CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 101 to 120 of 617

_id ecc5
authors Bassanino, May Nahab
year 1999
title The perception of computer generated architectural images
source Liverpool University
summary The broad aim of the research is to examine the role of computer generated architectural images on the way different people perceive architecture, and within this field of interest I have established a list of specific tasks to define the specific points of interest to examine. The following list of the main research objectives served as a guide in designing the experimental tests undertaken as part of this research: (*) Study the effect of both representation techniques and the used media on perceiving architecture. (*) Establish the differences (if there are any) of perception between different groups of people; principally architects and non-architects, but also subsets of each of these two groups. (*) To suggest the appropriate technique for presenting architecture for a particular group in a particular stage in the design process. (*) To investigate the influence of CAAD in architectural education on the students’ perception for architectural images.
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 328d
authors Bassanino, May Nahab and Brown, Andre
year 1999
title Computer Generated Architectural Images: A Comparative Study
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 552-556
summary This work is part of a long term research programme (Brown and Horton, 1992; Brown and Nahab, 1996; Bassanino, 1999) in which tests and studies have been carried out on various groups of people to investigate their reaction to, and interpretation of different forms of architectural representation. In the work described here a range of architectural schemes were presented using particular representational techniques and media. An experiment was then undertaken on two different groups; architects and lay people. They were presented with a number of schemes displayed using the various techniques and media. The responses are summarised and some comments are made on the effect of computers on perceiving architecture and on communicating architectural ideas arising from an analysis of the responses.
keywords Subject, Image Type, Presentation Technique, Medium, SD Scales, Factors
series eCAADe
email andygbp@liv.ac.uk
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id a8f2
authors Becker, R.
year 1999
title Research and development needs for better implementation of the performance concept in building
source Automation in Construction 8 (4) (1999) pp. 525-532
summary Gaps in basic knowledge, inadequacies in the procedural infrastructure and lack of working tools, that still prevent a more systematic application of the performance concept throughout the building process, are identified. One of the main conclusions is that, despite the vast knowledge accumulated during the years in the fields of ergonometrics, human needs, human factor engineering, architectural design, structural analysis, building physics, building materials and durability analysis, this knowledge is not applied systematically during the building process. The situation is attributed to lack of tools for some of the decision making phases in the process, and to the lack of a common, preferably computerized, design platform that would ensure a comprehensive and quantitative approach to all the relevant performance attributes, link smoothly between the various phases along the project development, and minimizes bias caused by human experts.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 2da9
authors Becker, R.
year 1999
title Introduction
source Automation in Construction 8 (4) (1999) pp. 375-376
summary The Performance Concept provides a philosophical framework for building design and construction, that is flexible and technically non-prescriptive, but altogether ensures building quality and satisfaction of user demands and expectations.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 7da7
authors Benedetti, Cristina and Salvioni, Giulio
year 1999
title The Use of Renewable Resource in Architecture: New Teaching Methodologies
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 751-756
summary The program is organized into four parts. Each is very much connected, both logically and methodologically, so that the unit as a whole consists of a content and method of access that are not divided up. This method is not in a chronological order that simply goes in one direction, rather it allows the user to "refer back", in real time and in different directions. For the simple purpose of explanation, the sections of the program are listed as follows: (-) "Basic information" concerns the basics of bioclimatic and timber architecture. Without this knowledge, the other two sections would be difficult to understand; (-) "Actual buildings throughout the world"; give examples of architectural quality; they concretize the basics of bioclimatic and timber architecture; (-) "Students' Masters Theses", that follow on from the basic information and the learning experience "in the field", and guided by the lecturer, have a critical approach to actual buildings throughout the world. (-) A multimedia data-sheet organized to ensure a clear and straightforward presentation of information about the construction products. It relies on a tab-based navigation interface that gives users access to eight different stacked windows.
keywords Architecture, Multimedia, Timber, Bioclimatic, Classification
series eCAADe
email benedetti@axrma.uniroma1.it
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 4805
authors Bentley, P.
