CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 81 to 100 of 617

_id 93a8
authors Anders, P.
year 1999
title Envisioning Cyberspace: Designing 3D Electronic Spaces
source McGraw-Hill, NY
summary Free of the constraints of physical form and limited only by imagination, new environments spring to life daily in a fantastic realm called cyberspace. The creators of this new virtual world may be programmers, designers, architects, even children. In this invigorating exploration of the juncture between cyberspace and the physical world, architect Peter Anders brings together leading-edge cyberspace art and architecture ... inspiring new techniques and technologies ... unexpected unions of reality and virtuality ... and visions of challenges and opportunities as yet unexplored. More than an invitation to tour fantastic realms and examine powerful tools, this book is a hard-eyed look at cyberspace's impact on physical, cultural, and social reality, and the human-centered principles of its design. This is a book that will set designers and architects thinkingNand a work of importance to anyone fascinated with the fast-closing space between the real and the virtual.
series other
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id e78e
authors Anders, Peter
year 1999
title Anthropic Cyberspace: Defining Eletronic Space from First Principles
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 56-62
summary This paper proposes principles for the design of human-centered, anthropic cyberspaces. Starting with a brief examination of our cognitive use of space, it suggests that we address cyberspace as an extension of our mental space. The paper procedes with twelve concepts based on scientific and cultural observations with respect to individual cognition and social interaction. These concepts are general - not specific to any culture or technology in the accompanying arguments the author expands on these concepts illustrating them with examples taken from conventional and electronic media, space and cyberspace the author hopes with these conjectures to begin a discussion on the anthropology of space and its emulation.
keywords Cognition, Cyberspace, Design, Internet, Simulation, Space
series SIGRADI
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 5cba
authors Anders, Peter
year 1999
title Beyond Y2k: A Look at Acadia's Present and Future
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 1, p. 10
summary The sky may not be falling, but it sure is getting closer. Where will you when the last three zeros of our millennial odometer click into place? Computer scientists tell us that Y2K will bring the world’s computer infrastructure to its knees. Maybe, maybe not. But it is interesting that Y2K is an issue at all. Speculating on the future is simultaneously a magnifying glass for examining our technologies and a looking glass for what we become through them. "The future" is nothing new. Orwell's vision of totalitarian mass media did come true, if only as Madison Avenue rather than Big Brother. Futureboosters of the '50s were convinced that each garage would house a private airplane by the year 2000. But world citizens of the 60's and 70's feared a nuclear catastrophe that would replace the earth with a smoking crater. Others - perhaps more optimistically -predicted that computers were going to drive all our activities by the year 2000. And, in fact, theymay not be far off... The year 2000 is symbolic marker, a point of reflection and assessment. And - as this date is approaching rapidly - this may be a good time to come to grips with who we are and where we want to be.
series ACADIA
email ptr@mindspace.com
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id becb
authors Anders, Peter
year 1999
title Electronic Extension: Some implications of cyberspace for the practice of architecture
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 276-289
summary This white-paper builds upon previous research to present hybrids of electronic and physical spaces as extensions of current design practice. It poses an hypothetical project - a hybrid of physical and cyberspaces - to be developed through an extrapolation of current architectural practice by fully exploiting new information technologies. The hybrid's attributes not only affect the scope of development but the very activities of the design team and client during - and after - deployment. The entire life cycle of the project is affected by its dual material and media presence. The paper concludes by discussing the effect the hybrid - here called a "cybrid" - on the occupant, and its local and global communities. It reviews the economics, administration, marketing, operation, flexibility, and extension of the project to assess its effects on these scales. The conclusions are provisional owing to the youth of the technologies. However, in laying out these issues, the author hopes to begin a discussion on effects computation will have on our built environment.
series ACADIA
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id d5c8
authors Angelo, C.V., Bueno, A.P., Ludvig, C., Reis, A.F. and Trezub, D.
