CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 21 to 40 of 584

_id 9acf
authors Pinet, Céline
year 1999
title Adding a Wow Factor to CAD Drawings
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 24-25
summary Why do so many CAD renderings look stiff? Where has our creativity gone? Are we going to let technology drive us away from our design roots? In a web site that overflows with creativity, Jeremy Sutton confronts unused opportunities in computer art and reminds us to explore and expand our artistic boundaries.
series ACADIA
email celine_pinet@westvalley.edu
last changed 2002/12/15 15:37

_id ee8a
authors Porrúa, Marina and Rueda, Marta
year 1999
title Innovación Didáctica. Digitalización de un ejercicio práctico cuya problemática central es la organización de la forma en el espacio bidimensional y la introducción al diseño textil (Didactic Innovation. Digitalization of a practical exercises whose Central Issue is the Organization of Form in Bidimensional Space and the Introduction to the Textile Design)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 285-288
summary The projectual disciplines must respond with some grade of originality to a approached problem. In order to products of design be creative must be implemented a creative process of design and also from the teaching. The essence of creativity are the variations over a subject. A pedagogic way for this, is the one to recognise, individualise and represent the problem attributes, building upon them an "exploration space", to analyse and create new combinatorial alternatives or restructuring of the problem. The digital media incorporation as a new proyectual environment approaches the interactivity not only of the combinatorial variables, but, also to the hypermedia's. Both the digital documents, as the creative process, have a "no linear" or a "net" structure, that allows the construction of a himself way, self-managemented into this structure. The interactivity makes possible to work, as the divergent thought does, in a "polydirectional" field, that stimulates the fluency, the flexibility and the originality. The new- media's, used as didactic tool, open to "action", allow the students to convert them in "co- author", together professors, about themself learning process. >From this educational conception and its potential enrichment with the hypermedia, we are designing a project of digitising of an exercise to our didactic proposal and its later application into the course with our students.
series SIGRADI
email mlporrua@mdp.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:57

_id 13f7
authors QaQish, Ra'Ed K.
year 1999
title Evaluation as a Key Tool to Bridge CAAD and Architecture Education
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 279-285
summary This paper reports on the findings of a study carried out at Glasgow University which proposes a framework for the evaluation of architecture curriculum once integrated with CAAD. This study investigated the evaluation of CAAD teaching methods (CTM) and the effectiveness of CAAD integration (CI) and explored CAAD employment suitability in the design studio, and what influences does it have on the design process tuition using the Kirkpatrick model as a vehicle. The related CAAD evaluation variables investigated were: CAAD Tutor, Course Materials & Contents, Class Environment, Use of Media, Delivery Methodologies, Administrative Briefs, and Overall Effectiveness of CAAD event. Several other variables investigated were the levels of students' performance, attitudes, knowledge, new-stand, creativity and skills. The paper covered briefly some of the findings of the case studies acquired over two years at MSA; both observations and questionnaire surveys were used as methods of data collection. Evaluation deficiency postulates the weaknesses of CAAD in architecture schools. Evaluation of CAAD tuition should be a fundamental approach to address CAAD integration efficiency and problems, to achieve effectiveness and productivity amongst architecture schools.
keywords Evaluation, Integration, Effectiveness
series eCAADe
email r.qaqish@index.com.jo
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 206caadria2004
id 206caadria2004
authors Ricardo Sosa and John S. Gero
year 2004
title Diffusion of Design Ideas: Gatekeeping Effects
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 287-302
summary Designers and design managers are interested in gaining a deeper understanding of the complexities of creativity and innovation (Langdon and Rothwell 1985). These two phenomena can be seen as complementary dimensions of a differentiation cycle where design plays a key value-adding role that gradually reduces through commoditisation. However, there is a lack of relevant evidence to explain the link between creativity and innovation. Creativity is increasingly considered as occurring in the interaction between the individual generator of an idea and a group of evaluators (Sawyer et al 2003). However, most studies have regarded the generation of a solution -and not its social impact- as the outcome of the creative process (Runco and Pritzker 1999). Accordingly, computational modelling of creativity has been mainly conducted in a social void (Boden 1999).
