CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 141 to 160 of 584

_id 90dc
authors Chen, C.
year 1999
title Information Visualisation and Virtual Environments
source Springer
summary Information Visualisation is a fast growing research field and an industry with tremendous potential. Virtual environments provide a unique medium for people to communicate and interact over computer networks. Information Visualisation and Virtual Environments links the two areas together and presents the latest research and development, highlighting the potential of information visualisation as an enabling technology in the design of new generations of virtual environments. This book will be an invaluable source of reference for courses in Information Visualisation, User Interface Design, Virtual Environments, HCI, and Information Retrieval, as well as being a useful resource for consultants and practitioners. The book contains 144 wonderful colour images of intriguing and influential works in information visualisation.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 1ea1
authors Cheng, Nancy Yen-wen
year 1999
title Digital Design at UO
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 4, p. 18
summary University of Oregon Architecture Department has developed a spectrum of digital design from introductory methods courses to advanced design studios. With a computing curriculum that stresses a variety of tools, architectural issues such as form-making, communication, collaboration,theory-driven design, and presentation are explored. During the first year, all entering students are required to learn 3D modeling, rendering, image-processing and web-authoring in our Introduction to Architectural ComputerGraphics course. Through the use of cross-platform software, the two hundred beginning students are able to choose to work in either MacOS or Windows. Students begin learning the software by ‘playing’ with geometric elements and further develop their control by describing assigned architectural monuments. In describing the monuments, they begin with 2D diagrams and work up to complete 3D compositions, refining their modelswith symbol libraries. By visualizing back and forth between the drafting and modeling modes, the students quickly connect orthogonal plans and sections with their spatial counterparts. Such connections are an essential foundation for further learning.
series ACADIA
email nywc@darkwing.uoregon.edu
last changed 2002/12/14 09:04

_id 5a10
authors Cheng, Nancy Yen-Wen
year 1999
title Playing with Digital Media: Enlivening Computer Graphics Teaching
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 96-109
summary Are there better ways of getting a student to learn? Getting students to play at learning can encourage comprehension by engaging their attention. Rather than having students' fascination with video games and entertainment limited to competing against learning, we can direct this interest towards learning computer graphics. We hypothesize that topics having a recreational component increase the learning curve for digital media instruction. To test this, we have offered design media projects with a playful element as a counterpart to more step-by-step descriptive exercises. Four kinds of problems, increasing in difficulty, are discussed in the context of computer aided architectural design education: 1) geometry play, 2) kit of parts, 3) dreams from childhood and 4) transformations. The problems engage the students in different ways: through playing with form, by capturing their imagination and by encouraging interaction. Each type of problem exercises specific design skills while providing practice with geometric modeling and rendering. The problems are sequenced from most constrained to most free, providing achievable milestones with focused objectives. Compared to descriptive assignments and more serious architectural problems, these design-oriented exercises invite experimentation by lowering risk, and neutralize stylistic questions by taking design out of the traditional architectural context. Used in conjunction with the modeling of case studies, they engage a wide range of students by addressing different kinds of issues. From examining the results of the student work, we conclude that play as a theme encourages greater degree of participation and comprehension.
series ACADIA
email nywc@darkwing.uoregon.edu
last changed 1999/12/10 12:50

_id 2690
authors Chiu, Mao-Lin
year 1999
title Design Navigation and Construction Simulation by Virtual Reality
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 31-41
summary This paper depicts the approach of constructing a virtual reality environment for simulating architectural design and construction operations. The virtual environment is established to demonstrate the spatial performance of design and constructability of construction operations. Particularly, the functions such as navigation of construction sites, simulation of construction operations, and evaluation of construction details will be critical to construction operations. The system shell is implemented by JAVA on the web and integrated with VRML for supporting the above functions. The study focuses on the needs for the system integration and interface design. Four modes of human computer interfaces are proposed, including the user, agent, monitor, and immersion modes. Finally, this paper provides demonstration of construction simulation in an office building project to highlight the above discussion. The operations of crane towers and curtain wall installation are also studied in the construction process. In conclusion, this paper demonstrates the potential uses and limitation of virtual reality in simulation of the built environment.
