CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id acac
authors Chan, Chiu-Shui, and Browning, Todd R.
year 1999
title Design Simulation
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 243-252
summary This paper intends to explore methods of constructing a design simulator. Two methodologies, approached differently, imitate the human design processes. The first component is an algorithmic method which has a cognitive model embedded. This cognitive model hypothesizes that human design has certain design logic applied. The design rationales are based on knowledge stored in a designer_ memory. Each time a similar design task is encountered, the same design procedures will be repeated for completion. What makes the results different are the design information used and sequences of processing it. A kitchen design using procedural algorithms is developed to simulate this design aspect. The second component simulates an intuitive design approach. Intuition is defined as design by rules of thumb, or heuristic design. This study investigated how to simulate an intuitive design process. The method involves building up a set of inductive rules symbolizing cultural aspects that need to be addressed in a design. A residential foyer design is the simulation task. The driving force is the heuristics. Results in this study have shown that there are many variables to include but impossible to capture and simulate any of the design processes, which are the reasons why studies in this area are difficult.
series CAADRIA
email cschan@iastate.edu
more http://www.public.iastate.edu/~cschan
last changed 2000/01/13 11:12

_id 7546
authors Coyne, R.
year 1999
title Technoromanticism - digital narrative, holism, and the romance of the real
source MIT Press
summary It's no secret that contemporary culture romanticizes digital technologies. In books, articles, and movies about virtual community, virtual reality, artificial intelligence, artificial life, and other wonders of the digital age, breathless anticipation of vast and thrilling changes has become a running theme. But as Richard Coyne makes clear in Technoromanticism: Digital Narrative, Holism, and the Romance of the Real, a dense but rewarding piece of academic criticism, we also get romantic about the new technologies in a more rigorous sense of the word. Whether heralding an electronic return to village communalism or celebrating cyberspace as a realm of pure mind, today's utopian thinking about the digital, Coyne argues, essentially replays the 18th- and 19th-century cultural movement called Romanticism, with its powerful yearnings for transcendence and wholeness. And this apparently is not a good thing. Romanticism, like the more sober Enlightenment rationalism against which it rebelled, has outlived its usefulness as a way of understanding the world, Coyne argues. And so he spends the duration of the book bombarding both the romantic and the rationalist tendencies in cyberculture with every weapon in the arsenal of 20th-century critical theory: poststructuralism, Freudianism, postmodern pragmatism, Heideggerian phenomenology, surrealism--Coyne uses each in turn to whack away at conventional wisdoms about digital tech. Whether the conventional wisdoms remain standing at the end is an open question, but Coyne's tour of the contemporary intellectual landscape is a tour de force, and never before has digital technology's place in that landscape been mapped so thoroughly. --
series other
email Richard.Coyne@ed.ac.uk
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 762b
authors De Paoli, Giovanni and Bogdan, Marius
year 1999
title The Front of the Stage of Vitruvius' Roman Theatre - A new Approach of Computer Aided Design that Transforms Geometric Operators to Semantic Operators
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 321-333
summary The driving force of all researches where the systems of computation are used, is the utilization of an intelligent method for the representation of building. The use of computer, in design process, is often limited to technical functions (tekhne), and what one usually calls computer-aided design is often no more than computer-aided drawing. In this research paper we continue a reflection on the architect's work methods, and suggest an approach to design based on the semantic properties of the object (i.e. semantic operators), rather than by geometric operators. We propose a method of computer aid design using procedural models where the initial state of design is vague and undefined. We operate from a paradigm that leads to represent a building by means of parametric functions that, expressed algorithmically, give a procedural model to facilitate the design process. This approach opens new avenues that would permit to add the logos (semantic properties) and lead to a metaphorical representation. By means of procedural models, we show that, from a generic model we can produce a four dimensional model that encapsulate a volumetric model with semantic characteristics. We use a meta-functional language that allows us to model the actions and encapsulate detailed information about various building elements. This descriptive mechanism is extremely powerful. It helps to establish relations between the functions, contributes to a better understanding of the project's aim, and encapsulates the building properties by recalling characteristics of common classes which give rise to a new configuration and a completely original design. The scientific result of this experiment is the understanding and confirmation of the hypothesis that it is possible to encapsulate, by means of computing process, the links between design moves during conceptual and figural decisions and transform the geometric operators in semantic operators.