year 1999
title Image and Shape: Two Distinct Approaches
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 410-415
summary This paper is the result of two researches done at the district of Campeche, Florianópolis, by the Grupo PET/ARQ/UFSC/CAPES. Different aspects and conceptual approaches were used to study the spatial attributes of this district located in the Southern part of Santa Catarina Island. The readings and analysis of two researches were based on graphic pistures builded with the use of Corel 7.0 e AutoCadR14. The first research – "Urban Development in the Island of Santa Catarina: Public Space Study"- examined the urban structures of Campeche based on the Spatial Syntax Theory developed by Hillier and Hanson (1984) that relates form and social appropriation of public spaces. The second research – "Topoceptive Characterisation of Campeche: The Image of a Locality in Expansion in the Island of Santa Catarina" -, based on the methodology developed by Kohlsdorf (1996) and also on the visual analysis proposed by Lynch (1960), identified characteristics of this locality with the specific goal of selecting attributes that contributed to the ideas of the place its population held. The paper consists of an initial exercise of linking these two methods in order to test the complementarity of their analytical tools. Exemplifying the analytical procedures undertaken in the two approaches, the readings done - global (of the locality as a whole) and partial (from parts of the settlement) - are presented and compared.
series SIGRADI
email caludvig@arq.ufsc.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id b73a
authors Angelo,C.V., Bins Ely, V.H.M., Bueno,A.P., Ludvig C. and Trezub, D.
year 1999
title Space Syntax and the New Transportation System in the Santa Catarina Island
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 434-437
summary The paper reports an on-going research that aims at describing and analysing some of the syntactic characteristics of the urban space of Santa Catarina Island, in an attempt to evaluate its performance, more specifically its social and spatial integration and segregation. The research has been conducted with the aid of the Aximagic software, still in exam stage and not yet released to the public, a tool being developed by a group of researches of the Rio Grande do Sul Federal University and given up by Prof. Doctor Benamy Turkienicz. The software is part of a larger georeferenced program called CityZoom wich includes others tools to the comprehention of the urban morphology. This program works with graphic pictures in the inlet of data and also in the acquisition of results. The syntactic study of the Santa Catarina Island as a whole aims to obtain the comprehension of its global structure, relating it to the integrated public transportation system proposed to Florianópolis. These studies should allow an understanding of the impact the developments will have upon the urban morphology, and the new public transportation system.
series SIGRADI
email caludvig@arq.ufsc.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ga9926
id ga9926
authors Antonini, Riccardo
year 1999
title Let's Improvise Together
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The creators of ‘Let's-Improvise-Together’ adhere to the idea that while there is a multitude of online games now available in cyberspace, it appears that relatively few are focused on providing a positive, friendly and productive experience for the user. Producing this kind of experience is one the goals of our Amusement Project.To this end, the creation of ‘Let's Improvise Together’ has been guided by dedication to the importance of three themes:* the importance of cooperation,* the importance of creativity, and* the importance of emotion.Description of the GameThe avatar arrives in a certain area where there are many sound-blocks/objects. Or he may add sound "property" to existing ones. He can add new objects at will. Each object may represents a different sound, they do not have to though. The avatar walks around and chooses which objects he likes. Makes copies of these and add sounds or change the sounds on existing ones, then with all of the sound-blocks combined make his personalized "instrument". Now any player can make sounds on the instrument by approaching or bumping into a sound-block. The way that the avatar makes sounds on the instrument can vary. At the end of the improvising session, the ‘composition’ will be saved on the instrument site, along with the personalized instrument. In this way, each user of the Amusement Center will leave behind him a unique instrumental creation, that others who visit the Center later will be able to play on and listen to. The fully creative experience of making a new instrument can be obtained connecting to Active Worlds world ‘Amuse’ and ‘Amuse2’.Animated colorful sounding objects can be assembled by the user in the Virtual Environment as a sort of sounding instrument. We refrain here deliberately from using the word musical instrument, because the level of control we have on the sound in terms of rythm and melody, among other parameters, is very limited. It resembles instead, very closely, to the primitive instruments used by humans in some civilizations or to the experience made by children making sound out of ordinary objects. The dimension of cooperation is of paramount importance in the process of building and using the virtual sounding instrument. The instrument can be built on ones own effort but preferably by a