series CAADRIA
email mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
last changed 2000/01/13 10:04

_id ga9904
id ga9904
authors Chupa, Anna
year 1999
title Generative Texture Maps for Animation (artwork and paper)
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary An aperiodic planar tiling is employed as the initial structure for texture application. A generative process for texture metamorphosis is used to create variation producing two-dimensional art work intended for printed output. Two-dimensional animations demonstrate the process for producing new textures. Expanding from this preliminary test, rules for opacity and relative depth, scale and velocity of movement will be related the length of time a form is visible on screen and geometric form. These are demonstrated in a two-dimensional animation that uses pictorial depth cues such as atmospheric perspective, occlusion, vertical placement, and diminishing size. Modification of rules take into consideration two underlying philosophical assumptions: 1) the world is created by a benevolent "god" and 2) aesthetic criteria govern issues related to selection of visual forms that persist.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ga9907
id ga9907
authors Ciao, Quinsan
year 1999
title Breeds of Artificial Design: Design Thinking in Computing Creation
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary There are many different paradigms or breeds of artificial design schemes. They each address artificial design from a different perspective. For instance, design by optimization emphasizes the iterative "trial-and-error" process of alternating generation and evaluation. Design by argumentation addresses the need of objectifying and communicating design thinking. Design by rues attempts to summary design knowledge into recipes. Design by simulation and electronic media offers a forum for design trial evaluation. Case-based design emphasizes experience-based design thinking. Fuzzy reasoning system provides a computing media to model and execute design reasoning. Although different, all of these paradigms are related and complement each other. Unification or collaboration of these different paradigms may lie ahead of future research and practice of artificial design.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 3db8
authors Clarke, Keith
year 1999
title Getting Started with GIS
source 2nd ed., Prentice Hall Series in Geographic Information Science, ed. Kieth Clarke. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1999, 2-3
summary This best-selling non-technical, reader-friendly introduction to GIS makes the complexity of this rapidly growing high-tech field accessible to beginners. It uses a "learn-by-seeing" approach that features clear, simple explanations, an abundance of illustrations and photos, and generic practice labs for use with any GIS software. What Is a GIS? GIS's Roots in Cartography. Maps as Numbers. Getting the Map into the Computer. What Is Where? Why Is It There? Making Maps with GIS. How to Pick a GIS. GIS in Action. The Future of GIS. For anyone interested in a hands-on introduction to Geographic Information Systems.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id b4a0
authors Clayton, M.J., Johnson R.E. and Song, Y.
year 1999
title Downstream of Design: Web-based Facility Operations Documents
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 365-380
summary Intemet technologies provide opportunities for improving the delivery of facility information to building owners and operators. Discussions with facility operators have led to identification of problems in current practices of delivering facility information using as-built drawings. A Web-based software prototype illustrates how facility information can be automatically structured into documents that support specific facility operations tasks.
keywords Facility Management, Computer-Aided Design, Intranet, Information Delivery, Life Cycle Design, As-Built Drawings
series CAAD Futures
email mark-clayton@tamu.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 4989
authors Clayton, M.J., Teicholz, P., Fischer, M. and Kunz, J.
year 1999
title Virtual components consisting of form, function and behavior
source Automation in Construction 8 (3) (1999) pp. 351-367
summary Software can produce a product model of a building as a consequence of the designers' actions in drawing and evaluating the design. The actions of the designer include interpreting, predicting and assessing the emerging design and describe the building in terms of forms, functions and behaviors. A software prototype has been implemented that incorporates this understanding of the design process in the field of building design. It employs object-oriented classes to represent forms, functions and behaviors. As a software user draws and interprets the design for multiple evaluation issues, the software creates a unique `virtual component' for each entity. During automated reasoning to evaluate the emerging design, virtual components collect and organize form, function and behavior instances to describe the parts of the building. In comparison to other product models, our approach, which we refer to as a `Virtual Product Model', better accommodates change, provides increased support for the design process and enriches the product representation by including function and behavior.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id b78f
authors Clayton, M.J., Warden, Robert B., Parker, Th.W.
