious debate about the role of CAAD in the changing professional, social and cultural contexts of its eventual use in education and practice. The paper, therefore, is not so concerned to arrive at a single 'right' vision for future CAAD systems as concerned by the lack of any cogent vision for CAAD.
keywords History, CAAD Research, Future Trends
series eCAADe
email c.tweed@qub.ac.uk, b.carabine@qub.ac.uk
more http://www.aic.salford.ac.uk/Pit/home.html
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 977d
authors Van Zutphen, R.H.M., Turksma, A., Achten, H.H. and Af Klercker, J.
year 1999
title AVOCAAD, Teaching CAAD on the Internet
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 345-354
summary The Leonardo da Vinci pilot project AVOCAAD (Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design), aims to innovate the use of computers in architecture. It tries to achieve this through the development of new course material, which will be used in the education of architectural students as well as for post-graduate education, continuous education and training-on-the-job of architects working in a practice. Besides the development of new course materials, a new framework was developed to give structure to the huge amount of different topics within the CAAD-curriculum and to improve dissemination and learning facilities using the Internet. In this paper, we describe the AVOCAAD project in general, give some examples of concrete course materials, and focus on the general framework, which we called the Vienna Scheme. The paper also focuses on the implementation, and use of the Vienna Scheme on the Internet is also discussed. The project is funded by the European Community under grant B/96/2/0539/PI/II.1.1.c/CONT.
series eCAADe
email rob.van.zutphen@logicacmg.com
more http://www.avocaad.org
last changed 2005/09/09 08:46

_id 1a3d
authors Willey, David
year 1999
title Sketchpad to 2000: From Computer Systems to Digital Environments
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 526-532
summary It can be argued that over the last thirty five years computer aided architectural design (CAAD) has made little impact in terms of aiding design. The paper provides a broadbrush review of the last 35 years of CAAD research and suggests that the SKETCHPAD notion that has dominated CAAD since 1963 is now a flawed concept. Then the discipline was replete with Modernist concepts of optimal solutions, objective design criteria and universal design standards. Now CAD needs to proceed on the basis of the Post Modern ways of thinking and designing opened up by digital techniques - the Internet, multimedia, virtual reality, electronic games, distance learning. Computers facilitate information flow and storage. In the late seventies and eighties the CAAD research community's response to the difficulties it had identified with the construction of integrated digital building models was to attempt to improve the intelligence of the computer systems to better match the understanding of designers. Now it is clear that the future could easily lie with CAAD systems that have almost no intelligence and make no attempt to aid the designer. Communication is much more central to designing than computing.
keywords History, Intelligence, Interface, Sketchpad, Web
series eCAADe
email dwilley@plymouth.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id cf2011_p109
id cf2011_p109
authors Abdelmohsen, Sherif; Lee Jinkook, Eastman Chuck
year 2011
title Automated Cost Analysis of Concept Design BIM Models
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 403-418.
summary AUTOMATED COST ANALYSIS OF CONCEPT DESIGN BIM MODELS Interoperability: BIM models and cost models This paper introduces the automated cost analysis developed for the General Services Administration (GSA) and the analysis results of a case study involving a concept design courthouse BIM model. The purpose of this study is to investigate interoperability issues related to integrating design and analysis tools; specifically BIM models and cost models. Previous efforts to generate cost estimates from BIM models have focused on developing two necessary but disjoint processes: 1) extracting accurate quantity take off data from BIM models, and 2) manipulating cost analysis results to provide informative feedback. Some recent efforts involve developing detailed definitions, enhanced IFC-based formats and in-house standards for assemblies that encompass building models (e.g. US Corps of Engineers). Some commercial applications enhance the level of detail associated to BIM objects with assembly descriptions to produce lightweight BIM models that can be used by different applications for various purposes (e.g. Autodesk for design review, Navisworks for scheduling, Innovaya for visual estimating, etc.). This study suggests the integration of design and analysis tools by means of managing all building data in one shared repository accessible to multiple domains in the AEC industry (Eastman, 1999; Eastman et al., 2008; authors, 2010). Our approach aims at providing an integrated platform that incorporates a quantity take off extraction method from IFC models, a cost analysis model, and a comprehensive cost reporting scheme, using the Solibri Model Checker (SMC) development environment. Approach As part of the effort to improve the performance of federal buildings, GSA evaluates concept design alternatives based on their compliance with specific requirements, including cost analysis. Two basic challenges emerge in the process of automating cost analysis for BIM models: 1) At this early concept design stage, only minimal information is available to produce a reliable analysis, such as space names and areas, and building gross area, 2) design alternatives share a lot of programmatic requirements such as location, functional spaces and other data. It is thus crucial to integrate other factors that contribute to substantial cost differences such as perimeter, and exterior wall and roof areas. These are extracted from BIM models using IFC data and input through XML into the Parametric Cost Engineering System (PACES, 2010) software to generate cost analysis reports. PACES uses this limited dataset at a conceptual stage and RSMeans (2010) data to infer cost assemblies at different levels of detail. Functionalities Cost model import module The cost model import module has three main functionalities: generating the input dataset necessary for the cost model, performing a semantic mapping between building type specific names and name aggregation structures in PACES known as functional space areas (FSAs), and managing cost data external to the BIM model, such as location and construction duration. The module computes building data such as footprint, gross area, perimeter, external wall and roof area and building space areas. This data is generated through SMC in the form of an XML file and imported into PACES. Reporting module The reporting module uses the cost report generated by PACES to develop a comprehensive report in the form of an excel spreadsheet. This report consists of a systems-elemental estimate that shows the main systems of the building in terms of UniFormat categories, escalation, markups, overhead and conditions, a UniFormat Level III report, and a cost breakdown that provides a summary of material, equipment, labor and total costs. Building parameters are integrated in the report to provide insight on the variations among design alternatives.
