CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 147

_id f9c4
authors Kvan, Thomas and Candy, Linda
year 1999
title Designing Collaborative Environments for Strategic Knowledge in Design
source 2nd International Workshop on Strategic Knowledge and Concept Formation, Iwate Prefectural University, 20-22 October 1999, pp. 85-94
summary This paper considers aspects of strategic knowledge in design and some implications for designing in collaborative environments. Two key questions underline the concerns. First; how can strategic knowledge for collaborative design be taught and second; what kind of computer-based collaborative designing might best support the learning of strategic knowledge? We argue that the support of learning of strategic knowledge in collaborative design by computer-mediated means must be based upon empirical evidence about the nature of learning and design practice in the real world. Examples of research by the authors that seeks to provide that evidence are described and an approach to computer system design and evaluation proposed.
keywords Collaborative Design; Strategic Knowledge; Empirical Studies; Computer Support
series other
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2002/11/15 17:29

_id 1a3d
authors Willey, David
year 1999
title Sketchpad to 2000: From Computer Systems to Digital Environments
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 526-532
summary It can be argued that over the last thirty five years computer aided architectural design (CAAD) has made little impact in terms of aiding design. The paper provides a broadbrush review of the last 35 years of CAAD research and suggests that the SKETCHPAD notion that has dominated CAAD since 1963 is now a flawed concept. Then the discipline was replete with Modernist concepts of optimal solutions, objective design criteria and universal design standards. Now CAD needs to proceed on the basis of the Post Modern ways of thinking and designing opened up by digital techniques - the Internet, multimedia, virtual reality, electronic games, distance learning. Computers facilitate information flow and storage. In the late seventies and eighties the CAAD research community's response to the difficulties it had identified with the construction of integrated digital building models was to attempt to improve the intelligence of the computer systems to better match the understanding of designers. Now it is clear that the future could easily lie with CAAD systems that have almost no intelligence and make no attempt to aid the designer. Communication is much more central to designing than computing.
keywords History, Intelligence, Interface, Sketchpad, Web
series eCAADe
email dwilley@plymouth.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 93a8
authors Anders, P.
year 1999
title Envisioning Cyberspace: Designing 3D Electronic Spaces
source McGraw-Hill, NY
summary Free of the constraints of physical form and limited only by imagination, new environments spring to life daily in a fantastic realm called cyberspace. The creators of this new virtual world may be programmers, designers, architects, even children. In this invigorating exploration of the juncture between cyberspace and the physical world, architect Peter Anders brings together leading-edge cyberspace art and architecture ... inspiring new techniques and technologies ... unexpected unions of reality and virtuality ... and visions of challenges and opportunities as yet unexplored. More than an invitation to tour fantastic realms and examine powerful tools, this book is a hard-eyed look at cyberspace's impact on physical, cultural, and social reality, and the human-centered principles of its design. This is a book that will set designers and architects thinkingNand a work of importance to anyone fascinated with the fast-closing space between the real and the virtual.
series other
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 8802
authors Burry, Mark, Dawson, Tony and Woodbury, Robert
year 1999
title Learning about Architecture with the Computer, and Learning about the Computer in Architecture
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 374-382
summary Most students commencing their university studies in architecture must confront and master two new modes of thought. The first, widely known as reflection-in-action, is a continuous cycle of self-criticism and creation that produces both learning and improved work. The second, which we call here design making, is a process which considers building construction as an integral part of architectural designing. Beginning students in Australia tend to do neither very well; their largely analytic secondary education leaves the majority ill-prepared for these new forms of learning and working. Computers have both complicated and offered opportunities to improve this situation. An increasing number of entering students have significant computing skill, yet university architecture programs do little in developing such skill into sound and extensible knowledge. Computing offers new ways to engage both reflection-in-action and design making. The collaboration between two Schools in Australia described in detail here pools computer-based learning resources to provide a wider scope for the education in each institution, which we capture in the phrase: Learn to use computers in architecture (not use computers to learn architecture). The two shared learning resources are Form Making Games (Adelaide University), aimed at reflection-in-action and The Construction Primer (Deakin University and Victoria University of Wellington), aimed at design making. Through contributing to and customising the resources themselves, students learn how designing and computing relate. This paper outlines the collaborative project in detail and locates the initiative at a time when the computer seems to have become less self-consciously assimilated within the wider architectural program.
