CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 133

_id ga0020
id ga0020
authors Codignola, G.Matteo
year 2000
title [Title missing]
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary This paper is a summary of my last degree in architecture (discussed in December 1999) with Prof. Celestino Soddu and Prof. Enrica Colabella. In this work I had the possibility to reach complexity by a generative approach with the construction of a paradigm that organizes the different codes of project identity. My general objective was to design shape complexity in variable categories : 3d space surfaces, 2d drawings and 2d textures. I was to discover the identity of one of my favourite architects of the 20th century : Antoni Gaudý, by constructing codes relative to shape complexity. I defined my particular objective in the possibility to abduct from Gaudý's imaginary reference the generatives codes that operate in the logical processing I use to create a possible species project. The next step was to verify the exact working of the new generative codes by means of 3d scenaries, that are recognizable as "Antoni Gaudý specie's architecture". Whit project processing on the generative codes and not on a possible resulting shape design, I was able to organize by my general paradigm the attributes of the project's species : different shapes, different attributes (color, scale, proportion), to get to possible and different scenarys, all recognizable by the relative class codes. I chose three examples in Barcellona built during the period 1902 to 1914 : The Parco Guell, Casa Batll˛ and Casa MilÓ are the three reference sceneryes that I used to create the generative codes. In the second step I defined different codes that operate in sequence (it is defined in the paradigm) : The generatives codes are only subjective; they are one possible solution of my interpretation of Antoni Gaudý's identity. This codes operate in four differents ways : Geometrical codes for 2d shapes Geometrical codes for interface relations Spatial codes for 3d extrusion of 2d shapes Geometrical codes for 2d and 3d texturing of generated surfaces. By a stratified application of this codes I arrived at one idea for all the generative processes but many different, possible scenaryes, all recognizable in Gaudý's species. So, my final result has made possible sceneryes belonging to related species defined previously. At the end of my research I designed a project by combination : using Antoni Gaudý's generative codes on a new 3d scenary with a shape catalyst : the Frank Lloyd Wright Guggenheim Museum of New York. In this process I created a "hybrid scenary" : a new species of architectural look; a Guggenheim museum planned by Wright with a god pinch of Gaudý.
series other
email coddoc@tin.it
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 874d
authors Diprose , Peter R. and Hotten, Robert D.
year 1999
title From Paris Texas to the Road Warrior: Computer Aided Landscapes and the Road Movie, AKA, Content, Form, and Film Media within Architectural Education.
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA Ĺ99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 290-300
summary In recent years the development of computer aided design technologies has offered designers greater opportunity for the thorough investigation of space. While a level of competence has been demonstrated by the architectural profession in the creation of static perspective presentations, a lack of knowledge has led to moving image presentations being treated in a relatively unsophisticated manner. To confront this problem there may be a pedagogical justification for the introduction of film studies and computer aided design as a hybrid design course. In the computer aided design of landscape, the critique of film media may be considered useful both in terms of the form and in terms of the content that it offers the student designer.
series ACADIA
email diprose@ihug.co.nz
last changed 1999/12/02 07:48

_id becb
authors Anders, Peter
year 1999
title Electronic Extension: Some implications of cyberspace for the practice of architecture
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA Ĺ99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 276-289
summary This white-paper builds upon previous research to present hybrids of electronic and physical spaces as extensions of current design practice. It poses an hypothetical project - a hybrid of physical and cyberspaces - to be developed through an extrapolation of current architectural practice by fully exploiting new information technologies. The hybrid's attributes not only affect the scope of development but the very activities of the design team and client during - and after - deployment. The entire life cycle of the project is affected by its dual material and media presence. The paper concludes by discussing the effect the hybrid - here called a "cybrid" - on the occupant, and its local and global communities. It reviews the economics, administration, marketing, operation, flexibility, and extension of the project to assess its effects on these scales. The conclusions are provisional owing to the youth of the technologies. However, in laying out these issues, the author hopes to begin a discussion on effects computation will have on our built environment.
