CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 41 to 60 of 584

_id 0eae
authors Gero, J.S. and Kazakov, V.
year 1999
title Using analogy to extend the behaviour state space in creative design
source J.S. Gero and M.L. Maher (Eds.), Computational Models of Creative Design IV, Key Centre of Design Computing and Cognition, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia, pp. 113-143
summary We propose an exploration model of design based on the extension of the space of design behaviours using analogy. The analogy is drawn on the basis of structure similarity or structure and behaviour similarity between source and target designs. New behaviours are introduced from the source design. This paper describes such a process and discusses its significance for creative design.
keywords Creative Design, Behaviour Analogy
series other
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/04/06 07:15

_id df70
authors Goel, V.
year 1999
title Cognitive Role of Ill-Structured Representations in Preliminary Design
source Visual and Spatial Reasoning in Design, eds. J. S. Gero, and B. Tversky. Sydney: Key Centre of Design Computing and Cognition, University of Sydney
summary I have previously argued that cognitive processes involved in preliminary design require "lateral" transformations or mental state shifts, and that "ill-structured" mental representations are necessary to support these transformations. I review the argument and provide additional support for it by appealing to some neuropsychological data.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 62c2
authors Kavakli, M., Suwa, M., Gero, J.S. and Purcell, T.
year 1999
title Sketching interpretation in novice and expert designers
source Gero, J.S. and Tversky, B. (Eds.), Visual and Spatial Reasoning in Design , Key Centre of Design Computing and Cognition, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia, pp. 209-220
summary This paper focuses on the differences in visual reasoning between a novice and an expert architectural designer during the conceptual design process. The cognitive actions of each designer while sketching were categorized into four main groups (each consisting of a number of sub-groups): physical, perceptual, functional, and conceptual. Based on this analysis, we found that the expert differs markedly from the novice in productivity in terms of the number of sketches and the number of alternative ideas. We focused on the differences between them in terms of the frequencies of cognitive actions, with the hypothesis that the difference in productivity could be attributed to the differences in some or all types of cognitive actions. Differences between the expert and the novice were found for revising features (in the subcategory of drawing actions in the physical action category), for paying attention to the relations of depicted elements (perceptual category) and for the rates of new and revisited functions (functional category). These results are discussed in terms of the types of visual reasoning processes that could be involved in expert design and the possible implications of these results if they can be demonstrated to be characteristic of expert designers generally.
keywords Visual Reasoning, Cognitive Actions, Sketching Interpretation
series other
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/04/06 07:18

_id 7e64
authors Koutamanis, Alexander
year 1999
title Approaches to the Integration of CAAD Education in the Electronic Era: Two Value Systems
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 238-243
summary In recent years the democratization of information and communication technologies (ICT) has become the greatest influence on the structure of CAAD education. While the content of the CAAD courses simply had to absorb the new technological possibilities, the structure of the courses and in particular their relationship to the rest of the curriculum has become the subject of speculation and experimentation. Integration of CAAD education in an architectural curriculum occurs either by (a) placing emphasis on designing in CAAD courses, or by (b)  integrating computing in design courses. Both approaches respond to the democratization of ICT by making design computing widely available and acceptable. Further improvement is possible if the student becomes the carrier of integration. This is based on the long-term amplification of two value systems. The first refers to personal cognition: rather than rewarding a student with the teacher's approval, educational goals should be translated into individual skills and knowledge. The second system addresses the values of the peer group: such groups support learning by comparison to other individuals and emerging communal characteristics, either as a result of competition or for reasons of assimilation.