keywords Reflection-In-Action, Design Making, Customising Computers
series eCAADe
email mburry@deakin.edu.au
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id f51a
authors Del Pup, Claudio
year 1999
title Carbon Pencil, Brush and Mouse, Three Tools in the Learning Process of New University Art Designers
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 420-425
summary This article develops the introduction of computer technologies in the fine arts environment the use of these new tools, sharing the process of creation and interacting at the same level with older technics, breaks the myth of technology and tries to reach the right place according to current or modern advances. As an introduction, it explains the insertion in the current courses of study of the "computer languages area", its implementation, present situation and future stages. An important point we have developed is the teaching methodology, to solve the transition of those who, challenging their investigations in different areas, like fire arts, graphic arts, film or video, need the support of computers. The first steps consist in designing sample courses, which allow the measurement of results, the definition of concepts like extension, capacities, teaching hours and the most important, a methodology to share the enthusiasm of creation with the difficulties of learning a new technique it is necessary to discover limits, to avoid easy results as a creative tool one of the most important problems we have faced is the necessity of coordinating the process of creation with the individual time of a plastic artist, finding the right way that allows the integration of all the group, minimizing desertion and losing of motivation. Two years later, the first results in the field of digital image investigations and assistance in form design. Volume as a challenge and solutions supported in techniques of modeling in 3D (experiences of modeling a virtual volume from a revolution profile, its particular facts and the parallelism with potter's lathe the handling of image as the most important element, as an work of art itself, but also as a support in the transmission of knowledge (design of a CD as a tool for the department of embryology of medical school with the participation of people from the medical school, engineering school and school of fine arts). Time as a variable, movement, animation and its techniques, multimedia (design of short videos for the 150th anniversary of the Republic University). Conclusions, good hits, adjustments, new areas to include, problems to solve, the way of facing a constantly evolving technology.
series SIGRADI
email claudio.delpup@quanam.com.uy
last changed 2016/03/10 08:50

_id 7e64
authors Koutamanis, Alexander
year 1999
title Approaches to the Integration of CAAD Education in the Electronic Era: Two Value Systems
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 238-243
summary In recent years the democratization of information and communication technologies (ICT) has become the greatest influence on the structure of CAAD education. While the content of the CAAD courses simply had to absorb the new technological possibilities, the structure of the courses and in particular their relationship to the rest of the curriculum has become the subject of speculation and experimentation. Integration of CAAD education in an architectural curriculum occurs either by (a) placing emphasis on designing in CAAD courses, or by (b)  integrating computing in design courses. Both approaches respond to the democratization of ICT by making design computing widely available and acceptable. Further improvement is possible if the student becomes the carrier of integration. This is based on the long-term amplification of two value systems. The first refers to personal cognition: rather than rewarding a student with the teacher's approval, educational goals should be translated into individual skills and knowledge. The second system addresses the values of the peer group: such groups support learning by comparison to other individuals and emerging communal characteristics, either as a result of competition or for reasons of assimilation.
keywords Education, Democracy, Personal Cognition
series eCAADe
email a.koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id ab9c
authors Kvan, Thomas and Kvan, Erik
year 1999
title Is Design Really Social
source International Journal of Virtual Reality, 4:1
summary There are many who will readily agree with Mitchell's assertion that "the most interesting new directions (for computer-aided design) are suggested by the growing convergence of computation and telecommunication. This allows us to treat designing not just as a technical process... but also as a social process." [Mitchell 1995]. The assumption is that design was a social process until users of computer-aided design systems were distracted into treating it as a merely technical process. Most readers will assume that this convergence must and will lead to increased communication between design participants, that better social interaction leads to be better design. The unspoken assumption appears to be that putting the participants into an environment with maximal communication channels will result in design collaboration. The tools provided, therefore, must permit the best communication and the best social interaction. We see a danger here, a pattern being repeated which may lead us into less than useful activities. As with several (popular) architectural design or modelling systems already available, however, computer system implementations all too often are poor imitations manual systems. For example, few in the field will argue with the statement that the storage of data in layers in a computer-aided drafting system is an dispensable approach. Layers derive from manual overlay drafting technology [Stitt 1984] which was regarded as an advanced (manual) production concept at the time many software engineers were specifying CAD software designs. Early implementations of CAD systems (such as RUCAPS, GDS, Computervision) avoided such data organisation, the software engineers recognising that object-based structures are more flexible, permitting greater control of data editing and display. Layer-based systems, however, are easier to implement in software, more familiar to the user and hence easier to explain, initially easier to use but more limiting for an experienced and thoughtful user, leading in the end to a lesser quality in resultant drawings and significant problems in output control (see Richens [1990], pp. 31-40 for a detailed analysis of such features and constraints). Here then we see the design for architectural software faithfully but inappropriately following manual methods. So too is there a danger of assuming that the best social interaction is that done face-to-face, therefore all collaborative design communications environments must mimic face-to-face.
