CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 627

_id 2995
authors Gabriel, Gerard Cesar and Maher, Mary Lou
year 1999
title Coding and Modelling Communication in Architectural Collaborative Design
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 152-166
summary Although there has been some research done on collaborative face-to-face (FTF) and video-conferencing sessions involving architects, little is know about the effects these different mediums have on collaborative design in general and collaborative communication and design representation in particular. In this paper we argue that successful computer-mediated collaborative design (CMCD) does not necessarily mean emulating close proximity environments. In order to investigate this view, we carried out experiments examining the effect and significance of different communication channels in collaborative sessions between architects. The experiments were conducted in different environments and classified into three categories. The first category is FTF. The second computer mediated collaborative design sessions with full communication channels CMCD-a. The third category was conducted also through computer mediated collaborative design sessions but with limited communication channels CMCD-b. A custom coding scheme is developed using data, external and theoretically derived coding categories as a base. Examples of how the proposed coding scheme works are given from all three categories of experiments. The coding scheme provides the basis for modeling and understanding communication in collaborative design.
series ACADIA
email gerard@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 1999/12/02 07:48

_id 1ea1
authors Cheng, Nancy Yen-wen
year 1999
title Digital Design at UO
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 4, p. 18
summary University of Oregon Architecture Department has developed a spectrum of digital design from introductory methods courses to advanced design studios. With a computing curriculum that stresses a variety of tools, architectural issues such as form-making, communication, collaboration,theory-driven design, and presentation are explored. During the first year, all entering students are required to learn 3D modeling, rendering, image-processing and web-authoring in our Introduction to Architectural ComputerGraphics course. Through the use of cross-platform software, the two hundred beginning students are able to choose to work in either MacOS or Windows. Students begin learning the software by ‘playing’ with geometric elements and further develop their control by describing assigned architectural monuments. In describing the monuments, they begin with 2D diagrams and work up to complete 3D compositions, refining their modelswith symbol libraries. By visualizing back and forth between the drafting and modeling modes, the students quickly connect orthogonal plans and sections with their spatial counterparts. Such connections are an essential foundation for further learning.
series ACADIA
email nywc@darkwing.uoregon.edu
last changed 2002/12/14 09:04

_id 5477
authors Donath, D., Kruijff, E., Regenbrecht, H., Hirschberg, U., Johnson, B., Kolarevic, B. and Wojtowicz, J.
year 1999
title Virtual Design Studio 1998 - A Place2Wait
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 453-458
summary This article reports on the recent, geographically and temporally distributed, intercollegiate Virtual Design Studio based on the 1998 implementation Phase(x) environment. Students participating in this workshop had to create a place to wait in the form of a folly. This design task was cut in five logical parts, called phases. Every phase had to be finished within a specific timeframe (one day), after which the results would be stored in a common data repository, an online MSQL database environment which holds besides the presentations, consisting of text, 3D models and rendered images, basic project information like the descriptions of the phases and design process visualization tools. This approach to collaborative work is better known as memetic engineering and has successfully been used in several educational programs and past Virtual Design Studios. During the workshop, students made use of a variety of tools, including modeling tools (specifically Sculptor), video-conferencing software and rendering programs. The project distinguishes itself from previous Virtual Design Studios in leaving the design task more open, thereby focusing on the design process itself. From this perspective, this paper represents both a continuation of existing reports about previous Virtual Design Studios and a specific extension by the offered focus. Specific attention will be given at how the different collaborating parties dealt with the data flow and modification, the crux within a successful effort to cooperate on a common design task.
keywords Collaborative design, Design Process, New Media Usage, Global Networks
series eCAADe
email donath@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 2145
authors Engeli, Maia and Mueller Andre
year 1999
title Digital Environments for Learning and Collaboration Architecture, Communication, Creativity, Media and Design Process
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 40-52
summary Digital networks are gaining importance as environments for learning and creative collaboration. Technical achievements, software enhancements, and a growing number of applicable principles make it possible to compile complex environments that satisfy many aspects necessary for creative collaboration. This paper focuses on three issues: the architecture of collaborative environments, communication in these environments and the processes inherent to creative collaboration. The information architecture of digital environments looks different from physical architecture, mainly because the material that it is made out of is information and not stone, wood or metal and the goal is to pro-vide appropriate paths and views to information. Nonetheless, many analogies can be drawn between information architecture and physical architecture, including the need for useability, aesthetics, and consistency. To communicate is important for creative collaboration. Digital networks request and enable new strategies for communicating. Regarding the collaborative creative process we have been able to detect principles and features that enhance this process, but there are still many unanswered questions. For example, the environment can enable and improve the frequency of surprise and coincidence, two factors that often play decisive roles in the creative processes but cannot be planned for in advance. Freedom and transparency within the environment are other important factors that foster creative collaboration. The following findings are based on numerous courses, which we have taught using networked environments and some associated, research projects that helped to verify their applicability for architectural practice.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email engeli@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2008/06/12 19:05

