CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 41 to 60 of 626

_id 3ddc
authors Dijkstra, Jan and Timmermans, Harry
year 1999
title Towards a Multi-Agent Model for Visualizing Simulated User Behavior to Support the Assessment of Design Performance
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 226-237
summary We introduce the outline of a multi-agent model that can be used for visualizing simulated user behavior to support the assessment of design performance. We will consider various performance indicators of building environments, which are related to user reaction to design decisions. This system may serve as a media tool in the design process for a better understanding of what the design will look like, especially for those cases where design or planning decisions will affect the behavior of individuals. The system is based on cellular automata and multi-agent simulation technology. The system simulates how agents move around in a particular 3D (or 2D) environment, in which space is represented as a lattice of cells. Agents represent objects or people with their own behavior, moving over the network. Each agent will be located in a simulated space, based on the cellular automata grid. Each iteration of the simulation is based on a parallel update of the agents conforming local rules. Agents positioned within an environment will need sensors to perceive their local neighborhood and some means with which to affect the environment. In this way, autonomous individuals and the interaction between them can be simulated by the system. As a result, designers can use the system to assess the likely consequences of their design decisions on user behavior. We think that the system provides a potentially valuable tool to support design and decision-making processes, related to user behavior in architecture and urban planning.
series ACADIA
email j.dijkstra@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 1999/12/02 07:48

_id fd35
authors Donath, Dirk
year 1999
title Using Immersive Virtual Reality Systems for Spatial Design in Architecture
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 307-318
summary In the very young discipline of Virtual Reality Applications only a few reports are available about using this technology for periods longer than in experimental setups. This paper describes experiences made during four years of usage of Virtual Reality (VR) in educational training for architects. About 100 different people were working with our systems during this period. Two programs were developed at Bauhaus University with the aim of teaching students in architecture in three-dimensional sketching. An other program for free and own interfaces and environments is currently under construction and will be presented at the international computer fair "CeBit" in 1999. The first program called voxDesign is based on the metaphor of voxels. The second program, planeDesign, uses rectangualar planes to describe room-like situations. All programs force the users to design in a 1:1 scale, which means that the design and the feedback actions are coupled in an embodied way. A real walking metaphor is used for navigation. The experiences made by the students are explained too.
keywords Virtual Reality, Architecture, Design, Design Support Systems, Interaction, Research, Education, Usability, Human Computer Interfaces
series AVOCAAD
email donath@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id d79a
authors Ekholm, Anders and Fridqvist, Sverker
year 1999
title The BAS*CAAD Information System for Design principles, Implementation, and a Design Scenario
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 149-164
summary The objectives of the BAS-CAAD-project are to investigate into theories and methods for computer aided architectural design, with emphasis on requirements of early stages of the design process. Information systems can be characterised as static or dynamic concerning the definition of classes in the model schema, and concerning classification of model objects. The paper presents the BAS-CAAD system, a prototype software that implements the conceptually most important features of a dynamic information system for design. The BAS-CAAD information system is built on a generic ontological framework. The system allows a free combination of attributes, supporting the incremental way that knowledge is built up during design. It provides a generic library structure that allows definition of objects classes in different levels of generalisation that may originate from international standards or the individual designer. For example, in the construction context, it allows modelling of buildings and their parts, as well as user organisations and user activities. The function of the system is illustrated in two scenarios.
keywords CAD, Design, Dynamic Schema Evolution, Information Systems, Object Oriented Modelling, Product Modelling, Design Scenario
series CAAD Futures
email Anders.Ekholm@caad.lth.se
last changed 2006/11/07 06:23