series CAADRIA
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2004/05/20 16:46

_id c9ed
authors Saito, Elena Keiko
year 1999
title Formal Alternatives Through Ludic Process Applied to Tessellation
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 101-108
summary The digital graphic systems development is evident during the alternative generation process, especially when the component objects are linked to a geometric base by modulation. In this sense, the tiling modular characteristics are used as geometric support which modulation or internal divisions contain material forms (objects in 3D) immaterial forms (spaces in 3D). That is to say that each tiling module can be projected or not in 3D. The way to do this consists of applying it not only as two-dimensional support but also as operational structure by means of operations of pure translation, in 3D. It is applied to architectural themes which systemic parts or components sectors admit repetitions of units (dwelling buildings, schools, offices, hotels, etc.) in plan floor levels and in elevation as well. When programmatic and morphological requirements are solved groups are organized conforming systems in two or three dimensions. In the alternative generation stage it is tried to avoid conditioning and restrictions developing a ludic process of "piling up tiles" simple concepts stimulating creativity for the production of innovating architectonic forms. Creative ideas can arise from the game playing with 3D forms. This paper attempts to show a manner to generate unusual architectural forms that, otherwise, within a traditional design process might not be found. Some architectural examples developed with this ludic procedure are presented.
series SIGRADI
email labsist@herrera.unt.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

_id 3d23
authors Sellgren, Ulf
year 1999
title Simulation-driven Design
source KTH Stockholm
summary Efficiency and innovative problem solving are contradictory requirements for product development (PD), and both requirements must be satisfied in companies that strive to remain or to become competitive. Efficiency is strongly related to ”doing things right”, whereas innovative problem solving and creativity is focused on ”doing the right things”. Engineering design, which is a sub-process within PD, can be viewed as problem solving or a decision-making process. New technologies in computer science and new software tools open the way to new approaches for the solution of mechanical problems. Product data management (PDM) technology and tools can enable concurrent engineering (CE) by managing the formal product data, the relations between the individual data objects, and their relation to the PD process. Many engineering activities deal with the relation between behavior and shape. Modern CAD systems are highly productive tools for concept embodiment and detailing. The finite element (FE) method is a general tool used to study the physical behavior of objects with arbitrary shapes. Since a modern CAD technology enables design modification and change, it can support the innovative dimension of engineering as well as the verification of physical properties and behavior. Concepts and detailed solutions have traditionally been evaluated and verified with physical testing. Numerical modeling and simulation is in many cases a far more time efficient method than testing to verify the properties of an artifact. Numerical modeling can also support the innovative dimension of problem solving by enabling parameter studies and observations of real and synthetic behavior. Simulation-driven design is defined as a design process where decisions related to the behavior and performance of the artifact are significantly supported by computer-based product modeling and simulation. A framework for product modeling, that is based on a modern CAD system with fully integrated FE modeling and simulation functionality provides the engineer with tools capable of supporting a number of engineering steps in all life-cycle phases of a product. Such a conceptual framework, that is based on a moderately coupled approach to integrate commercial PDM, CAD, and FE software, is presented. An object model and a supporting modular modeling methodology are also presented. Two industrial cases are used to illustrate the possibilities and some of the opportunities given by simulation-driven design with the presented methodology and framework.
keywords CAE; FE Method; Metamodel; Object Model; PDM; Physical Behavior, System
series thesis:PhD
email ulfs@md.kth.se
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 6800
authors Stellingwerff, Martijn
year 1999
title SketchBoX
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 491-497
summary Most Computer Aided Architectural Design software suits the engineered aspects of design quite well but is lacking as a design medium. As far as sketching is concerned, many architects still rely on traditional media such as pen and paper and scale models. This paper presents a theory concerning design media and the application of typical media aspects in a spatial sketch program. SketchBoX is conceived as an experimental 3D version of a sketchbook. It can be used for the notation of primary forms and structures in 'architectural' space. The program consists of several transparent drawing surfaces that can be placed in relation to each other and in relation to models of design or different design contexts. Thus architects and students in architecture might be able to explore more adequately the spatial configuration of the built environment and they can comment within the models of their designs. Architectural group discussions and collaborative work can be enhanced by SketchBoX because visual annotations can be made directly in relation to a 3D model. This paper describes the consequent design considerations and expected use of the SketchBoX program.
