CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 1 to 20 of 626

_id bd21
authors Barría Chateau, H., García Alvarado, R., Lagos Vergara, R. and Parra Márquez, J.C.
year 1999
title Evaluation of Spatial Perception in Virtual Environments
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 145-148
summary The 3D environments created by computers can be used as a powerful simulation tool for architecture, especially with inmersive devices, but it is necessary to know properly their spatial characteristics to use it effectively. It is also important to consider their possibilities in communication networks and their implications in contemporary architecture. For this reason, the goal of this research is to evaluate the perception of virtual architectonic spaces in relation to the perception of real architectonic spaces. This research is based on the comparison of experiences of university students in a real space (Entrance Hall of Faculty of Economy) and in the same space modeled by a computer. The evaluation considers tests with stereoscopic helmets and interactive navigation, making questionnaires to characterize the sensation of dimensions, relationships and time for an specific activity. The measuring of real and virtual spaces are made through references (furniture, textures, etc.) or by proportional relations between height, width and depth, in different patterns. The experience also reveals mental schemes to perceive the dimension of architectonic space and the orientation in a real and virtual environment. Besides, the research allows to relate the different levels of complexity and information with the understanding of real architectonic space and modeled space.
series SIGRADI
email rgarcia@pegsasus.dci.ubiobio.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 3ac3
authors Devetakovic, Mirjana and Radojevic, Milan
year 1999
title The Electronic Communication as a Part of CAAD Educational Process
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 265-273
summary Considering demands of contemporary architectural practice to shift spatial and cultural barriers and became more global and more creative, this paper analyses the role of electronic communication within the process of CAAD (Computer Aided Architectural Design) education. After explaining Virtual Design Studio phenomena, represented by several worldwide university projects, this paper focuses on the reflection of those projects in rethinking the CAAD education approach at the Faculty of Architecture, University of Belgrade. The case illustrating the problem is The Virtual Group activity within the Course "The basics of Computer Application in Architecture". Some examples of student work are given as well as several conclusions based on two-year experience.
series AVOCAAD
email mirjana@arh.arh.bg.ac.yu
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id ga9928
id ga9928
authors Goulthorpe
year 1999
title Hyposurface: from Autoplastic to Alloplastic Space
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary By way of immediate qualification to an essay which attempts to orient current technical developments in relation to a series of dECOi projects, I would suggest that the greatest liberation offered by new technology in architecture is not its formal potential as much as the patterns of creativity and practice it engenders. For increasingly in the projects presented here dECOi operates as an extended network of technical expertise: Mark Burry and his research team at Deakin University in Australia as architects and parametric/ programmatic designers; Peter Wood in New Zealand as programmer; Alex Scott in London as mathematician; Chris Glasow in London as systems engineer; and the engineers (structural/services) of David Glover’s team at Ove Arup in London. This reflects how we’re working in a new technical environment - a new form of practice, in a sense - a loose and light network which deploys highly specialist technical skill to suit a particular project. By way of a second disclaimer, I would suggest that the rapid technological development we're witnessing, which we struggle to comprehend given the sheer pace of change that overwhelms us, is somehow of a different order than previous technological revolutions. For the shift from an industrial society to a society of mass communication, which is the essential transformation taking place in the present, seems to be a subliminal and almost inexpressive technological transition - is formless, in a sense - which begs the question of how it may be expressed in form. If one holds that architecture is somehow the crystallization of cultural change in concrete form, one suspects that in the present there is no simple physical equivalent for the burst of communication technologies that colour contemporary life. But I think that one might effectively raise a series of questions apropos technology by briefly looking at 3 or 4 of our current projects, and which suggest a range of possibilities fostered by new technology. By way of a third doubt, we might qualify in advance the apparent optimism of architects for CAD technology by thinking back to Thomas More and his island ‘Utopia’, which marks in some way the advent of Modern rationalism. This was, if not quite a technological utopia, certainly a metaphysical one, More’s