team of cooperating users. The cooperation has as an important corolary: the sharing of the experience. The shared experience finds its permanence in the collective memory of the sounding instruments built. The sounding instrument can be seen also as a virtual sculpture, indeed this sculpture is a multimedial one. The objects have properties that ranges from video animation to sound to virtual physical properties like solidity. The role of the user representation in the Virtual World, called avatar, is important because it conveys, among other things, the user’s emotions. It is worth pointing out that the Avatar has no emotions on its own but it simply expresses the emotions of the user behind it. In a way it could be considered a sort of actor performing the script that the user gives it in real-time while playing.The other important element of the integration is related to the memory of the experience left by the user into the Virtual World. The new layout is explored and experienced. The layout is a permanent editable memory. The generative aspects of Let's improvise together are the following.The multi-media virtual sculpture left behind any participating avatar is not the creation of a single author/artist. The outcome of the sinergic interaction of various authors is not deterministic, nor predictable. The authors can indeed use generative algorythm in order to create the texture to be used on the objects. Usually, in our experience, the visitors of the Amuse worlds use shareware programs in order to generate their texture. In most cases the shareware programs are simple fractals generators. In principle, it is possible to generate also the shape of the object in a generative way. Taking into account the usual audience of our world, we expected visitors to use very simple algorythm that could generate shapes as .rwx files. Indeed, noone has attempted to do so insofar. As far as the music is concerned, the availability of shareware programs that allow simple generation of sounds sequences has made possible, for some users, to generate sounds sequences to be put in our world. In conclusion, the Let's improvise section of the Amuse worlds could be open for experimentation on generative art as a very simple entry point platform. We will be very happy to help anybody that for educational purposes would try to use our platform in order to create and exhibit generative forms of art.
series other
email Riccardo.Antonini@UniRoma2.it
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id a35a
authors Arponen, Matti
year 2002
title From 2D Base Map To 3D City Model
source UMDS '02 Proceedings, Prague (Czech Republic) 2-4 October 2002, I.17-I.28
summary Since 1997 Helsinki City Survey Division has proceeded in experimenting and in developing the methods for converting and supplementing current digital 2D base maps in the scale 1:500 to a 3D city model. Actually since 1986 project areas have been produced in 3D for city planning and construction projects, but working with the whole map database started in 1997 because of customer demands and competitive 3D projects. 3D map database needs new data modelling and structures, map update processes need new working orders and the draftsmen need to learn a new profession; the 3D modeller. Laser-scanning and digital photogrammetry have been used in collecting 3D information on the map objects. During the years 1999-2000 laser-scanning experiments covering 45 km2 have been carried out utilizing the Swedish TopEye system. Simultaneous digital photography produces material for orto photo mosaics. These have been applied in mapping out dated map features and in vectorizing 3D buildings manually, semi automatically and automatically. In modelling we use TerraScan, TerraPhoto and TerraModeler sw, which are developed in Finland. The 3D city model project is at the same time partially a software development project. An accuracy and feasibility study was also completed and will be shortly presented. The three scales of 3D models are also presented in this paper. Some new 3D products and some usage of 3D city models in practice will be demonstrated in the actual presentation.
keywords 3D City modeling
series other
email matti.arponen@hel.fi
more www.udms.net
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id d423
authors Arvin, Scott A. and House, Donald H.
year 1999
title Making Designs Come Alive: Using Physically Based Modeling Techniques in Space Layout Planning
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 245-262
summary This paper introduces the concept of responsive design. It elaborates this concept as an approach to free form, adaptable, automated design applying physically based modeling techniques to the design process. Our approach attempts to bridge the gap between totally automated design and the free form brainstorming designers normally employ. We do this by automating the initial placement and sizing of design elements, with an interactive engine that appears alive and highly responsive. We present a method for applying these techniques to architectural space layout planning, and preliminary implementation details for a prototype system for developing rectangular, two-dimensional, single- story floor plans.
keywords Physically Based Space Layout, Physically Based Design, Responsive Design, Space Layout Planning, Computer-aided Design, Human-computer Interaction
series CAAD Futures
email arvin@viz.tamu.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id f317
authors Arvin, Scott A. and House, Donald H.