keywords Education, Democracy, Personal Cognition
series eCAADe
email a.koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id e6fb
authors McFadzean, Jeanette
year 1999
title Computational Sketch Analyser (CSA): Extending the Boundaries of Knowledge in CAAD
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 503-510
summary This paper focuses on the cognitive problem-solving strategies of professional architectural designers and their use of external representations for the production of creative ideas. Using a new form of protocol analysis (Computational Sketch Analysis), the research has analysed five architects' verbal descriptions of their cognitive reasoning strategies during conceptual designing. It compares these descriptions to a computational analysis of the architects' sketches and sketching behaviour. The paper describes how the current research is establishing a comprehensive understanding of the mapping between conceptualisation, cognition, drawing, and complex problem solving. The paper proposes a new direction for Computer Aided Architectural Design tools (CAAD). It suggests that in order to extend the boundaries of knowledge in CAAD an understanding of the complex nature of architectural conceptual problem-solving needs to be incorporated into and supported by future conceptual design tools.
keywords Computational Sketch Analysis, Conceptual Design
series eCAADe
email j.mcfadzean@open.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id ga9927
id ga9927
authors Neagu, Mariana
year 1999
title On Linguistic Aspects from a Cross-cultural Perspective
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The goal of this paper is to discuss the issue of culture and its relationship to language and cognition by dealing with a number of lexical concepts, grammatical concepts and cultural scripts. Taking a moderate view, I reconcile universalism and ethnocentrism and argue that the study of culture-specific aspects of language has both a theoretical and practical importance. The role of universal semantic primes is obvious in culture-specific words such as the Japanese amae (a peculiarly Japanese emotion) which, though unique and untranslatable, can be accurately and intelligibly defined in terms of semantic primes (Wierzbicka, 1996). The view that meanings cannot be fully transferred from one language to another is supported by the difference in meaning manifested in the different range of use of the word happy (a common, everyday word in modern English) and joyful (a more literally and stylistically marked term.). A cross-linguistic analysis of the concept ‘happy’in English, Romanian, German, French, Italian, points to the so-called ‘traditional Anglo-Saxon distate for extreme emotions’. As far as aspects of grammar connected with culture are concerned, I compare expressive grammatical devices like intensifiers in English, Romanian and Italian. The question the paper addresses is whether constructions like syntactic reduplication(e.g. bella bella) and the absolute superlative (e.g. bellissimo) are indeed linked with what has been called ‘the theatrical quality’ of Italian life (Barzini, 1964) or not. Relative to Romanian, I assume that the idea of intensity of a state or action is conveyed, in certain registers, by terms and expressions pertaining to basic element source domains such as fire (e.g. frumoasa foc ‘fire-beautiful’) and earth (e.g. frumusetea pamantului ‘beauty of the earth’) and also by syntactic reduplication (e.g. frumoasa-frumoaselor ’beauty of the beauties’). Finally, I approach aspects of pragmatics which are culturally determined in the sense that they express cultural norms, values, ideals, attitudes. For instance, preferences are expressed directly in English while in Japanese this manner is contrary to the ideal of enryo ’restraint, reserve’.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 138e
authors Park, S.-H. and Gero, J.S.
year 1999
title Qualitative representation and reasoning about shapes
source Gero, J.S. and Tversky, B. (Eds.), Visual and Spatial Reasoning in Design , Key Centre of Design Computing and Cognition, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia, pp. 55-68
summary In this paper we present an approach to the qualitative representation of shape and its use. We use a qualitative coding scheme founded on landmarks in the shape. The scheme encodes a qualitative representation of angles, relative side lengths and curvatures at landmarks. We then show how such a representation can be used as a basis for reasoning about shapes using extracted shape features. We conclude with a preliminary analysis of 12 sketches of the architect Louis Kahn and show how they may be categorised based on these shape features.
keywords Qualitative Representation, Shape Reasoning
series other
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/04/06 07:19

_id 36dc
authors Reffat, Rabee M. and Gero, John S.