_id 7717
authors Huang, Jeffrey
year 1999
title How Do Distributed Design Organizations Act Together to Create a Meaningful Design? Towards a Process Model for Design Coordination
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 99-115
summary This paper describes the results of a longer-term research project that looked at CAAD as an enabler of completely new collaborative processes rather than as a support for existing collaborative processes. In order to question existing design processes and invent new collaborative processes systematically, we applied a process modeling methodology that employed recent developments in coordination theory. The methodology contained four steps: (1) Decomposition, (2) Dependency Analysis, (3) Process Substitution, and (4) Recomposition. In this paper, we describe how this approach was used to redesign a sample collaborative design process in building design, and present the resulting process coordination model. We describe the implications of this model for the development of collaborative environments, and illustrate its practical application in a case study. We conclude by reiterating the contributions made.
keywords Distributed Design, Coordination Theory, Process Modeling, Process Redesign, Collaborative Design Environments
series CAAD Futures
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 399e
authors Kaga, A., Nakahama, K., Hamada, S., Yamaguchi, S., Yamanishi, H. and Sasada, T.
year 1999
title Collaborative Design System for Citizen Participation in Planning Public Road Projects
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 225-234
summary The realization of smooth execution of public street enterprise and good communication with inhabitants needs the way of easy and right explanation which the inhabitants understand the street planning, and the scheme of administration and inhabitants make the nice housing environment together. In this paper, the street planing presentation system for inhabitants established by using computer graphics. The applicability of the presentation system is made clear using in the real project.
series CAADRIA
last changed 2000/01/13 11:08

_id 1121
authors Kalay, Yehuda E.
year 1999
title The Future of CAAD: From Computer-aided Design to Computer-aided Collaboration
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 14-30
summary The primary uses of computers in the construction industry have been shifting, over the past four decades, from the evaluation of proposed design solutions, to their graphical (and other) representation, and more recently to facilitating collaboration among the various professionals who are involved in the design process. The paper argues that what may appear to be shifts in emphasis actually represents convergence on a single, original goal: the use of computers to help designers assess the quality, desirability, and the implications of their creations. The paper shows how the formerly independent components can be joined into an integrated collaborative design environment, where they build upon and strengthen each other. Moreover, the paper argues that this convergence represents the future of CAAD research and development, providing the appropriate answer to the upcoming needs of the construction industry, whose products have become too complex and must abide by too many requirements for any one professional to handle all by himself. The paper argues that further improvements in the overall quality of the products, and the process of their design, will only accrue when the heretofore separate solutions are considered together, as integral parts of an overall solution. The paper describes the efforts that have been made by the CAD Research Group in Berkeley over the past six years in developing an integrated collaborative design environment that can facilitate multidisciplinary, a- synchronous design of buildings. The environment includes several semantically-rich, shared product representations, a network of distributed evaluators, and graphically enhanced collaboration and negotiation tools.
keywords Collaborative Design, Distributed Design Environment, Product Modeling, Performance Modeling, Process Modeling, Negotiation, Integration
series CAAD Futures
email kalay@socrates.berkeley.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id caadria2015_188
id caadria2015_188
authors Krakhofer, Stefan and Martin Kaftan
year 2015
title Augmented Reality Design Decision Support Engine for the Early Building Design Stage
source Emerging Experience in Past, Present and Future of Digital Architecture, Proceedings of the 20th International Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia (CAADRIA 2015) / Daegu 20-22 May 2015, pp. 231-240
summary Augmented reality has come a long way and experienced a paradigm shift in 1999 when the ARToolKit was released as open source. The nature of interaction between the physical world and the virtual-world has changed forever. Fortunately for the AECO industry, the transition from traditional Computer Aided Design to virtual building design phrased as Building Information Modeling has created a tremendous potential to adopt Augmented Reality. The presented research is situated in the early design stage of project inception and focuses on supporting informed collective decision-making, characterized by a dynamic back and forth analytical process generating large amounts of data. Facilitation aspects, such as data-collection, storage and access to enable comparability and evaluation are crucial for collective decision-making. The current research has addressed these aspects by means of data accessibility, visualization and presentation. At the core of the project is a custom developed Augmented Reality framework that enables data interaction within the design model. In order to serve as a collaborative decision support engine, the framework also allows multiple models and their datasets to be displayed and exercised simultaneously. The paper demonstrates in the case study the successful application of the AR tool during collaborative design decision meetings.
keywords Augmented Reality; Design Decision Support; Data Visualization.
series CAADRIA
email skrakhof@cityu.edu.hk
last changed 2015/06/05 05:14