year 1999
title Modeling Architectural Design Objectives in Physically Based Space Planning
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 212-225
summary Physically based space planning is a means for automating the conceptual design process by applying the physics of motion to space plan elements. This methodology provides for a responsive design process, which allows a designer to easily make decisions whose consequences immediately propagate throughout the design. It combines the speed of automated design methods with the flexibility of manual design methods, while adding a highly interactive quality and a sense of collaboration with the design itself. In our approach, the designer creates a space plan by specifying and modifying graphic design objectives rather than by directly manipulating primitive geometry. The plan adapts to the changing state of objectives by applying the physics of motion to its elements. For design objectives to have an effect on a physically based space plan, they need to be able to apply appropriate forces to space plan elements. Space planning can be separated into two problems, determining topological properties and determining geometric properties. Design objectives can then be categorized as topological or geometric objectives. Topological objectives influence the location of individual spaces, affecting how one space relates to another. Geometric objectives influence the size and shape of space boundaries, affecting the dimensions of individual walls. This paper focuses on how to model a variety of design objectives for use in a physically based space planning system. We describe how topological objectives, such as adjacency and orientation, can be modeled to apply forces to space locations, and how geometric objectives, such as area, proportion, and alignment, can be modeled to apply forces to boundary edges.
series ACADIA
email arvin@viz.tamu.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 1071
authors Asanowicz, Aleksander
year 1999
title Evolution of Computer Aided Design: Three Generations of CAD
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 94-100
summary This paper describes the three generations of CAD systems. The first generation of (primarily analytical) computer programmes really aided designing. These programmes were the tools for finding a functional solution in different areas of designing, from flat plans to the space organisation of a hospital. One of the shortcomings of these programmes was the lack of graphic interface. With time, however, this kind of interface was developed. As a result of this second generation of CAD systems the computer was transformed into a drafting machine and CAD meant Computer Aided Drafting. The main thesis of this consideration is that only now we have the chance to return to the idea of Computer Aided Design. One of the examples of these trends is the AVOCAAD programme in which Added Value of CAAD is analysed. The development of the third generation of CAD systems will be possible in the near future. Aiding the process of designing will demand the elaboration of new methods of using the computer at the early stages of this process. The computer should be used not for generating variants of functional solutions only but for also for the creation of 3D forms by 3D sketching. For this, the computer should be transformed from a tool into a medium; only then will designing become true Designing in Cyber Space.
keywords Generations of CAAD, Design Process, Creation, Medium
series eCAADe
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:46

_id 411c
authors Ataman, Osman and Bermúdez (Ed.)
year 1999
title Media and Design Process [Conference Proceedings]
source ACADIA ‘99 Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-08-X / Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, 353 p.
summary Throughout known architectural history, representation, media and design have been recognized to have a close relationship. This relationship is inseparable; representation being a means for engaging in design thinking and making and this activity requiring media. Interpretations as to what exactly this relationship is or means have been subject to debate, disagreement and change along the ages. Whereas much has been said about the interactions between representation and design, little has been elaborated on the relationship between media and design. Perhaps, it is not until now, surrounded by all kinds of media at the turn of the millennium, as Johnson argues (1997), that we have enough context to be able to see and address the relationship between media and human activities with some degree of perspective.
series ACADIA
email oataman@astro.ocis.temple.edu, bermudez@arch.utah.edu
more http://www.acadia.org
last changed 1999/12/02 07:48

_id 89bb
authors Ataman, Osman and Richey, Thomas
year 1999
title ArchiDATA: A Hypermedia Tool for Architecture
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 496-500
summary Design is a cooperative activity at several levels. At one level, clients, architects, financiers, and construction engineers and contractors, all play important roles in creating the design for the building. At another level, the design team may contain architects, interior and landscape designers, lighting experts, heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning experts, etc. At a third level, individual architects cooperate with computer-based design tools in creating portions of a complex design. This paper describes an ongoing project called ArchiDATA, in which we are developing a computational Case-Based Design Aid (CBDA) for architectural design. This project, which is collaboration between cognitive scientists and architectural researchers, builds on an artificial intelligence paradigm called case-based reasoning and work in post-occupancy evaluation and other case study research in architecture.