vision typically deductive, prognostic, causal. But which by the time of Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis is a technological utopia availing itself of all the possibilities put at humanity’s disposal by the known machines of the time. There’s a sort of implicit sanction within these two accounts which lies in their nature as reality optimized by rational DESIGN as if the very ethos of design were sponsored by Modern rationalist thought and its utopian leanings. The faintly euphoric ‘technological’ discourse of architecture at present - a sort of Neue Bauhaus - then seems curiously misplaced historically given the 20th century’s general anti-, dis-, or counter-utopian discourse. But even this seems to have finally run its course, dissolving into the electronic heterotopia of the present with its diverse opportunities of irony and distortion (as it’s been said) as a liberating potential.1 This would seem to mark the dissolution of design ethos into non-causal process(ing), which begs the question of ‘design’ itself: who 'designs' anymore? Or rather, has 'design' not become uncoupled from its rational, deterministic, tradition? The utopianism that attatches to technological discourse in the present seems blind to the counter-finality of technology's own accomplishments - that transparency has, as it were, by its own more and more perfect fulfillment, failed by its own success. For what we seem to have inherited is not the warped utopia depicted in countless visions of a singular and tyrranical technology (such as that in Orwell's 1984), but a rich and diverse heterotopia which has opened the possibility of countless channels of local dialect competing directly with the channels of power. Undoubtedly such multiplicitous and global connectivity has sent creative thought in multiple directions…
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 8666
authors Martínez, A.C., Vigo, L., Cabral, J., Folchi, A. and Palacio, M.
year 2000
title Seminario/Taller de Investigacón Proyectual:Estructura de taller activo para enseñar a proyectar asistido por la tipología y de software de mercado (Design Research Seminar/Workshop: A Structure of Active Studio for the Teaching of Design Aided by Typology and Commercial Software)
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 377-379
summary General outline: Typology has provided architects basic design resources in the past. Repertories have been created by comparing and establishing relations among a multiplicity of examples: these repertories have been used as the basis for new inventions. Research on type establishes the foundations for organized knowledge that can be accumulated, shared, and enriched by successive designs. We are testing our assumption that CAD is a specially adequate tool for the transformation and manipulation of type in the early stages of the design process. Goals: Our Seminar/Studio gives those who take part in it a renewed vision of type as a basic disposition that can be subject to dynamic transformations. The use of CAD will allow the participants to experiment and verify design decisions on the grounds of a systematic use of typological precedents. Methodology: Starting with definite examples of contemporary architecture and the design theory backing the examples selected, the seminar/ studio is developed in eight studio sessions, exploring different dimensions leading to the “parti”. It is meant for experienced designers, both advanced students and graduates. The first experimental seminar of two sessions took place in November 1999. A more developed version is under way in August, 2000.
series SIGRADI
email corona@cvtci.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id f9f7
authors Mullins, Michael
year 1999
title Forming, Planning, Imaging and Connecting
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 178-185
summary This paper sets out to define aspects of the architectural design process, using historical precedent and architectural theory, and tests the relationship of those aspects to the application of computers in architectural design, particularly in an educational context. The design process sub-sets are defined as: Forming, Planning, Imaging and Connecting. Historical precedents are uncovered in Classical, Modern, Postmodern and Contemporary architecture. The defined categories of the design process are related to current usages of computers in architectural education towards elucidating the strengths and weaknesses of digital media in those areas. Indications of their concurrent usage in digital design will be demonstrated in analysis of design studio programs presented at recent ACADIA conferences. An example of a current design studio programme set at the School of Architecture University of Natal, South Africa in which the above described categories give an underlying structure to the introduction of 3D digital modelling to undergraduates through design process. The definition of this set of design activities may offer a useful method for other educators in assessing existing and future design programs where digital tools are used.
keywords Design-Process, Digital-Media, Design-Programmes
series eCAADe
email madura@iafrica.com
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 9eb6
authors Peng C. and Blundell Jones, P.