year 1999
title Situatedness: A New Dimension for Learning Systems in Design
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 252-261
summary In this paper we adopt the approach that designing is a series of situated acts, ie designing cannot be pre-planned to completion. This is based on ideas from situated cognition theory that claims that what people perceive, how they conceive and what they do develop together and are adapted to the environment. For a system to be useful for human designers it must have the ability to associate what is learned to its environment. In order for a system to do that such a system must be able to acquire knowledge of the environment that a design constructs. Therefore, acknowledging the notion of situatedness is of importance to provide a system with such capability and add on a new dimension to existing learning systems in design. We will call such a learning system within the design domain a Situated Learning Design System (SLDS). A SLDS should be able to create its own situational categories from its perceptual experiences and modify them if encountered again to link the learned knowledge to its corresponding situation. We have chosen architectural shapes as the vehicle to demonstrate our ideas and used multiple representations to build a platform for a SLDS to learn from. In this paper the notion of situatedness and its role in both designing and learning is discussed. The overall architecture of a SLDS is introduced and how the potential outcome of such a system will support human designers while designing is discussed.
keywords Designing, Situated Knowledge, Multiple Representations, Situated Learning
series eCAADe
email rabee@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id a875
authors Suwa, M., Gero, J.S. and Purcell, T.
year 1999
title How an Architect Created Design Requirements
source G. Goldschmidt and W. Porter (eds), Design Thinking Research Symposium: Design Representation, MIT, Cambridge, pp. II.101-124
summary There is an anecdotal view that designers, during a conceptual design process, not just synthesise solutions that satisfy initially given requirements, but also create by themselves novel design requirements that capture important aspects of the given problem. Further, it is believed that design sketches serve as a thinking tool for designers to do this. Then, what kinds of cognitive interaction with their own sketches enable designers to create novel requirements? The purpose of this paper is to answer this question. We examined the cognitive processes of a practising architect, using a protocol analysis technique. Our examinations focused on whether particular types of cognitive actions account for the creation of novel design requirements. We found that intensive occurrences of a certain type of perceptual actions, acts of establishing new relations or visual features on the sketches, are likely to co-occur with the creation of requirements. This suggests that this type of perceptual actions are the key constituent of acts of creating novel requirements, and therefore one of the important actions in sketching activities. This presents evidence of the view that designing is a situated act, as well as has an implication for design education.
keywords Design Requirements; Sketches; Design Cognition; Protocol Analysis
series journal paper
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/03/31 06:37

_id 90ad
authors Voigt, A., Walchhofer, H.P. and Linzer, H.
year 1999
title The Historico-cultural Past as Spatial-related Cognition Archives: Computer-assisted Methods in the History of Urban Development, Archeology and History of Art
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 672-677
summary Implementation of computer-assisted visualizing methods in studying historico-cultural facts provides archeological and historico-cultural research with a tool adding to consolidation of knowledge resulting from assumptions. The visualizing methods presently available by utilizing of computers have advanced to an extent justifying their implementation in the field of archeological and historico-cultural research. The present contribution covers the above matters by means of a variety of applied examples performed at the Institute for Local Planning at the Vienna University of Technology dealing with history of urban development, archeology and history of art.
keywords Historico-cultural Past, Reconstruction, Visualizing Methods
series eCAADe
email voigt@ifoer.tuwien.ac.at, hpw@ifoer.tuwien.ac.at, linzer@ifoer.tuwien.ac.at
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id e978
authors [Zupancic] Strojan, Tadeja Z.
year 1999
title CyberUniversity
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 196-200
summary The study of a cyberuniversity derives from an analogy between real urban space and its virtual "substitution". It represents an attempt to balance some views, which seems to be contrary, exclusive, but they are just parts of the same wholeness. Especially the notion of a cyber society is lately considered such an exaggeration, that it is possible to forget the meaning of a real life experience and interactions, which are already threatened. One should contribute to the awarness that is used in such a comparison, it is "just" an analogy, not a real similarity. At the same time it is possible to point out some limitations of a cyberspace and indicate a more realistic view of the meaning of cyber communities. Awarness of the development processes could help to find a balance between reality and virtuality, using cyberfacilities not to destroy us (our identity) but to improve the quality of our (real) life.
