CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 21 to 40 of 579

_id c991
authors Moorhouse, Jon and Brown,Gary
year 1999
title Autonomous Spatial Redistribution for Cities
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 678-684
summary The paper investigates an automated methodology for the appropriate redistribution of usable space in distressed areas of inner cities. This is achieved by categorising activity space and making these spaces morphologically mobile in relation to the topography within a representative artificial space. The educational module has been influenced by theories from the natural environment, which possess patterns that have inherent evolutionary programmes in which the constituents are recyclable, Information is strategically related to the environment to produce forms of growth and behaviour. Artificial landscape patterns fail to evolve, the inhabited landscape needs a means of starting from simplicity and building into the most complex of systems that are capable of re-permutation over time. The paper then describes the latest methodological development in terms of a shift from the use of the computer as a tool for data manipulation to embracing the computer as a design partner. The use of GDL in particular is investigated as a facilitator for such generation within a global, vectorial environment.
keywords Animated, Urban, Programme, Education, Visual Database
series eCAADe
email Jonhat@aol.com
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 2874
authors Pan, Yunhe
year 1999
title Dunhuang Art Cave Virtual Rebuilding and Navigation: Applying Multimedia, Intelligence and Design Technologies in Dunhuang Arts
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 1-20
summary Dunhuang Art Cave is confronted with the serious influence of natural forces. Integrating Multimedia, Artificial intelligence and CAD, we can virtually preserve and reproduce the original cave architecture, painting sculptures and murals. This paper first introduce the main ideas of Dunhuang cave virtual rebuilding, cave virtual navigating, mural color restoring as well as Dunhuang-style pattern designing, and then analyzes in detail their technical issues and show results of prototype systems. In the end, we give a brief summary.
series CAADRIA
last changed 2002/09/05 07:19

_id a4e9
authors Petrovic, Igor and Svetel, Igor
year 1999
title From Number Cruncher to Digital Being: The Changing Role of Computer in CAAD
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 33-39
summary The paper reflects on a thirteen-year period of CAAD research and development by a small group of researchers and practitioners. Starting with simple algorithmic drafting programmes, the work transcended to expert systems and distributed artificial intelligence, using computers as tools. The research cycle is about to begin afresh; computers in the next century shall not be detached entities but the extensions of man. The computer shall be the medium that will enable a designer to be what he/she really is. This future has already begun.
keywords History of CAAD, CAAD Design Paradigms, CAADfuture
series eCAADe
email aivan@eunet.yu, isvetel@infosky.net
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id ga9902
id ga9902
authors Soddu, Celestino
year 1999
title Recognizability of designer imprinting in Generative artwork
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Design lives within two fundamental stages, the creative and the evolutionary. The first is that of producing the idea: this approach is built activating a logical jump between the existing and possible worlds that represent our wishes and thoughts. A design idea is the identification of a set of possibilities that goes beyond specific "solutions" but identifies the sense or the attainable quality. The field involved in this design stage is "how" the world may be transformed, not what the possible scenario may be. The second is the evolutionary stage, that of the development of the idea. This approach runs inside paths of refinement and increases in complexity of the projects. It involves the management of the project to reach the desired quality.Generative design is founded on the possibility to clearly separate the creative and the evolutionary stages of the idea. And the first is reserved for man (because creative processes, being activated from subjective interpretations and being abduptive paths and not deductive, inductive or analytical ones, can not be emulated by machines) and the second may be carried out using artificial devices able to emulate logical procedures. The emulation of evolutionary logics is useful for a very simple reason: for getting the best operative design control on complexity. Designers know very well that the quality of a project depends, very importantly, on the time spent designing. If the time is limited, the project can not evolve enough to attain the desired quality. If the available time is increased, the project acquires a higher quality due to the possibility of crossing various parallel evolutionary paths, to develop these and to verify their relative potential running through the cycle idea/evolution more times and in progress. (scheme1) This is not all. In a time-limited design activity, the architect is pressed into