series ACADIA
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ga0010
id ga0010
authors Moroni, A., Zuben, F. Von and Manzolli, J.
year 2000
title ArTbitrariness in Music
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Evolution is now considered not only powerful enough to bring about the biological entities as complex as humans and conciousness, but also useful in simulation to create algorithms and structures of higher levels of complexity than could easily be built by design. In the context of artistic domains, the process of human-machine interaction is analyzed as a good framework to explore creativity and to produce results that could not be obtained without this interaction. When evolutionary computation and other computational intelligence methodologies are involved, every attempt to improve aesthetic judgement we denote as ArTbitrariness, and is interpreted as an interactive iterative optimization process. ArTbitrariness is also suggested as an effective way to produce art through an efficient manipulation of information and a proper use of computational creativity to increase the complexity of the results without neglecting the aesthetic aspects [Moroni et al., 2000]. Our emphasis will be in an approach to interactive music composition. The problem of computer generation of musical material has received extensive attention and a subclass of the field of algorithmic composition includes those applications which use the computer as something in between an instrument, in which a user "plays" through the application's interface, and a compositional aid, which a user experiments with in order to generate stimulating and varying musical material. This approach was adopted in Vox Populi, a hybrid made up of an instrument and a compositional environment. Differently from other systems found in genetic algorithms or evolutionary computation, in which people have to listen to and judge the musical items, Vox Populi uses the computer and the mouse as real-time music controllers, acting as a new interactive computer-based musical instrument. The interface is designed to be flexible for the user to modify the music being generated. It explores evolutionary computation in the context of algorithmic composition and provides a graphical interface that allows to modify the tonal center and the voice range, changing the evolution of the music by using the mouse[Moroni et al., 1999]. A piece of music consists of several sets of musical material manipulated and exposed to the listener, for example pitches, harmonies, rhythms, timbres, etc. They are composed of a finite number of elements and basically, the aim of a composer is to organize those elements in an esthetic way. Modeling a piece as a dynamic system implies a view in which the composer draws trajectories or orbits using the elements of each set [Manzolli, 1991]. Nonlinear iterative mappings are associated with interface controls. In the next page two examples of nonlinear iterative mappings with their resulting musical pieces are shown.The mappings may give rise to attractors, defined as geometric figures that represent the set of stationary states of a non-linear dynamic system, or simply trajectories to which the system is attracted. The relevance of this approach goes beyond music applications per se. Computer music systems that are built on the basis of a solid theory can be coherently embedded into multimedia environments. The richness and specialty of the music domain are likely to initiate new thinking and ideas, which will have an impact on areas such as knowledge representation and planning, and on the design of visual formalisms and human-computer interfaces in general. Above and bellow, Vox Populi interface is depicted, showing two nonlinear iterative mappings with their resulting musical pieces. References [Manzolli, 1991] J. Manzolli. Harmonic Strange Attractors, CEM BULLETIN, Vol. 2, No. 2, 4 -- 7, 1991. [Moroni et al., 1999] Moroni, J. Manzolli, F. Von Zuben, R. Gudwin. Evolutionary Computation applied to Algorithmic Composition, Proceedings of CEC99 - IEEE International Conference on Evolutionary Computation, Washington D. C., p. 807 -- 811,1999. [Moroni et al., 2000] Moroni, A., Von Zuben, F. and Manzolli, J. ArTbitration, Las Vegas, USA: Proceedings of the 2000 Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference Workshop Program ľ GECCO, 143 -- 145, 2000.
series other
email artemis@ia.cti.br
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id dc01
authors Saleh Uddin, M.