year 1999
title Hypermedia Authoring and Contextual Modeling in Architecture and Urban Design: Collaborative Reconstructing Historical Sheffield
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 114-124
summary Studies of historical architecture and urban contexts in preparation for contemporary design interventions are inherently rich in information, demanding versatile and efficient methods of documentation and retrieval. We report on a developing program to establish a hypermedia authoring approach to collaborative contextual modeling in architecture and urban design. The paper begins with a description of a large-scale urban history study project in which 95 students jointly built a physical model of the city center of Sheffield as it stood in 1900, at a scale of 1:500. Continuing work on the Sheffield urban study project, it appears to us desirable to adopt a digital approach to archiving the material and in making it both indexible and accessible via multiple routes. In our review of digital models of cities, some interesting yet unexplored issues were identified. Given the issues and tasks elicited, we investigated hypermedia authoring in HTML and VRML as a designer-centered modeling methodology. Conceptual clarity of the methodology was considered, intending that an individual or members of design groups with reasonable computing skills could learn to operate it quickly. The methodology shows that it is practicable to build a digital contextual databank by a group of architecture/urban designers rather than by specialized modeling teams. Contextual modeling with or without computers can be a research activity on its own. However, we intend to investigate further how hypermedia-based contextual models can be interrelated to design development and communication. We discuss three aspects that can be explored in a design education setting.
series ACADIA
email c.peng@sheffield.ac.uk
last changed 1999/12/02 07:48

_id 504a
authors Rodrigo Alvarado, García
year 1999
title Design-Based on VR-Modeling of Environemntal Conditions
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 126-129
summary The research on CAD has been looking for a long time a creative contribution to architectural design, including recently the use of virtual-reality as an immersive modeling system, but without much practical results. However, contemporary architecture is increasingly including digital characteristics based more on cultural influences than on the use of electronic tools. This shows an evolution of the discipline in relation to digital media and apparently distant from environmental concerns. But the works and reflexions reveal a common convergence in the role of body in architecture as a pivot between virtual and local dimension of design. Based on that relationship we propose to take advantage of virtual-reality for modeling environmental conditions of the location in order to guide architectural design, using for example the potential of representing characteristics not visible in reality or to simulate time cycles. Sun displacement, wind direction, temperature ranges, topography and landscape are specific conditions in design that define energy consumption and human comfort. Such characteristics can establish optimal shapes crossing the different variables with timelines. VR-modeling and interactive control allow an spatial evaluation of environmentally efficient forms. That is showed through an exercise of housing in different locations of Chile. This merger between digital media and ecological concerns represents a crossing of contemporary cultural trends to motivate exploration of new geometries, supported on the potential of technology and on sustainable human development
series SIGRADI
email rgarcia@pegsasus.dci.ubiobio.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

_id eeff
authors Schanz, Javier A. and Garcia, Claudia V.
year 1999
title Changes for the Visual Representation of the World - Transfer from the Analogical to the Digital
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 45-51
summary This research work deals with the changes of paradigms as treated by architecture. These changes result from the loss of values of ontological dimensions accepted so far. The analysis addresses the understanding of these changes pushing our logic towards an attempt to apprehend the new dynamics and parameters that have invaded our disciplinary field. In the design process, different logical projections derived from a combination of traditional representational methods and updated technical resources (analogic and digital) have been tried. Technical resources have always conditioned the ways of conceiving, practicing and experiencing art and architecture, it is on this basis that we seek to find out how different modeling techniques have modified the relationship between reality and its representations. Thus the central topic of our thesis is "transfer from the analogic to the digital". We have developed a chronological analysis of the evolution of images and we have seen how each period depends on the main material vector of transmission, which modifies the perception of space and time. Within this iconographic analysis, we reflected on which the rules that connect architecture and the different ways of representation and production are and we were able to show how new technological resources condition the way we conceive architecture today. In our opinion, the best way to understand the nature of digital means is the implementation of a methodology that ranges between direct and critical dialogue and manual and digital ways of production. The designed was applied on a "centre of contemporary art". This allowed experimentation in the treatment of general and particular issues arising from the process of means interaction.
series SIGRADI
email aschanz@fadu.unl.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

_id 53df
authors Uddin, M.S.