year 1999
title Virtual Construction of Architecture Using 3D CAD and Simulation
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 316-324
summary 3D modeling and computer simulations provide new ways for architecture students to study the relationship between the design and construction of buildings. Digital media help to integrate and expand the content of courses in drafting, construction and design. This paper describes computer-based exercises that intensify the students’ experience of construction in several courses from sophomore to senior level. The courses integrate content from drafting and design communication, construction, CAD, and design. Several techniques are used to strengthen students’ awareness and ability in construction. These include: · Virtual design - build projects in which students construct 3D CAD models that include all elements that are used in construction. · Virtual office in which several students must collaborate under the supervision of a student acting as project architect to create a 3D CAD model and design development documents. · Virtual sub-contracting in which each student builds a trade specific 3D CAD model of a building and all of the trade specific models must be combined into a single model. · Construction simulations (4D CAD) in which students build 3D CAD models showing all components and then animate them to illustrate the assembly process. · Cost estimating using spreadsheets. These techniques are applied and reapplied at several points in the curriculum in both technical laboratory courses and design studios. This paper compares virtual construction methods to physical design – build projects and provides our pedagogical arguments for the use of digital media for understanding construction.
series ACADIA
email wardenr@archone.tamu.edu, mark-clayton@tamu.edu
last changed 1999/12/02 07:59

_id 9a1e
authors Clayton, Mark J. and Vasquez de Velasco, Guillermo
year 1999
title Stumbling, Backtracking, and Leapfrogging: Two Decades of Introductory Architectural Computing
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 151-158
summary Our collective concept of computing and its relevance to architecture has undergone dramatic shifts in emphasis. A review of popular texts from the past reveals the biases and emphases that were current. In the seventies, architectural computing was generally seen as an elective for data processing specialists. In the early eighties, personal computers and commercial CAD systems were widely adopted. Architectural computing diverged from the "batch" world into the "interactive" world. As personal computing matured, introductory architectural computing courses turned away from a foundation in programming toward instruction in CAD software. By the late eighties, Graphic User Interfaces and windowing operating systems had appeared, leading to a profusion of architecturally relevant applications that needed to be addressed in introductory computing. The introduction of desktop 3D modeling in the early nineties led to increased emphasis upon rendering and animation. The past few years have added new emphases, particularly in the area of network communications, the World Wide Web and Virtual Design Studios. On the horizon are topics of electronic commerce and knowledge markets. This paper reviews these past and current trends and presents an outline for an introductory computing course that is relevant to the year 2000.
keywords Computer-Aided Architectural Design, Computer-Aided Design, Computing Education, Introductory Courses
series eCAADe
email mark-clayton@tamu.edu
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id ga9921
id ga9921
authors Coates, P.S. and Hazarika, L.
year 1999
title The use of genetic programming for applications in the field of spatial composition
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Architectural design teaching using computers has been a preoccupation of CECA since 1991. All design tutors provide their students with a set of models and ways to form, and we have explored a set of approaches including cellular automata, genetic programming ,agent based modelling and shape grammars as additional tools with which to explore architectural ( and architectonic) ideas.This paper discusses the use of genetic programming (G.P.) for applications in the field of spatial composition. CECA has been developing the use of Genetic Programming for some time ( see references ) and has covered the evolution of L-Systems production rules( coates 1997, 1999b), and the evolution of generative grammars of form (Coates 1998 1999a). The G.P. was used to generate three-dimensional spatial forms from a set of geometrical structures .The approach uses genetic programming with a Genetic Library (G.Lib) .G.P. provides a way to genetically breed a computer program to solve a problem.G. Lib. enables genetic programming to define potentially useful subroutines dynamically during a run .* Exploring a shape grammar consisting of simple solid primitives and transformations. * Applying a simple fitness function to the solid breeding G.P.* Exploring a shape grammar of composite surface objects. * Developing grammarsfor existing buildings, and creating hybrids. * Exploring the shape grammar of abuilding within a G.P.We will report on new work using a range of different morphologies ( boolean operations, surface operations and grammars of style ) and describe the use of objective functions ( natural selection) and the "eyeball test" ( artificial selection) as ways of controlling and exploring the design spaces thus defined.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id cb42
authors Coates, Paul and Schmid, Claudia
year 1999
title Agent Based Modelling
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 652-661
summary This paper describes the work of students in Unit 6 of the Diploma school at the UEL during 1998-9. The unit in association with the MSc has been exploring ways of using the computer to explore the idea of emergent form as a way of generating designs, and a way of focussing the pedagogic process on a new and interesting set of determinants of form.