keywords Exploration, Sketching, Commenting, Media, Creativity
series eCAADe
email M.C.Stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 91c8
authors Stellingwerff, Martijn
year 1999
title Evocation and Serendipity in a Cyberreal World
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 181-188
summary Adding two apples to three oranges is not possible in a purely computational way. It takes creativity to see that you have got five pieces of … fruit. Computation implies exact solutions while creativity is needed when there is an arbitrary gap or bias in a given situation. This paper is about the explicit introduction of gaps and biases in a visually simulated world. The computer is treated as a medium in which reference information from a virtual city model is confronted with sketch objects. The juxtaposition of referential information and sketch information delivers images that can evoke new ideas. The serendipity (gift to pick up ideas) of the designer transforms the given capricious cyber-real world into useful ideas and inventions. This process is supposed to trigger creativity for urban and architectural design.
series AVOCAAD
email m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 9c96
authors Szalapaj, Peter and Chang, David C.
year 1999
title Computer Architectural Representation - Applying the VOIDs Framework to a Bridge Design Scheme
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 387-394
summary A virtual environment presents sensory information and visual feedback to the user in order to give convincing illusion of an artificial world. In the architectural profession, the spatio-temporal metaphor in itself constitutes significant information retrieval, because we understand architecture by seeing it. This paper attempts to understand, and then to analyse the characteristics of representation of architectural models in virtual environments. We will examine the use and creativity of current computer generated architectural presentation in virtual environments. Our observations will be applied to the modelling of a bridge in Castlefield, Manchester, and evaluated by a group of students within the School of Architecture at Sheffield University. The conclusion of this paper will be the presentation of a conceptual structure for representing architectural models in virtual environments. This paper also explores the tension between the correspondence and constructivist views of representation. The correspondence view of representation relies on the idea that a representation corresponds to what is out there in the world. The constructivist view of representation advocates that any actual interpretation would depend on the context of their social and cultural backgrounds. However, the authors believe there should be a combination of these two views for architectural representation in virtual environments, and a framework developed by the authors - VOIDs will be presented.
keywords Virtual Environment, Architectural Representation, VOIDs, Correspondence, Constructivist
series eCAADe
email p.szalapaj@sheffield.ac.uk, arp95cc@sheffield.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id a832
authors Terzidis, Kostas
year 1999
title Computers and the Creative Process
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 43-50
summary In this paper the role of the computer in the creative process is discussed. The main focus is the investigation of whether computers can be regarded as candidates for sharing or participating in a task that has been attached almost exclusively to humans: that of creativity.
series eCAADe
email kostas@ucla.edu
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id d54b
authors Thomas, N.J.T.
year 1999
title Are theories of imagery theories of imagination? An active perception approach to conscious mental content
source Cognitive Science 23(2): 207-245
summary Can theories of mental imagery, conscious mental contents, developed within cognitive science throw light on the obscure (but culturally very significant) concept of imagination? Three extant views of mental imagery are considered: quasi-pictorial, description, and perceptual activity theories. The first two face serious theoretical and empirical difficulties. The third is (for historically contingent reasons) little known, theoretically underdeveloped, and empirically untried, but has real explanatory potential. It rejects the "traditional" symbolic computational view of mental contents, but is compatible with recent and approaches in robotics. This theory is developed and elucidated. Three related key aspects of imagination (non-discursiveness, creativity, and ) raise difficulties for the other theories. Perceptual activity theory presents imagery as non-discursive and relates it closely to . It is thus well placed to be the basis for a general theory of imagination and its role in creative thought.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 73e2
authors Tokman, Leyla Y. and Yamacli, Rusen
year 1999
title Imagining the Ideal Design Studio: Technology, People and Environment in Architectural Education
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 6-10
summary Architectural education is strongly related to technology and people-environment. While architecture has its own history and traditions, new knowledge is incorporated from other fields such as the basic sciences and engineering, behavioral sciences and the humanities. This paper refers to an ideal study which aims to integrate a range of computer-based multimedia technologies. This ideal study has the overall goal of enhancing the processes of architectural education in the design studio. In case of the design process, the development of advanced design systems has a twofold role, to provide for design students, with experience and understanding of the role of advanced design systems in the architectural education. Architectural design must meet a wide range of design objectives. Each objective has its own technological, people- environmental, social, economic and other requirements, and each has been the subject of intensive study, and even specialization. These individual objectives, however, are not independent of each other. Our paper asserts that they are combined in an ideal design studio imagination of the built environment and design decisions that are intended to meet one objective in an interactive design studio of the future. As we approach the 21st century, the need for creativity in the design studio becomes more important. The model motivates students achieves results and can also be applied at an individual personal and professional level.