year 1999
title Evolutionary Design by Computers Morgan Kaufmann
source San Francisco, CA
summary Computers can only do what we tell them to do. They are our blind, unconscious digital slaves, bound to us by the unbreakable chains of our programs. These programs instruct computers what to do, when to do it, and how it should be done. But what happens when we loosen these chains? What happens when we tell a computer to use a process that we do not fully understand, in order to achieve something we do not fully understand? What happens when we tell a computer to evolve designs? As this book will show, what happens is that the computer gains almost human-like qualities of autonomy, innovative flair, and even creativity. These 'skills'which evolution so mysteriously endows upon our computers open up a whole new way of using computers in design. Today our former 'glorified typewriters' or 'overcomplicated drawing boards' can do everything from generating new ideas and concepts in design, to improving the performance of designs well beyond the abilities of even the most skilled human designer. Evolving designs on computers now enables us to employ computers in every stage of the design process. This is no longer computer aided design - this is becoming computer design. The pages of this book testify to the ability of today's evolutionary computer techniques in design. Flick through them and you will see designs of satellite booms, load cells, flywheels, computer networks, artistic images, sculptures, virtual creatures, house and hospital architectural plans, bridges, cranes, analogue circuits and even coffee tables. Out of all of the designs in the world, the collection you see in this book have a unique history: they were all evolved by computer, not designed by humans.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id e531
authors Berk, Michael
year 1999
title CYBERjack
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 4, p. 10
summary Using a limited "kit of parts" [two 8 ft. 2x4's and one sheet of 1/2" birch plywood] students in teams of two are to design and construct an "interface" which joins the physical world to the virtual world of the web. The location for this piece of furniture [the CYBERjack] will be a local library in Okolona, Mississippi, where existing web computers are to be housed. The students modeled the design using formZ, then plotted full-size templates to be used in cutting the actual parts out of wood in the shop. The device was supposed to join the Body to the Machine. The project lasted 2 weeks and was part of a 4th year studio which participated in the ACADIA Library Competition last year.
series ACADIA
email mberk@sarc.msstate.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id ca13
authors Bermúdez, Julio and King, Kevin
year 1999
title Media Interaction in the Design Proces
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 35-44
summary Integrating computers in architectural design means to negotiate between centuries-old analog design methods and the new digital systems of production. The difficulty lies in the underdeveloped state of the necessary methods, techniques, and theories to relate traditional and new media. Recent investigations on the use of multiple iterations between manual and electronic systems to advance architectural work show promising results. However, these experiments have not yet either developed a theoretical base that connects their procedures to a larger conceptual framework nor been sufficiently cross-referenced and third party tested to conform a reliable knowledge base.
series SIGRADI
email bermudez@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id bfc2
authors Bessone, Miriam and Mantovani, Graciela
year 1999
title Integración del Medio Digital a la Enseñanza del Diseño Arquitectónico. Huellas de un Taller Experimental (Integration of Digital Media in the Teaching of Architectural Design. Tracks of an Experimental Studio)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 289-294
summary This paper presents the searching of new building modes for the knowledge of design in curriculum workshops at Facultad de Arquitectura, Diseno y Urbanismo of the Universidad Nacional del Litoral the proposed “research action” program articulates longitudinally in the three cycles of the career, understanding architecture as metaknowledge within a new paradigm of subjectivity, complexity and multidimensionality. In other words, it is recognized a new scenery tending to modify didactic relations. This experimental field looks for conscientious equilibrium between “written culture/audiovisual culture”, and “analog instruments/digital media”. We focus our interest on the “machine interacting with and for men”, looking for harmonious synthesis through a new way of thinking, to allow “real progress”. For turning this idea into action, we organized an alternative and plural team-work in architecture. We called it “experimental workshop”. In this first level the students worked. On a preliminary plan of a “kindergarden”. They developed a divergent process through the 3D simulations (using the software 3DS MAX v2), scale models and sensible sketches. For conclusions, the paper addresses the characteristics of the pedagogic model used and the results achieved.
series SIGRADI
email mbessone@fadu.unl.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 9f35
authors Bhavnani, S. K., Garrett, J.H., Flemming, U. and Shaw, D.S.
year 1999
title Towards Active Assistance
source Bridging the Generations. The Future of Computer-Aided Engineering (eds. J. H. Garrett and D. R. Rehak) Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (1999), 199-203
summary The exploding functionality of current computer-aided engineering (CAE) systems has provided today’s users with a vast, but under-utilized collection of tools and options. For example, MicroStation, a popular CAE system sold by Intergraph, offers more than 1000 commands including 16 ways to construct a line (in different contexts) and 28 ways to manipulate elements using a “fence”. This complex array of functionalities is bewildering and hardly exploited to its full extent even by frequent, experienced users. In a recent site visit to a federal design office, we observed ten architects and three draftsmen using MicroStation.