series SIGRADI
email ataman@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 8171
authors Ataman, Osman
year 1999
title Facilitating Conceptual Change: Computers, Cognitive Processes and Architecture
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 275-279
summary Computers have gained universal acceptance as tools that designers use. However, computers are often not used to advance the design process but just to make drawings. Many architectural schools still focus on a production orientation which puts the highest value on information management, precise representations and drafting enhancements. Mostly, computer education is limited with button pushing and training manuals. It is the contention of the author that students in Design Studio courses can benefit greatly from computer based educational pedagogy designed to provide them with experiences they currently do not possess. In particular, little time in the computer courses (outside lectures) is spent applying concepts and features of digital tools in design studio environment. In architecture, computers cannot be simply defined as a presentation and production tools. As a cognitive tool, computers provide designers with intelligible and effective representational tools of thought and communication, changes the syntactic structure of design. Consequently, the conceptual structure of computers impacts the conceptual structure of the design project, fosters the analytical processes and facilitates conceptual changes. This paper describes the use of computers in a first year architectural design studio. It attempts to address the importance of developing a design process that is redefined by the use of computing, integrating concept and perception. Furthermore, it describes the theoretical foundations and the underlying cognitive processes that contribute designers' conceptual development.
series SIGRADI
email ataman@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 7ccd
authors Augenbroe, Godfried and Eastman, Chuck
year 1999
title Computers in Building: Proceedings of the CAADfutures '99 Conference
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, 398 p.
summary This is the eight CAADfutures Conference. Each of these bi-annual conferences identifies the state of the art in computer application in architecture. Together, the series provides a good record of the evolving state of research in this area over the last fourteen years. Early conferences, for example, addressed project work, either for real construction or done in academic studios, that approached the teaching or use of CAD tools in innovative ways. By the early 1990s, such project-based examples of CAD use disappeared from the conferences, as this area was no longer considered a research contribution. Computer-based design has become a basic way of doing business. This conference is marked by a similar evolutionary change. More papers were submitted about Web- based applications than about any other area. Rather than having multiple sessions on Web-based applications and communications, we instead came to the conclusion that the Web now is an integral part of digital computing, as are CAD applications. Using the conference as a sample, Web-based projects have been integrated into most research areas. This does not mean that the application of the Web is not a research area, but rather that the Web itself is an integral tool in almost all areas of CAAD research.
series CAAD Futures
email chuck.eastman@arch.gatech.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 1c5c
authors Balmaceda, M.A., Deiana, S.M., Quiroga, G. and Toro, M.
year 1999
title Modelo Virtual Abierto de la Ciudad de San Juan (Open Virtual Model of the City of San Juan)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 470-474
summary The purpose of the present work is to virtually rebuild the city of san juan that was completely destroyed by an earthquake in 1944. From an audiovisual, multimedial approach, it tries to be a contribution to the recovering of the collective memory. Through virtual reality techniques, a three dimensional model of the city central area has been built, as it was before the earthquake. It has been achieved a multidisciplinary, open model that sums up a great deal of information and allows: 1.) From a pedagogic approach: an opened window to new ways of knowledgement transmission, through visual virtual information. The virtual rebuilt has been reconsidered as a pedagogic and communicational tool; 2.) From a historic and morphologic approach: to obtain multiple readings and to revolution the way to manage categories in different analysis scales; 3.) In the future, the model would allow the possibility of an unlimited improvement by working in different scales. Furthermore it would allow to add information, an so to increase the research area or to go deeper into details not only in the phenomenological dimension of the objects but also in their logic significant dimension.
series SIGRADI
email sudeiana@farqui.unsj.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 21c8
authors Bargiela, Beatriz and Bausset, Raúl Abad
year 1999
title Sistemas multimediales aplicados a la arquitectura y su conocimiento (Multimedia Systems Applied to Architecture and its Knowledge Base)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 186-191
summary This text makes a careful description of a great part of the components of the vocabulary of architecture and their syntax. It's structured in two parts, one textual and the other graphic. Due to the acknowledged contribution of the author on the subject of description of vocabulary of the elements of architecture and the research and development works that are entered upon in the master in computer graphics in the informatic field, it was proposed the development of an interactive system that allowed by means of links to connect the different parts of text and their respective graphics. Having as a basis the idiomatic equivalent term in Spanish and English, carried out in another research work, it was considered the possibility to link the text in these two languages besides the original one, french. That's why we've decided to propose the navigation through numeric text and images. This navigation has been already inferred from the reading of the text as intended from the author's that was why our task has been the interpretation of this intention and its translation in an informatic system. The product presented in this work is limited to having designed a methodology and showing its performance with some terms and images, able to make evident the sketch of our idea. The work is made out of the description of the following phases: 1.) Design of its interface; 2.) Compilation and classification of images compilation and classification of text; 3.) Coordination of textual and graphic elements; 4.) Programming of events in the interactive system.