keywords University, Cyberuniversity, Space, Cyberspace
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email tadeja.zupancic@guest.arnes.si
last changed 2007/03/04 06:03

_id bacd
authors Abadí Abbo, Isaac
year 1999
title APPLICATION OF SPATIAL DESIGN ABILITY IN A POSTGRADUATE COURSE
source Full-scale Modeling and the Simulation of Light [Proceedings of the 7th European Full-scale Modeling Association Conference / ISBN 3-85437-167-5] Florence (Italy) 18-20 February 1999, pp. 75-82
summary Spatial Design Ability (SDA) has been defined by the author (1983) as the capacity to anticipate the effects (psychological impressions) that architectural spaces or its components produce in observers or users. This concept, which requires the evaluation of spaces by the people that uses it, was proposed as a guideline to a Masters Degree Course in Architectural Design at the Universidad Autonoma de Aguascalientes in Mexico. The theory and the exercises required for the experience needed a model that could simulate spaces in terms of all the variables involved. Full-scale modeling as has been tested in previous research, offered the most effective mean to experiment with space. A simple, primitive model was designed and built: an articulated ceiling that allows variation in height and shape, and a series of wooden panels for the walls and structure. Several exercises were carried out, mainly to experience cause -effect relationships between space and the psychological impressions they produce. Students researched into spatial taxonomy, intentional sequences of space and spatial character. Results showed that students achieved the expected anticipation of space and that full-scale modeling, even with a simple model, proved to be an effective tool for this purpose. The low cost of the model and the short time it took to be built, opens an important possibility for Institutions involved in architectural studies, both as a research and as a learning tool.
keywords Spatial Design Ability, Architectural Space, User Evaluation, Learning, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
email iabadi@ceea.arq.ucv.ve
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa
last changed 2004/05/04 09:27

_id cf2011_p109
id cf2011_p109
authors Abdelmohsen, Sherif; Lee Jinkook, Eastman Chuck
year 2011
title Automated Cost Analysis of Concept Design BIM Models
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 403-418.
summary AUTOMATED COST ANALYSIS OF CONCEPT DESIGN BIM MODELS Interoperability: BIM models and cost models This paper introduces the automated cost analysis developed for the General Services Administration (GSA) and the analysis results of a case study involving a concept design courthouse BIM model. The purpose of this study is to investigate interoperability issues related to integrating design and analysis tools; specifically BIM models and cost models. Previous efforts to generate cost estimates from BIM models have focused on developing two necessary but disjoint processes: 1) extracting accurate quantity take off data from BIM models, and 2) manipulating cost analysis results to provide informative feedback. Some recent efforts involve developing detailed definitions, enhanced IFC-based formats and in-house standards for assemblies that encompass building models (e.g. US Corps of Engineers). Some commercial applications enhance the level of detail associated to BIM objects with assembly descriptions to produce lightweight BIM models that can be used by different applications for various purposes (e.g. Autodesk for design review, Navisworks for scheduling, Innovaya for visual estimating, etc.). This study suggests the integration of design and analysis tools by means of managing all building data in one shared repository accessible to multiple domains in the AEC industry (Eastman, 1999; Eastman et al., 2008; authors, 2010). Our approach aims at providing an integrated platform that incorporates a quantity take off extraction method from IFC models, a cost analysis model, and a comprehensive cost reporting scheme, using the Solibri Model Checker (SMC) development environment. Approach As part of the effort to improve the performance of federal buildings, GSA evaluates concept design alternatives based on their compliance with specific requirements, including cost analysis. Two basic challenges emerge in the process of automating cost analysis for BIM models: 1) At this early concept design stage, only minimal information is available to produce a reliable analysis, such as space names and areas, and building gross area, 2) design alternatives share a lot of programmatic requirements such as location, functional spaces and other data. It is thus crucial to integrate other factors that contribute to substantial cost differences such as perimeter, and exterior wall and roof areas. These are extracted from BIM models using IFC data and input through XML into the Parametric Cost Engineering System (PACES, 2010) software to generate cost analysis reports. PACES uses this limited dataset at a conceptual stage and RSMeans (2010) data to infer cost assemblies at different levels of detail. Functionalities Cost model import module The cost model import module has three main functionalities: generating the input dataset necessary for the cost model, performing a semantic mapping between building type specific names and name aggregation structures in PACES known as functional space areas (FSAs), and managing cost data external to the BIM model, such as location and construction duration. The module computes building data such as footprint, gross area, perimeter, external wall and roof area and building space areas. This data is generated through SMC in the form of an XML file and imported into PACES. Reporting module The reporting module uses the cost report generated by PACES to develop a comprehensive report in the form of an excel spreadsheet. This report consists of a systems-elemental estimate that shows the main systems of the building in terms of UniFormat categories, escalation, markups, overhead and conditions, a UniFormat Level III report, and a cost breakdown that provides a summary of material, equipment, labor and total costs. Building parameters are integrated in the report to provide insight on the variations among design alternatives.
