CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 545

_id 9fd8
authors Wojtowicz Jerzy and Butelski, Kazimierz
year 1999
title Lessons from Distributed Design Practice
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 482-487
summary Parallel to the expansion of the internet, the acceptance of computerization in architectural practice is clearly evident. This paper signals the emergence of long-distance design collaborations over networks as a pragmatic condition of contemporary design practice, and reports on several successful design projects conceived under these new circumstances. Experiences from these projects were important in formulating both the limits and opportunities derived from the distributed design condition.
keywords Design Collaboration, VDS, Networks
series eCAADe
email jw@architecture.ubc.ca, pabutels@cyf-kr.edu.pl
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 837b
authors Elger, Dietrich and Russell, Peter
year 2000
title Using the World Wide Web as a Communication and Presentation Forum for Students of Architecture
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 61-64
summary Since 1997, the Institute for Industrial Building Production (ifib) has been carrying out upper level design studios under the framework of the Netzentwurf or Net-Studio. The Netzentwurf is categorized as a virtual design studio in that the environment for presentation, criticism and communication is web based. This allows lessons learned from research into Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) to be adapted to the special conditions indigenous to the architectural design studio. Indeed, an aim of the Netzentwurf is the creation and evolution of a design studio planing platform. In the Winter semester 1999-2000, ifib again carried out two Netzentwurf studios. involving approximately 30 students from the Faculty of Architecture, University of Karlsruhe. The projects differed from previous net studios in that both studios encompassed an inter-university character in addition to the established framework of the Netzentwurf. The first project, the re-use of Fort Kleber in Wolfisheim by Strasbourg, was carried out as part of the Virtual Upperrhine University of Architecture (VuuA) involving over 140 students from various disciplines in six institutions from five universities in France, Switzerland and Germany. The second project, entitled "Future, Inc.", involved the design of an office building for a scenario 20 years hence. This project was carried out in parallel with the Technical University Cottbus using the same methodology and program for two separate building sites.
keywords Virtual Design Studios, Architectural Graphics, Presentation Techniques
series eCAADe
email dietrich.elger@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id b7ff
authors Mullins, Michael and Van Zyl, Douw
year 2000
title Self-Selecting Digital Design Students
source Promise and Reality: State of the Art versus State of Practice in Computing for the Design and Planning Process [18th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-6-5] Weimar (Germany) 22-24 June 2000, pp. 85-88
summary Recent years have seen the increasing use of digital media in undergraduate architectural education at UND, and which has been fuelled by students themselves taking up the tools available to practising architects. This process of self-selection may hold valuable lessons for the development of architectural curricula. An experimental design studio offered as an elective to UND undergraduates in 1999 has indicated that the design work produced therein, most often differed remarkably from the previous work of the same students using only traditional media. In so far as digital environments rapidly provide new and strange objects and images for students to encounter, those students are driven to interpret, transform or customise that environment in innovative ways, thereby making it their own. It is clear that the full integration of digital environments into architectural education will profoundly effect the outcomes of student work. We have observed that some self-selecting students struggle in expressing ideas through repre-sentative form in traditional studios. The question arises whether these students are "onto something" which they intuitively understand as better suited to their abilities, or whether in fact they are see digital tools as a means to avoid those areas in design in which they experience difficulties. Through observation of a group of "self-selectors" the authors attempt to lead useful generalisations; to develop a theory and method for facilitators to deal with specific students; and to work toward the development of suitable curricula for these cases.
keywords Architectural Education, Digital Media, Learning Styles
series eCAADe
email mullins@gwise.mc.und.ac.za, vanzyl@gwise.mc.und.ac.za
more http://www.uni-weimar.de/ecaade/
last changed 2002/11/23 05:59

_id 0c9c
authors Tweed, Christopher
year 1999
title Prescribing Designs
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 51-57
summary Much of the debate and argument among CAAD researchers has turned on the degree to which CAAD systems limit the ways in which designers can express themselves. By defining representations for design objects and design functions, systems determine what it is possible to describe. Aart Bijl used the term 'prescriptiveness' to refer to this property of systems, and the need to overcome it was a major preoccupation of research at EdCAAD during the 1980s, including the development of the MOLE (Modelling Objects with Logic Expressions) system. But in trying to offer designers the freedom that was judged to be essential to evolving design practices, MOLE transferred much of the burden of programming from system developers to end-users - you can have any design objects you want, as long as you write the code. Close examination of MOLE's logic reveals that it too had to rely on fundamental definitions that, even if not domain-specific, are certainly historically contingent. This paper will return to the issue of prescriptiveness, summarising the lessons learned from the MOLE 'experiment,' and identifying new prescriptions that are deciding what designs can be. Looking beyond computer representations, we find that designs are shaped by much larger, and arguably more powerful, historical, social and cultural forces surrounding design practice. These forces are shaping the way CAAD is used and how new systems are conceived and developed.