series journal paper
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2003/05/15 08:29

_id 9c3e
authors Maher, M.L., Skow, B. and Cicognani, A.
year 1999
title Designing the virtual campus
source Design Studies, 20, 319-342
summary Virtual Worlds are networked environments that look like the physical world, and create a sense of place for the person communicating, navigating, and doing things in the virtual world. Virtual worlds have traditionally been developed as games, in fact, most virtual worlds today are games. A virtual campus has been developed in the Architecture Faculty at the University of Sydney that is based on some of the concepts of virtual worlds. The virtual campus is a place on the internet where students can go to take courses, meet with academic staff, and communicate with other students. The development of the virtual campus has been influenced by research in design science and is based on the conceptual metaphor of architectural design. The design of the virtual campus is considered at three levels: the implementation level, the representation level, and the interface level. Identifying these levels provides a basis for the design of virtual worlds for professional and educational environments. The consideration of the representation level results in a consistent use of a conceptual metaphor so that a person in the virtual campus can make use of the facilities in an intuitive manner.
series journal paper
email mary@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 2a47
authors Mortola, E., Giangrande, A., Mirabelli, P. and Fortuzzi, A.
year 1999
title Interactive Didactic Modules for On-Line Learning via Internet
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 273-278
summary On-line learning can become a very efficient method of teaching in the University of the future. The Students can plan their curricula by selecting the offers of some universities coordinated that meet their specific aims. The communication interchange between student and teacher can be enriched through new forms of interaction via network technology. Laboratories of interactive design, which involve the participation of citizens, can become a good occasion to learn designing linked to the human needs. The architect who is interested in the sustainable development has to consider local needs and interact with users to build a new environment full of local values.
keywords On-Line Learning, Internet, Teaching Modules, Participation, Collaborative Design, Neighbourhood Municipal Laboratories
series eCAADe
email mortola@arch.uniroma3.it
more http://rmac.arch.uniroma3.it
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 60a5
authors Oxman, R.E.
year 1999
title Educating the designerly thinker
source Design Studies, Vol 20 No 2
summary This paper presents a hypothesis about design education that is framed within and derived from cognitive theories of learning. The relevance of design thinking and cognitive approaches to the development of pedagogical approaches in design education is presented and discussed. A conceptual model for design education that emphasizes the acquisition of explicit knowledge of design is proposed. The acquisition of knowledge is achieved through the explication of cognitive structures and strategies of design thinking. The explication process is constructed by exploiting a representational formalism, and a computational medium which supports both the learning process as well as the potential re-use of this knowledge. Finally, an argument is presented that the measure of learning, generally equated with the evaluation of the product of designing, can instead be based upon evaluating learning increments of acquired knowledge.
series journal paper
email arrro01@techunix.technion.ac.il
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id ee8a
authors Porrúa, Marina and Rueda, Marta
year 1999
title Innovación Didáctica. Digitalización de un ejercicio práctico cuya problemática central es la organización de la forma en el espacio bidimensional y la introducción al diseño textil (Didactic Innovation. Digitalization of a practical exercises whose Central Issue is the Organization of Form in Bidimensional Space and the Introduction to the Textile Design)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 285-288
summary The projectual disciplines must respond with some grade of originality to a approached problem. In order to products of design be creative must be implemented a creative process of design and also from the teaching. The essence of creativity are the variations over a subject. A pedagogic way for this, is the one to recognise, individualise and represent the problem attributes, building upon them an "exploration space", to analyse and create new combinatorial alternatives or restructuring of the problem. The digital media incorporation as a new proyectual environment approaches the interactivity not only of the combinatorial variables, but, also to the hypermedia's. Both the digital documents, as the creative process, have a "no linear" or a "net" structure, that allows the construction of a himself way, self-managemented into this structure. The interactivity makes possible to work, as the divergent thought does, in a "polydirectional" field, that stimulates the fluency, the flexibility and the originality. The new- media's, used as didactic tool, open to "action", allow the students to convert them in "co- author", together professors, about themself learning process. >From this educational conception and its potential enrichment with the hypermedia, we are designing a project of digitising of an exercise to our didactic proposal and its later application into the course with our students.