_id ga9916
id ga9916
authors Elzenga, R. Neal and Pontecorvo, Michael S.
year 1999
title Arties: Meta-Design as Evolving Colonies of Artistic Agents
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Meta-design, the act of designing a system or species of design instead of a design instance, is an important concept in modern design practice and in the generative design paradigm. For meta-design to be a useful tool, the designer must have more formal support for both design species definition/expression and the abstract attributes which the designer is attempting to embody within a design. Arties is an exploration of one possible avenue for supporting meta-design. Arties is an artistic system emphasizing the co-evolution of colonies of Artificial Life design or artistic agents (called arties) and the environment they inhabit. Generative design systems have concentrated on biological genetics metaphors where a population of design instances are evolved directly from a set of ‘parent’ designs in a succession of generations. In Arties, the a-life agent which is evolved, produces the design instance as a byproduct of interacting with its environment. Arties utilize an attraction potential curve as their primary dynamic. They sense the relative attraction of entities in their environment, using multiple sensory channels. Arties then associate an attractiveness score to each entity. This attractiveness score is combined with a 'taste' function built into the artie that is sensitized to that observation channel, entity, and distance by a transfer function. Arties use this attraction to guide decisions and behaviors. A community of arties, with independent evolving attraction criteria can pass collective judgement on each point in an art space. As the Artie moves within this space it modifies the environment in reaction to what it senses. Arties support for Meta-design is in (A) the process of evolving arties, breeding their attraction potential curve parameters using a genetic algorithm and (B) their use of sensory channels to support abstract attributes geometries. Adjustment of these parameters tunes the attraction of the artie along various sensing channels. The multi-agent co-evolution of Arties is one approach to creating a system for supporting meta-design. Arties is part of an on-going exploration of how to support meta-design in computer augmented design systems. Our future work with Arties-like systems will be concerned with applications in areas such as modeling adaptive directives in Architecture, Object Structure Design, spatio-temporal behaviors design (for games and simulations), virtual ambient spaces, and representation and computation of abstract design attributes.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 8c4f
authors Emdanat, Samir S. and Vakalo, Emmanuel-G.
year 1999
title An Experiment in Using Virtual Reality to Teach Compositional Principles to Beginning Students
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 325-333
summary This paper introduces an experiment in using educational toys as a means for teaching compositional principles to architectural students using: (1) a traditional model-based approach and (2) "BlocksWorld" a computer-based system that utilizes immersive virtual reality technologies. The paper discusses the general nature of the exercise and its objectives and illustrates some of the resulting student projects. Then it introduces an approach to implementing an interactive virtual design environment that is based on this exercise.
series CAADRIA
email emdanat@umich.edu
last changed 2000/01/13 11:21

