CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 21 to 40 of 617

_id 3ac3
authors Devetakovic, Mirjana and Radojevic, Milan
year 1999
title The Electronic Communication as a Part of CAAD Educational Process
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 265-273
summary Considering demands of contemporary architectural practice to shift spatial and cultural barriers and became more global and more creative, this paper analyses the role of electronic communication within the process of CAAD (Computer Aided Architectural Design) education. After explaining Virtual Design Studio phenomena, represented by several worldwide university projects, this paper focuses on the reflection of those projects in rethinking the CAAD education approach at the Faculty of Architecture, University of Belgrade. The case illustrating the problem is The Virtual Group activity within the Course "The basics of Computer Application in Architecture". Some examples of student work are given as well as several conclusions based on two-year experience.
series AVOCAAD
email mirjana@arh.arh.bg.ac.yu
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 874d
authors Diprose , Peter R. and Hotten, Robert D.
year 1999
title From Paris Texas to the Road Warrior: Computer Aided Landscapes and the Road Movie, AKA, Content, Form, and Film Media within Architectural Education.
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 290-300
summary In recent years the development of computer aided design technologies has offered designers greater opportunity for the thorough investigation of space. While a level of competence has been demonstrated by the architectural profession in the creation of static perspective presentations, a lack of knowledge has led to moving image presentations being treated in a relatively unsophisticated manner. To confront this problem there may be a pedagogical justification for the introduction of film studies and computer aided design as a hybrid design course. In the computer aided design of landscape, the critique of film media may be considered useful both in terms of the form and in terms of the content that it offers the student designer.
series ACADIA
email diprose@ihug.co.nz
last changed 1999/12/02 07:48

_id 4b48
authors Dourish, P.
year 1999
title Where the Footprints Lead: Tracking down other roles for social navigation
source Social Navigation of Information Space, eds. A. Munro, K. H. and D Benyon. London: Springer-Verlag, pp 15-34
summary Collaborative Filtering was proposed in the early 1990's as a means of managing access to large information spaces by capturing and exploiting aspects of the experiences of previous users of the same information. Social navigation is a more general form of this style of interaction, and with the widening scope of the Internet as an information provider, systems of this sort have rapidly moved from early research prototypes to deployed services in everyday use. On the other hand, to most of the HCI community, the term social navigation" is largely synonymous with "recommendation systems": systems that match your interests to those of others and, on that basis, provide recommendations about such things as music, books, articles and films that you might enjoy. The challenge for social navigation, as an area of research and development endeavour, is to move beyond this rather limited view of the role of social navigation; and to do this, we must try to take a broader view of both our remit and our opportunities. This chapter will revisit the original motivations, and chart something of the path that recent developments have taken. Based on reflections on the original concerns that motivated research into social navigation, it will explore some new avenues of research. In particular, it will focus on two. The first is social navigation within the framework of "awareness" provisions in collaborative systems generally; and the second is the relationship of social navigation systems to spatial models and the ideas of "space" and "place" in collaborative settings. By exploring these two ideas, two related goals can be achieved. The first is to draw attention to ways in which current research into social navigation can be made relevant to other areas of research endeavour; and the second is to re-motivate the idea of "social navigation" as a fundamental model for collaboration in information-seeking."
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 5007
authors Elezkurtaj, Tomor and Franck, Georg
year 1999
title Genetic Algorithms in Support of Creative Architectural Design
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 645-651
summary The functions supported by commercial CAAD software are drawing, construction and presentation. Up to now few programs supporting the creative part of architectural problem solving have become available. The grand hopes of symbolic AI to program creative architectural design have been disappointing. In the meantime, methods called referred to as New AI have become available. Such methods includegenetic algorithms (GA). But GA, though successfully applied in other fields of engineering, still waits to be applied broadly in architectural design. A main problem lies in defining function in architecture. It is much harder to define the function of a building than that of a machine. Without specifying the function of the artifact, the fitness function of the design variants participating in the survival game of artificial evolution remains undetermined. It is impossible to fully specify the fitness function of architecture. The approach presented is one of circumventing a full specification through dividing labor between the GA software and its user. The fitness function of architectural ground plans is typically defined in terms only of the proportions of the room to be accommodated and certain topological relations between them. The rest is left to the human designer who interactively intervenes in the evolution game as displayed on the screen.