year 1999
title Hybrid Drawing Techniques by Contemporary Architects and Designers
source John Wiley, New York,
summary The complete hybrid drawing sourcebook Hybrid drawings offer limitless possibilities for the fusion and superimposition of ideas, media, and techniques-powerful creative tools for effective and innovative architectural graphic presentation. This unique guide offers a dynamic introduction to these drawings and how they are created, with a stunning color portfolio of presentation-quality examples that give full visual expression to the power and potential of hybrid drawing techniques. Featuring the work of dozens of internationally recognized architects and firms, including Takefumi Aida, Helmut Jahn of Murphy/Jahn Architects, Morphosis, Eric Owen Moss, NBBJ Sports & Entertainment, Smith-Miller & Hawkinson, and Bernard Tschumi Architects, the book's visual examples are accompanied by descriptive and analytical commentary that gives valuable practical insight into the background of each project, along with essential information on the design concept and the drawing process. Combining all of the best features of an idea resource and a how-to guide, Hybrid Drawing Techniques by Contemporary Architects and Designers is an important creative tool for students and professionals in architecture, design, illustration, and related areas
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 9fd8
authors Wojtowicz Jerzy and Butelski, Kazimierz
year 1999
title Lessons from Distributed Design Practice
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 482-487
summary Parallel to the expansion of the internet, the acceptance of computerization in architectural practice is clearly evident. This paper signals the emergence of long-distance design collaborations over networks as a pragmatic condition of contemporary design practice, and reports on several successful design projects conceived under these new circumstances. Experiences from these projects were important in formulating both the limits and opportunities derived from the distributed design condition.
keywords Design Collaboration, VDS, Networks
series eCAADe
email jw@architecture.ubc.ca, pabutels@cyf-kr.edu.pl
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id avocaad_2001_16
id avocaad_2001_16
authors Yu-Ying Chang, Yu-Tung Liu, Chien-Hui Wong
year 2001
title Some Phenomena of Spatial Characteristics of Cyberspace
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary "Space," which has long been an important concept in architecture (Bloomer & Moore, 1977; Mitchell, 1995, 1999), has attracted interest of researchers from various academic disciplines in recent years (Agnew, 1993; Benko & Strohmayer, 1996; Chang, 1999; Foucault, 1982; Gould, 1998). Researchers from disciplines such as anthropology, geography, sociology, philosophy, and linguistics regard it as the basis of the discussion of various theories in social sciences and humanities (Chen, 1999). On the other hand, since the invention of Internet, Internet users have been experiencing a new and magic "world." According to the definitions in traditional architecture theories, "space" is generated whenever people define a finite void by some physical elements (Zevi, 1985). However, although Internet is a virtual, immense, invisible and intangible world, navigating in it, we can still sense the very presence of ourselves and others in a wonderland. This sense could be testified by our naming of Internet as Cyberspace -- an exotic kind of space. Therefore, as people nowadays rely more and more on the Internet in their daily life, and as more and more architectural scholars and designers begin to invest their efforts in the design of virtual places online (e.g., Maher, 1999; Li & Maher, 2000), we cannot help but ask whether there are indeed sensible spaces in Internet. And if yes, these spaces exist in terms of what forms and created by what ways?To join the current interdisciplinary discussion on the issue of space, and to obtain new definition as well as insightful understanding of "space", this study explores the spatial phenomena in Internet. We hope that our findings would ultimately be also useful for contemporary architectural designers and scholars in their designs in the real world.As a preliminary exploration, the main objective of this study is to discover the elements involved in the creation/construction of Internet spaces and to examine the relationship between human participants and Internet spaces. In addition, this study also attempts to investigate whether participants from different academic disciplines define or experience Internet spaces in different ways, and to find what spatial