_id 4ae4
authors Kvan, Th., Yip, A. and Vera, A.
year 1999
title Supporting Design Studio Learning: An investigation into design communication in computer-supported collaboration
source CSCL’99, Stanford, December 1999, pp. 328-332
summary Earlier studies suggest that benefits may be found in chat line communication rather than high bandwidth video-conferencing conditions when considering collaborative design learning. This paper draws together studies that look at this conjecture and concludes that chat line collaboration reduces fixation in problem space exploration. This encourages the participants to explore design opportunities in a different way than graphical or video based communication.
keywords Design Learning; Collaborative Design; Text Communication; Architectural Design
series other
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2002/11/15 17:29

_id ab9c
authors Kvan, Thomas and Kvan, Erik
year 1999
title Is Design Really Social
source International Journal of Virtual Reality, 4:1
summary There are many who will readily agree with Mitchell's assertion that "the most interesting new directions (for computer-aided design) are suggested by the growing convergence of computation and telecommunication. This allows us to treat designing not just as a technical process... but also as a social process." [Mitchell 1995]. The assumption is that design was a social process until users of computer-aided design systems were distracted into treating it as a merely technical process. Most readers will assume that this convergence must and will lead to increased communication between design participants, that better social interaction leads to be better design. The unspoken assumption appears to be that putting the participants into an environment with maximal communication channels will result in design collaboration. The tools provided, therefore, must permit the best communication and the best social interaction. We see a danger here, a pattern being repeated which may lead us into less than useful activities. As with several (popular) architectural design or modelling systems already available, however, computer system implementations all too often are poor imitations manual systems. For example, few in the field will argue with the statement that the storage of data in layers in a computer-aided drafting system is an dispensable approach. Layers derive from manual overlay drafting technology [Stitt 1984] which was regarded as an advanced (manual) production concept at the time many software engineers were specifying CAD software designs. Early implementations of CAD systems (such as RUCAPS, GDS, Computervision) avoided such data organisation, the software engineers recognising that object-based structures are more flexible, permitting greater control of data editing and display. Layer-based systems, however, are easier to implement in software, more familiar to the user and hence easier to explain, initially easier to use but more limiting for an experienced and thoughtful user, leading in the end to a lesser quality in resultant drawings and significant problems in output control (see Richens [1990], pp. 31-40 for a detailed analysis of such features and constraints). Here then we see the design for architectural software faithfully but inappropriately following manual methods. So too is there a danger of assuming that the best social interaction is that done face-to-face, therefore all collaborative design communications environments must mimic face-to-face.
series journal paper
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2003/05/15 08:29

_id 422f
authors Morozumi, M., Shounai, Y., Homma, R., Iki, K. and Murakami, Y.
year 1999
title A Group Ware for Asynchronous Design Communication and Project Management
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 171-180
summary The number of Virtual Design Studio experiment that used WWW (Digital Pin-up Board) and e-mail for a synchronous communication, is rapidly increasing. There is no doubt that those media are quite helpful, but it also became clear that writing and managing pages of DPB require extra work for designers and technical staff to proceed with collaborative design. To make VDS a popular approach of collaborative design, developing convenient tools to support writing and managing pages of DPB has become inevitable. This paper discusses a prototype of group ware that supports asynchronous design communication with DPB: GW-Notebook that can be used with common web browsers on net-PCs.
series CAADRIA
email moro@arch.kumamoto-u.ac.jp
last changed 2003/05/17 07:54