series SIGRADI
email gidcad@ub.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id bd21
authors Barría Chateau, H., García Alvarado, R., Lagos Vergara, R. and Parra Márquez, J.C.
year 1999
title Evaluation of Spatial Perception in Virtual Environments
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 145-148
summary The 3D environments created by computers can be used as a powerful simulation tool for architecture, especially with inmersive devices, but it is necessary to know properly their spatial characteristics to use it effectively. It is also important to consider their possibilities in communication networks and their implications in contemporary architecture. For this reason, the goal of this research is to evaluate the perception of virtual architectonic spaces in relation to the perception of real architectonic spaces. This research is based on the comparison of experiences of university students in a real space (Entrance Hall of Faculty of Economy) and in the same space modeled by a computer. The evaluation considers tests with stereoscopic helmets and interactive navigation, making questionnaires to characterize the sensation of dimensions, relationships and time for an specific activity. The measuring of real and virtual spaces are made through references (furniture, textures, etc.) or by proportional relations between height, width and depth, in different patterns. The experience also reveals mental schemes to perceive the dimension of architectonic space and the orientation in a real and virtual environment. Besides, the research allows to relate the different levels of complexity and information with the understanding of real architectonic space and modeled space.
series SIGRADI
email rgarcia@pegsasus.dci.ubiobio.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 7436
authors Barría Chateau, H., Muñoz Viveros, C. and Cerda Brintrup, G.
year 1999
title Virtual Tour Through Modern Architecture in Conception
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 475-477
summary This paper describes the development of a project that was selected and sponsoured by the Regional Competition FONDART 1998 (Funds for the Development of Arts of the Regional Secretary of Education) that follows the aim of cultural diffusion. Towards the middle of the 30s, the city of Concepción developed an architecture distinctly colonial, neoclassical and eclectic. An earthquake in 1939 abruptly interrupted this scene, destroying the enterity of its most important buildings. The reconstruction of the city followed the manifestoes of Modern Architecture, consolidating the urban importance of buildings such us the Law Courts, the Railway Station and the Regional Government, that emerged as the new architectural and cultural heritage of the city. The project consisted on the modeling of eleven buildings of the modern architectural heritage, and on the generation of 42 virtual tours through the buildings that were finally edited on a 16' video. This video allows the spectator to make a virtual tour through the original modern heritage of the city, nowadays demolished, altered, and sometimes, even forgotten. This project pretends to widen the ways of comprehension of our cultural identity by using computer modelling and animation as a tool for the conservation of the architectural heritage; and creating a record that can be used as a reference and as an instrument of cultural difussion.
series SIGRADI
email mtrebilc@zeus.dci.ubiobio.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id e15c
authors Bartenbach, Christian and Witting, Walter
year 1999
title VDU WORK IN DIFFERENT LIGHTING CONDITIONS
source Full-scale Modeling and the Simulation of Light [Proceedings of the 7th European Full-scale Modeling Association Conference / ISBN 3-85437-167-5] Florence (Italy) 18-20 February 1999, pp. 7-28
summary In order to avoid the disadvantages of purely subjective methods in a technical evaluation of daylight and artificial light systems, the Bartenbach LichtLabor developed new test methods which can determine objectively and quantitatively the visual or psycho-physiological stress connected with VDU work [1], depending on different lighting conditions. Daylight and artificial lighting systems were tested with these methods and compared by using the performances achieved by the test subjects. Some highly significant differences in performance done under the individual lighting systems became apparent and demonstrated that the visual stress or the physical or physiological fatigue from an ergonomic viewpoint depends largely on the lighting conditions at the workplace. This holds true for daylight systems (glare protection, re-directing lamellae, clear window as a control condition) as well as for purely artificial lighting systems where especially the choice of color temperature of the light and the used control gear (conventional or electronic) determine the resulting performance. Optimized lighting also positively affects the productivity and economicy for the design of workplaces that take the human factor into account.
keywords VDU, Optimized Lighting, Performance Test, Lighting System, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa
last changed 2004/05/04 09:27

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