CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 21 to 40 of 626

_id 762b
authors De Paoli, Giovanni and Bogdan, Marius
year 1999
title The Front of the Stage of Vitruvius' Roman Theatre - A new Approach of Computer Aided Design that Transforms Geometric Operators to Semantic Operators
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 321-333
summary The driving force of all researches where the systems of computation are used, is the utilization of an intelligent method for the representation of building. The use of computer, in design process, is often limited to technical functions (tekhne), and what one usually calls computer-aided design is often no more than computer-aided drawing. In this research paper we continue a reflection on the architect's work methods, and suggest an approach to design based on the semantic properties of the object (i.e. semantic operators), rather than by geometric operators. We propose a method of computer aid design using procedural models where the initial state of design is vague and undefined. We operate from a paradigm that leads to represent a building by means of parametric functions that, expressed algorithmically, give a procedural model to facilitate the design process. This approach opens new avenues that would permit to add the logos (semantic properties) and lead to a metaphorical representation. By means of procedural models, we show that, from a generic model we can produce a four dimensional model that encapsulate a volumetric model with semantic characteristics. We use a meta-functional language that allows us to model the actions and encapsulate detailed information about various building elements. This descriptive mechanism is extremely powerful. It helps to establish relations between the functions, contributes to a better understanding of the project's aim, and encapsulates the building properties by recalling characteristics of common classes which give rise to a new configuration and a completely original design. The scientific result of this experiment is the understanding and confirmation of the hypothesis that it is possible to encapsulate, by means of computing process, the links between design moves during conceptual and figural decisions and transform the geometric operators in semantic operators.
keywords Architecture, CAD, Function, Modeling, Semantic Operator, Geometric Operator
series CAAD Futures
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 9745
authors De Paoli, Giovanni and Bogdan, Marius
year 1999
title The Backstage of Vitruvius' Roman Theatre: A New Method of Computer-Aided Design that Reduces the Gap between the Functional and the Operational
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 411-422
summary Computers are increasingly being used in professional design studios and by students of Architecture. However, their use is limited to technical functions (tekhne); what one usually calls computer-aided design is often no more than computer-aided drawing. In this research paper we reflect on the architect's work methods, and suggest an approach to design based on the "projection" of properties of the object (i.e. operators), rather than by geometric primitives. We propose a method of design using procedural models, and encourage a reevaluation of current programs of study with their traditional subdivision into separate disciplines. By means of a procedural model of Vitruvius' Roman theatre, we show that, from a generic model we can produce a three dimensional (volumetric) model with all the characteristics belonging to a single family of objects. In order to clarify the method of construction, we use a functional language that allows us to model the actions. Similarly, we can use this functional language to encapsulate the properties of the building. The scientific result of this experiment is the understanding and confirmation of the hypothesis that, by means of computers, we can find operators that help the architect assimilate a complex building design.
keywords Architecture, CAD, Discipline, Functions, Modeling, Operator
series CAADRIA
last changed 2000/01/13 11:32

_id 9e26
authors Do, Ellen Yi-Luen,
year 1999
title The right tool at the right time : investigation of freehand drawing as an interface to knowledge based design tools
source College of Architecture, Georgia Institute of Technology
summary Designers use different symbols and configurations in their drawings to explore alternatives and to communicate with each other. For example, when thinking about spatial arrangements, they draw bubble diagrams; when thinking about natural lighting, they draw a sun symbol and light rays. Given the connection between drawings and thinking, one should be able infer design intentions from a drawing and ultimately use such inferences to program a computer to understand our drawings. This dissertation reports findings from empirical studies on drawings and explores the possibility of using the computer to automatically infer designer's concerns from the drawings a designer makes. This dissertation consists of three parts: 1) a literature review of design studies, cognitive studies of drawing and computational sketch systems, and a set of pilot projects; 2) empirical studies of diagramming design intentions and a design drawing experiment; and 3) the implementation of a prototype system called Right-Tool-Right-Time. The main goal is to find out what is in design drawings that a computer program should be able to recognize and support. Experiments were conducted to study the relation between drawing conventions and the design tasks with which they are associated. It was found from the experiments that designers use certain symbols and configurations when thinking about certain design concerns. When thinking about allocating objects or spaces with a required dimensions, designers wrote down numbers beside the drawing to reason xviii about size and to calculate dimensions. When thinking about visual analysis, designers drew sight lines from a view point on a floor plan. Based on the recognition that it is possible to associate symbols and spatial arrangements in a drawing with a designer's intention, or task context, the second goal is to find out whether a computer can be programed to recognize these drawing conventions. Given an inferred intention and context, a program should be able to activate appropriate design tools automatically. For example, concerns about visual analysis can activate a visual simulation program, and number calculations can activate a calculator. The Right- Tool-Right-Time prototype program demonstrates how a freehand sketching system that infers intentions would support the automatic activation of different design tools based on a designers' drawing acts.