year 1999
title Digital Architecture
source McGraw-Hill
summary Digital Architecture is the only guide that shows you how to create accomplished computer drawings by displaying and explaining the work of many of today's most justly celebrated design professionals. It gives you the foundation to understand how these international masters so deftly exploited computers, by providing a clear overview of the hardware, software, and input and output devices involved in digital media. It then showcases the conceptual studies, desktop formats, 3D renderings, digital hybrids, and animation of more than 50 top designers and firms. Each project comes with a succinct explanation of the design concept, drawing techniques, hardware and software used, and output media involved. Featuring an easy-to-use, loose-leaf format, Digital Architecture will be your ongoing reference on hybrid digital representation and an endless source of ideas and inspiration.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 732d
authors Uddin, M. Saleh
year 1999
title Digital Architecture
source McGraw-Hill, New York
summary Digital Architecture is the only guide that shows you how to create accomplished computer drawings by displaying and explaining the work of many of today's most justly celebrated design professionals. It gives you the foundation to understand how these international masters so deftly exploited computers, by providing a clear overview of the hardware, software, and input and output devices involved in digital media. It then showcases the conceptual studies, desktop formats, 3D renderings, digital hybrids, and animation of more than 50 top designers and firms. Each project comes with a succinct explanation of the design concept, drawing techniques, hardware and software used, and output media involved. Featuring an easy-to-use, loose-leaf format, Digital Architecture will be your ongoing reference on hybrid digital representation and an endless source of ideas and inspiration.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 53df
authors Uddin, M.S.
year 1999
title Hybrid Drawing Techniques by Contemporary Architects and Designers
source John Wiley, New York,
summary The complete hybrid drawing sourcebook Hybrid drawings offer limitless possibilities for the fusion and superimposition of ideas, media, and techniques-powerful creative tools for effective and innovative architectural graphic presentation. This unique guide offers a dynamic introduction to these drawings and how they are created, with a stunning color portfolio of presentation-quality examples that give full visual expression to the power and potential of hybrid drawing techniques. Featuring the work of dozens of internationally recognized architects and firms, including Takefumi Aida, Helmut Jahn of Murphy/Jahn Architects, Morphosis, Eric Owen Moss, NBBJ Sports & Entertainment, Smith-Miller & Hawkinson, and Bernard Tschumi Architects, the book's visual examples are accompanied by descriptive and analytical commentary that gives valuable practical insight into the background of each project, along with essential information on the design concept and the drawing process. Combining all of the best features of an idea resource and a how-to guide, Hybrid Drawing Techniques by Contemporary Architects and Designers is an important creative tool for students and professionals in architecture, design, illustration, and related areas
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id e978
authors [Zupancic] Strojan, Tadeja Z.
year 1999
title CyberUniversity
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 196-200
summary The study of a cyberuniversity derives from an analogy between real urban space and its virtual "substitution". It represents an attempt to balance some views, which seems to be contrary, exclusive, but they are just parts of the same wholeness. Especially the notion of a cyber society is lately considered such an exaggeration, that it is possible to forget the meaning of a real life experience and interactions, which are already threatened. One should contribute to the awarness that is used in such a comparison, it is "just" an analogy, not a real similarity. At the same time it is possible to point out some limitations of a cyberspace and indicate a more realistic view of the meaning of cyber communities. Awarness of the development processes could help to find a balance between reality and virtuality, using cyberfacilities not to destroy us (our identity) but to improve the quality of our (real) life.
