CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 93

_id b78f
authors Clayton, M.J., Warden, Robert B., Parker, Th.W.
year 1999
title Virtual Construction of Architecture Using 3D CAD and Simulation
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 316-324
summary 3D modeling and computer simulations provide new ways for architecture students to study the relationship between the design and construction of buildings. Digital media help to integrate and expand the content of courses in drafting, construction and design. This paper describes computer-based exercises that intensify the students’ experience of construction in several courses from sophomore to senior level. The courses integrate content from drafting and design communication, construction, CAD, and design. Several techniques are used to strengthen students’ awareness and ability in construction. These include: · Virtual design - build projects in which students construct 3D CAD models that include all elements that are used in construction. · Virtual office in which several students must collaborate under the supervision of a student acting as project architect to create a 3D CAD model and design development documents. · Virtual sub-contracting in which each student builds a trade specific 3D CAD model of a building and all of the trade specific models must be combined into a single model. · Construction simulations (4D CAD) in which students build 3D CAD models showing all components and then animate them to illustrate the assembly process. · Cost estimating using spreadsheets. These techniques are applied and reapplied at several points in the curriculum in both technical laboratory courses and design studios. This paper compares virtual construction methods to physical design – build projects and provides our pedagogical arguments for the use of digital media for understanding construction.
series ACADIA
email wardenr@archone.tamu.edu, mark-clayton@tamu.edu
last changed 1999/12/02 07:59

_id 6062
authors Kensek, Karen and Noble, Douglas
year 1999
title Digital Constructions of Art Works: A Method for Exploring Four Dimensions
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 259-263
summary To animate is to give life or motion to an object. In this study, the method for exploring in four dimensions was the use of animation in a three dimensional model; the objects were well known paintings or drawings. Although architectural studies were encouraged, a range of paintings was chosen and different intentions about the role of animation were investigated.
series SIGRADI
email kensek@usc.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id cf2011_p109
id cf2011_p109
authors Abdelmohsen, Sherif; Lee Jinkook, Eastman Chuck
year 2011
title Automated Cost Analysis of Concept Design BIM Models
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 403-418.
summary AUTOMATED COST ANALYSIS OF CONCEPT DESIGN BIM MODELS Interoperability: BIM models and cost models This paper introduces the automated cost analysis developed for the General Services Administration (GSA) and the analysis results of a case study involving a concept design courthouse BIM model. The purpose of this study is to investigate interoperability issues related to integrating design and analysis tools; specifically BIM models and cost models. Previous efforts to generate cost estimates from BIM models have focused on developing two necessary but disjoint processes: 1) extracting accurate quantity take off data from BIM models, and 2) manipulating cost analysis results to provide informative feedback. Some recent efforts involve developing detailed definitions, enhanced IFC-based formats and in-house standards for assemblies that encompass building models (e.g. US Corps of Engineers). Some commercial applications enhance the level of detail associated to BIM objects with assembly descriptions to produce lightweight BIM models that can be used by different applications for various purposes (e.g. Autodesk for design review, Navisworks for scheduling, Innovaya for visual estimating, etc.). This study suggests the integration of design and analysis tools by means of managing all building data in one shared repository accessible to multiple domains in the AEC industry (Eastman, 1999; Eastman et al., 2008; authors, 2010). Our approach aims at providing an integrated platform that incorporates a quantity take off extraction method from IFC models, a cost analysis model, and a comprehensive cost reporting scheme, using the Solibri Model Checker (SMC) development environment. Approach As part of the effort to improve the performance of federal buildings, GSA evaluates concept design alternatives based on their compliance with specific requirements, including cost analysis. Two basic challenges emerge in the process of automating cost analysis for BIM models: 1) At this early concept design stage, only minimal information is available to produce a reliable analysis, such as space names and areas, and building gross area, 2) design alternatives share a lot of programmatic requirements such as location, functional spaces and other data. It is thus crucial to integrate other factors that contribute to substantial cost differences such as perimeter, and exterior wall and roof areas. These are extracted from BIM models using IFC data and input through XML into the Parametric Cost Engineering System (PACES, 2010) software to generate cost analysis reports. PACES uses this limited dataset at a conceptual stage and RSMeans (2010) data to infer cost assemblies at different levels of detail. Functionalities Cost model import module The cost model import module has three main functionalities: generating the input dataset necessary for the cost model, performing a semantic mapping between building type specific names and name aggregation structures in PACES known as functional space areas (FSAs), and managing cost data external to the BIM model, such as location and construction duration. The module computes building data such as footprint, gross area, perimeter, external wall and roof area and building space areas. This data is generated through SMC in the form of an XML file and imported into PACES. Reporting module The reporting module uses the cost report generated by PACES to develop a comprehensive report in the form of an excel spreadsheet. This report consists of a systems-elemental estimate that shows the main systems of the building in terms of UniFormat categories, escalation, markups, overhead and conditions, a UniFormat Level III report, and a cost breakdown that provides a summary of material, equipment, labor and total costs. Building parameters are integrated in the report to provide insight on the variations among design alternatives.