series thesis:PhD
email ellendo@cmu.edu
more http://www.arch.gatech.edu/~ellen/thesis.html
last changed 2004/10/04 05:49

_id ga9916
id ga9916
authors Elzenga, R. Neal and Pontecorvo, Michael S.
year 1999
title Arties: Meta-Design as Evolving Colonies of Artistic Agents
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Meta-design, the act of designing a system or species of design instead of a design instance, is an important concept in modern design practice and in the generative design paradigm. For meta-design to be a useful tool, the designer must have more formal support for both design species definition/expression and the abstract attributes which the designer is attempting to embody within a design. Arties is an exploration of one possible avenue for supporting meta-design. Arties is an artistic system emphasizing the co-evolution of colonies of Artificial Life design or artistic agents (called arties) and the environment they inhabit. Generative design systems have concentrated on biological genetics metaphors where a population of design instances are evolved directly from a set of ‘parent’ designs in a succession of generations. In Arties, the a-life agent which is evolved, produces the design instance as a byproduct of interacting with its environment. Arties utilize an attraction potential curve as their primary dynamic. They sense the relative attraction of entities in their environment, using multiple sensory channels. Arties then associate an attractiveness score to each entity. This attractiveness score is combined with a 'taste' function built into the artie that is sensitized to that observation channel, entity, and distance by a transfer function. Arties use this attraction to guide decisions and behaviors. A community of arties, with independent evolving attraction criteria can pass collective judgement on each point in an art space. As the Artie moves within this space it modifies the environment in reaction to what it senses. Arties support for Meta-design is in (A) the process of evolving arties, breeding their attraction potential curve parameters using a genetic algorithm and (B) their use of sensory channels to support abstract attributes geometries. Adjustment of these parameters tunes the attraction of the artie along various sensing channels. The multi-agent co-evolution of Arties is one approach to creating a system for supporting meta-design. Arties is part of an on-going exploration of how to support meta-design in computer augmented design systems. Our future work with Arties-like systems will be concerned with applications in areas such as modeling adaptive directives in Architecture, Object Structure Design, spatio-temporal behaviors design (for games and simulations), virtual ambient spaces, and representation and computation of abstract design attributes.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id c21a
authors Fitzsimons, J. Kent
year 1999
title Net-Based History of Architecture
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 319-325
summary History sequences in professional architecture programs must meet broad educational objectives. Inherent in an architect’s education is a tension between the rigorous consideration of important ideas in the history of architecture and the inspired implementation of these ideas in the design studio. A digital history course can bridge the education/training divide by making the study of history emulate the methods and strategies used in the architecture studio. Using a relational database and navigation software, we have developed a course in which students move through a digital environment of text, image, audio and video resources pertaining to broad historical categories in architecture. Charged with producing historical genealogies, students must incorporate current architectural and cultural concerns in their distillation of the history presented by the articles, surveys, manifestoes, photographs, drawings and interviews encountered online. The immersive multimedia environment uses hyperlinks as a structure, placing emphasis on the student’s role in navigation while increasing the possibilities for chance encounters in the material. The delivery of basic material having been accomplished independently by the student, class meetings are used for higher-level discussions of the issues that surface. The project is currently being implemented as a half-semester course in 20th century architecture for a small group of sophomore students in the professional Bachelor of Architecture program. The project’s pedagogical and technical aspects will be discussed with respect to this stage of its development.