keywords University, Cyberuniversity, Space, Cyberspace
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email tadeja.zupancic@guest.arnes.si
last changed 2007/03/04 06:03

_id bacd
authors AbadÝ Abbo, Isaac
year 1999
title APPLICATION OF SPATIAL DESIGN ABILITY IN A POSTGRADUATE COURSE
source Full-scale Modeling and the Simulation of Light [Proceedings of the 7th European Full-scale Modeling Association Conference / ISBN 3-85437-167-5] Florence (Italy) 18-20 February 1999, pp. 75-82
summary Spatial Design Ability (SDA) has been defined by the author (1983) as the capacity to anticipate the effects (psychological impressions) that architectural spaces or its components produce in observers or users. This concept, which requires the evaluation of spaces by the people that uses it, was proposed as a guideline to a Masters Degree Course in Architectural Design at the Universidad Autonoma de Aguascalientes in Mexico. The theory and the exercises required for the experience needed a model that could simulate spaces in terms of all the variables involved. Full-scale modeling as has been tested in previous research, offered the most effective mean to experiment with space. A simple, primitive model was designed and built: an articulated ceiling that allows variation in height and shape, and a series of wooden panels for the walls and structure. Several exercises were carried out, mainly to experience cause -effect relationships between space and the psychological impressions they produce. Students researched into spatial taxonomy, intentional sequences of space and spatial character. Results showed that students achieved the expected anticipation of space and that full-scale modeling, even with a simple model, proved to be an effective tool for this purpose. The low cost of the model and the short time it took to be built, opens an important possibility for Institutions involved in architectural studies, both as a research and as a learning tool.
keywords Spatial Design Ability, Architectural Space, User Evaluation, Learning, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
email iabadi@ceea.arq.ucv.ve
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa
last changed 2004/05/04 09:27

_id cf2011_p109
id cf2011_p109
authors Abdelmohsen, Sherif; Lee Jinkook, Eastman Chuck
year 2011
title Automated Cost Analysis of Concept Design BIM Models
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 403-418.
summary AUTOMATED COST ANALYSIS OF CONCEPT DESIGN BIM MODELS Interoperability: BIM models and cost models This paper introduces the automated cost analysis developed for the General Services Administration (GSA) and the analysis results of a case study involving a concept design courthouse BIM model. The purpose of this study is to investigate interoperability issues related to integrating design and analysis tools; specifically BIM models and cost models. Previous efforts to generate cost estimates from BIM models have focused on developing two necessary but disjoint processes: 1) extracting accurate quantity take off data from BIM models, and 2) manipulating cost analysis results to provide informative feedback. Some recent efforts involve developing detailed definitions, enhanced IFC-based formats and in-house standards for assemblies that encompass building models (e.g. US Corps of Engineers). Some commercial applications enhance the level of detail associated to BIM objects with assembly descriptions to produce lightweight BIM models that can be used by different applications for various purposes (e.g. Autodesk for design review, Navisworks for scheduling, Innovaya for visual estimating, etc.). This study suggests the integration of design and analysis tools by means of managing all building data in one shared repository accessible to multiple domains in the AEC industry (Eastman, 1999; Eastman et al., 2008; authors, 2010). Our approach aims at providing an integrated platform that incorporates a quantity take off extraction method from IFC models, a cost analysis model, and a comprehensive cost reporting scheme, using the Solibri Model Checker (SMC) development environment. Approach As part of the effort to improve the performance of federal buildings, GSA evaluates concept design alternatives based on their compliance with specific requirements, including cost analysis. Two basic challenges emerge in the process of automating cost analysis for BIM models: 1) At this early concept design stage, only minimal information is available to produce a reliable analysis, such as space names and areas, and building gross area, 2) design alternatives share a lot of programmatic requirements such as location, functional spaces and other data. It is thus crucial to integrate other factors that contribute to substantial cost differences such as perimeter, and exterior wall and roof areas. These are extracted from BIM models using IFC data and input through XML into the Parametric Cost Engineering System (PACES, 2010) software to generate cost analysis reports. PACES uses this limited dataset at a conceptual stage and RSMeans (2010) data to infer cost assemblies at different levels of detail. Functionalities Cost model import module The cost model import module has three main functionalities: generating the input dataset necessary for the cost model, performing a semantic mapping between building type specific names and name aggregation structures in PACES known as functional space areas (FSAs), and managing cost data external to the BIM model, such as location and construction duration. The module computes building data such as footprint, gross area, perimeter, external wall and roof area and building space areas. This data is generated through SMC in the form of an XML file and imported into PACES. Reporting module The reporting module uses the cost report generated by PACES to develop a comprehensive report in the form of an excel spreadsheet. This report consists of a systems-elemental estimate that shows the main systems of the building in terms of UniFormat categories, escalation, markups, overhead and conditions, a UniFormat Level III report, and a cost breakdown that provides a summary of material, equipment, labor and total costs. Building parameters are integrated in the report to provide insight on the variations among design alternatives.