elements of Internet they emphasize the most.In order to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the spatial phenomena in Internet and to overcome the subjectivity of the members of the research team, the research design of this study was divided into two stages. At the first stage, we conducted literature review to study existing theories of space (which are based on observations and investigations of the physical world). At the second stage of this study, we recruited 8 Internet regular users to approach this topic from different point of views, and to see whether people with different academic training would define and experience Internet spaces differently.The results of this study reveal that the relationship between human participants and Internet spaces is different from that between human participants and physical spaces. In the physical world, physical elements of space must be established first; it then begins to be regarded as a place after interaction between/among human participants or interaction between human participants and the physical environment. In contrast, in Internet, a sense of place is first created through human interactions (or activities), Internet participants then begin to sense the existence of a space. Therefore, it seems that, among the many spatial elements of Internet we found, "interaction/reciprocity" Ñ either between/among human participants or between human participants and the computer interface Ð seems to be the most crucial element.In addition, another interesting result of this study is that verbal (linguistic) elements could provoke a sense of space in a degree higher than 2D visual representation and no less than 3D visual simulations. Nevertheless, verbal and 3D visual elements seem to work in different ways in terms of cognitive behaviors: Verbal elements provoke visual imagery and other sensory perceptions by "imagining" and then excite personal experiences of space; visual elements, on the other hand, provoke and excite visual experiences of space directly by "mapping".Finally, it was found that participants with different academic training did experience and define space differently. For example, when experiencing and analyzing Internet spaces, architecture designers, the creators of the physical world, emphasize the design of circulation and orientation, while participants with linguistics training focus more on subtle language usage. Visual designers tend to analyze the graphical elements of virtual spaces based on traditional painting theories; industrial designers, on the other hand, tend to treat these spaces as industrial products, emphasizing concept of user-center and the control of the computer interface.The findings of this study seem to add new information to our understanding of virtual space. It would be interesting for future studies to investigate how this information influences architectural designers in their real-world practices in this digital age. In addition, to obtain a fuller picture of Internet space, further research is needed to study the same issue by examining more Internet participants who have no formal linguistics and graphical training.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id c3c6
authors Bonetti, Máximo
year 1999
title Inventario Digital del Patrimonio Arquitectónico y Urbano Marplatense (Digital Inventory of the Architectural and Urban Patrimony of Mar del Plata)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 458-461
summary Assisting to the urgent necessity of documenting buildings, urban and rural spaces of our district and keeping in mind that, this patrimonial values represent a considerable proportion of the creative and constructive effort of the pioneers of this region and of our memory and identity, you urgent restitution the report of the examples that are still conserved. As well as the reconstruction, in the cases that it was necessary, of the missing patrimony that still stays in the collective memory. The construction of the digital inventory outlines, in a principle; to divide to the city in sectors of different urban-architectural importance the hills of. Santa Cecilia Stala Maris and Divino Rostro, those that still conserve numerous examples of architecture of the past, are an example of it. This documentation is carried out from the entity of culture of the municipality of the district of general Pueyrredón, in function of the activity developed in the area of patrimonial preservation. In what concerns to this work, previous antecedents don't exist in our means, being this the first time that is intruded in the land of the digital graph applied to the investigation and historical documentation.