series SIGRADI
email jkentf@rice.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:51

_id b0c3
authors Flanagan, Robert
year 1999
title Designing by Simulation
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 25-30
summary This article evaluates ‘simulation’ as a contributing factor in architectural design. While computers enhance simulation, they have yet to transform the art of architecture. A partial explanation is found at the extremes of design processes: Gaudí’s Sagrada Família Cathedral of Barcelona is an empiricist’s culminating achievement -- faith expressed in stone. By contrast, SOM’s Sear’s Tower of Chicago is the modernist monument to rational process -- (financial) faith engineered in steel and glass. Gaudí employed an understanding of the heritage of stone and masonry to fashion his design while SOM used precise relationships of mathematics and steel. However, the designs in both the Sear’s Tower and Sagrada Família are restricted by the solutions inherent in the methods. In contrast, student designs often have no inherent approach to building. While the solution may appear to be evident, the method must often be invented; this is potentially more costly and complex than the design itself. This issue is not new to computers, but its hyper--reality is potentially more complex and disruptive. In evaluating the role of computer simulation in architectural design, this article employs two methods: 1.) Exoskeletal design: A limited collection of connected plates is formed and designed through warping, bending and forming. Reference architect Buckminster Fuller. 2.) Endoskeletal design: Curtain wall construction is taken to its minimalist extreme, using pure structure and membrane. Reference artist Christo.
series SIGRADI
email rflanaga@carbon.cudenver.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id 993c
authors Fruchter, Renate
year 1999
title A/E/C Teamwork: A Collaborative Design and Learning Space
source Journal of Computing in Civil Engineering -- October 1999 -- Volume 13, Issue 4, pp. 261-269
summary This paper describes an ongoing effort focused on combined research and curriculum development for multidisciplinary, geographically distributed architecture/engineering/construction (A/E/C) teamwork. Itpresents a model for a distributed A/E/C learning environment and an Internet-based Web-mediated collaboration tool kit. The distributed learning environment includes six universities from Europe, Japan, andthe United States. The tool kit is aimed to assist team members and owners (1) capture and share knowledge and information related to a specific project; (2) navigate through the archived knowledge andinformation; and (3) evaluate and explain the product's performance. The A/E/C course offered at Stanford University acts as a testbed for cutting-edge information technologies and a forum to teach newgenerations of professionals how to team up with practitioners from other disciplines and take advantage of information technology to produce a better, faster, more economical product. The paper presents newassessment metrics to monitor students' cross-disciplinary learning experience and track programmatic changes. The paper concludes with challenges and quandaries regarding the impact of informationtechnologies on team performance and behavior.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:45

_id acadia06_426
id acadia06_426
authors Garber, R., Robertson, N.
year 2006
title The Pleated Cape: From the Mass-Standardization of Levittown to Mass Customization Today
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 426-439
summary In the 1950’s, the Levitts put mass-production and the reverse assembly line into use in the building of thousands of single-family houses. However, the lack of variation that made their construction process so successful ultimately produced a mundane suburban landscape of sameness. While there were many attempts to differentiate these Levitt Cape Cods, none matched the ingenuity of their original construction process. The notion of mass-customization has been heavily theorized since the 1990’s, first appearing in the field of management and ultimately finding its way into the field of architecture. Greg Lynn used mass-customization in his design for the Embryological House in which thousands of unique houses could be generated using biological rules of differentiation (Lynn 1999). Other industries have embraced the premise that computer-numerically-controlled technologies allow for the production of variation, though it has not been thoroughly studied in architecture. While digital fabrication has been integral in the realization of several high-profile projects, the notion of large-scale mass-customization in the spec-housing market has yet to become a reality. Through the execution of an addition to a Cape Cod-style house, we examine the intersection between prefabricated standardized panels and digital fabrication to produce a mass-customized approach to housing design. Through illustrations and a detailed description of our design process, we will show how digital fabrication technologies allow for customization of mass produced products.