facing the formalization of performance requirements in terms of answering directly specific questions. He is pressed into analytically systematizing the requirements before him to quickly work on the evolution of the project. The design solution can be effective but absolutely not flexible. If the real need of the user is, even slightly, different to the hypothesized requirement, the quality of the project, as its ability to respond to needs, breaks down. Projects approached in this way, which we could call "analytical", are quickly obsolete, being tied up to the flow of fashion. A more "creative" approach, where we don't try to accelerate (therby simplifying) the design development path "deducting" from the requirements the formalization choices but we develop our idea using the requirements and the constraints as opportunities of increasing the complexity of the idea, enriching the design development path to reach a higher quality, needs, without doubt, more time. As well as being, of course, a creative and non-analytical approach. This design approach, which is "the" design path, is a voyage of discovery that is comparable to that of scientific research. The fundamental structure is the idea as a "not deducted" hypothesis concerning a quality and recognizability of attainable artwork, according to the architect's "subjective" point of view. The needs and the constraints, identified as fields of possible development of the project, are opportunities for the idea to develop and acquire a specific identity and complexity. Once possible scenarios of a project are formed, the same requirements and constraints will take part, as "verification of congruity", of the increase in quality. Then the cycle, once more, will be run again to reach more satisfactory results. It is, without doubt, an approach that requires time.
series other
email Celestino.soddu@polimi.it
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 9c96
authors Szalapaj, Peter and Chang, David C.
year 1999
title Computer Architectural Representation - Applying the VOIDs Framework to a Bridge Design Scheme
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 387-394
summary A virtual environment presents sensory information and visual feedback to the user in order to give convincing illusion of an artificial world. In the architectural profession, the spatio-temporal metaphor in itself constitutes significant information retrieval, because we understand architecture by seeing it. This paper attempts to understand, and then to analyse the characteristics of representation of architectural models in virtual environments. We will examine the use and creativity of current computer generated architectural presentation in virtual environments. Our observations will be applied to the modelling of a bridge in Castlefield, Manchester, and evaluated by a group of students within the School of Architecture at Sheffield University. The conclusion of this paper will be the presentation of a conceptual structure for representing architectural models in virtual environments. This paper also explores the tension between the correspondence and constructivist views of representation. The correspondence view of representation relies on the idea that a representation corresponds to what is out there in the world. The constructivist view of representation advocates that any actual interpretation would depend on the context of their social and cultural backgrounds. However, the authors believe there should be a combination of these two views for architectural representation in virtual environments, and a framework developed by the authors - VOIDs will be presented.
keywords Virtual Environment, Architectural Representation, VOIDs, Correspondence, Constructivist
series eCAADe
email p.szalapaj@sheffield.ac.uk, arp95cc@sheffield.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id f02e
authors Traverso, Giovanni and Vighy, Paola
year 1999
title FULL-SCALE MODELING FOR THE LIGHTING DESIGN OF A NEW PAVILION AT THE VENICE BIENNALE
source Full-scale Modeling and the Simulation of Light [Proceedings of the 7th European Full-scale Modeling Association Conference / ISBN 3-85437-167-5] Florence (Italy) 18-20 February 1999, pp. 51-56
summary The research which is presented in this paper is related to a lighting topic and part of an architectural project for a pavilion at the Biennale of Venice, used for modern art exhibitions. The building is located along a Venetian canal: the roof form is curved in a way to allow daylight, reflected by the water, to penetrate in the lower part of the building, determining the atmosphere for the sculpture exhibition. In the upper part of the building, where the rooms have a barrel-shaped roof, we want to provide good diffuse lighting to emphasise the quality of the materials and colors of paintings. Starting point is a study of lighting techniques related to a temporary exhibition of modern art. Special attention will be paid to some considerations concerning the question of conservation, the integration of artificial lighting and daylighting, the modeling effects of light and its color performance as well as the effect of light. The study has been carried out testing (full-) scale models in the Lighting Laboratory at the University College of London.