keywords Architecture, CAD, Function, Modeling, Semantic Operator, Geometric Operator
series CAAD Futures
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 22b7
authors Donath, D. and Regenbrecht, H.
year 1999
title Der Bleistift im 21. Jahrhundert. Das architektonische Entwerfen in interaktiven VR Umgebungen. (The pencil in the 21th century. The architectural design process in Virtual Environments)
source IAO Forum Architektur im Informationszeitalter, FhG Stuttgart, 21.-22.4.1999, proceedings, chapter 7, 10 p.
summary In the very young discipline of Virtual Reality Applications only a few reports are available about using this technology for periods longer than in experimental setups. This paper describes experiences made during five years of usage of Virtual Reality (VR) in educational training for architects. About 100 different people were working with our systems during this period. Three programs were developed at Bauhaus University with the aim of teaching architectural students to design in three-dimesional environments. The first program called voxDesign is based on the metaphor of voxels. The second program, planeDesign, uses rectangualar planes to describe room-like situations. An other program vram for the user orientated description of flexible and own interfaces and environments is current under construction, a first verson is presented at the international computer exhibition ìCeBitî in 1999. All programs force the users to design in a 1:1 scale, that means that the design and the feedback actions are coupled in an embodied way. A real walking metaphor is used for navigation. The experiences made by users are explained too.
keywords Virtual Reality, Interaction, Human Computer Interfaces, Digital Media
series other
email donath@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2003/02/26 17:58

_id fd35
authors Donath, Dirk
year 1999
title Using Immersive Virtual Reality Systems for Spatial Design in Architecture
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 307-318
summary In the very young discipline of Virtual Reality Applications only a few reports are available about using this technology for periods longer than in experimental setups. This paper describes experiences made during four years of usage of Virtual Reality (VR) in educational training for architects. About 100 different people were working with our systems during this period. Two programs were developed at Bauhaus University with the aim of teaching students in architecture in three-dimensional sketching. An other program for free and own interfaces and environments is currently under construction and will be presented at the international computer fair "CeBit" in 1999. The first program called voxDesign is based on the metaphor of voxels. The second program, planeDesign, uses rectangualar planes to describe room-like situations. All programs force the users to design in a 1:1 scale, which means that the design and the feedback actions are coupled in an embodied way. A real walking metaphor is used for navigation. The experiences made by the students are explained too.
keywords Virtual Reality, Architecture, Design, Design Support Systems, Interaction, Research, Education, Usability, Human Computer Interfaces
series AVOCAAD
email donath@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id b1db
authors Francis, Sabu
year 1999
title The Importance of Being Abstract: An Indian Approach to Models
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 101-109
summary Traditional Indian way of life is surrounded by ambiguity. This is in direct contrast to an Aristotelian approach, where polarised stands are always taken. A black and white approach tends to yield results speedily, but exhaustive solutions which can explain complexity are usually brute force procedures. Even so, their conclusions in the end are still suspect. The author believes that rich solutions may exist when we use an 'alternate' or abstract synthesized reality to do our modelling instead of relying on analogies and other direct links to the real world. Models that allow synthesis tend to accept ambiguity. The author presents in this paper an 'unconventional' system to represent architecture which has had some amount of success probably because it started of, on pure abstract grounds that allowed ambiguity instead of basing it on an Aristotelian, analytical model.
keywords Aristotle, Buddha, Representations, Abstract Models
series eCAADe
email chief@archsfa.com
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id ee8e
authors Kalay, Y.E.