keywords Bijl, Prescriptiveness
series eCAADe
email c.tweed@qub.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 4aa9
authors Roberts, Andrew
year 1999
title Virtual Site Planning
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 442-447
summary This paper looks at the potential for the Virtual Reality to be used as a medium for the development of teaching tools in Architectural and Urban Design Education. It identifies examples and lessons learned from the development of teaching tools in other disciplines. The paper outlines a prototype system developed at Cardiff University to help Town Planning students understand the three dimensional nature of site planning and design. This was developed following difficulties encountered by students in using CAD which was seen as insufficiently intuitive to allow effective use within the short timespan available. The prototype system allows students to access their site through the familiar environment of a Web Browser. A number of 'Standard' house types are available which can be selected and inserted into the design space. Once in the space the houses can be viewed in three dimensions, moved and rotated in order to form any configuration that the students may wish. The system is easily customisable; it need not be limited to uses in urban design, but could be used in many situations where component parts are arranged in space.
keywords Virtual Reality, Teaching, Learning, Site Planning
series eCAADe
email robertsas@cf.ac.uk
more http://ctiweb.cf.ac.uk/Housing/
last changed 2002/11/23 13:44

_id b34d
authors Russell, P., Kohler, N., Forgber, U., Koch, V. and Rügemer, J.
year 1999
title Interactive Representation of Architectural Design: The Virtual Design Studio as an Architectural Graphics Laboratory
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 459-465
summary This paper introduces the Virtual Design Studio (VDS), an internet based design studio environment established by ifib. VDS transfers lessons learned through research projects in the field of Computer Supported Co-operative Work (CSCW) being carried out at ifib into design education. By training for interdisciplinary co-operation within the design process, the students will become better prepared for the flexibility and co-operability required in planning situations. Increasing the communication and co-operation in the planning process can be achieved through the implementation of IT based virtual workspaces. In the design studio setting, this is done through the use of available internet software and technologies. The methodology of the VDS is briefly described including specific assignments intended to focus student investigations into specific areas including the representation of their work using the world wide web. The pedagogical expectations are discussed and anecdotal evidence precedes an general evaluation of the teaching method. The authors postulate that one of the unintended by-products of the studio is the evolution of an effective use of interactivity in the presentation of design concepts, ideas and solutions. A handful of student work is presented to describe the different approaches taken in using the world wide web (WWW) to display project work. A description of the local evolution (VDS specific) of graphical methods and technologies is followed by a comparison with those used in traditional settings. Representation is discussed with focus on the ability of the WWW to replace, augment or corrupt other methods of presentation. The interactive nature of web based presentations induces alterations to the narration of architectural work and can enhance the spatial perception of design space. Space Perception can be enabled through geometrically true VRML representations, the inclusion of auditory sensations, the abstraction of representation through the use of advertising techniques as well as the introduction of non-linear narrative concepts. Examples used by students are shown. A critical assessment of these new representational methods and the place of current new media within the context of architectural representation is discussed.
keywords Virtual Design Studio, Architectural Graphics, Teaching
series eCAADe
email peter.russell@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id edf5
authors Arnold, J.A., Teicholz, P. and Kunz, J.