series SIGRADI
email mlporrua@mdp.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:57

_id 36dc
authors Reffat, Rabee M. and Gero, John S.
year 1999
title Situatedness: A New Dimension for Learning Systems in Design
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 252-261
summary In this paper we adopt the approach that designing is a series of situated acts, ie designing cannot be pre-planned to completion. This is based on ideas from situated cognition theory that claims that what people perceive, how they conceive and what they do develop together and are adapted to the environment. For a system to be useful for human designers it must have the ability to associate what is learned to its environment. In order for a system to do that such a system must be able to acquire knowledge of the environment that a design constructs. Therefore, acknowledging the notion of situatedness is of importance to provide a system with such capability and add on a new dimension to existing learning systems in design. We will call such a learning system within the design domain a Situated Learning Design System (SLDS). A SLDS should be able to create its own situational categories from its perceptual experiences and modify them if encountered again to link the learned knowledge to its corresponding situation. We have chosen architectural shapes as the vehicle to demonstrate our ideas and used multiple representations to build a platform for a SLDS to learn from. In this paper the notion of situatedness and its role in both designing and learning is discussed. The overall architecture of a SLDS is introduced and how the potential outcome of such a system will support human designers while designing is discussed.
keywords Designing, Situated Knowledge, Multiple Representations, Situated Learning
series eCAADe
email rabee@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 7012
authors Sheng-Fen, Chien
year 2002
title Design Gaming, Designing Games - Learning Design through Game Playing and Game Making
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 28-33
summary This is an ongoing effort to make design learning fun and constructive. The process of designing, in many respects, is very similar to playing games: exploring possibilities under certain constraints. Since 1999, the “designing as game playing” concept has been used in architectural design studios and related courses in my institution. In the early years, preexisting games or games created by instructors were used. These games were played in a junior-year course that emphasized design decision-making and design collaborations. In recent two years, design game making has been used as a vehicle for senior-year student to strengthen their analytical skills. So far, students have developed games of Mario Botta, Le Corbusier (Villa Savoy), Aldolf Loos, Mies van der Rohe, and Richard Meier. Two more games are underdevelopment: the games of Isosaki and Tadao Ando. Some of these games have been used in freshman-year courses to introduce certain principles of form composition. Playing design games enables students to gain design knowledge as well as to be able to view design constraints constructively as special characteristics on the game board that may turn to their advantages rather than as useless stumbling blocks. Designing games requires students to analyze existing designs in great details as well as to be able to organize certain relationships of these details into operable rules that could produce new designs. The experience of teaching “games and design” to-date has been a very fruitful one. Future work will focus on design gaming for freshman students and game designing for senior students, as well as the interaction between the freshmen (game players) and the seniors (game designers).
series eCAADe
email schien@mail.ntust.edu.tw
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 20ab
authors Yakeley, Megan
year 2000
title Digitally Mediated Design: Using Computer Programming to Develop a Personal Design Process
source Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Architecture
summary This thesis is based on the proposal that the current system of architectural design education confuses product and process. Students are assessed through, and therefore concentrate on, the former whilst the latter is left in many cases to chance. This thesis describes a new course taught by the author at MIT for the last three years whose aim is to teach the design process away from the complexities inherent in the studio system. This course draws a parallel between the design process and the Constructionist view of learning, and asserts that the design process is a constant learning activity. Therefore, learning about the design process necessarily involves learning the cognitive skills of this theoretical approach to education. These include concrete thinking and the creation of external artifacts to develop of ideas through iterative, experimental, incremental exploration. The course mimics the Constructionist model of using the computer programming environment LOGO to teach mathematics. It uses computer programming in a CAD environment, and specifically the development of a generative system, to teach the design process. The efficacy of such an approach to architectural design education has been studied using methodologies from educational research. The research design used an emergent qualitative model, employing Maykut and Morehouses interpretive descriptive approach (Maykut & Morehouse, 1994) and Glaser and Strausss Constant Comparative Method of data analysis (Glaser & Strauss, 1967). Six students joined the course in the Spring 1999 semester. The experience of these students, what and how they learned, and whether this understanding was transferred to other areas of their educational process, were studied. The findings demonstrated that computer programming in a particular pedagogical framework, can help transform the way in which students understand the process of designing. The following changes were observed in the students during the course of the year: Development of understanding of a personalized design process; move from using computer programming to solve quantifiable problems to using it to support qualitative design decisions; change in understanding of the paradigm for computers in the design process; awareness of the importance of intrapersonal and interpersonal communication skills; change in expectations of, their sense of control over, and appropriation of, the computer in the design process; evidence of transference of cognitive skills; change from a Behaviourist to a Constructionist model of learning Thesis Supervisor: William J. Mitchell Title: Professor of Architecture and Media Arts and Sciences, School of Architecture and Planning
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 9c96
authors Szalapaj, Peter and Chang, David C.