keywords Lighting Techniques, Full-scale Experiments, Daylight Control, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
email traverso@keycomm.it
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa
last changed 2004/05/04 09:29

_id d59a
authors Zarnowiecka, Jadwiga C.
year 1999
title AI and Regional Architecture
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 584-588
summary In 1976 Richard Foqué established periods in the development of methods of designing. The first stage (the 50's and early 60's) - automatization of the designing process - properly identified language of description that is understood by a machine is vital. Christopher Alexander publishes 'Pattern Language'. The second stage (late 60's) - the use of the Arts - research techniques as interview, questionnaire, active observation; ergonomic aspects are also taken into consideration. The third stage (starts at the turn of the 60's and 70's) - co-participation of all of the parties involved in the designing process, and especially the user. The designing process becomes more complex but at the same time more intelligible to a non-professional - Alexander's 'Pattern Language' returns. It's been over 20 years now since the publication of this work. In the mid 70's prototypes of integrate building description are created. We are dealing now with the next stage of the designing methods development. Unquestionable progress of computer optimalization of technical and economical solutions has taken place. It's being forecasted that the next stage would be using computer as a simulator of the designing process. This stage may be combined with the development of AI. (Already in 1950 Alan Turing had formulated the theoretical grounds of Artificial Intelligence.) Can the development of the AI have the influence on the creation of present time regional architecture? Hereby I risk a conclusion that the development of AI can contribute to the creation of modern regional architecture.
keywords Design Process, Artificial Intelligence, Regional Architecture
series eCAADe
email zarnow@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id acadia10_183
id acadia10_183
authors Ireland, Tim
year 2010
title Stigmergic Planning
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 183-189
summary This paper presents an application of swarm intelligence towards the problem of spatial configuration. The methodology classifies activities as discrete entities, which self-organise topologically through associational parameters: an investigation of emergent route formation and spatial connectivity based on simple agent and pheromone interaction, coupled with the problem of ‘loose’ rectangular geometric assembly. A concept model sniffingSpace (Ireland, 2009) developed in Netlogo (Willensky, 1999), which established the self-organising topological capacity of the system, is extended in Processing (Fry & Rea, 2009) to incorporate rectangular geometry towards the problem of planning architectural space.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email t.ireland@ucl.ac.uk
last changed 2010/11/10 06:27

_id 3fb8
authors Monedero, Javier
year 1999
title Can a Machine Design? A Disturbing Recreation of Turing's Test for the Use of Architects
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 589-594
summary In 1950, fifty years ago, Alan Turing published a much-quoted paper that has given rise to a long list of articles and books. It presented, perhaps for the first time, in a clever and somehow sarcastic way, what has become one of the main big questions raised by the use of computers in human societies. The title of that paper was "Computing Machinery and Intelligence" (Mind, Vol. LIX, No. 236, October 1950) and the game proposed in it, called by Turing "the imitation game" has come to be known as "Turing's Test". The paper presented here is a rather simple adaptation of Turing's Test. It may, I hope, present in a, perhaps, not too serious a way, some central points related to the way that computers have integrated themselves in architect's, engineer's and building enterprises and, through them, in the way that architecture evolves in our times and adapts itself to modern societies.
series eCAADe
email javier.monedero@ega1.upc.es
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id ga0010
id ga0010
authors Moroni, A., Zuben, F. Von and Manzolli, J.