keywords building information modeling, interoperability, cost analysis, IFC
series CAAD Futures
email sherif.morad@gatech.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id 93a8
authors Anders, P.
year 1999
title Envisioning Cyberspace: Designing 3D Electronic Spaces
source McGraw-Hill, NY
summary Free of the constraints of physical form and limited only by imagination, new environments spring to life daily in a fantastic realm called cyberspace. The creators of this new virtual world may be programmers, designers, architects, even children. In this invigorating exploration of the juncture between cyberspace and the physical world, architect Peter Anders brings together leading-edge cyberspace art and architecture ... inspiring new techniques and technologies ... unexpected unions of reality and virtuality ... and visions of challenges and opportunities as yet unexplored. More than an invitation to tour fantastic realms and examine powerful tools, this book is a hard-eyed look at cyberspace's impact on physical, cultural, and social reality, and the human-centered principles of its design. This is a book that will set designers and architects thinkingNand a work of importance to anyone fascinated with the fast-closing space between the real and the virtual.
series other
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id d5c8
authors Angelo, C.V., Bueno, A.P., Ludvig, C., Reis, A.F. and Trezub, D.
year 1999
title Image and Shape: Two Distinct Approaches
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 410-415
summary This paper is the result of two researches done at the district of Campeche, Florianópolis, by the Grupo PET/ARQ/UFSC/CAPES. Different aspects and conceptual approaches were used to study the spatial attributes of this district located in the Southern part of Santa Catarina Island. The readings and analysis of two researches were based on graphic pistures builded with the use of Corel 7.0 e AutoCadR14. The first research – "Urban Development in the Island of Santa Catarina: Public Space Study"- examined the urban structures of Campeche based on the Spatial Syntax Theory developed by Hillier and Hanson (1984) that relates form and social appropriation of public spaces. The second research – "Topoceptive Characterisation of Campeche: The Image of a Locality in Expansion in the Island of Santa Catarina" -, based on the methodology developed by Kohlsdorf (1996) and also on the visual analysis proposed by Lynch (1960), identified characteristics of this locality with the specific goal of selecting attributes that contributed to the ideas of the place its population held. The paper consists of an initial exercise of linking these two methods in order to test the complementarity of their analytical tools. Exemplifying the analytical procedures undertaken in the two approaches, the readings done - global (of the locality as a whole) and partial (from parts of the settlement) - are presented and compared.
series SIGRADI
email caludvig@arq.ufsc.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id d423
authors Arvin, Scott A. and House, Donald H.
year 1999
title Making Designs Come Alive: Using Physically Based Modeling Techniques in Space Layout Planning
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 245-262
summary This paper introduces the concept of responsive design. It elaborates this concept as an approach to free form, adaptable, automated design applying physically based modeling techniques to the design process. Our approach attempts to bridge the gap between totally automated design and the free form brainstorming designers normally employ. We do this by automating the initial placement and sizing of design elements, with an interactive engine that appears alive and highly responsive. We present a method for applying these techniques to architectural space layout planning, and preliminary implementation details for a prototype system for developing rectangular, two-dimensional, single- story floor plans.
keywords Physically Based Space Layout, Physically Based Design, Responsive Design, Space Layout Planning, Computer-aided Design, Human-computer Interaction
series CAAD Futures
email arvin@viz.tamu.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 6480
authors Asanowicz, Aleksander
year 1999
title Computer in Creation of Architectural Form
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999,pp. 131-142
summary This paper considers graphic methods of presentation of ideas 'in the creation of architectural forms' and evolution of these methods, determined by the implementations of information technology. Drawings have been the main medium of expression since Leonardo da Vinci to the present-day. Graphic communication has always been treated as a main design tool, both - at the ending stage of design and at the early design stage. Implementation of computers in design doe not change this situation. The entire design process proceeds in a traditional way. While searching for the idea we use hand sketches and, after this, technical drawings are draught on a plotter, which replaces a drawing pen. Using computers at the early design stages encounters serious difficulties. The main thesis of this paper is that hardware and software inadequacy is not the problem, the problem is in the inadequacy of the design methods. This problem is to be reconceived as what a person can do with a program, rather than what is the capacity of a program. Contemporary computer techniques allow us to put an equation mark between the searching for idea, visualisation and its realisation in virtual space. This paper presents Sketching by scanning - an experimental method of using computer hardware and software for stimulating of searching of architectural's form.