year 1999
title Computer Architectural Representation - Applying the VOIDs Framework to a Bridge Design Scheme
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 387-394
summary A virtual environment presents sensory information and visual feedback to the user in order to give convincing illusion of an artificial world. In the architectural profession, the spatio-temporal metaphor in itself constitutes significant information retrieval, because we understand architecture by seeing it. This paper attempts to understand, and then to analyse the characteristics of representation of architectural models in virtual environments. We will examine the use and creativity of current computer generated architectural presentation in virtual environments. Our observations will be applied to the modelling of a bridge in Castlefield, Manchester, and evaluated by a group of students within the School of Architecture at Sheffield University. The conclusion of this paper will be the presentation of a conceptual structure for representing architectural models in virtual environments. This paper also explores the tension between the correspondence and constructivist views of representation. The correspondence view of representation relies on the idea that a representation corresponds to what is out there in the world. The constructivist view of representation advocates that any actual interpretation would depend on the context of their social and cultural backgrounds. However, the authors believe there should be a combination of these two views for architectural representation in virtual environments, and a framework developed by the authors - VOIDs will be presented.
keywords Virtual Environment, Architectural Representation, VOIDs, Correspondence, Constructivist
series eCAADe
email p.szalapaj@sheffield.ac.uk, arp95cc@sheffield.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id c056
authors Tsou, Jin-Yeu and Chow, Benny
year 1999
title Team Orientated Knowledge Construction for Architectural Education
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 292-300
summary Information Technology is always more accessible when we trying to imagine what the IT could be actually used. This situation is even more noticeable in the architecture field, and there are various technologies that have failed on delivering urgent needed education quality. Meanwhile, the tradition architecture education is evolving rapidly under the concepts of problem-based approach, knowledge reconstruction, and self-guided learning. "Education without institutional boundary" happens everyday in the classroom, and multi-direction learning modes have replaced the traditional single-direction teaching approach. The role of IT in the curriculum of architectural design education has become a subject of debate, scrutiny and experimentation in architectural schools. This paper will first outline the theory of applying team-oriented knowledge construction approach into studio teaching, the setup of our integrated digital design media environment is introduced; organization issue regarding the team formation and studio coordination is discussed; case studies are illustrated for demonstrating the methodology applied; and the student feedback is summarized to analysis the effectiveness of the approach.
keywords Multimedia, CD-ROM, Problem-Based Learning, Team-Orientated Learning, Constructivist Learning
series eCAADe
email jinyeutsou@cuhk.edu.hk, kaming@cuhk.edu.hk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id bacd
authors Abadí Abbo, Isaac
year 1999
title APPLICATION OF SPATIAL DESIGN ABILITY IN A POSTGRADUATE COURSE
source Full-scale Modeling and the Simulation of Light [Proceedings of the 7th European Full-scale Modeling Association Conference / ISBN 3-85437-167-5] Florence (Italy) 18-20 February 1999, pp. 75-82
summary Spatial Design Ability (SDA) has been defined by the author (1983) as the capacity to anticipate the effects (psychological impressions) that architectural spaces or its components produce in observers or users. This concept, which requires the evaluation of spaces by the people that uses it, was proposed as a guideline to a Masters Degree Course in Architectural Design at the Universidad Autonoma de Aguascalientes in Mexico. The theory and the exercises required for the experience needed a model that could simulate spaces in terms of all the variables involved. Full-scale modeling as has been tested in previous research, offered the most effective mean to experiment with space. A simple, primitive model was designed and built: an articulated ceiling that allows variation in height and shape, and a series of wooden panels for the walls and structure. Several exercises were carried out, mainly to experience cause -effect relationships between space and the psychological impressions they produce. Students researched into spatial taxonomy, intentional sequences of space and spatial character. Results showed that students achieved the expected anticipation of space and that full-scale modeling, even with a simple model, proved to be an effective tool for this purpose. The low cost of the model and the short time it took to be built, opens an important possibility for Institutions involved in architectural studies, both as a research and as a learning tool.