series ACADIA
email richard@emergence.net
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id b5d9
authors González, Guillermo and Gutiérrez, Liliana
year 1999
title El TDE-AC: tecnología digital y estrategia pedagógica (The Tde-ac: Digital Technology and Pedagogical Strategy)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 269-271
summary In 1995 the programming of a specialized, expert graphic software CA-TSD, began. The TSD acronym designates a graphic language derived from the theory of spatial delimitation, it systematizes all possibilities of selection and combination of flat and volumetric figures. It establishes necessary and sufficient morphic and tactic dimensions to account for all possible relationships of selection and combination. TSD proposes a syntactic reading of those formal, pure design operations underlying traditional representations. Tracings and complex configurations described by tree-hierarchical structures of simple configurations allow for a coherent syntactic analysis of the design structure of any object this will allow the construction of a pure design formula for the conscious and unconscious prefiguration operations of an artist or style in this presentation, we will use our proprietary CA-TSD software that will allow for fast verification of what's stated, including architecture and graphic design examples.
series SIGRADI
email gnzlz@satlink.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id ga9928
id ga9928
authors Goulthorpe
year 1999
title Hyposurface: from Autoplastic to Alloplastic Space
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary By way of immediate qualification to an essay which attempts to orient current technical developments in relation to a series of dECOi projects, I would suggest that the greatest liberation offered by new technology in architecture is not its formal potential as much as the patterns of creativity and practice it engenders. For increasingly in the projects presented here dECOi operates as an extended network of technical expertise: Mark Burry and his research team at Deakin University in Australia as architects and parametric/ programmatic designers; Peter Wood in New Zealand as programmer; Alex Scott in London as mathematician; Chris Glasow in London as systems engineer; and the engineers (structural/services) of David Glover’s team at Ove Arup in London. This reflects how we’re working in a new technical environment - a new form of practice, in a sense - a loose and light network which deploys highly specialist technical skill to suit a particular project. By way of a second disclaimer, I would suggest that the rapid technological development we're witnessing, which we struggle to comprehend given the sheer pace of change that overwhelms us, is somehow of a different order than previous technological revolutions. For the shift from an industrial society to a society of mass communication, which is the essential transformation taking place in the present, seems to be a subliminal and almost inexpressive technological transition - is formless, in a sense - which begs the question of how it may be expressed in form. If one holds that architecture is somehow the crystallization of cultural change in concrete form, one suspects that in the present there is no simple physical equivalent for the burst of communication technologies that colour contemporary life. But I think that one might effectively raise a series of questions apropos technology by briefly looking at 3 or 4 of our current projects, and which suggest a range of possibilities fostered by new technology. By way of a third doubt, we might qualify in advance the apparent optimism of architects for CAD technology by thinking back to Thomas More and his island ‘Utopia’, which marks in some way the advent of Modern rationalism. This was, if not quite a technological utopia, certainly a metaphysical one, More’s vision typically deductive, prognostic, causal. But which by the time of Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis is a technological utopia availing itself of all the possibilities put at humanity’s disposal by the known machines of the time. There’s a sort of implicit sanction within these two accounts which lies in their nature as reality optimized by rational DESIGN as if the very ethos of design were sponsored by Modern rationalist thought and its utopian leanings. The faintly euphoric ‘technological’ discourse of architecture at present - a sort of Neue Bauhaus - then seems curiously misplaced historically given the 20th century’s general anti-, dis-, or counter-utopian discourse. But even this seems to have finally run its course, dissolving into the electronic heterotopia of the present with its diverse opportunities of irony and distortion (as it’s been said) as a liberating potential.1 This would seem to mark the dissolution of design ethos