series AVOCAAD
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 0f1e
authors Barrionuevo, Luis F.
year 1999
title Posicionamiento de Volúmenes Arquitectónicos Mediante Algoritmos Evolucionistas (Positioning of Architectural Volumes by Means of Evolutionist Algorithms)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 176-181
summary Configurational studies involve the groups of elements fulfilling restrictions defined by the designer in Architectural design. According to its necessities and intentions, the planner distributes the components of the group in a certain tridimensional way, establishing a composition. This operative procedure implies a classification system according to typologies that respond to a bigger system, and this in turn to another, until the whole is obtained. From the beginning the pattern should satisfy form restrictions, as well as dimensional and positional restrictions for each part that conforms the whole. Functional requirements are attended for each object satisfying relationships of connectivity and adjacency among them. In this work the parts are restricted by their relative position to a central element. Evolutionary Algorithms (EA) are used to solve this type of problem. Using evolutionary metaphors they originate concepts such as "genes", "chromosomes", "mutation", "crosses” and " population " (among other), which come closer to one of the solutions looked for by the designer, under combinatory stochastic methods. The most appropriate use of EA corresponds to problems of complexity NP-completeness (for example, problems of generation of cases of composition), allowing an efficient although not exhaustive analysis. Applying this technique to the generation of architectural volumes, some obtained results are exemplified.
series SIGRADI
email labsist@herrera.unt.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 616c
authors Bentley, Peter J.
year 1999
title The Future of Evolutionary Design Research
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 349-350
summary The use of evolutionary algorithms to optimise designs is now well known, and well understood. The literature is overflowing with examples of designs that bear the hallmark of evolutionary optimisation: bridges, cranes, electricity pylons, electric motors, engine blocks, flywheels, satellite booms -the list is extensive and evergrowing. But although the optimisation of engineering designs is perhaps the most practical and commercially beneficial form of evolutionary design for industry, such applications do not take advantage of the full potential of evolutionary design. Current research is now exploring how the related areas of evolutionary design such as evolutionary art, music and the evolution of artificial life can aid in the creation of new designs. By employing techniques from these fields, researchers are now moving away from straight optimisation, and are beginning to experiment with explorative approaches. Instead of using evolution as an optimiser, evolution is now beginning to be seen as an aid to creativity -providing new forms, new structures and even new concepts for designers.
series AVOCAAD
email P.Bentley@cs.ucl.ac.uk
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 8802
authors Burry, Mark, Dawson, Tony and Woodbury, Robert
year 1999
title Learning about Architecture with the Computer, and Learning about the Computer in Architecture
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 374-382
summary Most students commencing their university studies in architecture must confront and master two new modes of thought. The first, widely known as reflection-in-action, is a continuous cycle of self-criticism and creation that produces both learning and improved work. The second, which we call here design making, is a process which considers building construction as an integral part of architectural designing. Beginning students in Australia tend to do neither very well; their largely analytic secondary education leaves the majority ill-prepared for these new forms of learning and working. Computers have both complicated and offered opportunities to improve this situation. An increasing number of entering students have significant computing skill, yet university architecture programs do little in developing such skill into sound and extensible knowledge. Computing offers new ways to engage both reflection-in-action and design making. The collaboration between two Schools in Australia described in detail here pools computer-based learning resources to provide a wider scope for the education in each institution, which we capture in the phrase: Learn to use computers in architecture (not use computers to learn architecture). The two shared learning resources are Form Making Games (Adelaide University), aimed at reflection-in-action and The Construction Primer (Deakin University and Victoria University of Wellington), aimed at design making. Through contributing to and customising the resources themselves, students learn how designing and computing relate. This paper outlines the collaborative project in detail and locates the initiative at a time when the computer seems to have become less self-consciously assimilated within the wider architectural program.
keywords Reflection-In-Action, Design Making, Customising Computers
series eCAADe
email mburry@deakin.edu.au
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 92ce
authors Cabezas, M., Mariano, C., Mitolo, S. and Oliva, S.
year 1999
title Una Experiencia Docente sobre la Incorporación del Uso de la Informática en la Enseñanza-Aprendizaje de la Forma (An Educational Experience on the Incorporation of the use of Computing in the Teaching/Learning of Form)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 349-351
summary In this work an experience pilot is presented based on the study of the transformations of the teaching-learning process referred to the visual communication, specifically in the didactic units referred to the bi- and three-dimensional form, proposing to the student as an informatical user like a new alternative to the conventional form.