keywords Interactive Architectural Education; Design Studio; Computer Technology and People-environment
series ACADIA
email lytokman@anadolu.edu.tr, ryamacli@anadolu.edu.tr
last changed 2002/12/14 08:21

_id d267
authors Verbeke, J. Provoost, T., Verleye, J., Nys, K., Van Zutphen, R., Achten, H., Turksma, A., Pittioni, G., Asanowicz, A., Jakimowicz A. and Af Klercker, J.
year 1999
title AVOCAAD, The Experience
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 244-251
summary The Leonardo da Vinci project AVOCAAD (Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design) aims at stimulating creative and experimental use of computers in the field of Architecture and Construction by the use of new technologies. For this purpose, a large set of exercises and exercise materials was developed and is now available through an interactive web-site. This allows regular students as well as architects in practice to continuously seek for a more interesting and inspiring use of computers and IC-technology, adding value in their own field of interest and work. The interactive web-site generates a virtual forum for exchange of ideas. The AVOCAAD partners as well as the newly joined partners are currently using and testing the available teaching materials (exercises, foreground and background information) with students. Moreover a small design exercise in the context of the project has been the theme of a workshop held at the AVOCAAD 1999 conference. Students and architects were asked to create a design in a predefined space based on experimental architectural music. This paper intends to report on the experiences we gained in using the interactive web-site, the exercises and also doing the workshop. We will address the pedagogical implications of issues like learning environment, continuous and distance learning, and focus on their impact towards CAAD curricula. Examples and results will illustrate the general framework.
keywords AVOCAAD, CAAD, Creativity, LLL, ODL
series eCAADe
email info@avocaad.org
more http://www.avocaad.org
last changed 2005/09/09 08:46

_id 168e
authors Verbeke, J., Provoost, T., Verleye, J., Nys, K., Van Zutphen, R., Achten, H., Turksma, A., Pittioni, G., Asanowicz, A., Jakimowicz, A. and Af Klercker, J.
year 1999
title AVOCAAD
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 9-24
summary The Leonardo da Vinci pilot project AVOCAAD (Added Value of Computer Aided Architectural Design) aims to innovate the use of computers in architecture. Hereto, new course materials and structures are developed. Focus is on new unusual ways to use software in Architecture. In this paper, we first describe the context using the general AVOCAAD statement. In order to give structure to the developed materials, a scheme was developed. This AVOCAAD scheme is given and described. In order to innovate in the architectural curriculum as well as in design offices, exercise materials will be available through the Internet. Hereto, a web- structure for the exercises was developed.
keywords Creativity, Innovation, Exercise Materials, WWW
series AVOCAAD
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id ga9903
id ga9903
authors Ward, Adrian and Cox, Geoff
year 1999
title How I Drew One of My Pictures: * or, The Authorship of Generative Art
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The concept of value is traditionally bestowed on a work of art when it is seen to be unique and irreproducible, thereby granting it authenticity. Think of a famous painting: only the original canvas commands genuinely high prices. Digital artwork is not valued in the same way. It can be copied infinitely and there is therefore a corresponding crisis of value. It has been argued that under these conditions of the dematerialised artwork, it is process that becomes valued. In this way, the process of creation and creativity is valued in place of authenticity, undermining conventional notions of authorship. It is possible to correlate many of these creative processes into instructions. However, to give precise instructions on the construction of a creative work is a complex, authentic and intricate process equivalent to conventional creative work (and is therefore not simply a question of 'the death of the author'). This paper argues that to create ‘generative’ systems is a rigorous and intricate procedure. Moreover, the output from generative systems should not be valued simply as an endless, infinite series of resources but as a system. To have a machine write poetry for ten years would not generate creative music, but the process of getting the machine to do so would certainly register an advanced form of creativity. When a programmer develops a generative system, they are engaged in a creative act. Programming is no less an artform than painting is a technical process. By analogy, the mathematical value pi can be approximated as 3.14159265, but a more thorough and accurate version can be stored as the formula used to calculate it. In the same way, it is more complete to express creativity formulated as code, which can then be executed to produce the results we desire. Rather like using Leibnitz's set of symbols to represent a mathematical formula, artists can now choose to represent creativity as computer programs (Harold Cohen’s Aaron, a computer program that creates drawings is a case in point). By programming computers to undertake creative instructions, this paper will argue that more accurate and expansive traces of creativity are being developed that suitably merge artistic subjectivity with technical form. It is no longer necessary or even desirable to be able to render art as a final tangible medium, but instead it is more important to program computers to be creative by proxy. [The paper refers to Autoshop software, available from http://autoshop.signwave.co.uk]
series other