into non-causal process(ing), which begs the question of ‘design’ itself: who 'designs' anymore? Or rather, has 'design' not become uncoupled from its rational, deterministic, tradition? The utopianism that attatches to technological discourse in the present seems blind to the counter-finality of technology's own accomplishments - that transparency has, as it were, by its own more and more perfect fulfillment, failed by its own success. For what we seem to have inherited is not the warped utopia depicted in countless visions of a singular and tyrranical technology (such as that in Orwell's 1984), but a rich and diverse heterotopia which has opened the possibility of countless channels of local dialect competing directly with the channels of power. Undoubtedly such multiplicitous and global connectivity has sent creative thought in multiple directions…
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 933a
authors GVU
year 1999
title Conceptual Design Space Project
source Center Virtual Environments Group. GeorgiaTech,Virginia, USA
summary The Conceptual Design Space (CDS) is a real-time, interactive virtual environments application which attempts to address the issue of 3D design in general and immersive design in particular. We are researching innovative tools and interface elements for virtual worlds. The first application of these techniques is an architectural one. Graduate students from Georgia Tech's College of Architecture will be using CDS to create conceptual building designs. The students will not only be able to inspect and "inhabit" their buildings, but will also have the ability to modify them, add details, or create new designs, all while immersed in the virtual world.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 8735
authors James, Stephen
year 1999
title An Allegorical Architecture: A Proposed Interpretive Center for the Bonneville Salt Flats
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 18-19
summary Architecture is the physical expression of man's relationship to the landscape- an emblem of our heritage. Such a noble statement sounds silly into today's context, because civilized society has largely disassociated itself from raw nature. We have tamed the elements with our environmental controls and turned the deserts into pasture. I find much of the built environment distracting. Current architecture is trite, compared to geologic form and order. I visited the Bonneville Salt Flats- (Utah's anti-landscape) in the summer of 1997. The experience of arriving at the flats exceeded my expectations. I was overpowered by a sense of personal insignificance - a small spot floating on a sea of salt. The horizon seemed to swallow up the sky. Off in the distance I noticed a dark fleck. It looked as foreign as I felt on this pure white plane. I drove across the sticky salt toward it, only to discover an old rusty oil barrel half submerged in salt. In my mind, the barrel has a history. It tells the story of a man's attempt at achieving a goal, or maybe it represents a broken dream left to corrode in the alkali flats. The barrel remains planted in the salt as a relic for those who venture into the white wilderness. This experience left me to ponder whether or not architecture can serve the same purpose - telling the story of a place through its relationship to a landscape, and connection to events.
series ACADIA
email sjames@email.hga.com
last changed 2002/12/14 08:21

_id 161c
authors Juroszek, Steven P.
year 1999
title Access, Instruction, Application: Towards a Universal Lab
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 141-150
summary In January 1998, the Montana State University School of Architecture embarked upon an initiative to successfully integrate computer technology into its design curriculum. At that time only a handful of student computers could be found in the design studio. By January 1999 over 95 students have and use computers in their courses. The increase in computer access and use is occurring through a five-phase initiative called the Universal Lab-a school-wide commitment to the full integration of computer technology into all design studios, support courses and architectural electives. The Universal Lab uses the areas of Access, Instruction and Application as the vehicles for appropriate placement and usage of digital concepts within the curriculum. The three-pronged approach allows each instructor to integrate technology using one, two or all three areas with varying degrees of intensity. This paper presents the current status of the Universal Lab-Phase I and Phase II-and describes the effect of this program on student work, course design and faculty instruction.
keywords Design, Access, Instruction, Application, Integration
series eCAADe
email stevej@montana.edu
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 39cb
authors Kelleners, Richard H.M.C.