year 2000
title ArTbitrariness in Music
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Evolution is now considered not only powerful enough to bring about the biological entities as complex as humans and conciousness, but also useful in simulation to create algorithms and structures of higher levels of complexity than could easily be built by design. In the context of artistic domains, the process of human-machine interaction is analyzed as a good framework to explore creativity and to produce results that could not be obtained without this interaction. When evolutionary computation and other computational intelligence methodologies are involved, every attempt to improve aesthetic judgement we denote as ArTbitrariness, and is interpreted as an interactive iterative optimization process. ArTbitrariness is also suggested as an effective way to produce art through an efficient manipulation of information and a proper use of computational creativity to increase the complexity of the results without neglecting the aesthetic aspects [Moroni et al., 2000]. Our emphasis will be in an approach to interactive music composition. The problem of computer generation of musical material has received extensive attention and a subclass of the field of algorithmic composition includes those applications which use the computer as something in between an instrument, in which a user "plays" through the application's interface, and a compositional aid, which a user experiments with in order to generate stimulating and varying musical material. This approach was adopted in Vox Populi, a hybrid made up of an instrument and a compositional environment. Differently from other systems found in genetic algorithms or evolutionary computation, in which people have to listen to and judge the musical items, Vox Populi uses the computer and the mouse as real-time music controllers, acting as a new interactive computer-based musical instrument. The interface is designed to be flexible for the user to modify the music being generated. It explores evolutionary computation in the context of algorithmic composition and provides a graphical interface that allows to modify the tonal center and the voice range, changing the evolution of the music by using the mouse[Moroni et al., 1999]. A piece of music consists of several sets of musical material manipulated and exposed to the listener, for example pitches, harmonies, rhythms, timbres, etc. They are composed of a finite number of elements and basically, the aim of a composer is to organize those elements in an esthetic way. Modeling a piece as a dynamic system implies a view in which the composer draws trajectories or orbits using the elements of each set [Manzolli, 1991]. Nonlinear iterative mappings are associated with interface controls. In the next page two examples of nonlinear iterative mappings with their resulting musical pieces are shown.The mappings may give rise to attractors, defined as geometric figures that represent the set of stationary states of a non-linear dynamic system, or simply trajectories to which the system is attracted. The relevance of this approach goes beyond music applications per se. Computer music systems that are built on the basis of a solid theory can be coherently embedded into multimedia environments. The richness and specialty of the music domain are likely to initiate new thinking and ideas, which will have an impact on areas such as knowledge representation and planning, and on the design of visual formalisms and human-computer interfaces in general. Above and bellow, Vox Populi interface is depicted, showing two nonlinear iterative mappings with their resulting musical pieces. References [Manzolli, 1991] J. Manzolli. Harmonic Strange Attractors, CEM BULLETIN, Vol. 2, No. 2, 4 -- 7, 1991. [Moroni et al., 1999] Moroni, J. Manzolli, F. Von Zuben, R. Gudwin. Evolutionary Computation applied to Algorithmic Composition, Proceedings of CEC99 - IEEE International Conference on Evolutionary Computation, Washington D. C., p. 807 -- 811,1999. [Moroni et al., 2000] Moroni, A., Von Zuben, F. and Manzolli, J. ArTbitration, Las Vegas, USA: Proceedings of the 2000 Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference Workshop Program – GECCO, 143 -- 145, 2000.
series other
email artemis@ia.cti.br
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id cf2011_p109
id cf2011_p109
authors Abdelmohsen, Sherif; Lee Jinkook, Eastman Chuck
year 2011
title Automated Cost Analysis of Concept Design BIM Models
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 403-418.