_id 076e
authors Ennis, G. and Lindsay, M.
year 1999
title VRML Possibilities: The evolution of the Glasgow Model
source Proceedings of International Conference on Virtual Systems and MultiMedia. University of Abertay. Dundee
summary During the 1980's, ABACUS, a research unit at the University of Strathclyde developed an interest in the ability to model and manipulate large geometrical databases of urban topography. Initially, this interest lay solely in the ability to source, capture and store the relevant data. However, once constructed, these models proved genuinely useful to a wide range of users and there was soon a demand for more functionality relating to the manipulation not just of the graphics, but also the range of urban attributes. Although a number of improvements were implemented there were drawbacks to the wide adoption of the software produced. The problems were almost all due to deficiencies in the then current hardware and software system available to the professions, and although this strand of research continued to be pursued, most of the development had to be focused on research applications and deployment. However, the recent advent of the Virtual Reality Modelling Language (VRML) standards have rekindled interest in this field since this language enables many of the issues that have proved problematic in the past to be addressed and solved. The potential now exists to provide wide access to large scale urban models. This paper focuses on the application of VRML as applied to the 'Glasgow Model'.
series other
email malcolm@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id b1db
authors Francis, Sabu
year 1999
title The Importance of Being Abstract: An Indian Approach to Models
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 101-109
summary Traditional Indian way of life is surrounded by ambiguity. This is in direct contrast to an Aristotelian approach, where polarised stands are always taken. A black and white approach tends to yield results speedily, but exhaustive solutions which can explain complexity are usually brute force procedures. Even so, their conclusions in the end are still suspect. The author believes that rich solutions may exist when we use an 'alternate' or abstract synthesized reality to do our modelling instead of relying on analogies and other direct links to the real world. Models that allow synthesis tend to accept ambiguity. The author presents in this paper an 'unconventional' system to represent architecture which has had some amount of success probably because it started of, on pure abstract grounds that allowed ambiguity instead of basing it on an Aristotelian, analytical model.
keywords Aristotle, Buddha, Representations, Abstract Models
series eCAADe
email chief@archsfa.com
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id d931
authors Gabryszewski, Artur B.
year 1999
title Idea of an Intelligent Building - Development Prospects
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 739-743
summary An ever-increasing number of offices as also residential buildings are being realised by designers and investors in accordance with the concept of an intelligent building. Houses of the new generation are being constructed. This is possible thanks to dynamic progress in the development of computer and microprocessor engineering techniques. Putting into reality the idea of the 'intelligent building' will become one of the most interesting assignments of Polish building industry in the rapidly approaching XXI century. The term 'intelligent building' first appeared in the eighties. The idea behind this conception is aspiring to create a friendly, work supporting, effective environment. The revolution in telecommunications and information technology along with change in the standards of office work, have caused computer networks and modem systems of automation and protection, to invade buildings. From the technical point of view, an intelligent building is an object in which all the subsystems co-operate with each other, forming a friendly environment for man. For users of an intelligent building, the most important issue is realisation of the following aims: object management which includes both control of human resources and automation systems in the building and also efficient management of the building space in such a way that the costs of its utilisation are minimised. The possibility of optional installation of modern systems and equipment should be facilitated by the architecture itself. Therefore, the specifics of all the building elements should be taken into account right at the designing stage. The following features characterise an intelligent building: integration of telecommunication systems in the building, central management and supervision system and utilisation of structural cabling as the carrier of signals controlling most of the systems in the building. Presently, there is no building in Poland that could be characterised by the three features mentioned.
keywords High-tech Architecture, Ecology, CAAD
series eCAADe
email zarnow@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 3936
authors Geroimenko, Vladimir
year 1999
title Online Photorealistic VR with Interactive Architectural Objects
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 414-417
summary This paper describes how Virtual Reality (VR) technologies can be used for modelling photorealistic environments with interactive and changeable architectural content. This application of VR allows us to create photograph-based panoramic models of real places that include a variety of interactive architectural objects and details. The user is able not only to navigate through a virtual environment (look around, up and down, zoom, jump to another viewpoint or location) but also to change buildings or their architectural details by clicking, moving or rotating. The following types of interactive objects are completely integrated with a virtual environment: 2D image-based objects, 3D image-based objects, 3D VRML-based objects and onscreen world controls. The application can be used effectively for teaching, including distance Internet-based education, project presentations and rapid prototyping. A sample VR environment is presented and some of the key creative and technological issues are discussed.
keywords Virtual Reality Modelling, Architectural Design, Interactive Contents, Photorealistic Environments
series eCAADe
email vladg@soc.plym.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id b8b4
authors Igarashi, T., Matsuoka, S. and Tanaka, H.
year 1999
title Teddy: A Sketching Interface for 3D Freeform Design
source SIGGRAPH 99 Conference Proceedings, 109-126. ACM
summary Teddy is a sketching interface for quickly and easily design freeform models such as stuffed animals and other rotund objects. The user draws several 2D freeform strokes interactively on the screen and the system automatically constructs plausible 3D polygonal surfaces. Our system supports several modeling operations, including the operation to construct a 3D polygonal surface from a 2D silhouette drawn by the user: it inflates the region surrounded by the silhouette making wide area fat, and narrow area thin. Teddy, our prototype system, is implemented as a Java program, and the mesh construction is done in real-time on a standard PC. I will give a live demonstration of modeling operations and describe its algorithms in detail.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 5a4e
authors Jeng, Taysheng
year 1999
title Design coordination modeling: A distributed computer environment for managing design activities
source College of Architecture, Georgia Institute of Technology
summary The objective of this thesis is to develop an effective multi-user computer environment supporting design collaboration. This research takes a knowledge-based approach to capture meaningful process semantics specified by designers to effectively realize work. It concentrates on establishing a process infrastructure and tools for managing activities for a building design team, with emphasis on remote collaboration and distributed coordination. The results of this research include a design coordination model (DCM) and the prototype of a future generation of distributed coordination environments. DCM provides a digital representation of design processes and support visibility of coordination logic within a CAD environment. Some extended features of distributed coordination are explored in DCM, equipped with a model server that is developed using a web-based three-tier computing system architecture approach.  
keywords Data Processing
series thesis:PhD
email tsjeng@mail.ncku.edu.tw
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id avocaad_2001_22
id avocaad_2001_22
authors Jos van Leeuwen, Joran Jessurun
year 2001
title XML for Flexibility an Extensibility of Design Information Models