year 1999
title Performance-based design
source Automation in Construction 8 (4) (1999) pp. 395-409
summary Even before Louis Sullivan coined the phrase `Form Follows Function,' architectural researchers have sought, to no avail, a causal relationship between these two primary constituents of the building enterprise. This paper attempts to explain why this quest has been futile, and proposes a performance-based design paradigm, instead of the prevailing process-based paradigms. It suggests that the driving force behind any design activity is the desire to achieve a qualitative solution for a particular combination of form and function in a specific context. Furthermore, it suggests that quality can only be determined by a multi-criteria, multi-disciplinary performance evaluation, which comprises a weighted sum of several satisfaction/behavior functions. The paper develops a performance-based design methodology and demonstrates its application in an experimental, knowledge-based CAD system.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id e12c
authors Wingham, Ivana
year 1999
title Digital Space, Social Technology and Virtual Force as Determinants of Design in the 21st Century
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 122-126
summary It is appropriate to begin with salient quotes relating to the Interface Paradigm: 'The grand abstraction of man as the measure of all things, as an originary condition, a whole presence, can no longer be sustained' P. Eisenmann, 1986 'Although notions of adaptation are perhaps most familiar from biology, the most important ideas about adaptation in the history of AI are actually sociological' P.E.Agre, 1998 'When several bureaucracies coexist (governmental, academic, ecclesiastic) in the absence of super hierarchy to co-ordinate the interactions, the whole set of institutions will tend to form a meshwork of hierarchies, articulated mostly through local and temporary links' M. De Landa 1998
keywords Interface, Social Space, Virtual Force
series eCAADe
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id becb
authors Anders, Peter
year 1999
title Electronic Extension: Some implications of cyberspace for the practice of architecture
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 276-289
summary This white-paper builds upon previous research to present hybrids of electronic and physical spaces as extensions of current design practice. It poses an hypothetical project - a hybrid of physical and cyberspaces - to be developed through an extrapolation of current architectural practice by fully exploiting new information technologies. The hybrid's attributes not only affect the scope of development but the very activities of the design team and client during - and after - deployment. The entire life cycle of the project is affected by its dual material and media presence. The paper concludes by discussing the effect the hybrid - here called a "cybrid" - on the occupant, and its local and global communities. It reviews the economics, administration, marketing, operation, flexibility, and extension of the project to assess its effects on these scales. The conclusions are provisional owing to the youth of the technologies. However, in laying out these issues, the author hopes to begin a discussion on effects computation will have on our built environment.
series ACADIA
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 3ddc
authors Dijkstra, Jan and Timmermans, Harry
year 1999
title Towards a Multi-Agent Model for Visualizing Simulated User Behavior to Support the Assessment of Design Performance
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 226-237
summary We introduce the outline of a multi-agent model that can be used for visualizing simulated user behavior to support the assessment of design performance. We will consider various performance indicators of building environments, which are related to user reaction to design decisions. This system may serve as a media tool in the design process for a better understanding of what the design will look like, especially for those cases where design or planning decisions will affect the behavior of individuals. The system is based on cellular automata and multi-agent simulation technology. The system simulates how agents move around in a particular 3D (or 2D) environment, in which space is represented as a lattice of cells. Agents represent objects or people with their own behavior, moving over the network. Each agent will be located in a simulated space, based on the cellular automata grid. Each iteration of the simulation is based on a parallel update of the agents conforming local rules. Agents positioned within an environment will need sensors to perceive their local neighborhood and some means with which to affect the environment. In this way, autonomous individuals and the interaction between them can be simulated by the system. As a result, designers can use the system to assess the likely consequences of their design decisions on user behavior. We think that the system provides a potentially valuable tool to support design and decision-making processes, related to user behavior in architecture and urban planning.
series ACADIA
email j.dijkstra@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 1999/12/02 07:48

_id 9f08
authors Hillis, K.