keywords Spatial Design Ability, Architectural Space, User Evaluation, Learning, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
email iabadi@ceea.arq.ucv.ve
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa
last changed 2004/05/04 09:27

_id 2145
authors Engeli, Maia and Mueller Andre
year 1999
title Digital Environments for Learning and Collaboration Architecture, Communication, Creativity, Media and Design Process
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 40-52
summary Digital networks are gaining importance as environments for learning and creative collaboration. Technical achievements, software enhancements, and a growing number of applicable principles make it possible to compile complex environments that satisfy many aspects necessary for creative collaboration. This paper focuses on three issues: the architecture of collaborative environments, communication in these environments and the processes inherent to creative collaboration. The information architecture of digital environments looks different from physical architecture, mainly because the material that it is made out of is information and not stone, wood or metal and the goal is to pro-vide appropriate paths and views to information. Nonetheless, many analogies can be drawn between information architecture and physical architecture, including the need for useability, aesthetics, and consistency. To communicate is important for creative collaboration. Digital networks request and enable new strategies for communicating. Regarding the collaborative creative process we have been able to detect principles and features that enhance this process, but there are still many unanswered questions. For example, the environment can enable and improve the frequency of surprise and coincidence, two factors that often play decisive roles in the creative processes but cannot be planned for in advance. Freedom and transparency within the environment are other important factors that foster creative collaboration. The following findings are based on numerous courses, which we have taught using networked environments and some associated, research projects that helped to verify their applicability for architectural practice.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email engeli@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2008/06/12 19:05

_id b7ff
authors Mullins, Michael and Van Zyl, Douw
year 2000
title Self-Selecting Digital Design Students
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 85-88
summary Recent years have seen the increasing use of digital media in undergraduate architectural education at UND, and which has been fuelled by students themselves taking up the tools available to practising architects. This process of self-selection may hold valuable lessons for the development of architectural curricula. An experimental design studio offered as an elective to UND undergraduates in 1999 has indicated that the design work produced therein, most often differed remarkably from the previous work of the same students using only traditional media. In so far as digital environments rapidly provide new and strange objects and images for students to encounter, those students are driven to interpret, transform or customise that environment in innovative ways, thereby making it their own. It is clear that the full integration of digital environments into architectural education will profoundly effect the outcomes of student work. We have observed that some self-selecting students struggle in expressing ideas through repre-sentative form in traditional studios. The question arises whether these students are "onto something" which they intuitively understand as better suited to their abilities, or whether in fact they are see digital tools as a means to avoid those areas in design in which they experience difficulties. Through observation of a group of "self-selectors" the authors attempt to lead useful generalisations; to develop a theory and method for facilitators to deal with specific students; and to work toward the development of suitable curricula for these cases.
keywords Architectural Education, Digital Media, Learning Styles
series eCAADe
email mullins@gwise.mc.und.ac.za, vanzyl@gwise.mc.und.ac.za
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id ee92
authors Papanikolaou Maria and Tuncer, Bige
year 1999
title The Fake.Space Experience - Exploring New Spaces
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 395-402
summary Fake.space is an elective CAAD course in which teachers and students form an online community. It is a Web-based communication environment for the exchange of ideas on the concept of space. Fake.space is also a narrative structure consisting of threads of nodes created by students. These nodes present different aspects of space. Fake.space represents our current generation of teaching environments. In this paper we describe and analyse its latest incarnation and discuss our aims and thoughts for further development. We believe that fake.space reflects on a future where online environments entice the students in a playful way to work with computers and CAD and consider the role of networked environments in architectural space.
keywords Online Community, Learning Environment, Identity, Transparency, Visualisation
series eCAADe
email papan@arch.ethz.ch, tuncer@arch.ethz.ch
more http://space.arch.ethz.ch/ws98/
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

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