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary The VR-DIS research programme aims at the development of a Virtual Reality – Design Information System. This is a design and decision support system for collaborative design that provides a VR interface for the interaction with both the geometric representation of a design and the non-geometric information concerning the design throughout the design process. The major part of the research programme focuses on early stages of design. The programme is carried out by a large number of researchers from a variety of disciplines in the domain of construction and architecture, including architectural design, building physics, structural design, construction management, etc.Management of design information is at the core of this design and decision support system. Much effort in the development of the system has been and still is dedicated to the underlying theory for information management and its implementation in an Application Programming Interface (API) that the various modules of the system use. The theory is based on a so-called Feature-based modelling approach and is described in the PhD thesis by [first author, 1999] and in [first author et al., 2000a]. This information modelling approach provides three major capabilities: (1) it allows for extensibility of conceptual schemas, which is used to enable a designer to define new typologies to model with; (2) it supports sharing of conceptual schemas, called type-libraries; and (3) it provides a high level of flexibility that offers the designer the opportunity to easily reuse design information and to model information constructs that are not foreseen in any existing typologies. The latter aspect involves the capability to expand information entities in a model with relationships and properties that are not typologically defined but applicable to a particular design situation only; this helps the designer to represent the actual design concepts more accurately.The functional design of the information modelling system is based on a three-layered framework. In the bottom layer, the actual design data is stored in so-called Feature Instances. The middle layer defines the typologies of these instances in so-called Feature Types. The top layer is called the meta-layer because it provides the class definitions for both the Types layer and the Instances layer; both Feature Types and Feature Instances are objects of the classes defined in the top layer. This top layer ensures that types can be defined on the fly and that instances can be created from these types, as well as expanded with non-typological properties and relationships while still conforming to the information structures laid out in the meta-layer.The VR-DIS system consists of a growing number of modules for different kinds of functionality in relation with the design task. These modules access the design information through the API that implements the meta-layer of the framework. This API has previously been implemented using an Object-Oriented Database (OODB), but this implementation had a number of disadvantages. The dependency of the OODB, a commercial software library, was considered the most problematic. Not only are licenses of the OODB library rather expensive, also the fact that this library is not common technology that can easily be shared among a wide range of applications, including existing applications, reduces its suitability for a system with the aforementioned specifications. In addition, the OODB approach required a relatively large effort to implement the desired functionality. It lacked adequate support to generate unique identifications for worldwide information sources that were understandable for human interpretation. This strongly limited the capabilities of the system to share conceptual schemas.The approach that is currently being implemented for the core of the VR-DIS system is based on eXtensible Markup Language (XML). Rather than implementing the meta-layer of the framework into classes of Feature Types and Feature Instances, this level of meta-definitions is provided in a document type definition (DTD). The DTD is complemented with a set of rules that are implemented into a parser API, based on the Document Object Model (DOM). The advantages of the XML approach for the modelling framework are immediate. Type-libraries distributed through Internet are now supported through the mechanisms of namespaces and XLink. The implementation of the API is no longer dependent of a particular database system. This provides much more flexibility in the implementation of the various modules of the VR-DIS system. Being based on the (supposed to become) standard of XML the implementation is much more versatile in its future usage, specifically in a distributed, Internet-based environment.These immediate advantages of the XML approach opened the door to a wide range of applications that are and will be developed on top of the VR-DIS core. Examples of these are the VR-based 3D sketching module [VR-DIS ref., 2000]; the VR-based information-modelling tool that allows the management and manipulation of information models for design in a VR environment [VR-DIS ref., 2000]; and a design-knowledge capturing module that is now under development [first author et al., 2000a and 2000b]. The latter module aims to assist the designer in the recognition and utilisation of existing and new typologies in a design situation. The replacement of the OODB implementation of the API by the XML implementation enables these modules to use distributed Feature databases through Internet, without many changes to their own code, and without the loss of the flexibility and extensibility of conceptual schemas that are implemented as part of the API. Research in the near future will result in Internet-based applications that support designers in the utilisation of distributed libraries of product-information, design-knowledge, case-bases, etc.The paper roughly follows the outline of the abstract, starting with an introduction to the VR-DIS project, its objectives, and the developed theory of the Feature-modelling framework that forms the core of it. It briefly discusses the necessity of schema evolution, flexibility and extensibility of conceptual schemas, and how these capabilities have been addressed in the framework. The major part of the paper describes how the previously mentioned aspects of the framework are implemented in the XML-based approach, providing details on the so-called meta-layer, its definition in the DTD, and the parser rules that complement it. The impact of the XML approach on the functionality of the VR-DIS modules and the system as a whole is demonstrated by a discussion of these modules and scenarios of their usage for design tasks. The paper is concluded with an overview of future work on the sharing of Internet-based design information and design knowledge.
series AVOCAAD
email J.P.v.Leeuwen@tue.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 39cb
authors Kelleners, Richard H.M.C.
year 1999
title Constraints in object-oriented graphics
source Eindhoven University of Technology
summary In the area of interactive computer graphics, two important approaches to deal with the complexity of designing and implementing graphics systems are object-oriented programming and constraint-based programming. From literature, it appears that combination of these two has clear advantages but has also proven to be difficult. One of the main problems is that constraint programming infringes the information hiding principle of object-oriented programming. The goal of the research project is to combine these two approaches to benefit from the strengths of both. Two research groups at the Eindhoven University of Technology investigate the use of constraints on graphics objects. At the Architecture department, constraints are applied in a virtual reality design environment. At the Computer Science department, constraints aid in modeling 3D animations. For these two groups, a constraint system for 3D graphical objects was developed. A conceptual model, called CODE (Constraints on Objects via Data flows and Events), is presented that enables integration of constraints and objects by separating the object world from the constraint world. In the design of this model, the main aspect being considered is that the information hiding principle among objects may not be violated. Constraint solvers, however, should have direct access to an object’s internal data structure. Communication between the two worlds is done via a protocol orthogonal to the message passing mechanism of objects, namely, via events and data flows. This protocol ensures that the information hiding principle at the object-oriented programming level is not violated while constraints can directly access “hidden” data. Furthermore, CODE is built up of distinct elements, or entity types, like constraint, solver, event, data flow. This structure enables that several special purpose constraint solvers can be defined and made to cooperate to solve complex constraint problems. A prototype implementation was built to study the feasibility of CODE. Therefore, the implementation should correspond directly to the conceptual model. To this end, every entity (object, constraint, solver) of the conceptual model is represented by a separate process in the language MANIFOLD. The (concurrent) processes communicate by events and data flows. The implementation serves to validate the conceptual model and to demonstrate that it is a viable way of combining constraints and objects. After the feasibility study, the prototype was discarded. The gained experience was used to build an implementation of the conceptual model for the two research groups. This implementation encompassed a constraint system with multiple solvers and constraint types. The constraint system was built as an object-oriented library that can be linked to the applications in the respective research groups. Special constructs were designed to ensure information hiding among application objects while constraints and solvers have direct access to the object data. CODE manages the complexity of object-oriented constraint solving by defining a communication protocol to allow the two paradigms to cooperate. The prototype implementation demonstrates that CODE can be implemented into a working system. Finally, the implementation of an actual application shows that the model is suitable for the development of object-oriented software.
keywords Computer Graphics; Object Oriented Programming; Constraint Programming
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id d5b3
authors Knight, Michael and Brown, Andre
year 1999
title Working in Virtual Environments through appropriate Physical Interfaces
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 431-436
summary The work described here is aimed at contributing towards the debate and development relating to the construction of interfaces to explore buildings and their environs through virtual worlds. We describe a particular hardware and software configuration which is derived by the use of low cost games software to create the Virtual Environment. The Physical Interface responds to the work of other researchers, in this area, in particular Shaw (1994) and Vasquez de Velasco & Trigo (1997). Virtual Evironments might have the potential to be "a magical window into other worlds, from molecules to minds" (Rheingold, 1992), but what is the nature of that window? Currently it is often a translucent opening which gives a hazy and distorted (disembodied) view. And many versions of such openings are relatively expensive. We consider ways towards clearing the haze without too much expense, adapting techniques proposed by developers of low cost virtual reality systems (Hollands, 1995) for use in an architectural setting.
keywords Virtual Environments, Games Software
series eCAADe
email mknight@liv.ac.uk
last changed 2002/11/22 17:33