keywords building information modeling, interoperability, cost analysis, IFC
series CAAD Futures
email sherif.morad@gatech.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id 36d3
authors Af Klercker, Jonas
year 1999
title A CAVE-Interface in CAAD-Education?
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 313-323
summary The so called "CAVE-interface" is a very interesting and thrilling development for architects! It supports a better illusion of space by exposing almost a 270░ view of a computer model than the 60░ which can be viewed on an ordinary computer screen. At the Lund University we have got the possibility to experiment with a CAVE-installation, using it in research and the education of CAAD. The technique and three experiments are discribed. The possibilities are discussed and some problems and questions are put forward.
series CAADRIA
email jonas.af_klercker@caad.lth.se
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 3cde
authors Alik, B.
year 1999
title A topology construction from line drawings using a uniform plane subdivision technique
source Computer-Aided Design, Vol. 31 (5) (1999) pp. 335-348
summary The paper describes an algorithm for constructing the topology from a set of line segments or polylines. The problem appears for example at land-maps that have been drawnby general-purpose drawing packages or captured from blue-prints by digitalisation. The solution comprises two steps; in the first step inconsistencies in the input data aredetected and removed, and in the second step the topology is constructed. The algorithm for topology construction consists of two phases: determination of a concave hull,and generation of polygons. It is shown that the running-time of the presented algorithm is better than O(n2), where n is the number of input points. Because of a largenumber of geometric elements being expected, the geometric search needed at the first step of the algorithm is speeded up by an acceleration techniquea uniform planesubdivision.
keywords Computational Geometry, Topology Construction, Uniform Space Subdivision
series journal paper
email zalik@uni-mb.si
last changed 2003/05/15 19:33

_id 4d95
authors Alvarado, Rodrigo Garcia and Maver, Tom
year 1999
title Virtual Reality in Architectural Education: Defining Possibilities
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 7-9
summary Introduction: virtual reality in architecture Virtual Reality (VR) is an emergent computer technology for full 3D-simulations, which has a natural application in the architectural work, due that activity involves the complete definition of buildings prior to its construction. Although the profession has a long tradition and expertise in the use of 2D-plans for the design of buildings, the increasing complexity of projects and social participation requires better media of representation. However, the technological promise of Virtual Reality involves many sophisticated software and hardware developments. It is based on techniques of 3D-modelling currently incorporated in the majority of drawing software used in architecture, and also there are several tools for rendering, animation and panoramic views, which provide visual realism. But other capabilities like interactivity and sense of immersion are still complex, expensive and under research. These require stereoscopic helmets, 3D pointers and trackers with complicated configurations and uncomfortable use. Most advanced installations of Virtual-Reality like CAVEs involve much hardware, building space and restrictions for users. Nevertheless, diverse developers are working in Virtual-Reality user-friendly techniques and there are many initial experiences of architectural walk-throughs showing advantages in the communication and development of designs. Then we may expect an increasing use of Virtual Reality in architecture.
series ACADIA
email rgarcia@ubiobio.cl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ga9925
id ga9925
authors Ambrosini, L., Longatti, M. and Miyajima, H.