year 1999
title An approach for the interoperation of web-distributed applications with a design model
source Automation in Construction 8 (3) (1999) pp. 291-303
summary This paper defines the data and inference requirements for the integration of analysis applications with a product model described by a CAD/CAE application. Application input conditions often require sets of complex data that may be considered views of a product model database. We introduce a method that is compatible with the STEP and PLIB product description standards to define an intermediate model that selects, extracts, and validates views of information from a product model to serve as input for an engineering CAD/CAE application. The intermediate model framework was built and tested in a software prototype, the Internet Broker for Engineering Services (IBES). The first research case for IBES integrates applications that specify certain components, for example pumps and valves, with a CAD/CAE application. This paper therefore explores a sub-set of the general problem of integrating product data semantics between various engineering applications. The IBES integration method provides support for a general set of services that effectively assist interpretation and validate information from a product model for an engineering purpose. Such methods can enable application interoperation for the automation of typical engineering tasks, such as component specification and procurement.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 7674
authors Bourdakis, Vassilis and Charitos, Dimitrios
year 1999
title Virtual Environment Design - Defining a New Direction for Architectural Education
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 403-409
summary This paper considers the design and development of virtual environments (VEs) and the way that it relates to traditional architectural education and practice. The need for practitioners who will contribute to the design of 3D content for multimedia and virtual reality applications is identified. The design of space in a VE is seen as being partly an architectural problem. Therefore, architectural design should play an important role in educating VE designers. Other disciplines, intrinsically related to the issue of VE design, are also identified. Finally, this paper aims at pointing out the need for a new direction within architectural education, which will lead towards a generation of VE architects.
keywords Virtual Environments, Architectural Design, Architectural Education
series eCAADe
email V.Bourdakis@prd.uth.gr
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 2c1d
authors Castańé, D., Tessier, C., Álvarez, J. and Deho, C.
year 1999
title Patterns for Volumetric Recognition - Guidelines for the Creation of 3D-Models
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 171-175
summary This piece proposes new strategies and pedagogic methodologies applied to the recognition and study of the subjacent measurements of the architectural projects to be created. This proposal is the product of pedagogic experience, which stems from this instructional team of the department of tri-dimensional models of electronic models. This program constitutes an elective track for the architectural major at the college of architecture, design, and urbanism of the University of Buenos Aires and housed at the CAO center. One of the requirements that the students must complete, after doing research and analytical experimentation through the knowledge that they acquired through this course, is to practice the attained skills through exercises proposed by the department in this case, the student would be required to virtually rebuild a paradigmatic architectonic piece of several sample architects. Usually at this point, students experience some difficulties when they analyze the existing documents on the plants, views, picture, details, texts, etc., That they have obtained from magazines, books, and other sources. Afterwards, when they digitally begin to generate basic measurements of the architectural work to be modeled, they realize that there are great limitations in the comprehension of the tri-dimensional understanding of the work. This issue has brought us to investigate and develop proposals of volumetric understanding of patterns through examples of work already analyzed and digitalized tri-dimensionally in the department. Through a careful study of the existent documentation for that particular work, it is evaluated which would be the paths and basis to adopt through utilizing alternative technologies to arrive at a clear reconstruction of the projected architectural work, the study gets completed by implementing the proposal at the internet site http://www.datarq.fadu.uba.ar/catedra/dorcas
series SIGRADI
email dorcas@fadu.uba.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:48

_id ga9913
id ga9913
authors Ceccato, Cristiano and Liauw, Laurence
year 1999
title Parametric Urbanism: Explorations in Generative Urban Design
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary This paper is the result of several years of research by the Authors into the new field of generative design, as applied to urbanism. Its purpose is to formulate a concept of parametric urbanism and data-driven urban design, and how it departs from existing concepts of urban analysis and resulting design methods. This paper first gives a definition and description of the notion of generative urban design, and its relevance to current the practice of architecture and global political, sociological and economic developments. The difference between dogmatic forms of urban design and new parametric research methods is explained, and the Authors argue the fundamental relevance of using examples of post-colonial large-scale projects. In support of this, the Authors explore the widening field of research into parametric and data-driven architecture and urban design and the history of rule-based and evolutionary design methodologies. The paper illustrates examples of successful research in the field of parametric and rule-based urban design, by the Authors as well as colleagues within the field. It surveys the Authors’ work done at the Architectural Association School of Architecture, at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University School of Design, as well as in practice and research-oriented consultancy. The projects illustrated support the thesis of parametric urbanism by showing its power and versatility when applied to very large-scale projects, in particular within the People’s Republic of China.
series other
email sdchris@polyu.edu.hk
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 0dc3
authors Chambers, Tom and Wood, John B.