_id caadria2015_188
id caadria2015_188
authors Krakhofer, Stefan and Martin Kaftan
year 2015
title Augmented Reality Design Decision Support Engine for the Early Building Design Stage
source Emerging Experience in Past, Present and Future of Digital Architecture, Proceedings of the 20th International Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia (CAADRIA 2015) / Daegu 20-22 May 2015, pp. 231-240
summary Augmented reality has come a long way and experienced a paradigm shift in 1999 when the ARToolKit was released as open source. The nature of interaction between the physical world and the virtual-world has changed forever. Fortunately for the AECO industry, the transition from traditional Computer Aided Design to virtual building design phrased as Building Information Modeling has created a tremendous potential to adopt Augmented Reality. The presented research is situated in the early design stage of project inception and focuses on supporting informed collective decision-making, characterized by a dynamic back and forth analytical process generating large amounts of data. Facilitation aspects, such as data-collection, storage and access to enable comparability and evaluation are crucial for collective decision-making. The current research has addressed these aspects by means of data accessibility, visualization and presentation. At the core of the project is a custom developed Augmented Reality framework that enables data interaction within the design model. In order to serve as a collaborative decision support engine, the framework also allows multiple models and their datasets to be displayed and exercised simultaneously. The paper demonstrates in the case study the successful application of the AR tool during collaborative design decision meetings.
keywords Augmented Reality; Design Decision Support; Data Visualization.
series CAADRIA
email skrakhof@cityu.edu.hk
last changed 2015/06/05 05:14