series other
email bhavnani@umich.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id a0b6
authors Bhavnani, S., John, B. and Flemming, U.
year 1999
title The Strategic Use of CAD: An Empirically Inspired, Theory-Based Course
source Proceedings of ACM CHI 99 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 1999 v.1 pp. 183-190
summary The inefficient use of complex computer systems has been widely reported. These studies show the persistence of inefficient methods despite many years of experience and formal training. To counteract this phenomenon, we present the design of a new course, called the Strategic Use of CAD. The course aims at teaching students efficient strategies to use a computer-aided drafting system through a two-pronged approach. Learning to See teaches students to recognize opportunities to use efficient strategies by studying the nature of the task, and Learning to Do teaches students to implement the strategies. Results from a pilot experiment show that this approach had a positive effect on the strategic behavior of students who did not exhibit knowledge of efficient strategies before the class, and had no effect on the strategic behavior of those who did. Strategic training can thus assist users in recognizing opportunities to use efficient strategies. We present the ramifications of these results on the design of training and future experiments.
keywords Strategy; Training; GOMS; Learning; Efficiency
series other
email ujf@cmu.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id f288
authors Bille, Pia
year 1999
title Integrating GIS and Electronic Networks In Urban Design and Planning
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 722-728
summary In 1998 I undertook an inquiry into the use of information technology in Urban Design and Planning in Danish municipalities and among planning consultants. The aim was to find out who was working with the IT and for what purposes it was used. In education there seems to be barriers to a full integration of the new media, and I wanted to find out if that was also the case in the practise of architects and planners. Surprisingly I discovered that there was a computer on almost every desk, - but there were big differences in the use of the technology. The investigation described here is based on interviews with planners in selected municipalities and with urban planning consultants, and the results have been summarised in a publication.
keywords Urban Planning, Electronic Collaboration, GIS, Data Bases
series eCAADe
email pia.bille@a-aarhus.dk
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id bbb9
authors Blaise, Jean-Yves and Dudek, Iwona
year 1999
title SOL: Spatial and Historical Web-Based Interface for On Line Architectural Documentation of Krakow's Rynek Gowny
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 700-707
summary Our paper presents recent developments of a co-operation program that links the MAP-GAMSAU CNRS laboratory (Marseilles, France), specialised in computer science and the HAiKZ Institute of Krakow's Faculty of Architecture, specialised in architectural heritage and conservation. Before undertaking any action to a listed building or interventions in its neighbourhood, it is vital to gain a clear understanding of the building in question. Numerous heterogeneous data detained by diverse institutions has to be handled. This process can be greatly eased by enhanced classification of the information. The development we present is a multidisciplinary platform independent information tool dedicated to education and research. SOL uses an http protocol centred computer architecture connecting a relational database, a VRML 2.0 representation module and a web search interface. It allows searches and updating of the database through a standard text based interface, a VRML 2.0 graphical module and a thematic interface. SOL is experienced on the urban fabric of the Main Square (Rynek Gówny) in Kraków. The choice of a web-centred development, both in the search and updating interface and in the representation module provides platform independence and distant access to the database, and enables successive contributions of students or researchers.
keywords Web Interface, Database, Architectural Heritage Environment, Information Module, Historical Evolutions
series eCAADe
email jyb@gamsau.archi.fr, idu@gamsau.archi.fr
more http://alberti.gamsau.archi.fr
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id c3c6
authors Bonetti, Máximo
year 1999
title Inventario Digital del Patrimonio Arquitectónico y Urbano Marplatense (Digital Inventory of the Architectural and Urban Patrimony of Mar del Plata)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 458-461
summary Assisting to the urgent necessity of documenting buildings, urban and rural spaces of our district and keeping in mind that, this patrimonial values represent a considerable proportion of the creative and constructive effort of the pioneers of this region and of our memory and identity, you urgent restitution the report of the examples that are still conserved. As well as the reconstruction, in the cases that it was necessary, of the missing patrimony that still stays in the collective memory. The construction of the digital inventory outlines, in a principle; to divide to the city in sectors of different urban-architectural importance the hills of. Santa Cecilia Stala Maris and Divino Rostro, those that still conserve numerous examples of architecture of the past, are an example of it. This documentation is carried out from the entity of culture of the municipality of the district of general Pueyrredón, in function of the activity developed in the area of patrimonial preservation. In what concerns to this work, previous antecedents don't exist in our means, being this the first time that is intruded in the land of the digital graph applied to the investigation and historical documentation.