keywords building information modeling, interoperability, cost analysis, IFC
series CAAD Futures
email sherif.morad@gatech.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id e719
authors Achten, Henri and Turksma, Arthur
year 1999
title Virtual Reality in Early Design: the Design Studio Experiences
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 327-335
summary The Design Systems group of the Eindhoven University of Technology started a new kind of design studio teaching. With the use of high-end equipment, students use Virtual Reality from the very start of the design process. Virtual Reality technology up to now was primarily used for giving presentations. We use the same technology in the design process itself by means of reducing the time span in which one gets results in Virtual Reality. The method is based on a very brief cycle of modelling in AutoCAD, assigning materials in 3DStudio Viz, and then making a walkthrough in Virtual Reality in a standard landscape. Due to this cycle, which takes about 15 seconds, the student gets immediate feedback on design decisions which facilitates evaluation of the design in three dimensions much faster than usual. Usually the learning curve of this kind of software is quite steep, but with the use of templates the number of required steps to achieve results is reduced significantly. In this way, the potential of Virtual Reality is not only explored in research projects, but also in education. This paper discusses the general set-up of the design studio and shows how, via short workshops, students acquire knowledge of the cycle in a short time. The paper focuses on the added value of using Virtual Reality technology in this manner: improved spatial reasoning, translation from two-dimensional to three-dimensional representations, and VR feedback on design decisions. It discusses the needs for new design representations in this design environment, and shows how fast feedback in Virtual Reality can improve the spatial design at an early stage of the design process.
series AVOCAAD
email H.H.Achten@tue.nl, A.A.E.Turksma@tue.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 6d88
authors Achten, Henri H. and Van Leeuwen, Jos P.
year 1999
title Feature-Based High Level Design Tools - A Classification
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 275-290
summary The VR-DIS project aims to provide design support in the early design stage using a Virtual Reality environment. The initial brief of the design system is based on an analysis of a design case. The paper describes the process of analysis and extraction of design knowledge and design concepts in terms of Features. It is demonstrated how the analysis has lead to a classification of design concepts. This classification forms one of the main specifications for the VR-based design aid system that is being developed in the VR-DIS programme. The paper concludes by discussing the particular approach used in the case analysis and discusses future work in the VR-DIS research programme.
keywords Features, Feature-Based modelling, Architectural Design, Design Process, Design Support
series CAAD Futures
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.n
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id alqawasmi
id alqawasmi
authors Al-Qawasmi, J., Clayton, M.J., Tassinary, L.G. and Johnson, R..
year 1999
title Observations on Collaborative Design and Multimedia Usage in Virtual Design Studio
source J. Woosely and T. Adair (eds.), Learning virtually: Proceedings of the 6th annual distance education conference, San Antonio, Texas, pp. 1-9
summary The virtual design studio (VDS) points to a new way of practicing and teaching architectural design. As a new phenomenon, little research has been done to evaluate design collaboration and multimedia usage in a distributed workplace like the virtual design studio. Our research provides empirical data on how students actually use multiple media during architectural collaborative design.