series SIGRADI
email dibarros@mdp.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 993c
authors Fruchter, Renate
year 1999
title A/E/C Teamwork: A Collaborative Design and Learning Space
source Journal of Computing in Civil Engineering -- October 1999 -- Volume 13, Issue 4, pp. 261-269
summary This paper describes an ongoing effort focused on combined research and curriculum development for multidisciplinary, geographically distributed architecture/engineering/construction (A/E/C) teamwork. Itpresents a model for a distributed A/E/C learning environment and an Internet-based Web-mediated collaboration tool kit. The distributed learning environment includes six universities from Europe, Japan, andthe United States. The tool kit is aimed to assist team members and owners (1) capture and share knowledge and information related to a specific project; (2) navigate through the archived knowledge andinformation; and (3) evaluate and explain the product's performance. The A/E/C course offered at Stanford University acts as a testbed for cutting-edge information technologies and a forum to teach newgenerations of professionals how to team up with practitioners from other disciplines and take advantage of information technology to produce a better, faster, more economical product. The paper presents newassessment metrics to monitor students' cross-disciplinary learning experience and track programmatic changes. The paper concludes with challenges and quandaries regarding the impact of informationtechnologies on team performance and behavior.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:45

_id 0beb
authors Koch, Volker and Russell, Peter
year 2000
title VuuA.Org: The Virtual Upperrhine University of Architecture
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 23-25
summary In 1998, architecture schools in the three nation region of the upper Rhine came together to undertake a joint design studio. With the support of the Center for Entrepeneurship in Colmar, France, the schools worked on the reuse of the Kuenzer Mill situated near Herbolzheim, Germany. The students met jointly three times during the semester and then worked on the project at their home universities usng conventional methods. This project was essential to generating closer ties between the participating students, tutors and institutions and as such, the results were quite positive. So much so, that the organisers decided to repeat the exercise one year later. However, it became clear that although the students had met three times in large groups, the real success of a co-operative design studio would require mechanisms which allow far more intimate interaction among the participants, be they students, teachers or outside experts. The experiences from the Netzentwurf at the Institut für Industrielle Bauproduktion (ifib) showed the potential in a web based studio and the addition of ifib to the three nation group led to the development of the VuuA platform. The first project served to illuminate the the differences in teaching concepts among the partner institutions and their teaching staff as well as problems related to the integration of students from three countries with two languages and four different faculties: landscape architecture, interior design, architecture and urban planning. The project for the Fall of 1999 was the reuse of Fort Kléber in Wolfisheim by Strasbourg, France. The students again met on site to kick off the Semester but were also instructed to continue their cooperation and criticism using the VuuA platform.
keywords Virtual Design Studio, CSCW, International Cooperation, Planning Platform
series eCAADe
email volker.koch@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de, peter.russell@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
more http://www.vuua.org
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id ascaad2007_025
id ascaad2007_025
authors Speed, C.
year 2007
title A Social Dimension to Digital Architectural Practice
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 291-304
summary In 1995 the first in a series of three books were published by Academy Editions, that have since become a vivid handbook that documents how designers responded to the development of architectural drawing applications and the growth of the internet, to establish a form of digital architecture. Offering dramatic images and emotive texts, many of the architects and designers featured in these books deeply affected the perception of digital architecture’s mission by students and elements of the design community. Concentrating upon how to resolve the view that time and space are separate dimensions, and the immersive and dematerial potentials of cyberspace, the developments of this ‘cyberromanticism’ (Coyne 1999) ultimately were not used to sustain digital architectural activity. This paper uses the Academy Editions series to understand how such a vivid aspect of digital architecture failed to fulfil its aspirations. The paper begins by establishing the premise for digital architecture through a link with mainstream architectures interest in the concept of shelter. Through a summary of the practical and theoretical methods outlined by the early designers within the series of publications, the paper demonstrates the critical potential of the field. However a summary of how the proliferation of early imagery fuelled a visual mannerism traces how the third Architects in Cyberspace publication represented a crisis in both identity and practice. The paper then identifies an opportunity for recovering the theoretical imperatives within digital architecture by reflecting upon the emergence of ‘interactive architectures’ use of a ‘social’ dimension that was previously hindered by the use of computer applications in early digital architecture. The paper closes with a reference to two of the authors practical projects that use social data to inform the generation of digital architecture.
series ASCAAD
email c.speed@plymouth.ac.uk
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id b7df
authors Uddin, M. Saleh
year 1999
title Beyond Mere Representation: The Changing Perspective of Computer Use in American Architecture
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 511-518
summary By surveying a total of 55 cutting-edge architectural design offices (mostly in the United States), this paper looks at the use of computational media to get an overall understanding of its current use for architectural design presentation. The intent of this paper is to highlight the changing direction of computer presentation through graphic examples, specifically three-dimensional modelling that goes beyond conventional representation. The paper also illustrates various types of uses of computer media by designers into specific categories, and extracts a summary of hardware and software preferences.
keywords Digital Media, Design Offices, Non-conventional Representation, 3D Modelling
series eCAADe
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id ga9925
id ga9925
authors Ambrosini, L., Longatti, M. and Miyajima, H.