year 1999
title Digital Sensations: Space, Identity, and Embodiment in Virtual Reality
source University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis, Minnesota
summary Virtual reality is in the news and in the movies, on TV and in the air. Why is the technology -- or the idea -- so prevalent precisely now? What does it mean -- what does it do -- to us? Digital Sensations looks closely at the ways representational forms generated by communication technologies -- especially digital/optical virtual technologies -- affect the "lived" world. Virtual reality, or VR, is a technological reproduction of the process of perceiving the real; yet that process is "filtered" through the social realities and embedded cultural assumptions about human bodies, perception, and space held by the technology's creators. Through critical histories of the technology -- of vision, light, space, and embodiment -- Ken Hillis traces the various and often contradictory intellectual and metaphysical impulses behind the Western transcendental wish to achieve an ever more perfect copy of the real. Because virtual technologies are new, these histories also address the often unintended and underconsidered consequences -- such as alienating new forms of surveillance and commodification -- flowing from their rapid dissemination. Current and proposed virtual technologies reflect a Western desire to escape the body Hillis says. Exploring topics from VR and other, earlier visual technologies, Hillis's penetrating perspective on the cultural power of place and space broadens our view of the interplay between social relations and technology.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 23df
authors Kolarevic, Branko and Ng, Edward Y.Y.
year 1999
title Net-enabled Collective Design Authorship
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 302-315
summary The paper describes an experiment in collective design authorship conducted within a semester-long virtual design studio. Students at two geographically distant institutions were asked to design a "Place2Meet on the Water," a small floating pavilion to be assembled from hollow-section steel components. The first part of the studio was devoted to a study of precedents, done in teams of five students from both institutions, who worked both synchronously and asynchronously over the Internet. The students' work was continuously reviewed through virtual crits conducted using web pages and video conferencing. The second part of the virtual design studio, devoted to the actual design of the pavilion, was divided into five closely related phases. After each phase students had to place their designs into a common database. They then had to browse through submitted designs and choose one to develop further; they were not allowed to continue with their own designs. That way, students implicitly formed teams and engaged in collective design authorship that was enabled by the network and supported by the design database. The design-centered research project presented in this paper also examines the issues of teaching methods and whether the quality of design could be improved in a networked design environment based on collective authorship and how such an environment can affect the nature of the produced designs.
series ACADIA
email akienyy@nus.edu.sg
last changed 1999/12/02 07:55

_id f8b5
authors Oswald, Daniel and Pittioni, Gernot
year 1999
title AVOCAAD Exercises Facility Management Training on the web A Facility Management Survey Relevance for the Architects Business
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 81-87
summary Facilities Management (FM) can't be seen as a subject with a specific area of knowledge with exactly defined borders relative to other subjects. Analysing the economic aspects of FM leads to the realisation that building management is experiencing a process of increasing specialisation and professionalism. It is possible to define FM from a variety of different points of origin. One possible approach views FM as an integral solution for the administration of buildings, their commercial activities, and technical maintenance from an economic perspective, during the whole life of a building. FM covers all strategies in order to efficiently provide, adequately operate and adapt buildings, their contents and systems to changing organisational demands. The current practice of limited analysis of specific administrative aspects, e.g. maintenance, is replaced by consideration of all factors that affect costs. Since all costs can be directly traced to space, the perfect procedure requires that FM is practised during the *hole living-cycle, starting with the definition of the program of construction until the day of conversion or demolition. Through successful FM, the real estate can contribute decisively to the improvement of productivity and the quality of life.