summary AUTOMATED COST ANALYSIS OF CONCEPT DESIGN BIM MODELS Interoperability: BIM models and cost models This paper introduces the automated cost analysis developed for the General Services Administration (GSA) and the analysis results of a case study involving a concept design courthouse BIM model. The purpose of this study is to investigate interoperability issues related to integrating design and analysis tools; specifically BIM models and cost models. Previous efforts to generate cost estimates from BIM models have focused on developing two necessary but disjoint processes: 1) extracting accurate quantity take off data from BIM models, and 2) manipulating cost analysis results to provide informative feedback. Some recent efforts involve developing detailed definitions, enhanced IFC-based formats and in-house standards for assemblies that encompass building models (e.g. US Corps of Engineers). Some commercial applications enhance the level of detail associated to BIM objects with assembly descriptions to produce lightweight BIM models that can be used by different applications for various purposes (e.g. Autodesk for design review, Navisworks for scheduling, Innovaya for visual estimating, etc.). This study suggests the integration of design and analysis tools by means of managing all building data in one shared repository accessible to multiple domains in the AEC industry (Eastman, 1999; Eastman et al., 2008; authors, 2010). Our approach aims at providing an integrated platform that incorporates a quantity take off extraction method from IFC models, a cost analysis model, and a comprehensive cost reporting scheme, using the Solibri Model Checker (SMC) development environment. Approach As part of the effort to improve the performance of federal buildings, GSA evaluates concept design alternatives based on their compliance with specific requirements, including cost analysis. Two basic challenges emerge in the process of automating cost analysis for BIM models: 1) At this early concept design stage, only minimal information is available to produce a reliable analysis, such as space names and areas, and building gross area, 2) design alternatives share a lot of programmatic requirements such as location, functional spaces and other data. It is thus crucial to integrate other factors that contribute to substantial cost differences such as perimeter, and exterior wall and roof areas. These are extracted from BIM models using IFC data and input through XML into the Parametric Cost Engineering System (PACES, 2010) software to generate cost analysis reports. PACES uses this limited dataset at a conceptual stage and RSMeans (2010) data to infer cost assemblies at different levels of detail. Functionalities Cost model import module The cost model import module has three main functionalities: generating the input dataset necessary for the cost model, performing a semantic mapping between building type specific names and name aggregation structures in PACES known as functional space areas (FSAs), and managing cost data external to the BIM model, such as location and construction duration. The module computes building data such as footprint, gross area, perimeter, external wall and roof area and building space areas. This data is generated through SMC in the form of an XML file and imported into PACES. Reporting module The reporting module uses the cost report generated by PACES to develop a comprehensive report in the form of an excel spreadsheet. This report consists of a systems-elemental estimate that shows the main systems of the building in terms of UniFormat categories, escalation, markups, overhead and conditions, a UniFormat Level III report, and a cost breakdown that provides a summary of material, equipment, labor and total costs. Building parameters are integrated in the report to provide insight on the variations among design alternatives.
keywords building information modeling, interoperability, cost analysis, IFC
series CAAD Futures
email sherif.morad@gatech.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id edf5
authors Arnold, J.A., Teicholz, P. and Kunz, J.
year 1999
title An approach for the interoperation of web-distributed applications with a design model
source Automation in Construction 8 (3) (1999) pp. 291-303
summary This paper defines the data and inference requirements for the integration of analysis applications with a product model described by a CAD/CAE application. Application input conditions often require sets of complex data that may be considered views of a product model database. We introduce a method that is compatible with the STEP and PLIB product description standards to define an intermediate model that selects, extracts, and validates views of information from a product model to serve as input for an engineering CAD/CAE application. The intermediate model framework was built and tested in a software prototype, the Internet Broker for Engineering Services (IBES). The first research case for IBES integrates applications that specify certain components, for example pumps and valves, with a CAD/CAE application. This paper therefore explores a sub-set of the general problem of integrating product data semantics between various engineering applications. The IBES integration method provides support for a general set of services that effectively assist interpretation and validate information from a product model for an engineering purpose. Such methods can enable application interoperation for the automation of typical engineering tasks, such as component specification and procurement.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id a8f2
authors Becker, R.
year 1999
title Research and development needs for better implementation of the performance concept in building
source Automation in Construction 8 (4) (1999) pp. 525-532
summary Gaps in basic knowledge, inadequacies in the procedural infrastructure and lack of working tools, that still prevent a more systematic application of the performance concept throughout the building process, are identified. One of the main conclusions is that, despite the vast knowledge accumulated during the years in the fields of ergonometrics, human needs, human factor engineering, architectural design, structural analysis, building physics, building materials and durability analysis, this knowledge is not applied systematically during the building process. The situation is attributed to lack of tools for some of the decision making phases in the process, and to the lack of a common, preferably computerized, design platform that would ensure a comprehensive and quantitative approach to all the relevant performance attributes, link smoothly between the various phases along the project development, and minimizes bias caused by human experts.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 9f35
authors Bhavnani, S. K., Garrett, J.H., Flemming, U. and Shaw, D.S.