year 1999
title Decoding to 2000 CAD as Mediator
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 210-216
summary This paper will present examples of current practice in the Design Studio course of the BDE, University of Strathclyde. The paper will demonstrate an integrated approach to teaching design, which includes CAD among other visual communication techniques as a means to exploring design concepts and the presentation of complex information as part of the design process. It will indicate how the theoretical dimension is used to direct the student in their areas of independent study. Projects illustrated will include design precedents that have involved students in the review and assessment of landmarks in the history of design. There will be evidence of how students integrate DTP in the presentation of site analysis, research of appropriate design precedents and presentation of their design solutions. CADET underlines the importance of considering design solutions within the context of both our European cultural context and of assessing the environmental impact of design options, for which CAD is eminently suited. As much as a critical method is essential to the development of the design process, a historical perspective and an appreciation of the sophistication of communicative media will inform the analysis of structural form and meaning in a modem urban context. Conscious of the dynamic of social and historical influences in design practice, the student is enabled "to take a critical stand against the dogmatism of the school "(Gadamer, 1988) that inevitably insinuates itself in learning institutions and professional practice.
keywords Design Studio, Communication, Integrated Teaching
series eCAADe
email j.b.wood@strath.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id ad51
authors Chastain, Th., Kalay, Y.E. and Peri, Ch.
year 1999
title Square Peg in a Round Hole or Horseless Carriage? Reflections on the Use of Computing in Architecture
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 4-15
summary We start with two paradigms that have been used to describe the relationship of computation methods and tools to the production of architecture. The first is that of forcing a square peg into a round hole — implying that the use of a tool is mis-directed, or at least poorly fits the processes that have traditionally been part of an architectural design practice. In doing so, the design practice suffers from the use of new technology. The other paradigm describes a state of transformation in relation-ship to new technology as a horseless carriage in which the process is described in obsolete and ‘backward’ terms. The impli-cation is that there is a lack of appreciation for the emerging potentials of technology to change our relationship with the task. The paper demonstrates these two paradigms through the invention of drawings in the 14th century, which helped to define the profession of Architecture. It then goes on to argue that modern computational tools follow the same paradigms, and like draw-ings, stand to bring profound changes to the profession of architecture as we know it.
series ACADIA
email kalay@socrates.berkeley.edu
last changed 1999/12/02 07:48

_id 5a10
authors Cheng, Nancy Yen-Wen
year 1999
title Playing with Digital Media: Enlivening Computer Graphics Teaching
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 96-109
summary Are there better ways of getting a student to learn? Getting students to play at learning can encourage comprehension by engaging their attention. Rather than having students' fascination with video games and entertainment limited to competing against learning, we can direct this interest towards learning computer graphics. We hypothesize that topics having a recreational component increase the learning curve for digital media instruction. To test this, we have offered design media projects with a playful element as a counterpart to more step-by-step descriptive exercises. Four kinds of problems, increasing in difficulty, are discussed in the context of computer aided architectural design education: 1) geometry play, 2) kit of parts, 3) dreams from childhood and 4) transformations. The problems engage the students in different ways: through playing with form, by capturing their imagination and by encouraging interaction. Each type of problem exercises specific design skills while providing practice with geometric modeling and rendering. The problems are sequenced from most constrained to most free, providing achievable milestones with focused objectives. Compared to descriptive assignments and more serious architectural problems, these design-oriented exercises invite experimentation by lowering risk, and neutralize stylistic questions by taking design out of the traditional architectural context. Used in conjunction with the modeling of case studies, they engage a wide range of students by addressing different kinds of issues. From examining the results of the student work, we conclude that play as a theme encourages greater degree of participation and comprehension.
series ACADIA
email nywc@darkwing.uoregon.edu
last changed 1999/12/10 12:50

_id ga9907
id ga9907
authors Ciao, Quinsan
year 1999
title Breeds of Artificial Design: Design Thinking in Computing Creation
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary There are many different paradigms or breeds of artificial design schemes. They each address artificial design from a different perspective. For instance, design by optimization emphasizes the iterative "trial-and-error" process of alternating generation and evaluation. Design by argumentation addresses the need of objectifying and communicating design thinking. Design by rues attempts to summary design knowledge into recipes. Design by simulation and electronic media offers a forum for design trial evaluation. Case-based design emphasizes experience-based design thinking. Fuzzy reasoning system provides a computing media to model and execute design reasoning. Although different, all of these paradigms are related and complement each other. Unification or collaboration of these different paradigms may lie ahead of future research and practice of artificial design.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 5477
authors Donath, D., Kruijff, E., Regenbrecht, H., Hirschberg, U., Johnson, B., Kolarevic, B. and Wojtowicz, J.