keywords building information modeling, interoperability, cost analysis, IFC
series CAAD Futures
email sherif.morad@gatech.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id e336
authors Achten, H., Roelen, W., Boekholt, J.-Th., Turksma, A. and Jessurun, J.
year 1999
title Virtual Reality in the Design Studio: The Eindhoven Perspective
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 169-177
summary Since 1991 Virtual Reality has been used in student projects in the Building Information Technology group. It started as an experimental tool to assess the impact of VR technology in design, using the environment of the associated Calibre Institute. The technology was further developed in Calibre to become an important presentation tool for assessing design variants and final design solutions. However, it was only sporadically used in student projects. A major shift occurred in 1997 with a number of student projects in which various computer technologies including VR were used in the whole of the design process. In 1998, the new Design Systems group started a design studio with the explicit aim to integrate VR in the whole design process. The teaching effort was combined with the research program that investigates VR as a design support environment. This has lead to increasing number of innovative student projects. The paper describes the context and history of VR in Eindhoven and presents the current set-UP of the studio. It discusses the impact of the technology on the design process and outlines pedagogical issues in the studio work.
keywords Virtual Reality, Design Studio, Student Projects
series eCAADe
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id e719
authors Achten, Henri and Turksma, Arthur
year 1999
title Virtual Reality in Early Design: the Design Studio Experiences
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 327-335
summary The Design Systems group of the Eindhoven University of Technology started a new kind of design studio teaching. With the use of high-end equipment, students use Virtual Reality from the very start of the design process. Virtual Reality technology up to now was primarily used for giving presentations. We use the same technology in the design process itself by means of reducing the time span in which one gets results in Virtual Reality. The method is based on a very brief cycle of modelling in AutoCAD, assigning materials in 3DStudio Viz, and then making a walkthrough in Virtual Reality in a standard landscape. Due to this cycle, which takes about 15 seconds, the student gets immediate feedback on design decisions which facilitates evaluation of the design in three dimensions much faster than usual. Usually the learning curve of this kind of software is quite steep, but with the use of templates the number of required steps to achieve results is reduced significantly. In this way, the potential of Virtual Reality is not only explored in research projects, but also in education. This paper discusses the general set-up of the design studio and shows how, via short workshops, students acquire knowledge of the cycle in a short time. The paper focuses on the added value of using Virtual Reality technology in this manner: improved spatial reasoning, translation from two-dimensional to three-dimensional representations, and VR feedback on design decisions. It discusses the needs for new design representations in this design environment, and shows how fast feedback in Virtual Reality can improve the spatial design at an early stage of the design process.
series AVOCAAD
email H.H.Achten@tue.nl, A.A.E.Turksma@tue.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 6d88
authors Achten, Henri H. and Van Leeuwen, Jos P.