series SIGRADI
email mariadc@copetel.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ga9915
id ga9915
authors Calio, F. and Marchetti, E.
year 1999
title Linear algebra and creative process
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Mathematical methods providing metamorphosis of three-dimensional objects are considered. Linear algebra is the basic tool : precisely linear transformations depending on a parameter are the way to produce the basic surface, moreover logic rules of manipulation of its parametric equations allow the realization of the generative process. We think that mathematical methods introduced into a generative approach can increase the performances in the designing evolution. This paper illustrates an example realized by modifying mathematically a three-dimensional form, whose initial idea is recognisable at every step.
series other
email fracal@mate.polimi.it
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 0dc3
authors Chambers, Tom and Wood, John B.
year 1999
title Decoding to 2000 CAD as Mediator
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 210-216
summary This paper will present examples of current practice in the Design Studio course of the BDE, University of Strathclyde. The paper will demonstrate an integrated approach to teaching design, which includes CAD among other visual communication techniques as a means to exploring design concepts and the presentation of complex information as part of the design process. It will indicate how the theoretical dimension is used to direct the student in their areas of independent study. Projects illustrated will include design precedents that have involved students in the review and assessment of landmarks in the history of design. There will be evidence of how students integrate DTP in the presentation of site analysis, research of appropriate design precedents and presentation of their design solutions. CADET underlines the importance of considering design solutions within the context of both our European cultural context and of assessing the environmental impact of design options, for which CAD is eminently suited. As much as a critical method is essential to the development of the design process, a historical perspective and an appreciation of the sophistication of communicative media will inform the analysis of structural form and meaning in a modem urban context. Conscious of the dynamic of social and historical influences in design practice, the student is enabled "to take a critical stand against the dogmatism of the school "(Gadamer, 1988) that inevitably insinuates itself in learning institutions and professional practice.
keywords Design Studio, Communication, Integrated Teaching
series eCAADe
email j.b.wood@strath.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 69f5
authors Chan, C., Maves, J. and Cruz-Neira, C.
year 1999
title An Electronic Library for Teaching Architectural History
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 335-344
summary This research project developed an electronic library of significant buildings chosen to represent seven selected periods of Western architectural history: Egyptian (Mortuary temple of Queen Hatshepsut), Greek (Parthenon), Roman (Pantheon), Romanesque (Speyer Cathedral), Gothic (Notre Dame Cathedral), Renaissance (Tempietto), and Modern (Des Moines Art Center). All buildings were reconstructed in their original or intended forms based on plans, drawings, photographs, and historical texts. Two products were generated by this project: (1) materials to be displayed on the World Wide Web, including rendered still images for perception, movies for a visual guide, and Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) models for user navigation; and (2) virtual reality (VR) models to be displayed in the C2 (an improved version of the Cave Automatic Virtual Environment or CAVE facility). The benefits of these VR models displayed on the Web and in the C2 are their easy accessibility at any time from various geographic locations and the immersive experience that enhances viewersÌ understanding of the effects of spatial proportions on form and of colors on materials.
series CAADRIA
more http://archvr.design.iastate.edu/miller
last changed 2000/01/13 11:23

_id 1ea1
authors Cheng, Nancy Yen-wen
year 1999
title Digital Design at UO
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 4, p. 18
summary University of Oregon Architecture Department has developed a spectrum of digital design from introductory methods courses to advanced design studios. With a computing curriculum that stresses a variety of tools, architectural issues such as form-making, communication, collaboration,theory-driven design, and presentation are explored. During the first year, all entering students are required to learn 3D modeling, rendering, image-processing and web-authoring in our Introduction to Architectural ComputerGraphics course. Through the use of cross-platform software, the two hundred beginning students are able to choose to work in either MacOS or Windows. Students begin learning the software by ‘playing’ with geometric elements and further develop their control by describing assigned architectural monuments. In describing the monuments, they begin with 2D diagrams and work up to complete 3D compositions, refining their modelswith symbol libraries. By visualizing back and forth between the drafting and modeling modes, the students quickly connect orthogonal plans and sections with their spatial counterparts. Such connections are an essential foundation for further learning.