email adrian@signwave.co.uk, geoffcox@excite.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id avocaad_2001_09
id avocaad_2001_09
authors Yu-Tung Liu, Yung-Ching Yeh, Sheng-Cheng Shih
year 2001
title Digital Architecture in CAD studio and Internet-based competition
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary Architectural design has been changing because of the vast and creative use of computer in different ways. From the viewpoint of designing itself, computer has been used as drawing tools in the latter phase of design (Mitchell 1977; Coyne et al. 1990), presentation and simulation tools in the middle phase (Liu and Bai 2000), and even critical media which triggers creative thinking in the very early phase (Maher et al. 2000; Liu 1999; Won 1999). All the various roles that computer can play have been adopted in a number of professional design corporations and so-called computer-aided design (CAD) studio in schools worldwide (Kvan 1997, 2000; Cheng 1998). The processes and outcomes of design have been continuously developing to capture the movement of the computer age. However, from the viewpoint of social-cultural theories of architecture, the evolvement of design cannot be achieved solely by designers or design processes. Any new idea of design can be accepted socially, culturally and historically only under one condition: The design outcomes could be reviewed and appreciated by critics in the field at the time of its production (Csikszentmihalyi 1986, 1988; Schon and Wiggins 1992; Liu 2000). In other words, aspects of design production (by designers in different design processes) are as critical as those of design appreciation (by critics in different review processes) in the observation of the future trends of architecture.Nevertheless, in the field of architectural design with computer and Internet, that is, so-called computer-aided design computer-mediated design, or internet-based design, most existing studies pay more attentions to producing design in design processes as mentioned above. Relatively few studies focus on how critics act and how they interact with designers in the review processes. Therefore, this study intends to investigate some evolving phenomena of the interaction between design production and appreciation in the environment of computer and Internet.This paper takes a CAD studio and an Internet-based competition as examples. The CAD studio includes 7 master's students and 2 critics, all from the same countries. The Internet-based competition, held in year 2000, includes 206 designers from 43 counties and 26 critics from 11 countries. 3 students and the 2 critics in the CAD studio are the competition participating designers and critics respectively. The methodological steps are as follows: 1. A qualitative analysis: observation and interview of the 3 participants and 2 reviewers who join both the CAD studio and the competition. The 4 analytical criteria are the kinds of presenting media, the kinds of supportive media (such as verbal and gesture/facial data), stages of the review processes, and interaction between the designer and critics. The behavioral data are acquired by recording the design presentation and dialogue within 3 months. 2. A quantitative analysis: statistical analysis of the detailed reviewing data in the CAD studio and the competition. The four 4 analytical factors are the reviewing time, the number of reviewing of the same project, the comparison between different projects, and grades/comments. 3. Both the qualitative and quantitative data are cross analyzed and discussed, based on the theories of design thinking, design production/appreciation, and the appreciative system (Goodman 1978, 1984).The result of this study indicates that the interaction between design production and appreciation during the review processes could differ significantly. The review processes could be either linear or cyclic due to the influences from the kinds of media, the environmental discrepancies between studio and Internet, as well as cognitive thinking/memory capacity. The design production and appreciation seem to be more linear in CAD studio whereas more cyclic in the Internet environment. This distinction coincides with the complementary observations of designing as a linear process (Jones 1970; Simon 1981) or a cyclic movement (Schon and Wiggins 1992). Some phenomena during the two processes are also illustrated in detail in this paper.This study is merely a starting point of the research in design production and appreciation in the computer and network age. The future direction of investigation is to establish a theoretical model for the interaction between design production and appreciation based on current findings. The model is expected to conduct using revised protocol analysis and interviews. The other future research is to explore how design computing creativity emerge from the process of producing and appreciating.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id e78e
authors Anders, Peter
year 1999
title Anthropic Cyberspace: Defining Eletronic Space from First Principles
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 56-62
summary This paper proposes principles for the design of human-centered, anthropic cyberspaces. Starting with a brief examination of our cognitive use of space, it suggests that we address cyberspace as an extension of our mental space. The paper procedes with twelve concepts based on scientific and cultural observations with respect to individual cognition and social interaction. These concepts are general - not specific to any culture or technology in the accompanying arguments the author expands on these concepts illustrating them with examples taken from conventional and electronic media, space and cyberspace the author hopes with these conjectures to begin a discussion on the anthropology of space and its emulation.