_id 2a47
authors Mortola, E., Giangrande, A., Mirabelli, P. and Fortuzzi, A.
year 1999
title Interactive Didactic Modules for On-Line Learning via Internet
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 273-278
summary On-line learning can become a very efficient method of teaching in the University of the future. The Students can plan their curricula by selecting the offers of some universities coordinated that meet their specific aims. The communication interchange between student and teacher can be enriched through new forms of interaction via network technology. Laboratories of interactive design, which involve the participation of citizens, can become a good occasion to learn designing linked to the human needs. The architect who is interested in the sustainable development has to consider local needs and interact with users to build a new environment full of local values.
keywords On-Line Learning, Internet, Teaching Modules, Participation, Collaborative Design, Neighbourhood Municipal Laboratories
series eCAADe
email mortola@arch.uniroma3.it
more http://rmac.arch.uniroma3.it
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 9eb6
authors Peng C. and Blundell Jones, P.
year 1999
title Hypermedia Authoring and Contextual Modeling in Architecture and Urban Design: Collaborative Reconstructing Historical Sheffield
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 114-124
summary Studies of historical architecture and urban contexts in preparation for contemporary design interventions are inherently rich in information, demanding versatile and efficient methods of documentation and retrieval. We report on a developing program to establish a hypermedia authoring approach to collaborative contextual modeling in architecture and urban design. The paper begins with a description of a large-scale urban history study project in which 95 students jointly built a physical model of the city center of Sheffield as it stood in 1900, at a scale of 1:500. Continuing work on the Sheffield urban study project, it appears to us desirable to adopt a digital approach to archiving the material and in making it both indexible and accessible via multiple routes. In our review of digital models of cities, some interesting yet unexplored issues were identified. Given the issues and tasks elicited, we investigated hypermedia authoring in HTML and VRML as a designer-centered modeling methodology. Conceptual clarity of the methodology was considered, intending that an individual or members of design groups with reasonable computing skills could learn to operate it quickly. The methodology shows that it is practicable to build a digital contextual databank by a group of architecture/urban designers rather than by specialized modeling teams. Contextual modeling with or without computers can be a research activity on its own. However, we intend to investigate further how hypermedia-based contextual models can be interrelated to design development and communication. We discuss three aspects that can be explored in a design education setting.
series ACADIA
email c.peng@sheffield.ac.uk
last changed 1999/12/02 07:48

_id 7b68
authors Shounai, Y., Morozumi, M., Homma , R. and Murakami, Y.
year 1999
title On the Development of Group Work CAD for Network PC: GW-CAD III
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 473-481
summary The number of Virtual Design Studio experiments that use a Digital Pin-up Board (WWW) and video conferencing tools is rapidly increasing. As we see that several schools have introduced group-ware to support asynchronous communication of their projects, it is possible to regard that techniques for asynchronous communication have already been developed to some extent. However, participants of those projects still have difficulty with synchronous communication. For example, though designers often desire to exchange models among members to get critical feedback and achieve fast problem solving while working at their desks, there are few CADs that can support concurrent synchronous design communication among members. The first half of this paper discusses a model of synchronous design communication that uses CAD models, and then proposes a prototype of tools that use Microsoft NetMeeting and AutoCAD R14: GW-CAD III. In the middle, a user interface system that enables designers to conveniently model and exchange separate sets of models necessary to elaborate different aspects of design is proposed: "Network Clipboard" "Modeling Space", "Plan Face", and "Section Face". Finally, this paper discusses the results of several experiments that used the prototype.
keywords Synchronous Collaboration, Internet, CAD, Prototype, Schematic Design
series eCAADe
email moro@arch.kumamoto-u.ac.jp
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 7a52
authors Wong, Wilson and Kvan, Thomas
year 1999
title Textual support of collaborative design
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 168-176
summary Discussions of media in architectural design typically revolve around graphical forms, be they digital or analog. For example, much current research addresses the relationship between design sketching and cognitive process affecting the products of individual designers. This emphasis on graphics overshadows the role of text in design. While most CAD tools pursue increasingly realistic computer graphics, the interactions of designing require broader support. In this paper, we consider the importance of text in collaborative architectural design. Text is a common medium to record information in computer technology and has a role to play in an architectural design process. In the collaborative environment, a shared understanding and preserved history are important for communication. In this way, just as graphics can be seen as a cognitive aid, so too can text. Any singular design medium is insufficient to present the design idea thoroughly. Several design media should coexist. This paper outlines the cognitive background graphics in design, then reviews the role of text in design collaboration, drawing upon experimental results from cognitive science and architectural settings. As a conclusion, the paper sets out a direction for future research and development of tools to support collaborative design communication.
series ACADIA
email wilson@arch.hku.hk
last changed 1999/12/02 07:48