_id 7c87
authors Mahdavi, A., Ilal, M.E. Mathew, O., Ries, R. and Suter, G.
year 1999
title Aspects of S2
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 185-196
summary We present in this paper the essential aspects of the S2 system. This is the internet realization of SEMPER, an active, multi-domain, space-based, object oriented design environment for integrated building performance modeling. The key features of the S2 environment are as follows: A user can access the system regardless of the computer hardware, operating system or the location on a network; geographically distributed users can asynchronously generate a building model through the user interface; this building model can then be simultaneously evaluated with multiple simulation applications running on remote simulation servers; persistent storage is provided for project data and evaluation results; designers using the system have access to multiple libraries that contain building information such as material data, construction types, schedules, and weather data.
keywords Building Performance Simulation, Distributed System, Internet
series CAAD Futures
email amahdavi@tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id d2b4
authors Maver, Tom and Petric, Jelena
year 1999
title Media in Mediation: Prospects for Computer Assisted Design Participation
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 138-147
summary One of the most consistent, powerful and philosophical ideas which has run like a silk thread through the short and erratic history of the development of computer aided architectural design is that of user participation in the design decision-making process. It is not an idea with which the architectural profession is particularly comfortable but it is, the authors claim, one which is central to the professional ethic and, therefore, to its ultimate survival.