year 1999
title Virtual Design Studio 1998 - A Place2Wait
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 453-458
summary This article reports on the recent, geographically and temporally distributed, intercollegiate Virtual Design Studio based on the 1998 implementation Phase(x) environment. Students participating in this workshop had to create a place to wait in the form of a folly. This design task was cut in five logical parts, called phases. Every phase had to be finished within a specific timeframe (one day), after which the results would be stored in a common data repository, an online MSQL database environment which holds besides the presentations, consisting of text, 3D models and rendered images, basic project information like the descriptions of the phases and design process visualization tools. This approach to collaborative work is better known as memetic engineering and has successfully been used in several educational programs and past Virtual Design Studios. During the workshop, students made use of a variety of tools, including modeling tools (specifically Sculptor), video-conferencing software and rendering programs. The project distinguishes itself from previous Virtual Design Studios in leaving the design task more open, thereby focusing on the design process itself. From this perspective, this paper represents both a continuation of existing reports about previous Virtual Design Studios and a specific extension by the offered focus. Specific attention will be given at how the different collaborating parties dealt with the data flow and modification, the crux within a successful effort to cooperate on a common design task.
keywords Collaborative design, Design Process, New Media Usage, Global Networks
series eCAADe
email donath@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 1999/10/10 12:52

_id ga9916
id ga9916
authors Elzenga, R. Neal and Pontecorvo, Michael S.
year 1999
title Arties: Meta-Design as Evolving Colonies of Artistic Agents
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Meta-design, the act of designing a system or species of design instead of a design instance, is an important concept in modern design practice and in the generative design paradigm. For meta-design to be a useful tool, the designer must have more formal support for both design species definition/expression and the abstract attributes which the designer is attempting to embody within a design. Arties is an exploration of one possible avenue for supporting meta-design. Arties is an artistic system emphasizing the co-evolution of colonies of Artificial Life design or artistic agents (called arties) and the environment they inhabit. Generative design systems have concentrated on biological genetics metaphors where a population of design instances are evolved directly from a set of ‘parent’ designs in a succession of generations. In Arties, the a-life agent which is evolved, produces the design instance as a byproduct of interacting with its environment. Arties utilize an attraction potential curve as their primary dynamic. They sense the relative attraction of entities in their environment, using multiple sensory channels. Arties then associate an attractiveness score to each entity. This attractiveness score is combined with a 'taste' function built into the artie that is sensitized to that observation channel, entity, and distance by a transfer function. Arties use this attraction to guide decisions and behaviors. A community of arties, with independent evolving attraction criteria can pass collective judgement on each point in an art space. As the Artie moves within this space it modifies the environment in reaction to what it senses. Arties support for Meta-design is in (A) the process of evolving arties, breeding their attraction potential curve parameters using a genetic algorithm and (B) their use of sensory channels to support abstract attributes geometries. Adjustment of these parameters tunes the attraction of the artie along various sensing channels. The multi-agent co-evolution of Arties is one approach to creating a system for supporting meta-design. Arties is part of an on-going exploration of how to support meta-design in computer augmented design systems. Our future work with Arties-like systems will be concerned with applications in areas such as modeling adaptive directives in Architecture, Object Structure Design, spatio-temporal behaviors design (for games and simulations), virtual ambient spaces, and representation and computation of abstract design attributes.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id a38c
authors Emdanat, S., Vakalo, E.G. and Birmingham, W.
year 1999
title Solving Form-Making Problems Using Shape Algebras and Constraint Satisfaction
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 620-625
summary Shape grammars are well known approaches in design space exploration. This paper reviews the current work on shape grammars in design and suggests that considerable gains can be attained by integrating parametric shape grammar based design approaches with distributed constraint-based problem solving. Parametric grammars are represent design topologies while distributed constrain satisfaction can be used to maintain consistency and produce the space of feasible design solutions. Designers' decision making can be coordinated such that constraints cannot be violated and designs that exhibit the highest utility (value) are selected.