series SIGRADI
email dibarros@mdp.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 6ae4
authors Borde, A., Miyamoto, J., Barki, J., and Conde, M.
year 1999
title New Trends In Graphic Representation
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 501-506
summary In terms of graphic representation, architectural & urban study drawings present some fuzziness related to the multiplicity of scales, to the representation of the urban dynamic and to the means of communicating the contents of these studies for different publics, clearly divided among lay and specialists. Since the 16th century there have been certain stimulating propositions to this theme that have had an enormous, often unacknowleged, impact on the perception and construction of the built environment. Recent experiences in Rio, due to the series of urban projects that are being accomplished, is showing that some architecture offices are adopting new graphic trends in drawings conceived for preliminary studies, diagnoses and inventories. Due to the new possibilities offered by graphic computing they are developing, with diferent softwares, a sort of "patchwork” or "collage” and "sampling” technique for morphological analysis and representantion of places and buildings. This use of graphic computing, as an alternative to the usual realistic depictions that attempts to deal with prosaic simulations of an everyday experience, results in a different type of graphic expression that transcend literalism and appealls to the imagination of the general viewer. It is important to highlight that the analysis of these graphic solutions that attempts to turn visible design problems, could result in the development of new graphic tools that will help the creative design process.
keywords Graphic Representation, Architecture, Urbanism
series SIGRADI
email aborde@rio.com.br, jamesm@rio.com.br, zbki@openlink.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 9e00
authors Bridges, Alan
year 1999
title Progress? What Progress?
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 321-326
summary This paper briefly reviews some of the history of computer graphics standardisation and then presents two specific case studies: one comparing HTML with SGML and Troff and the other comparing VRML with the Tektronix® Interactive Graphics Language implementation of the ACM Core Standard. In each case, it will be shown how the essential intellectual work carried out twenty years ago still lies at the foundations of the newer applications.
keywords SGML, HTML, VRML
series eCAADe
email a.h.bridges@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 48a7
authors Brooks
year 1999
title What's Real About Virtual Reality
source IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, Vol. 19, no. 6, Nov/Dec, 27
summary As is usual with infant technologies, the realization of the early dreams for VR and harnessing it to real work has taken longer than the wild hype predicted, but it is now happening. I assess the current state of the art, addressing the perennial questions of technology and applications. By 1994, one could honestly say that VR "almost works." Many workers at many centers could doe quite exciting demos. Nevertheless, the enabling technologies had limitations that seriously impeded building VR systems for any real work except entertainment and vehicle simulators. Some of the worst problems were end-to-end system latencies, low-resolution head-mounted displays, limited tracker range and accuracy, and costs. The technologies have made great strides. Today one can get satisfying VR experiences with commercial off-the-shelf equipment. Moreover, technical advances have been accompanied by dropping costs, so it is both technically and economically feasible to do significant application. VR really works. That is not to say that all the technological problems and limitations have been solved. VR technology today "barely works." Nevertheless, coming over the mountain pass from "almost works" to "barely works" is a major transition for the discipline. I have sought out applications that are now in daily productive use, in order to find out exactly what is real. Separating these from prototype systems and feasibility demos is not always easy. People doing daily production applications have been forthcoming about lessons learned and surprises encountered. As one would expect, the initial production applications are those offering high value over alternate approaches. These applications fall into a few classes. I estimate that there are about a hundred installations in daily productive use worldwide.
series journal paper
email brooks@ai.mit.edu
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id aef9
authors Brown, A., Knight, M. and Berridge, P. (Eds.)
year 1999
title Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [Conference Proceedings]
source eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7 / Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, 773 p.