year 1999
title Towards Active Assistance
source Bridging the Generations. The Future of Computer-Aided Engineering (eds. J. H. Garrett and D. R. Rehak) Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (1999), 199-203
summary The exploding functionality of current computer-aided engineering (CAE) systems has provided today’s users with a vast, but under-utilized collection of tools and options. For example, MicroStation, a popular CAE system sold by Intergraph, offers more than 1000 commands including 16 ways to construct a line (in different contexts) and 28 ways to manipulate elements using a “fence”. This complex array of functionalities is bewildering and hardly exploited to its full extent even by frequent, experienced users. In a recent site visit to a federal design office, we observed ten architects and three draftsmen using MicroStation.
series other
email bhavnani@umich.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 2524
authors Corrao, R. and Fulantelli, G.
year 1999
title The Web to Support Creative Design in Architecture
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 275-283
summary The use of the web in a didactic context appears to be extremely meaningful and effective. In Architecture, the web has huge potential: among others, it has the ability to gather an enormous amount of information, and the ability to create an active learning environment, one which affords the learner opportunities to engage and think. The paper reports on a Web Based Instruction (WBI) system developed at the Italian National Research Council -Institute for Educational and Training Technologies- to support design activities for students of the Italian Faculty of Architecture and Civil Engineering. Original features of the system allow students to study and design in an effective way. Specifically, a particular set of "virtual stationery items" has been implemented and integrated in the system to help students, enrolled on on-line courses, to mimic important traditional study activities, still gaining all the advantages of using the Web. These tools are integrated with communication tools in the same learning environment. A very important feature of the WBI system is that authorised users can enrich the information network in the system, by adding new pages and new links. In the paper we report on the structure of the system, with particular focus on the information domain. Some of the "working tools" which allow users to simulate traditional study activities and the hypertext extension mechanism are also described.
series AVOCAAD
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id ecaade2014_146
id ecaade2014_146
authors Davide Ventura and Matteo Baldassari
year 2014
title Grow: Generative Responsive Object for Web-based design - Methodology for generative design and interactive prototyping
source Thompson, Emine Mine (ed.), Fusion - Proceedings of the 32nd eCAADe Conference - Volume 2, Department of Architecture and Built Environment, Faculty of Engineering and Environment, Newcastle upon Tyne, England, UK, 10-12 September 2014, pp. 587-594
summary This paper is part of the research on Generative Design and is inspired by the ideas spread by the following paradigms: the Internet of Things (Auto-ID Center, 1999) and the Pervasive/Ubiquitous Computing (Weiser, 1993). Particularly, the research describes a number of case studies and, in detail, the experimental prototype of an interactive-design object: “Grow-1”. The general assumptions of the study are as follows: a) Developing the experimental prototype of a smart-design object (Figure 1) in terms of interaction with man, with regard to the specific conditions of the indoor environment as well as in relation to the internet/web platforms. b) Setting up a project research based on the principles of Generative Design.c) Formulating and adopting a methodology where computational design techniques and interactive prototyping ones converge, in line with the principles spread by the new paradigms like the Internet of Things.