series AVOCAAD
email pittioni@pittioni.de
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 2c63
authors QaQish, Ra'Ed and Tarazi, Khaled
year 1999
title Formulating a Computer-Aided Architectural Design (CAAD) Program Model in Distance Education (DE) at Open Universities (OU)
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 189-204
summary This paper reports on a project that aims to formulate a CAAD program model in Distance Education (Learning/Teaching) framework, to be applied and implemented in future settings at Open Universities worldwide. The methodology used to establish the CAAD program model consisted of a worldwide literature review on the subject of Distance Education and Open Universities. It also involved an assessment of the methods and means used in the delivery of materials to students enrolled at Open Universities, together with an analysis of the current program of study and subject related courses. The methods of this investigation consisted of a comparative analysis between the existing models of teaching process at Open Universities and how it relates to CAAD in architecture schools. The study endeavored to examine several issues that were found to be key factors in any Open University system, namely: the methods of study, program of study, student type/body, academic/degree requirements, and residency/academic calendars. While attempting to establish a conceptual CAAD program model, this study investigated several questions concerning the efficiency of CAAD teaching in Distance Education. One of the study objectives was to determine which factors were mostly needed to effectively integrate CAAD in DE as a new program in Open Universities. In addition, how would these factors affect the design of CAAD courses in OU systems as a new DE program area? And what structural elements would be most affected by these factors? Another objective of this study was to determine to what extent the new CAAD program model in tandem with staff, learning environment, and administered materials would be effective in generating supplementary strategies in the virtual design studio. A third objective was to evaluate the personal computer station as an alternative design studio space in future settings of schools of architecture. Consequently, the principle objective of this study was to develop and establish a CAAD program model to be adopted by Open Universities as a new subject area in DE. Mainly, the study attempted to locate the areas where CAAD teaching excels in the context of virtual design studio of OU system.
series AVOCAAD
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 2cf4
authors Shih, Naai-Jung and Huang, Yen-Shih
year 1999
title An Analysis and Simulation of Curtain Wall Reflection Glare
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 744-750
summary This paper presents a computer-aided visualization on the influence of reflected sunbeams from curtain wall buildings. A survey was made to local buildings and it was discovered that reflected glare is a significant urban problem. Based on survey findings, a simulation was conducted to compare with actual occurrences in order to increase the comprehension of the consequences of window orientation and angles in the design stage. The simulation enabled design evaluation with an inspection above normal eye level and in a broader area, than that which normally could be achieved in a site survey at a pedestrian's or a driver's level. The computer simulation verified the influence of reflection on the urban environment by using a time-based record. In order to provide design solutions, the simulation used a 10x10x10 cube in referencing the horizontal area that would receive reflections. Due to the symmetric shape of the cube, a butterfly shaped boundary of reflection area (BRA) was concluded. BRA is smaller on the summer solstice than on the spring or autumnal equinox. In order to reduce BRA, a passive design approach was applied by tilting or rotating walls to evaluate how the tilted angles or orientation of the façade could affect reflected glare.
keywords Reflection Glare, Visualization
series eCAADe
email shihnj@mail.ntust.edu.tw
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 1f90
authors Garcia, Renato
year 1999
title PUSH: Generating Structural Form with Haptic Feedback
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 252-259
summary This paper looks into the use of haptic feedback (also known as force feedback) in helping generate and evolve structural forms, a process that is important to students of architecture and engineering. Force feedback provides these students with opportunities to “feel and manipulate” virtual 3D structures in a very natural and intuitive way. It also makes it possible to have real time holistic evaluation of structures in a qualitative rather than quantitative manner, something of particular importance to introductory-level students. Furthermore, the incorporation of force feedback into a highly interactive multimodal structural behavior application furnishes students not only with a means to observe virtual structures but also a tool to help generate and develop efficient, innovative and alternative ones. This also is of vital importance to students of architecture as they are often challenged to explore non-conventional forms.

Implementing force feedback systems for these purposes need not necessarily require sophisticated and expensive VR hardware. This paper describes a structural behavior application called PUSH which utilizes a simple force feedback joystick connected a reasonably fast desktop computer.