keywords Genetic Algorithms, Creative Architectural Design
series eCAADe
email tomor@osiris.iemar.tuwien.ac.at, franck@osiris.iemar.tuwien.ac.at
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 2fc7
authors Forber, U. and Russell, P.
year 1999
title Interdisciplinary Collaboration in the Virtual Design Studio Design Studio
source Proceedings of the 17th Annual EAAE Annual Conference, Plymouth UK
summary Drastic changes in technology and economics currently impact common working structures. Moreover, a fundamental move of western societies from industrial and service oriented societies to information oriented societies can be observed. Like others, the AEC industry is also exposed to the challenge of these fundamental changes, not only regarding an ever growing stock of information on building components and materials, but also because of new methods of collaboration to be applied by all participants. As a result, integrating domain specific knowledge into the design process and conversely, conveying design intentions to domain experts, is meaningful in a constantly growing scale. Utilising advanced technology, a twofold approach in research and education, undertaken at the Institut für Industrielle Bauproduktion (ifib), University of Karlsruhe, is the basis of efforts to create and develop integrating methods of collaboration into the design and planning process. In addition, the integration of AEC practitioners (investors, users, designers, engineers) in the education process provides both drastic changes in the fields of design and construction education of students and a promising approach for life long learning. The focus of this paper is to present the current state of work and to report on experiences gathered during several Virtual Design Studios (VDS) in which multi-disciplinary participants from various Universities and backgrounds were involved. Platforms for the activities are World Wide Web based applications as well as animations, VR, CAD and video conferencing.
series other
email russell@bazillus.architektur.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 99ce
authors Forowicz, T.
year 1999
title Modeling of energy demands for residential buildings with HTML interface
source Automation in Construction 8 (4) (1999) pp. 481-487
summary This paper presents the package for calculation of energy and cost demands for heating, cooling and hot water. The package represents a new kind of approach to developing software, employing user (client) and server (program provider) computers connected by Internet. It is mounted on the owner server and is available to the whole world through the Web browser. The package was developed as a simplified tool for estimating energy use in four types of new and old houses, located in 900 US cities. The computing engine utilizes the database that was compiled by LBL in support of the 'Affordable Housing through Energy Conservation' Project with over 10000 DOE-2.1 simulations. The package consists of 69 routines and scripts coded in four languages: HTML, Perl, C, and FORTRAN. The modeling, the programming, and the future perspectives of the new kind of computational tool are presented. The paper discusses further technical limitations, as well as suggestions for further improvements and development. Especially important is the problem of multi-user access; ways for its solution are proposed.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 3940
authors Hall, Rick
year 1999
title Realtime 3D visual Analysis of Very Large Models at Low Cost
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 437-441
summary Computer based visualisation of 3D models in architecture has been possible for 20 years or more, and the software technology has steadily improved during this time so that now incredibly realistic images can be generated from any viewpoint in a model, and impressive fly through sequences can bring a model to life in ways previously not possible. Virtual reality is with us and multi-media enables us to present a finished design in increasingly seductive ways. However, these forms of output from a 3D model offer much more limited benefits during the design process and particularly on large complex models because they are so computing intensive and it often require many hours to produce just one image. Anything other than a small and relatively simple model cannot be viewed dynamically in real-time on a desktop PC of the type commonly used by architects in a design office. Until now the solution to this problem has meant investing in expensive design review hardware and software with its inherent need for trained, skilled labour. As a result, design review products are often viewed as a luxury or costly necessity.
keywords Visual Analysis, Low Cost, 3D Modelling
series eCAADe
last changed 2002/11/22 17:13

_id 8313
authors Harrop, Patrick H.