year 1999
title Time sections, abstract machines
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary conditions a time-spatial discontinuity in the urban grid, ancient walls casually discovered in a substrate of the contemporary town needs a surplus of information to be understood and interfaced with their current condition. diagrams diverse chronological stages of the urban evolution are mapped on the area, in order to read the historical stratifications as a multiplicity of signs; this abstract approach leads to consider the roman space as guided by metrics, a system of measure superimposed on the landscape, vs. medioeval spatial continuity, where more fluid relations between the same urban elements create a completely different pattern.assemblage (time sections) a surface, automatically displaced from the medioeval diagram, moves along the z axis, the historical stratification direction, intersecting in various, unpredictable, manners a series of paths; these paths start as parallels, allowing an undifferentiated access to the area, and mutate along their developing direction, intertweening and blending each other; linear openings are cut on the surface, virtually connecting the two levels by light, following the roman grid in rhythm and measure. Projected on the lateral wall, the cadence of the vertical and horizontal elements becomes a temporal diagram of the design process.movement time takes part into the process through two kinds of movement: the first one, freezed when reaches the best results, in terms of complexity, is given by the surface intersecting the tubular paths; the second one is represented by multiple routes walking on which the project can be experienced (in absence of any objective, fixed, point of view, movement becomes the only way to understand relations). Thresholds between typical architectural categories (such as inside-outside, object-landscape etc.) are blurred in favour of a more supple condition, another kind of continuity (re)appears, as a new media, between the different historical layers of the city.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 93a8
authors Anders, P.
year 1999
title Envisioning Cyberspace: Designing 3D Electronic Spaces
source McGraw-Hill, NY
summary Free of the constraints of physical form and limited only by imagination, new environments spring to life daily in a fantastic realm called cyberspace. The creators of this new virtual world may be programmers, designers, architects, even children. In this invigorating exploration of the juncture between cyberspace and the physical world, architect Peter Anders brings together leading-edge cyberspace art and architecture ... inspiring new techniques and technologies ... unexpected unions of reality and virtuality ... and visions of challenges and opportunities as yet unexplored. More than an invitation to tour fantastic realms and examine powerful tools, this book is a hard-eyed look at cyberspace's impact on physical, cultural, and social reality, and the human-centered principles of its design. This is a book that will set designers and architects thinkingNand a work of importance to anyone fascinated with the fast-closing space between the real and the virtual.
series other
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id e78e
authors Anders, Peter
year 1999
title Anthropic Cyberspace: Defining Eletronic Space from First Principles
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 56-62
summary This paper proposes principles for the design of human-centered, anthropic cyberspaces. Starting with a brief examination of our cognitive use of space, it suggests that we address cyberspace as an extension of our mental space. The paper procedes with twelve concepts based on scientific and cultural observations with respect to individual cognition and social interaction. These concepts are general - not specific to any culture or technology in the accompanying arguments the author expands on these concepts illustrating them with examples taken from conventional and electronic media, space and cyberspace the author hopes with these conjectures to begin a discussion on the anthropology of space and its emulation.
keywords Cognition, Cyberspace, Design, Internet, Simulation, Space
series SIGRADI
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id d5c8
authors Angelo, C.V., Bueno, A.P., Ludvig, C., Reis, A.F. and Trezub, D.
year 1999
title Image and Shape: Two Distinct Approaches
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 410-415
summary This paper is the result of two researches done at the district of Campeche, Florianˇpolis, by the Grupo PET/ARQ/UFSC/CAPES. Different aspects and conceptual approaches were used to study the spatial attributes of this district located in the Southern part of Santa Catarina Island. The readings and analysis of two researches were based on graphic pistures builded with the use of Corel 7.0 e AutoCadR14. The first research ľ "Urban Development in the Island of Santa Catarina: Public Space Study"- examined the urban structures of Campeche based on the Spatial Syntax Theory developed by Hillier and Hanson (1984) that relates form and social appropriation of public spaces. The second research ľ "Topoceptive Characterisation of Campeche: The Image of a Locality in Expansion in the Island of Santa Catarina" -, based on the methodology developed by Kohlsdorf (1996) and also on the visual analysis proposed by Lynch (1960), identified characteristics of this locality with the specific goal of selecting attributes that contributed to the ideas of the place its population held. The paper consists of an initial exercise of linking these two methods in order to test the complementarity of their analytical tools. Exemplifying the analytical procedures undertaken in the two approaches, the readings done - global (of the locality as a whole) and partial (from parts of the settlement) - are presented and compared.