Design decision-making is, if addressed properly, a hugely, complex multi-variety, multi-person process on which precious little serious research has been focused. In the late 1960's the Design Methods Group in the USA and the Design Research Society in the UK formulated paper-based models of the design process and anticipated, in some regards with un-nerving accuracy, the way in which the application of information technologies would impinge beneficially on the process of design decision-making and, therefore, on the quality of the built environment.

One concept expressed at that time was as follows: (•) the application of computers to the modeling and prediction of the cost and performance behavior of alternative design solutions allows subjective value judgements to be better informed and more explicitly audited, and that (•) such subjective value judgements should be made by those most affected by them, i.e. the future owners and users of buildings. //

This paper is devoted to the critical re-examination of this concept, on the seminal research and development which has kept the notion alive over 30 years, and, most importantly in the context of the theme of ACADIA 1999, how the current advances in multimedia, virtual reality and internet access are not yet making its ubiquitous adoption inevitable: in short, a plea for Media in Mediation.

series ACADIA
email jean.dick@strath.ac.uk
last changed 1999/12/02 07:51

_id 41d4
authors Medjdoub, Benachir
year 1999
title Interactive 2D Constraint-Based Geometric Construction System
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 197-212
summary This paper presents a 2D Constraint-Based Geometric Construction System where positioning and manipulating geometry is very precise. An unusually simple interface makes this system particularly interactive and easy to use. In our approach, the geometry types supported are: points, lines, circles, ellipses, circular arcs and b-spline curves. All the fundamental topologic constraints, i.e. tangent, parallel, perpendicular, coincident and concentric, are provided. Metric constraints, i.e. dividing the shapes into equal parts or fixing the geometric parameters, are also provided. These constraints are automatically applied by the application in response to the implied intentions of the end- user. Dynamic modifications of partially dimensioned models are supported, whereby the design is modified while enforcing the constraints. A graph-constructive approach is used to solve the model. As we are dealing with partial modifications, this resolution technique is quite sufficient, and makes our system stable and flexible. Our approach focuses highly on interactivity. Positioning a shape constrained to another is made directly through the graphic interface. Constraint relaxation is also done by direct manipulations. Modifications are made by dragging the geometry, or by typing into a numerical panel displaying the free shape parameters. Again, existing constraints are maintained as those numbers are applied. Well -constrained and under-constrained problems are discussed. This approach was developed in Java, JDK 3.0.1 of SGI's Java software.
keywords Sketching, Geometric Constraints, Interactivity, Geometric construction, Dynamic Modifications
series CAAD Futures
email Benachir.Medjdoub@nottingham.ac.uk
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 5222
authors Moloney, Jules
year 1999
title Bike-R: Virtual Reality for the Financially Challenged
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 410-413
summary This paper describes a 'low tech' approach to producing interactive virtual environments for the evaluation of design proposals. The aim was to produce a low cost alternative to such expensive installations as CAVE virtual reality systems. The system utilises a library of pre-rendered animation, video and audio files and hence is not reliant on powerful hardware to produce real time simulation. The participant sits astride a bicycle exercise machine and animation is triggered by the pedal revolution. Navigation is achieved by steering along and around the streets of the animated design. This project builds on the work of Desmond Hii. ( Hii, 1997) The innovations are the bicycle interface and the application to urban scale simulation.
keywords Virtual, Design, Interface, Urban
series eCAADe
email j.moloney@auckland.ac.nz
last changed 2002/11/22 17:34

_id 2151
authors Nakamura, H., Homma, R. and Morozumi, M.
year 1999
title On the development of Excavation Support System
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 341-348
summary This paper is about the development of a system that supports excavation surveys by use of a PC. The system consists of two sub-systems: One is the Onsite Support System (OSS). Other is the Excavation Data Shearing System (EDSS). OSS combines a database with a general purpose CAD system. When OSS is used, it is description by excavation site and information can be managed. EDSS combines a WEB server, a database, and a VRML server. When EDSS is used, information of relic can be shared on the Internet and discussed by researchers away from the site. It provides the users with a virtual reality experience of the excavation site. The experimental system has been used as a tool by practical excavation survey of Islam city ruins from the Middle Ages in the Arab Republic of Egypt. In this paper, the framework of the system is introduced. The authors verified the effectiveness of the system by participating in an excavation survey.
keywords Excavation Support, Onsite Work, Data Sharing, WEB, VRML
series eCAADe
email homma@arch.kumamoto-u.ac.jp
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

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