year 1999
title Constraints in object-oriented graphics
source Eindhoven University of Technology
summary In the area of interactive computer graphics, two important approaches to deal with the complexity of designing and implementing graphics systems are object-oriented programming and constraint-based programming. From literature, it appears that combination of these two has clear advantages but has also proven to be difficult. One of the main problems is that constraint programming infringes the information hiding principle of object-oriented programming. The goal of the research project is to combine these two approaches to benefit from the strengths of both. Two research groups at the Eindhoven University of Technology investigate the use of constraints on graphics objects. At the Architecture department, constraints are applied in a virtual reality design environment. At the Computer Science department, constraints aid in modeling 3D animations. For these two groups, a constraint system for 3D graphical objects was developed. A conceptual model, called CODE (Constraints on Objects via Data flows and Events), is presented that enables integration of constraints and objects by separating the object world from the constraint world. In the design of this model, the main aspect being considered is that the information hiding principle among objects may not be violated. Constraint solvers, however, should have direct access to an object’s internal data structure. Communication between the two worlds is done via a protocol orthogonal to the message passing mechanism of objects, namely, via events and data flows. This protocol ensures that the information hiding principle at the object-oriented programming level is not violated while constraints can directly access “hidden” data. Furthermore, CODE is built up of distinct elements, or entity types, like constraint, solver, event, data flow. This structure enables that several special purpose constraint solvers can be defined and made to cooperate to solve complex constraint problems. A prototype implementation was built to study the feasibility of CODE. Therefore, the implementation should correspond directly to the conceptual model. To this end, every entity (object, constraint, solver) of the conceptual model is represented by a separate process in the language MANIFOLD. The (concurrent) processes communicate by events and data flows. The implementation serves to validate the conceptual model and to demonstrate that it is a viable way of combining constraints and objects. After the feasibility study, the prototype was discarded. The gained experience was used to build an implementation of the conceptual model for the two research groups. This implementation encompassed a constraint system with multiple solvers and constraint types. The constraint system was built as an object-oriented library that can be linked to the applications in the respective research groups. Special constructs were designed to ensure information hiding among application objects while constraints and solvers have direct access to the object data. CODE manages the complexity of object-oriented constraint solving by defining a communication protocol to allow the two paradigms to cooperate. The prototype implementation demonstrates that CODE can be implemented into a working system. Finally, the implementation of an actual application shows that the model is suitable for the development of object-oriented software.
keywords Computer Graphics; Object Oriented Programming; Constraint Programming
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id fb37
authors Knight, T.
year 1999
title Applications in architectural design and education and practice
source Report for the NSF/MIT Workshop on Shape Computation, Cambridge, Mass., 25-26 April 1999
summary Shortly after shape grammars were invented by Stiny and Gips, a two part project for shape grammars was outlined by Stiny. In a 1976 paper,1 Stiny described "two exercises in formal composition". These simple exercises became the foundation for the many applications of shape grammars that followed, and suggested the potential of such applications in education and practice. The first exercise showed how shape grammars could be used in original composition, that is, the creation of new design languages or styles from scratch. The second exercise showed how shape grammars could be used to analyze known or existing design languages. Both exercises illustrated the unique characteristics of the shape grammar formalism that helped motivate a quarter century (almost!) of shape grammar work. General but simple, formal yet intuitive: qualities that continue to make shape grammar disciples and confound skeptics. The history of shape grammar applications in architecture and the arts for the two complementary purposes of synthesis and analysis, as well as for a third, joint purpose is sketched in the first section of this report. These three categories of applications do not have rigid boundaries. They are used in this report mostly as a framework for discussion. An overview of the roles of shape grammar applications in education and practice is given in the second section. New and ongoing issues concerning shape grammars in education and practice are discussed in the last section.