wos WOS:000361385100061
keywords Responsive environments and smart spaces; ubiquitous pervasive computing; internet of things; generative design; parametric modelling
series eCAADe
email davide.ventura@uniroma1.it
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id f51a
authors Del Pup, Claudio
year 1999
title Carbon Pencil, Brush and Mouse, Three Tools in the Learning Process of New University Art Designers
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 420-425
summary This article develops the introduction of computer technologies in the fine arts environment the use of these new tools, sharing the process of creation and interacting at the same level with older technics, breaks the myth of technology and tries to reach the right place according to current or modern advances. As an introduction, it explains the insertion in the current courses of study of the "computer languages area", its implementation, present situation and future stages. An important point we have developed is the teaching methodology, to solve the transition of those who, challenging their investigations in different areas, like fire arts, graphic arts, film or video, need the support of computers. The first steps consist in designing sample courses, which allow the measurement of results, the definition of concepts like extension, capacities, teaching hours and the most important, a methodology to share the enthusiasm of creation with the difficulties of learning a new technique it is necessary to discover limits, to avoid easy results as a creative tool one of the most important problems we have faced is the necessity of coordinating the process of creation with the individual time of a plastic artist, finding the right way that allows the integration of all the group, minimizing desertion and losing of motivation. Two years later, the first results in the field of digital image investigations and assistance in form design. Volume as a challenge and solutions supported in techniques of modeling in 3D (experiences of modeling a virtual volume from a revolution profile, its particular facts and the parallelism with potter's lathe the handling of image as the most important element, as an work of art itself, but also as a support in the transmission of knowledge (design of a CD as a tool for the department of embryology of medical school with the participation of people from the medical school, engineering school and school of fine arts). Time as a variable, movement, animation and its techniques, multimedia (design of short videos for the 150th anniversary of the Republic University). Conclusions, good hits, adjustments, new areas to include, problems to solve, the way of facing a constantly evolving technology.
series SIGRADI
email claudio.delpup@quanam.com.uy
last changed 2016/03/10 08:50

_id 125a
authors Dikbas, Attila
year 1999
title An Evaluating Model for the Usage of Web-based Information Technology in Computer Aided Architectural Design and Engineering Education
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 349-352
summary New technologies often reshape expectations, needs and Opportunities so as to develop strategic Plans for the implementation of Information Techniques in education and research. The widespread acceptance of the internet and more specifically the World Wide Web (WWW) has raised the awareness of educators to the potential for online education, virtual classrooms and even virtual universities. With the advent of computer mediated communication, especially the widespread adoption of the web as a publishing medium, educators see the advantages and potential of delivering educational material over the Internet. The Web offers an excellent medium for content delivery with full text, colour graphics support and hyperlinks. The Purpose of this paper is to present a model for the usage of web-based information technology in computer aided architectural design and engineering education. It involves the key features of a full educational system that is capable of offering the teacher and the student flexibility with which to approach their teaching and learning tasks in ways most appropriate to the architectural design and engineering education. Web-based educational system aims at creating quality in on-line educational materials taking collaboration, support, new skills, and, most of all, time. The paper concludes with a discussion of the benefits of such an education system suggesting directions for further work needed to improve the quality of architectural design and engineering education.
keywords Web-based Information Technology, Online Education, Virtual Campus, Computer Aided Architectural Design, Engineering Education
series eCAADe
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 1b4d
authors Ding, Lan
year 1999
title An Evolutionary Model for Style Representation Emergence in Design
source University of Sydney, Key Centre of Design Computing and Cognition
summary This thesis is concerned with the development of an evolutionary process model for style representation emergence in design. It explores issues involved in the interpretation of style, the concept and process of style representation emergence, an evolutionary approach based on genetic engineering, and its computational implementation. Style is a complex phenomenon in design. Interpreting and formulating design style is a difficult task. This thesis proposes a language model which interprets style space utilising hierarchical levels that map onto syntax and semantics. The style space is then formulated using a genetic description. Current studies have discussed shape semantics emergence in design, but none has been proposed for the emergence of style representation. This thesis provides the concept of style representation emergence with the emphasis on the interpretative aspect of style as well as the emergence process. It explores the emergence process of style representation through an evolutionary approach. Simulation of biological evolution appears to be very useful for design problems. This thesis develops style representation emergence through evolutionary simulation based on genetic engineering. A hierarchical evolutionary process encompassing competition as well as discovery and an evolutionary combination is proposed and developed. A computational representation of style can then be derived by the computer system through the use of this evolutionary process. This model of style representation emergence is applied to traditional Chinese architecture. An evolutionary system is implemented and presented with some examples of traditional Chinese architectural facades. The results from the implementation of the system are analysed and the utility of this model is investigated. The implementation is developed in a Unix environment using the C language. The AutoCAD package is used for the graphic representation.

series thesis:PhD
email Lan.Ding@csiro.au
last changed 2003/05/15 05:25

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