_id add2
authors Won, Peng-Whai
year 1999
title The Comparison between Visual Thinking Using Computer and Conventional Media in the Concept Generation Stages of Design
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 363-372
summary Computer, this new kind of media, has influenced the behavior of design to some degree. Among these years, many researches have appeared for the development of computer-aided design. In recent years, such kind of computer-aided studies about the forepart of design, that is the stage of concept generation, have also started to generate. But most of these researches belonged to the kind of applied studies with the test of computer systems. On the other hand, there were many researches about the visual thinking and cognitive behavior of designers while sketching or drawing in the stage of concept generation. From the synthesis of the fore two disciplines, we can find that there existing a point of deficiency, that is the cognitive research about designers using computers as the sketching media is absent. And that is what I want to study and discuss in this research. The fundamental analytic data of this research is the visual process chronicled form the sketching of subjects, and the assistant analytic data is the verbal data from the questions that the subjects are asked after his/her sketching. These data is analyzed by three coding schema. The cognitive appearance while designers generating concepts with computers or conventional media are propounded and discussed in this research.
series CAADRIA
last changed 2000/01/13 11:26

_id bacd
authors Abadí Abbo, Isaac
year 1999
title APPLICATION OF SPATIAL DESIGN ABILITY IN A POSTGRADUATE COURSE
source Full-scale Modeling and the Simulation of Light [Proceedings of the 7th European Full-scale Modeling Association Conference / ISBN 3-85437-167-5] Florence (Italy) 18-20 February 1999, pp. 75-82
summary Spatial Design Ability (SDA) has been defined by the author (1983) as the capacity to anticipate the effects (psychological impressions) that architectural spaces or its components produce in observers or users. This concept, which requires the evaluation of spaces by the people that uses it, was proposed as a guideline to a Masters Degree Course in Architectural Design at the Universidad Autonoma de Aguascalientes in Mexico. The theory and the exercises required for the experience needed a model that could simulate spaces in terms of all the variables involved. Full-scale modeling as has been tested in previous research, offered the most effective mean to experiment with space. A simple, primitive model was designed and built: an articulated ceiling that allows variation in height and shape, and a series of wooden panels for the walls and structure. Several exercises were carried out, mainly to experience cause -effect relationships between space and the psychological impressions they produce. Students researched into spatial taxonomy, intentional sequences of space and spatial character. Results showed that students achieved the expected anticipation of space and that full-scale modeling, even with a simple model, proved to be an effective tool for this purpose. The low cost of the model and the short time it took to be built, opens an important possibility for Institutions involved in architectural studies, both as a research and as a learning tool.
keywords Spatial Design Ability, Architectural Space, User Evaluation, Learning, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
email iabadi@ceea.arq.ucv.ve
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa
last changed 2004/05/04 09:27