series SIGRADI
email caludvig@arq.ufsc.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id b73a
authors Angelo,C.V., Bins Ely, V.H.M., Bueno,A.P., Ludvig C. and Trezub, D.
year 1999
title Space Syntax and the New Transportation System in the Santa Catarina Island
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 434-437
summary The paper reports an on-going research that aims at describing and analysing some of the syntactic characteristics of the urban space of Santa Catarina Island, in an attempt to evaluate its performance, more specifically its social and spatial integration and segregation. The research has been conducted with the aid of the Aximagic software, still in exam stage and not yet released to the public, a tool being developed by a group of researches of the Rio Grande do Sul Federal University and given up by Prof. Doctor Benamy Turkienicz. The software is part of a larger georeferenced program called CityZoom wich includes others tools to the comprehention of the urban morphology. This program works with graphic pictures in the inlet of data and also in the acquisition of results. The syntactic study of the Santa Catarina Island as a whole aims to obtain the comprehension of its global structure, relating it to the integrated public transportation system proposed to Florianˇpolis. These studies should allow an understanding of the impact the developments will have upon the urban morphology, and the new public transportation system.
series SIGRADI
email caludvig@arq.ufsc.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 2c4a
authors Aroztegui, Carmen
year 1999
title The Architect's Use of the Internet - Study of the Architectural Presentation Possibilities
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 363-368
summary The Internet media is opening new horizons in communication and representation in architecture. However, its use today is superficial, limited, and without creativity. This study will explore theories, methods and examples of how the virtual space of the Internet can be used in its full potential. That means to present ways of observing, understanding, interacting, and communicating the space without precedents in architecture. The existent presentations made by architects in the Internet are in general poor and static. Through the comparative analysis of two presentations of the same architectural space in the Internet and the use of state of the art technology in the Internet, this study will show innovations that will make the exploration of the architectural space more attractive, dynamic and interactive. The main issues will be on one hand, the improvement in the communication of the design through the use of the Internet, and on the other hand, the rise of the standards in the quality of the architectural presentations. This work will project possible implications of the Internet in architecture.
series SIGRADI
email arozteguic@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id f317
authors Arvin, Scott A. and House, Donald H.
year 1999
title Modeling Architectural Design Objectives in Physically Based Space Planning
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA Ĺ99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 212-225
summary Physically based space planning is a means for automating the conceptual design process by applying the physics of motion to space plan elements. This methodology provides for a responsive design process, which allows a designer to easily make decisions whose consequences immediately propagate throughout the design. It combines the speed of automated design methods with the flexibility of manual design methods, while adding a highly interactive quality and a sense of collaboration with the design itself. In our approach, the designer creates a space plan by specifying and modifying graphic design objectives rather than by directly manipulating primitive geometry. The plan adapts to the changing state of objectives by applying the physics of motion to its elements. For design objectives to have an effect on a physically based space plan, they need to be able to apply appropriate forces to space plan elements. Space planning can be separated into two problems, determining topological properties and determining geometric properties. Design objectives can then be categorized as topological or geometric objectives. Topological objectives influence the location of individual spaces, affecting how one space relates to another. Geometric objectives influence the size and shape of space boundaries, affecting the dimensions of individual walls. This paper focuses on how to model a variety of design objectives for use in a physically based space planning system. We describe how topological objectives, such as adjacency and orientation, can be modeled to apply forces to space locations, and how geometric objectives, such as area, proportion, and alignment, can be modeled to apply forces to boundary edges.
series ACADIA
email arvin@viz.tamu.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

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