year 1999
title Amor Infiniti/Horror Vacuii: Resolving Architecture Beyond the Planck Length ()
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 19-24
summary If one were to presume that every major shift in the perception and representational modes of architecture has its mirror in what is made, then we should be able to divine and critique the implications of making architecture through information technologies. We are only now beginning to enter speculations of what can possibly be made as a direct result of these systems. Already, the representation of digital space is undergoing a fundamental transition: From the highly precise facsimile of traditional Euclidean geometry, that we currently use in most CAD and modelling software to the visual interpretation of dense data arrays, as is emerging in GIS (Global Information Systems). This shift from a Vectorial world to a bitmap world is perhaps the most challenging to our historical and perhaps necessary assumption that Euclidean geometry , such as proportion and projection, is at the heart of making architecture. Does this shift imply an ultimately fatal divorce from the Vitruvian tradition of architecture through geometry or is it re-directing the interaction between computers and architecture into perhaps a more appropriate and creative realm of opportunity? This paper hopes to address these questions in the forum of a theoretical and historical discussion focused on the representation of architecture and making. Some current experimental digital work by the author will accompany this presentation and paper.
series SIGRADI
type normal paper
email pharrop@accesscable.net
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id acadia10_183
id acadia10_183
authors Ireland, Tim
year 2010
title Stigmergic Planning
source ACADIA 10: LIFE in:formation, On Responsive Information and Variations in Architecture [Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-1-4507-3471-4] New York 21-24 October, 2010), pp. 183-189
summary This paper presents an application of swarm intelligence towards the problem of spatial configuration. The methodology classifies activities as discrete entities, which self-organise topologically through associational parameters: an investigation of emergent route formation and spatial connectivity based on simple agent and pheromone interaction, coupled with the problem of ‘loose’ rectangular geometric assembly. A concept model sniffingSpace (Ireland, 2009) developed in Netlogo (Willensky, 1999), which established the self-organising topological capacity of the system, is extended in Processing (Fry & Rea, 2009) to incorporate rectangular geometry towards the problem of planning architectural space.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email t.ireland@ucl.ac.uk
last changed 2010/11/10 06:27

_id 3203
authors Jabi, Wassim
year 1999
title STUDIO@UB
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 2, p. 1
summary Design can be thought of as a process of interpolation. In the face of incomplete and distorted conditions, the designer interjects solutions that interpolate and mediate the given situation. The Upper level Electronic Studio in the Spring term 1999 investigated the nature of interpolation and its relationship to process, space, and program. In particular, it investigated how virtual space can interpolate and augment physical space. The students also researched the multiplicity of meanings of interpolation such as: Insertion/interjection, estimation, linkage, mediation, transformation, and augmentation. The process of interpolation was then mapped into a real architectural problem: The re-design of Hayes and Crosby Halls as an integrated School of Architecture and Planning for the 21st century. Some students took advantage of the option to choose other sites and building programs.
series ACADIA
email jabi@adm.njit.edu
last changed 2002/12/14 08:21

_id 4ae4
authors Kvan, Th., Yip, A. and Vera, A.
year 1999
title Supporting Design Studio Learning: An investigation into design communication in computer-supported collaboration
source CSCL’99, Stanford, December 1999, pp. 328-332
summary Earlier studies suggest that benefits may be found in chat line communication rather than high bandwidth video-conferencing conditions when considering collaborative design learning. This paper draws together studies that look at this conjecture and concludes that chat line collaboration reduces fixation in problem space exploration. This encourages the participants to explore design opportunities in a different way than graphical or video based communication.
keywords Design Learning; Collaborative Design; Text Communication; Architectural Design
series other
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2002/11/15 17:29

_id 0d5b
authors Latch Craig, David and Zimring, Craig
year 1999
title Practical Support for Collaborative Design Involving Divided Interests
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 126-137
summary Collaboration is common in design, yet relatively little is known about the cognitive reasoning processes that occur during collaboration. This paper discusses collaborative design, emphasizing the elaboration and transformations of the problem search space, and the roles that unstructured verbal communication and graphic communication can play in these processes. The paper discusses a prototype system called the Immersive Discussion Tool (IDT) that supports asynchronous design. IDT allows collaborators to mark-up 3-D models over the Internet using a variety of tools, including diagrammatic marks, dynamic simulations and text annotations. IDT relies on VRML to view the models, with an extensive Java-based interface on the backend powering the interactive construction and playback of graphical annotations, the management of threaded discussions, and the management of file input/output. The development of this tool has revealed the difficulty of constructing complex marks in a virtual 3-D space, and the initial implementation of IDT suggests several strategies for solving these problems.