keywords Cognition, Cyberspace, Design, Internet, Simulation, Space
series SIGRADI
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 6126
authors De Grassi, M., Giretti A. and Pinese, P.
year 1999
title Knowledge Structures of Episodic Memory in Architectural Design: An Example of Protocol Analysis
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 576-583
summary The Protocol Analysis of the design process is a very recent and very promising research field. It is believed that good application-oriented developments are possible mainly in the tutorial field (ITS). The research conducted up to now has primarily dealt with the study of the design process. On the contrary, we propose an investigation experiment on the knowledge structures relative to the use of the episodic memory in the architectural design. The proposed experiment concerns the monitoring of the cognitive processes utilised by tutors and students in a brief, but yet complete design session. The results have lead to a synthetic model (computational model) of the adopted knowledge structures, and to a complete index system oriented and organised according to semantic fields. The application of the synthetic model to the design process analysis of students and tutors enabled the definition of the different utilisation strategies of episodic memory to be defined. The results obtained will make up the structure of a tutorial program for the architectural design.
keywords Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITSs), Architectural Design Education, Case Based Reasoning, Protocol Analisys, Design Cognition
series eCAADe
email giretti@idau.unian.it
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id 1b4d
authors Ding, Lan
year 1999
title An Evolutionary Model for Style Representation Emergence in Design
source University of Sydney, Key Centre of Design Computing and Cognition
summary This thesis is concerned with the development of an evolutionary process model for style representation emergence in design. It explores issues involved in the interpretation of style, the concept and process of style representation emergence, an evolutionary approach based on genetic engineering, and its computational implementation. Style is a complex phenomenon in design. Interpreting and formulating design style is a difficult task. This thesis proposes a language model which interprets style space utilising hierarchical levels that map onto syntax and semantics. The style space is then formulated using a genetic description. Current studies have discussed shape semantics emergence in design, but none has been proposed for the emergence of style representation. This thesis provides the concept of style representation emergence with the emphasis on the interpretative aspect of style as well as the emergence process. It explores the emergence process of style representation through an evolutionary approach. Simulation of biological evolution appears to be very useful for design problems. This thesis develops style representation emergence through evolutionary simulation based on genetic engineering. A hierarchical evolutionary process encompassing competition as well as discovery and an evolutionary combination is proposed and developed. A computational representation of style can then be derived by the computer system through the use of this evolutionary process. This model of style representation emergence is applied to traditional Chinese architecture. An evolutionary system is implemented and presented with some examples of traditional Chinese architectural facades. The results from the implementation of the system are analysed and the utility of this model is investigated. The implementation is developed in a Unix environment using the C language. The AutoCAD package is used for the graphic representation.

series thesis:PhD
email Lan.Ding@csiro.au
last changed 2003/05/15 05:25

_id c91a
authors Gero, J.S. and Kazakov, V.
year 1999
title Adapting evolutionary computing for exploration in creative designing
source J.S. Gero and M.L. Maher (Eds.), Computational Models of Creative Design IV, Key Centre of Design Computing and Cognition, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia, pp. 175-186
summary This paper introduces a modification to genetic algorithms which provides computational support to creative designing by adaptively exploring design structure spaces. This modification is based on the re-interpretation of the GA's crossover as a random sampling of interpolations and its replacement with the random sampling of direct phenotype-phenotype interpolation and phenotype-phenotype extrapolation. Examples of the process are presented
keywords Creative Design, Evolutionary Computation
series other
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/04/06 07:11

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