year 1999
title Feature-Based High Level Design Tools - A Classification
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 275-290
summary The VR-DIS project aims to provide design support in the early design stage using a Virtual Reality environment. The initial brief of the design system is based on an analysis of a design case. The paper describes the process of analysis and extraction of design knowledge and design concepts in terms of Features. It is demonstrated how the analysis has lead to a classification of design concepts. This classification forms one of the main specifications for the VR-based design aid system that is being developed in the VR-DIS programme. The paper concludes by discussing the particular approach used in the case analysis and discusses future work in the VR-DIS research programme.
keywords Features, Feature-Based modelling, Architectural Design, Design Process, Design Support
series CAAD Futures
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.n
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id ae61
authors Af Klercker, Jonas
year 1999
title CAAD - Integrated with the First Steps into Architecture
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 266-272
summary How and when should CAAD be introduced in the curriculum of the School of Architecture? This paper begins with some arguments for starting CAAD education at the very beginning. At the School of Architecture in Lund teachers in the first year courses have tried to integrate CAAD with the introduction to architectural concepts and techniques. Traditionally the first year is divided by several subjects running courses separatly without any contact for coordination. From the academic year 96/97 the teachers of Aplied aestetics, Building Science, Architectural design and CAAD have decided to colaborate as much as possible to make the role of our different fields as clear as possible to the students. Therefore integrating CAAD was a natural step in the academic year 98/99. The computer techniques were taught one step in advance so that the students can practise their understanding of the programs in their tasks in the other subjects. The results were surprisingly good! The students have quickly learned to mix the manual and computer techniques to make expressive and interesting visual presentations of their ideas. Some students with antipaty to computers have overcome this handicap. Some interesting observations are discussed.
keywords Curriculum, First Year Studies, Integration, CAAD, Modelling
series eCAADe
email jonas.af_klercker@caad.lth.se
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 36d3
authors Af Klercker, Jonas
year 1999
title A CAVE-Interface in CAAD-Education?
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 313-323
summary The so called "CAVE-interface" is a very interesting and thrilling development for architects! It supports a better illusion of space by exposing almost a 270° view of a computer model than the 60° which can be viewed on an ordinary computer screen. At the Lund University we have got the possibility to experiment with a CAVE-installation, using it in research and the education of CAAD. The technique and three experiments are discribed. The possibilities are discussed and some problems and questions are put forward.
series CAADRIA
email jonas.af_klercker@caad.lth.se
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 37c2
authors Ahmad Rafi, M.E.
year 1999
title Visualisation of Design Using Animation for Virtual Prototyping
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 519-525
summary Although recent technology in time-based representation has vastly improved, animation in virtual prototype design field remains the same. Some designers invest a huge amount of money in the latest visualisation and multimedia technology and yet may create even worse animation. They often cramp sequences resulting in many viewers failing to interpret the design positively as they miss a lot of vital information that explains the design. This paper basically reports the importance of film-making understanding for producing good virtual prototype animation. It will be based on a part of a research project on the use of time-based media in architectural practices. It also includes an empirical analysis of several architectural-based documentary films (including an interview with the film director) and past and present computer animation. This paper then concludes with recommendations of good techniques for making animated visualisation relative to the stage at which the animation is produced for better design decision.
keywords Virtual Prototype, Animation, Time-Based, Film-Making
series eCAADe
email rafi@unitele.edu.my
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id alqawasmi
id alqawasmi
authors Al-Qawasmi, J., Clayton, M.J., Tassinary, L.G. and Johnson, R..
year 1999
title Observations on Collaborative Design and Multimedia Usage in Virtual Design Studio
source J. Woosely and T. Adair (eds.), Learning virtually: Proceedings of the 6th annual distance education conference, San Antonio, Texas, pp. 1-9
summary The virtual design studio (VDS) points to a new way of practicing and teaching architectural design. As a new phenomenon, little research has been done to evaluate design collaboration and multimedia usage in a distributed workplace like the virtual design studio. Our research provides empirical data on how students actually use multiple media during architectural collaborative design.
series other
email jamalq@kfupm.edu.sa
last changed 2003/12/06 08:55

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