series report
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 687c
authors Kosco, Igor
year 1999
title How the World Became Smaller
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 230-237
summary The world of computers became fruitful and independent before the new millennium started. New technologies and methods are giving us new tools and possibilities every day as well as the challenge how to use them. The advantage of architecture and namely of architects teaching at the universities or schools is remarkable: new techniques reflect the education, research and practice - and what is important - by one person. The links between practice and university from the point of view: how the computer technologies and CAAD influences methods of designing, managing and collaboration are very important in both directions. It grows with the number of students who left university with good computer skills on one side and number of architectural and engineering offices using computers on the other. Networks and Internet enables to exchange data but also experiences. Internet itself is not only a tool for surfing and enjoying or the source of information, but preferably like a powerful tool for collaboration, workgroups, virtual studios or long distance education. This paper describes experiences from research and educational projects between Slovak Technical University, IUG Grenoble, University of Newcastle and others and their influence on architectural education and practice.
keywords Long-Distance Education, Research, Practice
series eCAADe
email kosco@fastu.fa.stuba.sk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 6cc5
authors Kowaltowski, D.C.C.K., Da Silva, V.G., Gouveia, A.P.S., Pina. G., Ruschel, R.C., Filho, F.B. and Fávero, E.
year 2000
title Ensino de Projeto com Inserção da Informática Aplicada: O curso de Arquitetura e Urbanismo da UNICAMP (Design Teaching with the Introduction of Applied Computing: The Architecture and Urbanism course at UNICAMP)
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 352-354
summary This paper discusses the formal educational base of the Architecture course of the State University of Campinas, UNICAMP, which opened in 1999. Applied computing, thoerical content and technical aspects of design are principal educational elements of the course. The paper will show and discuss the structure of building up knowledge for design activities through drafting, applied computing and theory and practical design disciplines present in the course.
series SIGRADI
email doris@fec.unicamp.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:54

_id 5c07
authors Lee, H.-L., Liu, Y.-T., Chen, S.-C., Tang, S.-K. and Huang, C.-P., Huang, C.-H., Chang, Y.-L., Chang, K.-W. and Chen, K.-Y.
year 2002
title A Comparative study of protocol analysis for - Spatiality of a Text-based Cyberspace
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 262-266
summary Graduate Institute of Architecture, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, 30050, TAIWAN The adaptation of the word cyberspace (Gibson, 1984) following the emergence of the World Wide Web Internet not only succinctly revolutionized the correlation of time and space but also poised to challenge how we view the existing spatial concept. This research tries to use protocol analysis to examine text-based cyberspace, such as bulletin board, chart rooms and so forth, and the objective of this research is to realize the spatiality of cyberspace through the cognitive point of view, and to compare the differences of the definitions and perception ways of spatiality between people with general domain and in design fields. Finally, we validate the existence of cyberspace, where the process not only allows further categorization of spatial elements concluded from the earlier study, but discover that varied backgrounds can affect how a user defines and perceives cyberspace (Strate, 1999).
series eCAADe
email aleppo@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id ba3b
authors Madrazo, L.
year 1999
title Types and Instances: a paradigm for teaching design with computers
source Design Studies 20 (2) (1999) pp. 177-193
summary Types and Instances is the conceptual paradigm of this course for teaching design with computers to architecture students which was devised at the ETH Zurich. The course was initiated in the academic year 1990/91. Since then, it has been offered each following Winter semester up to the academic year 1995/1996. This paper discusses the essential concepts of the course and describes the tools that were created specifically for it. A reflection based on the experience of teaching the course is also included in the conclusions.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:45

_id f2cf
authors Madrazo, Leandro
year 2001
title NETWORKING : a web environment for a collaborative education
source Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), ACCOLADE - Architecture, Collaboration, Design. Delft University Press (DUP Science) / ISBN 90-407-2216-1 / The Netherlands, pp. 169-182 [Book ordering info: m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl]
summary NETWORKING is a teaching environment developed in close connection with the course "Sistemas de RepresentaciÛn", which has been carried out for the first time at the E.T.S. d'Arquitectura La Salle, Barcelona, in the academic year 1999/00. It is a web-based environment that promotes the exchange of ideas among students and their capacity to work collaboratively. There is a customized NETWORKING environment for each one of the six themes that made up the course: text, shape, object, image, space and light. In this paper we will discuss two of the six environments: OBJECT and SPACE.
series other
last changed 2001/09/14 19:30

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