keywords Shape Grammar, Shape Algebra, Constraint Satisfaction
series eCAADe
email emdanat@umich.edu
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 2145
authors Engeli, Maia and Mueller Andre
year 1999
title Digital Environments for Learning and Collaboration Architecture, Communication, Creativity, Media and Design Process
source Media and Design Process [ACADIA ‘99 / ISBN 1-880250-08-X] Salt Lake City 29-31 October 1999, pp. 40-52
summary Digital networks are gaining importance as environments for learning and creative collaboration. Technical achievements, software enhancements, and a growing number of applicable principles make it possible to compile complex environments that satisfy many aspects necessary for creative collaboration. This paper focuses on three issues: the architecture of collaborative environments, communication in these environments and the processes inherent to creative collaboration. The information architecture of digital environments looks different from physical architecture, mainly because the material that it is made out of is information and not stone, wood or metal and the goal is to pro-vide appropriate paths and views to information. Nonetheless, many analogies can be drawn between information architecture and physical architecture, including the need for useability, aesthetics, and consistency. To communicate is important for creative collaboration. Digital networks request and enable new strategies for communicating. Regarding the collaborative creative process we have been able to detect principles and features that enhance this process, but there are still many unanswered questions. For example, the environment can enable and improve the frequency of surprise and coincidence, two factors that often play decisive roles in the creative processes but cannot be planned for in advance. Freedom and transparency within the environment are other important factors that foster creative collaboration. The following findings are based on numerous courses, which we have taught using networked environments and some associated, research projects that helped to verify their applicability for architectural practice.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email engeli@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2008/06/12 19:05

_id 993c
authors Fruchter, Renate
year 1999
title A/E/C Teamwork: A Collaborative Design and Learning Space
source Journal of Computing in Civil Engineering -- October 1999 -- Volume 13, Issue 4, pp. 261-269
summary This paper describes an ongoing effort focused on combined research and curriculum development for multidisciplinary, geographically distributed architecture/engineering/construction (A/E/C) teamwork. Itpresents a model for a distributed A/E/C learning environment and an Internet-based Web-mediated collaboration tool kit. The distributed learning environment includes six universities from Europe, Japan, andthe United States. The tool kit is aimed to assist team members and owners (1) capture and share knowledge and information related to a specific project; (2) navigate through the archived knowledge andinformation; and (3) evaluate and explain the product's performance. The A/E/C course offered at Stanford University acts as a testbed for cutting-edge information technologies and a forum to teach newgenerations of professionals how to team up with practitioners from other disciplines and take advantage of information technology to produce a better, faster, more economical product. The paper presents newassessment metrics to monitor students' cross-disciplinary learning experience and track programmatic changes. The paper concludes with challenges and quandaries regarding the impact of informationtechnologies on team performance and behavior.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:45

_id 600e
authors Gavin, Lesley
year 1999
title Architecture of the Virtual Place
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 418-423
summary The Bartlett School of Graduate Studies, University College London (UCL), set up the first MSc in Virtual Environments in the UK in 1995. The course aims to synthesise and build on research work undertaken in the arts, architecture, computing and biological sciences in exploring the realms of the creation of digital and virtual immersive spaces. The MSc is concerned primarily with equipping students from design backgrounds with the skills, techniques and theories necessary in the production of virtual environments. The course examines both virtual worlds as prototypes for real urban or built form and, over the last few years, has also developed an increasing interest in the the practice of architecture in purely virtual contexts. The MSc course is embedded in the UK government sponsored Virtual Reality Centre for the Built Environment which is hosted by the Bartlett School of Architecture. This centre involves the UCL departments of architecture, computer science and geography and includes industrial partners from a number of areas concerned with the built environment including architectural practice, surveying and estate management as well as some software companies and the telecoms industry. The first cohort of students graduated in 1997 and predominantly found work in companies working in the new market area of digital media. This paper aims to outline the nature of the course as it stands, examines the new and ever increasing market for designers within digital media and proposes possible future directions for the course.
keywords Virtual Reality, Immersive Spaces, Digital Media, Education
series eCAADe
email l.gavin@ucl.ac.uk
more http://www.bartlett.ucl.ac.uk/ve/
last changed 2002/11/22 18:44

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