series ACADIA
email rjgarcia@hkusua.hku.hk
last changed 1999/12/02 07:48

_id caadria2006_573
id caadria2006_573
authors WEN-YEN TANG, SHENG-KAI TANG
year 2006
title THE DEVELOPMENT OF A TACTILE MODELING INTERFACE
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 573-575
summary Recently, more and more researchers dedicated in the development of human computer interaction for CAD systems, such as gestural input of three dimensional coordinates (Lee, Hu, and Selker, 2005), flexible manipulation of NURBS objects (Cohen, Markosian, Zeleznik, Hughes, and Barzel, 1999; Emmerik, 1990), and the creation of force feedback (Wu, 2003). These research results indicated that the more intuitive control the device can provide in modeling process, the more creative solutions can be generated (Lee, Hu, and Selker, 2005; Schweikardt and Gross, 2000; Wu, 2003).
series CAADRIA
email sp297922@giga.net.tw, tonytang@cmu.edu
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id 5c07
authors Lee, H.-L., Liu, Y.-T., Chen, S.-C., Tang, S.-K. and Huang, C.-P., Huang, C.-H., Chang, Y.-L., Chang, K.-W. and Chen, K.-Y.
year 2002
title A Comparative study of protocol analysis for - Spatiality of a Text-based Cyberspace
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 262-266
summary Graduate Institute of Architecture, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, 30050, TAIWAN The adaptation of the word cyberspace (Gibson, 1984) following the emergence of the World Wide Web Internet not only succinctly revolutionized the correlation of time and space but also poised to challenge how we view the existing spatial concept. This research tries to use protocol analysis to examine text-based cyberspace, such as bulletin board, chart rooms and so forth, and the objective of this research is to realize the spatiality of cyberspace through the cognitive point of view, and to compare the differences of the definitions and perception ways of spatiality between people with general domain and in design fields. Finally, we validate the existence of cyberspace, where the process not only allows further categorization of spatial elements concluded from the earlier study, but discover that varied backgrounds can affect how a user defines and perceives cyberspace (Strate, 1999).
series eCAADe
email aleppo@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 5456
authors Quéau, Philippe
year 1999
title The Information Revolution: in search of the common good
source Mendes, C. & Larreta, E.R. (eds) Media and Social Perception, Rio deJaneiro : UNESCO/ ISSC/ EDCAM, 131-154
summary Is globalization really global? * Glocalization. Towards the Common Good. * One Globe, Lots of Tribes and Many Ghettos * Is There a Pilot in the Global Plane? * The market vs. General interest. The Need for Regulation. * Deregulation does not necessarily mean more competition * Sharing the costs of international calls. The case of Internet. * Price setting and regulation for telecommunications * «Proper» competition vs. «Fair» competition * Public and Private. The crucial importance of «Public Domain» * Is Information Society a Meaningful Society? * New cognitive tools for a global citizenship * The role of UNESCO in the Information Society * Globalization and Abstraction * In search of a global meaning Is globalization really global? Glocalization. The Common Good. Buzz phrases like "global village" or "global information society" are misleading. The concept of "global" is not itself global, in other words globalization is not "universal", it does not affect everybody in the same way. Exactly like the very concept of "universality" is not itself "universal". I am referring here to some Asian voices raising concerns about the "occidental" flavour of the "Universal Declaration of Human Rights" and supporting the idea that "Asian values" were not taken properly into account and might even be in contradiction with it (for instance the confucean predominence of the Society over the rights of the Person).
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id e978
authors [Zupancic] Strojan, Tadeja Z.
year 1999
title CyberUniversity
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 196-200
summary The study of a cyberuniversity derives from an analogy between real urban space and its virtual "substitution". It represents an attempt to balance some views, which seems to be contrary, exclusive, but they are just parts of the same wholeness. Especially the notion of a cyber society is lately considered such an exaggeration, that it is possible to forget the meaning of a real life experience and interactions, which are already threatened. One should contribute to the awarness that is used in such a comparison, it is "just" an analogy, not a real similarity. At the same time it is possible to point out some limitations of a cyberspace and indicate a more realistic view of the meaning of cyber communities. Awarness of the development processes could help to find a balance between reality and virtuality, using cyberfacilities not to destroy us (our identity) but to improve the quality of our (real) life.
keywords University, Cyberuniversity, Space, Cyberspace
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email tadeja.zupancic@guest.arnes.si
last changed 2007/03/04 06:03

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