CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id ga9925
id ga9925
authors Ambrosini, L., Longatti, M. and Miyajima, H.
year 1999
title Time sections, abstract machines
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary conditions a time-spatial discontinuity in the urban grid, ancient walls casually discovered in a substrate of the contemporary town needs a surplus of information to be understood and interfaced with their current condition. diagrams diverse chronological stages of the urban evolution are mapped on the area, in order to read the historical stratifications as a multiplicity of signs; this abstract approach leads to consider the roman space as guided by metrics, a system of measure superimposed on the landscape, vs. medioeval spatial continuity, where more fluid relations between the same urban elements create a completely different pattern.assemblage (time sections) a surface, automatically displaced from the medioeval diagram, moves along the z axis, the historical stratification direction, intersecting in various, unpredictable, manners a series of paths; these paths start as parallels, allowing an undifferentiated access to the area, and mutate along their developing direction, intertweening and blending each other; linear openings are cut on the surface, virtually connecting the two levels by light, following the roman grid in rhythm and measure. Projected on the lateral wall, the cadence of the vertical and horizontal elements becomes a temporal diagram of the design process.movement time takes part into the process through two kinds of movement: the first one, freezed when reaches the best results, in terms of complexity, is given by the surface intersecting the tubular paths; the second one is represented by multiple routes walking on which the project can be experienced (in absence of any objective, fixed, point of view, movement becomes the only way to understand relations). Thresholds between typical architectural categories (such as inside-outside, object-landscape etc.) are blurred in favour of a more supple condition, another kind of continuity (re)appears, as a new media, between the different historical layers of the city.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id f154
authors Amor, Robert and Newnham, Leonard
year 1999
title CAD Interfaces to the ARROW Manufactured Product Server
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 1-11
summary The UK national project ARROW (Advanced Reusable Reliable Objects Warehouse) provides an Internet based framework through which it is possible to identify any of a range of manufactured products meeting specific design criteria. This open framework (based upon the IAI's IFCs) provides a mechanism for users to search for products from any participating manufacturer or supplier based both on specific attributes of a product or on any of the textual descriptions of the product. The service returns the closest matching products and allows the user to navigate to related information including manufacturer, suppliers, CAD details, VR displays, installation instructions, certificates, health and safety information, promotional information, costings, etc. ARROW also provides a toolkit to enable manufacturers and suppliers to more easily map and publish their information in the format utilised by the ARROW system. As part of the ARROW project we have examined the ability to interface from a design tool through to ARROW to automatically retrieve information required by the tool. This paper describes the API developed to allow CAD and simulation tools to communicate directly with ARROW and identify appropriate manufactured information. The demonstration system enables CAD systems to identify the closest matching manufactured product to a designed product and replacing the designed product with the details supplied by the manufacturer for the manufactured product as well as pulling through product attributes utilised by the design application. This paper provides a description of the ARROW framework and issues faced in providing information based upon standards as well as containing information not currently modelled in public standards. The paper looks at issues of enabling manufacturers and suppliers to move from their current world-view of product information to a more data-rich and user accessible information repository (even though this enables a uniform comparison across a range of manufacturer's products). Finally the paper comments on the likely way forward for ARROW like systems in providing quality information to end users.
keywords Computer-aided Design, Product Retrieval
series CAAD Futures
email trebor@cs.auckland.ac.nz
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 93a8
authors Anders, P.
year 1999
title Envisioning Cyberspace: Designing 3D Electronic Spaces
source McGraw-Hill, NY
summary Free of the constraints of physical form and limited only by imagination, new environments spring to life daily in a fantastic realm called cyberspace. The creators of this new virtual world may be programmers, designers, architects, even children. In this invigorating exploration of the juncture between cyberspace and the physical world, architect Peter Anders brings together leading-edge cyberspace art and architecture ... inspiring new techniques and technologies ... unexpected unions of reality and virtuality ... and visions of challenges and opportunities as yet unexplored. More than an invitation to tour fantastic realms and examine powerful tools, this book is a hard-eyed look at cyberspace's impact on physical, cultural, and social reality, and the human-centered principles of its design. This is a book that will set designers and architects thinkingNand a work of importance to anyone fascinated with the fast-closing space between the real and the virtual.
series other
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 5cba
authors Anders, Peter
year 1999
title Beyond Y2k: A Look at Acadia's Present and Future
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 18, no. 1, p. 10
summary The sky may not be falling, but it sure is getting closer. Where will you when the last three zeros of our millennial odometer click into place? Computer scientists tell us that Y2K will bring the world’s computer infrastructure to its knees. Maybe, maybe not. But it is interesting that Y2K is an issue at all. Speculating on the future is simultaneously a magnifying glass for examining our technologies and a looking glass for what we become through them. "The future" is nothing new. Orwell's vision of totalitarian mass media did come true, if only as Madison Avenue rather than Big Brother. Futureboosters of the '50s were convinced that each garage would house a private airplane by the year 2000. But world citizens of the 60's and 70's feared a nuclear catastrophe that would replace the earth with a smoking crater. Others - perhaps more optimistically -predicted that computers were going to drive all our activities by the year 2000. And, in fact, theymay not be far off... The year 2000 is symbolic marker, a point of reflection and assessment. And - as this date is approaching rapidly - this may be a good time to come to grips with who we are and where we want to be.
series ACADIA
email ptr@mindspace.com
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id b73a
authors Angelo,C.V., Bins Ely, V.H.M., Bueno,A.P., Ludvig C. and Trezub, D.