series ACADIA
email david.craig@arch.gatech.edu
last changed 1999/12/02 07:48

_id ga0009
id ga0009
authors Lewis, Matthew
year 2000
title Aesthetic Evolutionary Design with Data Flow Networks
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary For a little over a decade, software has been created which allows for the design of visual content by aesthetic evolutionary design (AED) [3]. The great majority of these AED systems involve custom software intended for breeding entities within one fairly narrow problem domain, e.g., certain classes of buildings, cars, images, etc. [5]. Only a very few generic AED systems have been attempted, and extending them to a new design problem domain can require a significant amount of custom software development [6][8]. High end computer graphics software packages have in recent years become sufficiently robust to allow for flexible specification and construction of high level procedural models. These packages also provide extensibility, allowing for the creation of new software tools. One component of these systems which enables rapid development of new generative models and tools is the visual data flow network [1][2][7]. One of the first CG packages to employ this paradigm was Houdini. A system constructed within Houdini which allows for very fast generic specification of evolvable parametric prototypes is described [4]. The real-time nature of the software, when combined with the interlocking data networks, allows not only for vertical ancestor/child populations within the design space to be explored, but also allows for fast "horizontal" exploration of the potential population surface. Several example problem domains will be presented and discussed. References: [1] Alias | Wavefront. Maya. 2000, http://www.aliaswavefront.com [2] Avid. SOFTIMAGE. 2000, http://www.softimage.com [3] Bentley, Peter J. Evolutionary Design by Computers. Morgan Kaufmann, 1999. [4] Lewis, Matthew. "Metavolve Home Page". 2000, http://www.cgrg.ohio-state.edu/~mlewis/AED/Metavolve/ [5] Lewis, Matthew. "Visual Aesthetic Evolutionary Design Links". 2000, http://www.cgrg.ohio-state.edu/~mlewis/aed.html [6] Rowley, Timothy. "A Toolkit for Visual Genetic Programming". Technical Report GCG-74, The Geometry Center, University of Minnesota, 1994. [7] Side Effects Software. Houdini. 2000, http://www.sidefx.com [8] Todd, Stephen and William Latham. "The Mutation and Growth of Art by Computers" in Evolutionary Design by Computers, Peter Bentley ed., pp. 221-250, Chapter 9, Morgan Kaufmann, 1999.    
series other
email mlewis@cgrg.ohio-state.edu
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id d14b
authors Lin, Cheng-Yuan
year 1999
title The Representing Capacity of Physical Models and Digital Models
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 53-62
summary Physical models are used in order to elucidate the lack of clarity found in the two-dimensional representations of design, and digital models have provided a more effective way of differentiating curvature and space with greater accuracy. What are the fundamental differences of these two approaches that plays the most significant role in modern design? This research attempts to analyze in depth the differences by operating an experiment that would determine the factors play a relevant role and describe some of the relevant phenomenon and establish criteria to aid this analysis.
series CAADRIA
email gage@iaa.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2000/01/13 10:07

_id ef83
authors Liu, A.M.M.
year 1999
title Residential satisfaction in housing estates: a Hong Kong perspective
source Automation in Construction 8 (4) (1999) pp. 511-524
summary Post-occupancy evaluation (POE) has been developed to address the problem of acquiring feedback from the occupants who are, arguably, in the best position to provide information for a future design database. This paper presents a study of the factors (on both physical and social levels), which influence residential satisfaction of a sample of occupants in a chosen residential area in Hong Kong; factor analysis and multiple regression were carried out on the data. A comparison is also made of the perceived factors of dissatisfaction amongst the public and private housing occupants. It is suggested that a wider systematic coverage of the subject through investigative and diagnostic POE should be carried out in Hong Kong.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id ga9912
id ga9912
authors Loocke, Philip Van
year 1999
title The art of growth and the solution of cognitive problems
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary A cellular method is proposed as an alternative for a connectionist approach. The present method does not use connections between cells, but introduces a field concept instead. If the fields are determined in accordance with the transformations familiar from fractal theory, then the solutions of problems that have some symmetry are forms of remarkable beauty. This way, a link is proposed between generative art and problem solving. It is conjectured that the ‘black box’ nature of connectionist systems can be replaced by an approach in which the solution of a problem coincides with a vivid visualization, also if the problems at hand are of a high-dimensional nature.