series other
email jamalq@kfupm.edu.sa
last changed 2003/12/06 08:55

_id 4d95
authors Alvarado, Rodrigo Garcia and Maver, Tom
year 1999
title Virtual Reality in Architectural Education: Defining Possibilities
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 7-9
summary Introduction: virtual reality in architecture Virtual Reality (VR) is an emergent computer technology for full 3D-simulations, which has a natural application in the architectural work, due that activity involves the complete definition of buildings prior to its construction. Although the profession has a long tradition and expertise in the use of 2D-plans for the design of buildings, the increasing complexity of projects and social participation requires better media of representation. However, the technological promise of Virtual Reality involves many sophisticated software and hardware developments. It is based on techniques of 3D-modelling currently incorporated in the majority of drawing software used in architecture, and also there are several tools for rendering, animation and panoramic views, which provide visual realism. But other capabilities like interactivity and sense of immersion are still complex, expensive and under research. These require stereoscopic helmets, 3D pointers and trackers with complicated configurations and uncomfortable use. Most advanced installations of Virtual-Reality like CAVEs involve much hardware, building space and restrictions for users. Nevertheless, diverse developers are working in Virtual-Reality user-friendly techniques and there are many initial experiences of architectural walk-throughs showing advantages in the communication and development of designs. Then we may expect an increasing use of Virtual Reality in architecture.
series ACADIA
email rgarcia@ubiobio.cl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id d423
authors Arvin, Scott A. and House, Donald H.
year 1999
title Making Designs Come Alive: Using Physically Based Modeling Techniques in Space Layout Planning
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 245-262
summary This paper introduces the concept of responsive design. It elaborates this concept as an approach to free form, adaptable, automated design applying physically based modeling techniques to the design process. Our approach attempts to bridge the gap between totally automated design and the free form brainstorming designers normally employ. We do this by automating the initial placement and sizing of design elements, with an interactive engine that appears alive and highly responsive. We present a method for applying these techniques to architectural space layout planning, and preliminary implementation details for a prototype system for developing rectangular, two-dimensional, single- story floor plans.
keywords Physically Based Space Layout, Physically Based Design, Responsive Design, Space Layout Planning, Computer-aided Design, Human-computer Interaction
series CAAD Futures
email arvin@viz.tamu.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 8171
authors Ataman, Osman
year 1999
title Facilitating Conceptual Change: Computers, Cognitive Processes and Architecture
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 275-279
summary Computers have gained universal acceptance as tools that designers use. However, computers are often not used to advance the design process but just to make drawings. Many architectural schools still focus on a production orientation which puts the highest value on information management, precise representations and drafting enhancements. Mostly, computer education is limited with button pushing and training manuals. It is the contention of the author that students in Design Studio courses can benefit greatly from computer based educational pedagogy designed to provide them with experiences they currently do not possess. In particular, little time in the computer courses (outside lectures) is spent applying concepts and features of digital tools in design studio environment. In architecture, computers cannot be simply defined as a presentation and production tools. As a cognitive tool, computers provide designers with intelligible and effective representational tools of thought and communication, changes the syntactic structure of design. Consequently, the conceptual structure of computers impacts the conceptual structure of the design project, fosters the analytical processes and facilitates conceptual changes. This paper describes the use of computers in a first year architectural design studio. It attempts to address the importance of developing a design process that is redefined by the use of computing, integrating concept and perception. Furthermore, it describes the theoretical foundations and the underlying cognitive processes that contribute designers' conceptual development.
series SIGRADI
email ataman@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 7ccd
authors Augenbroe, Godfried and Eastman, Chuck
year 1999
title Computers in Building: Proceedings of the CAADfutures '99 Conference
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, 398 p.
summary This is the eight CAADfutures Conference. Each of these bi-annual conferences identifies the state of the art in computer application in architecture. Together, the series provides a good record of the evolving state of research in this area over the last fourteen years. Early conferences, for example, addressed project work, either for real construction or done in academic studios, that approached the teaching or use of CAD tools in innovative ways. By the early 1990s, such project-based examples of CAD use disappeared from the conferences, as this area was no longer considered a research contribution. Computer-based design has become a basic way of doing business. This conference is marked by a similar evolutionary change. More papers were submitted about Web- based applications than about any other area. Rather than having multiple sessions on Web-based applications and communications, we instead came to the conclusion that the Web now is an integral part of digital computing, as are CAD applications. Using the conference as a sample, Web-based projects have been integrated into most research areas. This does not mean that the application of the Web is not a research area, but rather that the Web itself is an integral tool in almost all areas of CAAD research.