year 1999
title Time sections, abstract machines
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary conditions a time-spatial discontinuity in the urban grid, ancient walls casually discovered in a substrate of the contemporary town needs a surplus of information to be understood and interfaced with their current condition. diagrams diverse chronological stages of the urban evolution are mapped on the area, in order to read the historical stratifications as a multiplicity of signs; this abstract approach leads to consider the roman space as guided by metrics, a system of measure superimposed on the landscape, vs. medioeval spatial continuity, where more fluid relations between the same urban elements create a completely different pattern.assemblage (time sections) a surface, automatically displaced from the medioeval diagram, moves along the z axis, the historical stratification direction, intersecting in various, unpredictable, manners a series of paths; these paths start as parallels, allowing an undifferentiated access to the area, and mutate along their developing direction, intertweening and blending each other; linear openings are cut on the surface, virtually connecting the two levels by light, following the roman grid in rhythm and measure. Projected on the lateral wall, the cadence of the vertical and horizontal elements becomes a temporal diagram of the design process.movement time takes part into the process through two kinds of movement: the first one, freezed when reaches the best results, in terms of complexity, is given by the surface intersecting the tubular paths; the second one is represented by multiple routes walking on which the project can be experienced (in absence of any objective, fixed, point of view, movement becomes the only way to understand relations). Thresholds between typical architectural categories (such as inside-outside, object-landscape etc.) are blurred in favour of a more supple condition, another kind of continuity (re)appears, as a new media, between the different historical layers of the city.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 6480
authors Asanowicz, Aleksander
year 1999
title Computer in Creation of Architectural Form
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999,pp. 131-142
summary This paper considers graphic methods of presentation of ideas 'in the creation of architectural forms' and evolution of these methods, determined by the implementations of information technology. Drawings have been the main medium of expression since Leonardo da Vinci to the present-day. Graphic communication has always been treated as a main design tool, both - at the ending stage of design and at the early design stage. Implementation of computers in design doe not change this situation. The entire design process proceeds in a traditional way. While searching for the idea we use hand sketches and, after this, technical drawings are draught on a plotter, which replaces a drawing pen. Using computers at the early design stages encounters serious difficulties. The main thesis of this paper is that hardware and software inadequacy is not the problem, the problem is in the inadequacy of the design methods. This problem is to be reconceived as what a person can do with a program, rather than what is the capacity of a program. Contemporary computer techniques allow us to put an equation mark between the searching for idea, visualisation and its realisation in virtual space. This paper presents Sketching by scanning - an experimental method of using computer hardware and software for stimulating of searching of architectural's form.
series AVOCAAD
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 5716
authors Cohen Egler, Tamara Tania
year 1999
title Cyberspace: New Forms of Social Interaction
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 253-258
summary The cyberspace becomes into news forms of communication that transform and expand interaction among men. The objective of our reflection is to understand how space-time relations are changed by the new technologies of communication and information. The starting point of this analysis is the historic dimension of production, interaction and appropriation of space-time processes, proceeding in the se of solving their contemporary forms defined by the growing technology of daily life. It is possible to notice how communication expands the interaction among companies, institutions and society because processes and procedures are publicized, reducing the disorder and uncertain. It is a way of making social complexities more accessible, more clear, being easier read by individuals so they are able to lead with the complex of opportunities and responsibilities that compound the social system. The fundamental constitution of cybernetic spaces is on its capacity of make accessible the processes of communication and information which expand the interaction eliminating intermediaries. The condition of material localization dissolves itself to give place tommunicative interaction. The essential of the question can be stated in the theory that explains that social practices are the result of a cognitive system. That statement send us to the heart of analysis over the importance of comprehending as a moment that precede the action. When societies can be read through a union of knowledge condensed all along their social and cultural development. The development of new technologies of communication and information make nations capable to produce, accumulate diffuse knowledge, conducting to an action of intelligent individuals who write the social development.
series SIGRADI
email tamara@ippur.ufrj.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

For more results click below:

this is page 0show page 1show page 2show page 3show page 4show page 5... show page 31HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_479171 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002