series other
email philip.vanloocke@rug.ac.be
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id e6fb
authors McFadzean, Jeanette
year 1999
title Computational Sketch Analyser (CSA): Extending the Boundaries of Knowledge in CAAD
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 503-510
summary This paper focuses on the cognitive problem-solving strategies of professional architectural designers and their use of external representations for the production of creative ideas. Using a new form of protocol analysis (Computational Sketch Analysis), the research has analysed five architects' verbal descriptions of their cognitive reasoning strategies during conceptual designing. It compares these descriptions to a computational analysis of the architects' sketches and sketching behaviour. The paper describes how the current research is establishing a comprehensive understanding of the mapping between conceptualisation, cognition, drawing, and complex problem solving. The paper proposes a new direction for Computer Aided Architectural Design tools (CAAD). It suggests that in order to extend the boundaries of knowledge in CAAD an understanding of the complex nature of architectural conceptual problem-solving needs to be incorporated into and supported by future conceptual design tools.
keywords Computational Sketch Analysis, Conceptual Design
series eCAADe
email j.mcfadzean@open.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 41d4
authors Medjdoub, Benachir
year 1999
title Interactive 2D Constraint-Based Geometric Construction System
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 197-212
summary This paper presents a 2D Constraint-Based Geometric Construction System where positioning and manipulating geometry is very precise. An unusually simple interface makes this system particularly interactive and easy to use. In our approach, the geometry types supported are: points, lines, circles, ellipses, circular arcs and b-spline curves. All the fundamental topologic constraints, i.e. tangent, parallel, perpendicular, coincident and concentric, are provided. Metric constraints, i.e. dividing the shapes into equal parts or fixing the geometric parameters, are also provided. These constraints are automatically applied by the application in response to the implied intentions of the end- user. Dynamic modifications of partially dimensioned models are supported, whereby the design is modified while enforcing the constraints. A graph-constructive approach is used to solve the model. As we are dealing with partial modifications, this resolution technique is quite sufficient, and makes our system stable and flexible. Our approach focuses highly on interactivity. Positioning a shape constrained to another is made directly through the graphic interface. Constraint relaxation is also done by direct manipulations. Modifications are made by dragging the geometry, or by typing into a numerical panel displaying the free shape parameters. Again, existing constraints are maintained as those numbers are applied. Well -constrained and under-constrained problems are discussed. This approach was developed in Java, JDK 3.0.1 of SGI's Java software.
keywords Sketching, Geometric Constraints, Interactivity, Geometric construction, Dynamic Modifications
series CAAD Futures
email Benachir.Medjdoub@nottingham.ac.uk
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id ga0010
id ga0010
authors Moroni, A., Zuben, F. Von and Manzolli, J.