keywords Agent Based Modelling, Generative Modelling, Emergent Forms
series eCAADe
email p.s.coates@uel.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id ga0020
id ga0020
authors Codignola, G.Matteo
year 2000
title [Title missing]
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary This paper is a summary of my last degree in architecture (discussed in December 1999) with Prof. Celestino Soddu and Prof. Enrica Colabella. In this work I had the possibility to reach complexity by a generative approach with the construction of a paradigm that organizes the different codes of project identity. My general objective was to design shape complexity in variable categories : 3d space surfaces, 2d drawings and 2d textures. I was to discover the identity of one of my favourite architects of the 20th century : Antoni Gaudì, by constructing codes relative to shape complexity. I defined my particular objective in the possibility to abduct from Gaudì's imaginary reference the generatives codes that operate in the logical processing I use to create a possible species project. The next step was to verify the exact working of the new generative codes by means of 3d scenaries, that are recognizable as "Antoni Gaudì specie's architecture". Whit project processing on the generative codes and not on a possible resulting shape design, I was able to organize by my general paradigm the attributes of the project's species : different shapes, different attributes (color, scale, proportion), to get to possible and different scenarys, all recognizable by the relative class codes. I chose three examples in Barcellona built during the period 1902 to 1914 : The Parco Guell, Casa Batllò and Casa Milà are the three reference sceneryes that I used to create the generative codes. In the second step I defined different codes that operate in sequence (it is defined in the paradigm) : The generatives codes are only subjective; they are one possible solution of my interpretation of Antoni Gaudì's identity. This codes operate in four differents ways : Geometrical codes for 2d shapes Geometrical codes for interface relations Spatial codes for 3d extrusion of 2d shapes Geometrical codes for 2d and 3d texturing of generated surfaces. By a stratified application of this codes I arrived at one idea for all the generative processes but many different, possible scenaryes, all recognizable in Gaudì's species. So, my final result has made possible sceneryes belonging to related species defined previously. At the end of my research I designed a project by combination : using Antoni Gaudì's generative codes on a new 3d scenary with a shape catalyst : the Frank Lloyd Wright Guggenheim Museum of New York. In this process I created a "hybrid scenary" : a new species of architectural look; a Guggenheim museum planned by Wright with a god pinch of Gaudì.
series other
email coddoc@tin.it
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id d9d0
authors Cohen Egler, Tamara Tania
year 1999
title Río Digital (Digital Rio)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 478-481
summary RioDigital is a text situated on new forms of expression of knowledge over the city. It is a written multimedia whose objective is to place in disposability for the society the complexity of urban space on its multiple historical determinations, of its space, social and cultural forms. It is a research over the potentials of digital art to express the processes of constitution of social forms and constructions of urban space. The motion of works was in the sense of using this language to reconstitute and vivify the history of Rio de Janeiro city in the XX century. The city is an ensemble of symbols that encounters the language in its best form of presentation. The research identified visual documents as films, photos and maps that made possible to reconstruct processes of transformation, worked through the use of digital images technology that allows expression and turns move perceptible the transmission of this history. The digital image is certainly a possibility to represent urban reality. Through movement, illumination of image and of writing it was possible to express to process of construction and reconstruction of space building and social changes. We understand that the condition of citizen is associated with the feeling of belonging, which urban process every time move complex and difficult to understand, that new technologies can through synthesis, connectivity and interactivity expand the capacity of indivils to know the city and act positively with it. It is an intention to amplify the sense of belonging and encourage the action of transform.
series SIGRADI
email tamara@ippur.ufrj.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id 5716
authors Cohen Egler, Tamara Tania
year 1999
title Cyberspace: New Forms of Social Interaction
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 253-258
summary The cyberspace becomes into news forms of communication that transform and expand interaction among men. The objective of our reflection is to understand how space-time relations are changed by the new technologies of communication and information. The starting point of this analysis is the historic dimension of production, interaction and appropriation of space-time processes, proceeding in the se of solving their contemporary forms defined by the growing technology of daily life. It is possible to notice how communication expands the interaction among companies, institutions and society because processes and procedures are publicized, reducing the disorder and uncertain. It is a way of making social complexities more accessible, more clear, being easier read by individuals so they are able to lead with the complex of opportunities and responsibilities that compound the social system. The fundamental constitution of cybernetic spaces is on its capacity of make accessible the processes of communication and information which expand the interaction eliminating intermediaries. The condition of material localization dissolves itself to give place tommunicative interaction. The essential of the question can be stated in the theory that explains that social practices are the result of a cognitive system. That statement send us to the heart of analysis over the importance of comprehending as a moment that precede the action. When societies can be read through a union of knowledge condensed all along their social and cultural development. The development of new technologies of communication and information make nations capable to produce, accumulate diffuse knowledge, conducting to an action of intelligent individuals who write the social development.