_id cf2011_p109
id cf2011_p109
authors Abdelmohsen, Sherif; Lee Jinkook, Eastman Chuck
year 2011
title Automated Cost Analysis of Concept Design BIM Models
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 403-418.
summary AUTOMATED COST ANALYSIS OF CONCEPT DESIGN BIM MODELS Interoperability: BIM models and cost models This paper introduces the automated cost analysis developed for the General Services Administration (GSA) and the analysis results of a case study involving a concept design courthouse BIM model. The purpose of this study is to investigate interoperability issues related to integrating design and analysis tools; specifically BIM models and cost models. Previous efforts to generate cost estimates from BIM models have focused on developing two necessary but disjoint processes: 1) extracting accurate quantity take off data from BIM models, and 2) manipulating cost analysis results to provide informative feedback. Some recent efforts involve developing detailed definitions, enhanced IFC-based formats and in-house standards for assemblies that encompass building models (e.g. US Corps of Engineers). Some commercial applications enhance the level of detail associated to BIM objects with assembly descriptions to produce lightweight BIM models that can be used by different applications for various purposes (e.g. Autodesk for design review, Navisworks for scheduling, Innovaya for visual estimating, etc.). This study suggests the integration of design and analysis tools by means of managing all building data in one shared repository accessible to multiple domains in the AEC industry (Eastman, 1999; Eastman et al., 2008; authors, 2010). Our approach aims at providing an integrated platform that incorporates a quantity take off extraction method from IFC models, a cost analysis model, and a comprehensive cost reporting scheme, using the Solibri Model Checker (SMC) development environment. Approach As part of the effort to improve the performance of federal buildings, GSA evaluates concept design alternatives based on their compliance with specific requirements, including cost analysis. Two basic challenges emerge in the process of automating cost analysis for BIM models: 1) At this early concept design stage, only minimal information is available to produce a reliable analysis, such as space names and areas, and building gross area, 2) design alternatives share a lot of programmatic requirements such as location, functional spaces and other data. It is thus crucial to integrate other factors that contribute to substantial cost differences such as perimeter, and exterior wall and roof areas. These are extracted from BIM models using IFC data and input through XML into the Parametric Cost Engineering System (PACES, 2010) software to generate cost analysis reports. PACES uses this limited dataset at a conceptual stage and RSMeans (2010) data to infer cost assemblies at different levels of detail. Functionalities Cost model import module The cost model import module has three main functionalities: generating the input dataset necessary for the cost model, performing a semantic mapping between building type specific names and name aggregation structures in PACES known as functional space areas (FSAs), and managing cost data external to the BIM model, such as location and construction duration. The module computes building data such as footprint, gross area, perimeter, external wall and roof area and building space areas. This data is generated through SMC in the form of an XML file and imported into PACES. Reporting module The reporting module uses the cost report generated by PACES to develop a comprehensive report in the form of an excel spreadsheet. This report consists of a systems-elemental estimate that shows the main systems of the building in terms of UniFormat categories, escalation, markups, overhead and conditions, a UniFormat Level III report, and a cost breakdown that provides a summary of material, equipment, labor and total costs. Building parameters are integrated in the report to provide insight on the variations among design alternatives.
keywords building information modeling, interoperability, cost analysis, IFC
series CAAD Futures
email sherif.morad@gatech.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id alqawasmi
id alqawasmi
authors Al-Qawasmi, J., Clayton, M.J., Tassinary, L.G. and Johnson, R..
year 1999
title Observations on Collaborative Design and Multimedia Usage in Virtual Design Studio
source J. Woosely and T. Adair (eds.), Learning virtually: Proceedings of the 6th annual distance education conference, San Antonio, Texas, pp. 1-9
summary The virtual design studio (VDS) points to a new way of practicing and teaching architectural design. As a new phenomenon, little research has been done to evaluate design collaboration and multimedia usage in a distributed workplace like the virtual design studio. Our research provides empirical data on how students actually use multiple media during architectural collaborative design.
series other
email jamalq@kfupm.edu.sa
last changed 2003/12/06 08:55

_id 4d95
authors Alvarado, Rodrigo Garcia and Maver, Tom
year 1999
title Virtual Reality in Architectural Education: Defining Possibilities
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 7-9
summary Introduction: virtual reality in architecture Virtual Reality (VR) is an emergent computer technology for full 3D-simulations, which has a natural application in the architectural work, due that activity involves the complete definition of buildings prior to its construction. Although the profession has a long tradition and expertise in the use of 2D-plans for the design of buildings, the increasing complexity of projects and social participation requires better media of representation. However, the technological promise of Virtual Reality involves many sophisticated software and hardware developments. It is based on techniques of 3D-modelling currently incorporated in the majority of drawing software used in architecture, and also there are several tools for rendering, animation and panoramic views, which provide visual realism. But other capabilities like interactivity and sense of immersion are still complex, expensive and under research. These require stereoscopic helmets, 3D pointers and trackers with complicated configurations and uncomfortable use. Most advanced installations of Virtual-Reality like CAVEs involve much hardware, building space and restrictions for users. Nevertheless, diverse developers are working in Virtual-Reality user-friendly techniques and there are many initial experiences of architectural walk-throughs showing advantages in the communication and development of designs. Then we may expect an increasing use of Virtual Reality in architecture.
series ACADIA
email rgarcia@ubiobio.cl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

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