year 2000
title ArTbitrariness in Music
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Evolution is now considered not only powerful enough to bring about the biological entities as complex as humans and conciousness, but also useful in simulation to create algorithms and structures of higher levels of complexity than could easily be built by design. In the context of artistic domains, the process of human-machine interaction is analyzed as a good framework to explore creativity and to produce results that could not be obtained without this interaction. When evolutionary computation and other computational intelligence methodologies are involved, every attempt to improve aesthetic judgement we denote as ArTbitrariness, and is interpreted as an interactive iterative optimization process. ArTbitrariness is also suggested as an effective way to produce art through an efficient manipulation of information and a proper use of computational creativity to increase the complexity of the results without neglecting the aesthetic aspects [Moroni et al., 2000]. Our emphasis will be in an approach to interactive music composition. The problem of computer generation of musical material has received extensive attention and a subclass of the field of algorithmic composition includes those applications which use the computer as something in between an instrument, in which a user "plays" through the application's interface, and a compositional aid, which a user experiments with in order to generate stimulating and varying musical material. This approach was adopted in Vox Populi, a hybrid made up of an instrument and a compositional environment. Differently from other systems found in genetic algorithms or evolutionary computation, in which people have to listen to and judge the musical items, Vox Populi uses the computer and the mouse as real-time music controllers, acting as a new interactive computer-based musical instrument. The interface is designed to be flexible for the user to modify the music being generated. It explores evolutionary computation in the context of algorithmic composition and provides a graphical interface that allows to modify the tonal center and the voice range, changing the evolution of the music by using the mouse[Moroni et al., 1999]. A piece of music consists of several sets of musical material manipulated and exposed to the listener, for example pitches, harmonies, rhythms, timbres, etc. They are composed of a finite number of elements and basically, the aim of a composer is to organize those elements in an esthetic way. Modeling a piece as a dynamic system implies a view in which the composer draws trajectories or orbits using the elements of each set [Manzolli, 1991]. Nonlinear iterative mappings are associated with interface controls. In the next page two examples of nonlinear iterative mappings with their resulting musical pieces are shown.The mappings may give rise to attractors, defined as geometric figures that represent the set of stationary states of a non-linear dynamic system, or simply trajectories to which the system is attracted. The relevance of this approach goes beyond music applications per se. Computer music systems that are built on the basis of a solid theory can be coherently embedded into multimedia environments. The richness and specialty of the music domain are likely to initiate new thinking and ideas, which will have an impact on areas such as knowledge representation and planning, and on the design of visual formalisms and human-computer interfaces in general. Above and bellow, Vox Populi interface is depicted, showing two nonlinear iterative mappings with their resulting musical pieces. References [Manzolli, 1991] J. Manzolli. Harmonic Strange Attractors, CEM BULLETIN, Vol. 2, No. 2, 4 -- 7, 1991. [Moroni et al., 1999] Moroni, J. Manzolli, F. Von Zuben, R. Gudwin. Evolutionary Computation applied to Algorithmic Composition, Proceedings of CEC99 - IEEE International Conference on Evolutionary Computation, Washington D. C., p. 807 -- 811,1999. [Moroni et al., 2000] Moroni, A., Von Zuben, F. and Manzolli, J. ArTbitration, Las Vegas, USA: Proceedings of the 2000 Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference Workshop Program – GECCO, 143 -- 145, 2000.
series other
email artemis@ia.cti.br
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ecaade2015_161
id ecaade2015_161
authors Papasarantou, Chrissa; Kalaouzis, Giorgos, Pentazou, Ioulia and Bourdakis, Vassilis
year 2015
title A Spatio-Temporal 3D Representation of a Historic Dataset
source Martens, B, Wurzer, G, Grasl T, Lorenz, WE and Schaffranek, R (eds.), Real Time - Proceedings of the 33rd eCAADe Conference - Volume 1, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria, 16-18 September 2015, pp. 701-708
summary Previous research (Bourdakis et al, 2012; Papasarantou et al, 2013) dealt with the problem of creating information visualisation systems capable of combining historical data of MUCIV's database and developing strategies that embed the non-spatial data in spatial models. The database was primarily designed as an experimental flexible spatio-temporal configuration of dynamic visual structures generating a variety of narrations through interaction.The attempt of producing a legible configuration driven by a number of criteria, led to the proposition of two different arrangements, namely the linear and radial array. The aim of this paper is to present the next step on the visualization after redefining both the way that thematic axes and data are visualized and arranged/scattered. Alternate configurations are investigated, based also on theoretical analysis on the conceptualization and perception of information visualization systems (Card et al 1999, Ware, 2004).
wos WOS:000372317300076
series eCAADe
email papasarantou@uth.gr
more https://mh-engage.ltcc.tuwien.ac.at/engage/ui/watch.html?id=74178dba-702a-11e5-aa5b-67bfe1e6502f
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

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