summary The core theme of this book is the idea of looking forward to where research and development in Computer Aided Architectural Design might be heading. The contention is that we can do so most effectively by using the developments that have taken place over the past three or four decades in Computing and Architectural Computing as our reference point; the past informing the future. The genesis of this theme is the fact that a new millennium is about to arrive. If we are ruthlessly objective the year 2000 holds no more significance than any other year; perhaps we should, instead, be preparing for the year 2048 (2k). In fact, whatever the justification, it is now timely to review where we stand in terms of the development of Architectural Computing. This book aims to do that. It is salutary to look back at what writers and researchers have said in the past about where they thought that the developments in computing were taking us. One of the common themes picked up in the sections of this book is the developments that have been spawned by the global linkup that the worldwide web offers us. In the past decade the scale and application of this new medium of communication has grown at a remarkable rate. There are few technological developments that have become so ubiquitous, so quickly. As a consequence there are particular sections in this book on Communication and the Virtual Design Studio which reflect the prominence of this new area, but examples of its application are scattered throughout the book. In 'Computer-Aided Architectural Design' (1977), Bill Mitchell did suggest that computer network accessibility from expensive centralised locations to affordable common, decentralised computing facilities would become more commonplace. But most pundits have been taken by surprise by just how powerful the explosive cocktail of networks, email and hypertext has proven to be. Each of the ingredients is interesting in its own right but together they have presented us with genuinely new ways of working. Perhaps, with foresight we can see what the next new explosive cocktail might be.
series eCAADe
email andygbp@liv.ac.uk, mknight@liv.ac.uk, p.berridge@liverpool.ac.uk
more http://www.ecaade.org
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id f11d
authors Brown, K. and Petersen, D.
year 1999
title Ready-to-Run Java 3D
source Wiley Computer Publishing
summary Written for the intermediate Java programmer and Web site designer, Ready-to-Run Java 3D provides sample Java applets and code using Sun's new Java 3D API. This book provides a worthy jump-start for Java 3D that goes well beyond the documentation provided by Sun. Coverage includes downloading the Java 2 plug-in (needed by Java 3D) and basic Java 3D classes for storing shapes, matrices, and scenes. A listing of all Java 3D classes shows off its considerable richness. Generally, this book tries to cover basic 3D concepts and how they are implemented in Java 3D. (It assumes a certain knowledge of math, particularly with matrices, which are a staple of 3D graphics). Well-commented source code is printed throughout (though there is little additional commentary). An applet for orbiting planets provides an entertaining demonstration of transforming objects onscreen. You'll learn to add processing for fog effects and texture mapping and get material on 3D sound effects and several public domain tools for working with 3D artwork (including converting VRML [Virtual Reality Markup Language] files for use with Java 3D). In all, this book largely succeeds at being accessible for HTML designers while being useful to Java programmers. With Java 3D, Sun is betting that 3D graphics shouldn't require a degree in computer science. This book reflects that philosophy, though advanced Java developers will probably want more detail on this exciting new graphics package. --Richard Dragan Topics covered: Individual applets for morphing, translation, rotation, and scaling; support for light and transparency; adding motion and interaction to 3D objects (with Java 3D classes for behaviors and interpolators); and Java 3D classes used for event handling.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id f58e
authors Bugay, Edson Luiz and Ulbricht, Vania Ribas
year 1999
title Hipermidia para Ensino de Render no AutoCad 14 (Hypermedia for the Tachinf of Render 14 AutoCad)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 280-284
summary Hypermedia applications in education have grown very much and are nowadays available in a great variety of titles covering a major extension of topics. However most of these applications have not gathered too much pedagogic embodiment and when they do have it, it is rather nearly to the intuitive level than based on one or more pedagogic theories. This paper's objective is to provide a practical view of hypermedia directed to teaching which has formed the development basis of a prototype for teaching render in Autocad 14. The several stages' view of developing an hypermedia were considered in the process of the prototype's creation such as the theme's definition, the staffs composition, the metaphor's choice, and the pedagogic model are discussed in details, as well as the several stages that should be followed since the proposals beginning until the product's final distribution. The chosen metaphor is the one of an art study having in mind the meaning of the word "render" being "the artistic representation of a model" once defined the metaphor, the screen's graphical part were developed accordingly.
keywords Hypermedia, Rendering, Learning, Teaching
series SIGRADI
email elbugay@matrix.com.br, ulbricht@mbox1.ufsc.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

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