series SIGRADI
email tamara@ippur.ufrj.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id 84e8
authors Cohen, J.M., Markosian, L., Zeleznik, R.C., Hughes, J.F. and Barzel, R.
year 1999
title An Interface for Sketching 3D Curves
source ACM Symposium on Interactive 3D Graphics, pp. 17-22 (April 1999). ACM SIGGRAPH. Edited by Jessica Hodgins and James D. Foley
summary The ability to specify nonplanar 3D curves is of fundamental importance in 3D modeling and animation systems. Effective techniques for specifying such curves using 2D input devices are desirable, but existing methods typically require the user to edit the curve from several viewpoints. We present a novel method for specifying 3D curves with 2D input from a single viewpoint. The user rst draws the curve as it appears from the current viewpoint, and then draws its shadow on the oor plane. The system correlates the curve with its shadow to compute the curve's 3D shape. This method is more natural than existing methods in that it leverages skills that many artists and designers have developed from work with pencil and paper.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id d0aa
authors Colajanni, Benedetto, Concialdi, Salvatore and Pellitteri, Giuseppe
year 1999
title CoCoMa: a Collaborative Constraint Management System for the Collaborative Design
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 364-369
summary Collaborative Design is a topic of particular current interest. Existing software allows a multiplicity of designers to work on the same project. What the software really allows is accessing to a part of the information of the project and changing it. Sometimes there is a hierarchical distribution of the power of change: some participants can be permitted to operate only on some limited layers of the object representation. In this case the changes they propose are to be accepted by a general manager of the design process. What is lacking in this kind of software is the explicit management on the reciprocal constraints posed by different participants. In this paper, an elementary Collaborative Design System is presented whose main concern is just the management of constraints. Each participant designs the part of the project of his/her concern instantiating objects comprised of geometric description, alphanumeric variables and constraints on both. Constraints can be of two types: absolute or defined by a range of allowed values of the constrained variable. A participant intervening later can accept the constraint, choosing a value in the permitted range, or decide to violate it. In this case the proposed violation is signalled to whom posed it.
keywords Collaborative Design, Design Process, Management System, Participant Designs, Constraints Violation
series eCAADe
email bcolajan@unipa.it, ciesse@neomedia.it, pellitt@unipa.it
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id de50
authors Combes, Leonardo and Barrionuevo, Luis F.
year 1999
title Distribución Espacial de Elementos Arquitectónicos (Space Distribution of Architectural Elements)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 130-133
summary This paper treats of the management of the position of objects on the plane. At first sight problems related with planning objects on the plane appear to be quite trivial. Nevertheless a system able to manage the permutation of objects the one with respect to the others becomes a complex one when all the possible variations are taken into account. The operations to be performed include topological variations in a combinatorial process. Although the results of such a system could be of general design application in this paper only architectural problems are examined as examples. In the first part an outline of the system is presented. In the second part a computer program directed to produce graphical results is described together with some case studies.
series SIGRADI
email labsist@herrera.unt.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id 9cab
authors Coomans, M.K.D.
year 1999
title A Virtual Reality User Interface for a Design Information System, CCAI: the Journal for the Integrated Study of Artificial Intelligence
source Cognitive Science and Applied Epistemology, Rijks Universiteit Gent
summary The computer is a tool, a complex artefact that is used to extend our reach. A computer system can provide several kinds of services, but against these services stands a supplementary task that the user must deal with: the communication with the computer system. We argued that Virtual Reality (VR) can fundamentally improve the user interface by rendering on the common experiential skills of all users. We present the theoretical basis for this, referring to Donald Norman's theory. We show that VR provides at least theoretically, the means to take a big step in the direction of an ideal user interface. As an example of a innovative application of VR in user interface design, we presented the VR-DIS system; an interdisciplinary design system for the building and construction industry. We discuss the issues underlying the design of its VR interface.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

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