series ACADIA
email nywc@darkwing.uoregon.edu
last changed 2002/12/14 09:04

_id 5a10
authors Cheng, Nancy Yen-Wen
year 1999
title Playing with Digital Media: Enlivening Computer Graphics Teaching
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 96-109
summary Are there better ways of getting a student to learn? Getting students to play at learning can encourage comprehension by engaging their attention. Rather than having students' fascination with video games and entertainment limited to competing against learning, we can direct this interest towards learning computer graphics. We hypothesize that topics having a recreational component increase the learning curve for digital media instruction. To test this, we have offered design media projects with a playful element as a counterpart to more step-by-step descriptive exercises. Four kinds of problems, increasing in difficulty, are discussed in the context of computer aided architectural design education: 1) geometry play, 2) kit of parts, 3) dreams from childhood and 4) transformations. The problems engage the students in different ways: through playing with form, by capturing their imagination and by encouraging interaction. Each type of problem exercises specific design skills while providing practice with geometric modeling and rendering. The problems are sequenced from most constrained to most free, providing achievable milestones with focused objectives. Compared to descriptive assignments and more serious architectural problems, these design-oriented exercises invite experimentation by lowering risk, and neutralize stylistic questions by taking design out of the traditional architectural context. Used in conjunction with the modeling of case studies, they engage a wide range of students by addressing different kinds of issues. From examining the results of the student work, we conclude that play as a theme encourages greater degree of participation and comprehension.
series ACADIA
email nywc@darkwing.uoregon.edu
last changed 1999/12/10 12:50

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id ga9904
id ga9904
authors Chupa, Anna
year 1999
title Generative Texture Maps for Animation (artwork and paper)
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary An aperiodic planar tiling is employed as the initial structure for texture application. A generative process for texture metamorphosis is used to create variation producing two-dimensional art work intended for printed output. Two-dimensional animations demonstrate the process for producing new textures. Expanding from this preliminary test, rules for opacity and relative depth, scale and velocity of movement will be related the length of time a form is visible on screen and geometric form. These are demonstrated in a two-dimensional animation that uses pictorial depth cues such as atmospheric perspective, occlusion, vertical placement, and diminishing size. Modification of rules take into consideration two underlying philosophical assumptions: 1) the world is created by a benevolent "god" and 2) aesthetic criteria govern issues related to selection of visual forms that persist.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 4989
authors Clayton, M.J., Teicholz, P., Fischer, M. and Kunz, J.
year 1999
title Virtual components consisting of form, function and behavior
source Automation in Construction 8 (3) (1999) pp. 351-367
summary Software can produce a product model of a building as a consequence of the designers' actions in drawing and evaluating the design. The actions of the designer include interpreting, predicting and assessing the emerging design and describe the building in terms of forms, functions and behaviors. A software prototype has been implemented that incorporates this understanding of the design process in the field of building design. It employs object-oriented classes to represent forms, functions and behaviors. As a software user draws and interprets the design for multiple evaluation issues, the software creates a unique `virtual component' for each entity. During automated reasoning to evaluate the emerging design, virtual components collect and organize form, function and behavior instances to describe the parts of the building. In comparison to other product models, our approach, which we refer to as a `Virtual Product Model', better accommodates change, provides increased support for the design process and enriches the product representation by including function and behavior.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id ga9921
id ga9921
authors Coates, P.S. and Hazarika, L.
year 1999
title The use of genetic programming for applications in the field of spatial composition
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Architectural design teaching using computers has been a preoccupation of CECA since 1991. All design tutors provide their students with a set of models and ways to form, and we have explored a set of approaches including cellular automata, genetic programming ,agent based modelling and shape grammars as additional tools with which to explore architectural ( and architectonic) ideas.This paper discusses the use of genetic programming (G.P.) for applications in the field of spatial composition. CECA has been developing the use of Genetic Programming for some time ( see references ) and has covered the evolution of L-Systems production rules( coates 1997, 1999b), and the evolution of generative grammars of form (Coates 1998 1999a). The G.P. was used to generate three-dimensional spatial forms from a set of geometrical structures .The approach uses genetic programming with a Genetic Library (G.Lib) .G.P. provides a way to genetically breed a computer program to solve a problem.G. Lib. enables genetic programming to define potentially useful subroutines dynamically during a run .* Exploring a shape grammar consisting of simple solid primitives and transformations. * Applying a simple fitness function to the solid breeding G.P.* Exploring a shape grammar of composite surface objects. * Developing grammarsfor existing buildings, and creating hybrids. * Exploring the shape grammar of abuilding within a G.P.We will report on new work using a range of different morphologies ( boolean operations, surface operations and grammars of style ) and describe the use of objective functions ( natural selection) and the "eyeball test" ( artificial selection) as ways of controlling and exploring the design spaces thus defined.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

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