series CAAD Futures
email chuck.eastman@arch.gatech.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 21c8
authors Bargiela, Beatriz and Bausset, Raúl Abad
year 1999
title Sistemas multimediales aplicados a la arquitectura y su conocimiento (Multimedia Systems Applied to Architecture and its Knowledge Base)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 186-191
summary This text makes a careful description of a great part of the components of the vocabulary of architecture and their syntax. It's structured in two parts, one textual and the other graphic. Due to the acknowledged contribution of the author on the subject of description of vocabulary of the elements of architecture and the research and development works that are entered upon in the master in computer graphics in the informatic field, it was proposed the development of an interactive system that allowed by means of links to connect the different parts of text and their respective graphics. Having as a basis the idiomatic equivalent term in Spanish and English, carried out in another research work, it was considered the possibility to link the text in these two languages besides the original one, french. That's why we've decided to propose the navigation through numeric text and images. This navigation has been already inferred from the reading of the text as intended from the author's that was why our task has been the interpretation of this intention and its translation in an informatic system. The product presented in this work is limited to having designed a methodology and showing its performance with some terms and images, able to make evident the sketch of our idea. The work is made out of the description of the following phases: 1.) Design of its interface; 2.) Compilation and classification of images compilation and classification of text; 3.) Coordination of textual and graphic elements; 4.) Programming of events in the interactive system.
series SIGRADI
email gidcad@ub.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 7436
authors Barría Chateau, H., Muñoz Viveros, C. and Cerda Brintrup, G.
year 1999
title Virtual Tour Through Modern Architecture in Conception
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 475-477
summary This paper describes the development of a project that was selected and sponsoured by the Regional Competition FONDART 1998 (Funds for the Development of Arts of the Regional Secretary of Education) that follows the aim of cultural diffusion. Towards the middle of the 30s, the city of Concepción developed an architecture distinctly colonial, neoclassical and eclectic. An earthquake in 1939 abruptly interrupted this scene, destroying the enterity of its most important buildings. The reconstruction of the city followed the manifestoes of Modern Architecture, consolidating the urban importance of buildings such us the Law Courts, the Railway Station and the Regional Government, that emerged as the new architectural and cultural heritage of the city. The project consisted on the modeling of eleven buildings of the modern architectural heritage, and on the generation of 42 virtual tours through the buildings that were finally edited on a 16' video. This video allows the spectator to make a virtual tour through the original modern heritage of the city, nowadays demolished, altered, and sometimes, even forgotten. This project pretends to widen the ways of comprehension of our cultural identity by using computer modelling and animation as a tool for the conservation of the architectural heritage; and creating a record that can be used as a reference and as an instrument of cultural difussion.
series SIGRADI
email mtrebilc@zeus.dci.ubiobio.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 7da7
authors Benedetti, Cristina and Salvioni, Giulio
year 1999
title The Use of Renewable Resource in Architecture: New Teaching Methodologies
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 751-756
summary The program is organized into four parts. Each is very much connected, both logically and methodologically, so that the unit as a whole consists of a content and method of access that are not divided up. This method is not in a chronological order that simply goes in one direction, rather it allows the user to "refer back", in real time and in different directions. For the simple purpose of explanation, the sections of the program are listed as follows: (-) "Basic information" concerns the basics of bioclimatic and timber architecture. Without this knowledge, the other two sections would be difficult to understand; (-) "Actual buildings throughout the world"; give examples of architectural quality; they concretize the basics of bioclimatic and timber architecture; (-) "Students' Masters Theses", that follow on from the basic information and the learning experience "in the field", and guided by the lecturer, have a critical approach to actual buildings throughout the world. (-) A multimedia data-sheet organized to ensure a clear and straightforward presentation of information about the construction products. It relies on a tab-based navigation interface that gives users access to eight different stacked windows.
keywords Architecture, Multimedia, Timber, Bioclimatic, Classification
series eCAADe
email benedetti@axrma.uniroma1.it
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id e531
authors Berk, Michael
year 1999
title CYBERjack
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 4, p. 10
summary Using a limited "kit of parts" [two 8 ft. 2x4's and one sheet of 1/2" birch plywood] students in teams of two are to design and construct an "interface" which joins the physical world to the virtual world of the web. The location for this piece of furniture [the CYBERjack] will be a local library in Okolona, Mississippi, where existing web computers are to be housed. The students modeled the design using formZ, then plotted full-size templates to be used in cutting the actual parts out of wood in the shop. The device was supposed to join the Body to the Machine. The project lasted 2 weeks and was part of a 4th year studio which participated in the ACADIA Library Competition last year.
series ACADIA
email mberk@sarc.msstate.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

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