year 1999
title Space Syntax and the New Transportation System in the Santa Catarina Island
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 434-437
summary The paper reports an on-going research that aims at describing and analysing some of the syntactic characteristics of the urban space of Santa Catarina Island, in an attempt to evaluate its performance, more specifically its social and spatial integration and segregation. The research has been conducted with the aid of the Aximagic software, still in exam stage and not yet released to the public, a tool being developed by a group of researches of the Rio Grande do Sul Federal University and given up by Prof. Doctor Benamy Turkienicz. The software is part of a larger georeferenced program called CityZoom wich includes others tools to the comprehention of the urban morphology. This program works with graphic pictures in the inlet of data and also in the acquisition of results. The syntactic study of the Santa Catarina Island as a whole aims to obtain the comprehension of its global structure, relating it to the integrated public transportation system proposed to Florianópolis. These studies should allow an understanding of the impact the developments will have upon the urban morphology, and the new public transportation system.
series SIGRADI
email caludvig@arq.ufsc.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 2c4a
authors Aroztegui, Carmen
year 1999
title The Architect's Use of the Internet - Study of the Architectural Presentation Possibilities
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 363-368
summary The Internet media is opening new horizons in communication and representation in architecture. However, its use today is superficial, limited, and without creativity. This study will explore theories, methods and examples of how the virtual space of the Internet can be used in its full potential. That means to present ways of observing, understanding, interacting, and communicating the space without precedents in architecture. The existent presentations made by architects in the Internet are in general poor and static. Through the comparative analysis of two presentations of the same architectural space in the Internet and the use of state of the art technology in the Internet, this study will show innovations that will make the exploration of the architectural space more attractive, dynamic and interactive. The main issues will be on one hand, the improvement in the communication of the design through the use of the Internet, and on the other hand, the rise of the standards in the quality of the architectural presentations. This work will project possible implications of the Internet in architecture.
series SIGRADI
email arozteguic@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 7ccd
authors Augenbroe, Godfried and Eastman, Chuck
year 1999
title Computers in Building: Proceedings of the CAADfutures '99 Conference
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, 398 p.
summary This is the eight CAADfutures Conference. Each of these bi-annual conferences identifies the state of the art in computer application in architecture. Together, the series provides a good record of the evolving state of research in this area over the last fourteen years. Early conferences, for example, addressed project work, either for real construction or done in academic studios, that approached the teaching or use of CAD tools in innovative ways. By the early 1990s, such project-based examples of CAD use disappeared from the conferences, as this area was no longer considered a research contribution. Computer-based design has become a basic way of doing business. This conference is marked by a similar evolutionary change. More papers were submitted about Web- based applications than about any other area. Rather than having multiple sessions on Web-based applications and communications, we instead came to the conclusion that the Web now is an integral part of digital computing, as are CAD applications. Using the conference as a sample, Web-based projects have been integrated into most research areas. This does not mean that the application of the Web is not a research area, but rather that the Web itself is an integral tool in almost all areas of CAAD research.
series CAAD Futures
email chuck.eastman@arch.gatech.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id aef9
authors Brown, A., Knight, M. and Berridge, P. (Eds.)
year 1999
title Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [Conference Proceedings]
source eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7 / Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, 773 p.
summary The core theme of this book is the idea of looking forward to where research and development in Computer Aided Architectural Design might be heading. The contention is that we can do so most effectively by using the developments that have taken place over the past three or four decades in Computing and Architectural Computing as our reference point; the past informing the future. The genesis of this theme is the fact that a new millennium is about to arrive. If we are ruthlessly objective the year 2000 holds no more significance than any other year; perhaps we should, instead, be preparing for the year 2048 (2k). In fact, whatever the justification, it is now timely to review where we stand in terms of the development of Architectural Computing. This book aims to do that. It is salutary to look back at what writers and researchers have said in the past about where they thought that the developments in computing were taking us. One of the common themes picked up in the sections of this book is the developments that have been spawned by the global linkup that the worldwide web offers us. In the past decade the scale and application of this new medium of communication has grown at a remarkable rate. There are few technological developments that have become so ubiquitous, so quickly. As a consequence there are particular sections in this book on Communication and the Virtual Design Studio which reflect the prominence of this new area, but examples of its application are scattered throughout the book. In 'Computer-Aided Architectural Design' (1977), Bill Mitchell did suggest that computer network accessibility from expensive centralised locations to affordable common, decentralised computing facilities would become more commonplace. But most pundits have been taken by surprise by just how powerful the explosive cocktail of networks, email and hypertext has proven to be. Each of the ingredients is interesting in its own right but together they have presented us with genuinely new ways of working. Perhaps, with foresight we can see what the next new explosive cocktail might be.
series eCAADe
email andygbp@liv.ac.uk, mknight@liv.ac.uk, p.berridge@liverpool.ac.uk
more http://www.ecaade.org
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id f11d
authors Brown, K. and Petersen, D.
year 1999
title Ready-to-Run Java 3D
source Wiley Computer Publishing
summary Written for the intermediate Java programmer and Web site designer, Ready-to-Run Java 3D provides sample Java applets and code using Sun's new Java 3D API. This book provides a worthy jump-start for Java 3D that goes well beyond the documentation provided by Sun. Coverage includes downloading the Java 2 plug-in (needed by Java 3D) and basic Java 3D classes for storing shapes, matrices, and scenes. A listing of all Java 3D classes shows off its considerable richness. Generally, this book tries to cover basic 3D concepts and how they are implemented in Java 3D. (It assumes a certain knowledge of math, particularly with matrices, which are a staple of 3D graphics). Well-commented source code is printed throughout (though there is little additional commentary). An applet for orbiting planets provides an entertaining demonstration of transforming objects onscreen. You'll learn to add processing for fog effects and texture mapping and get material on 3D sound effects and several public domain tools for working with 3D artwork (including converting VRML [Virtual Reality Markup Language] files for use with Java 3D). In all, this book largely succeeds at being accessible for HTML designers while being useful to Java programmers. With Java 3D, Sun is betting that 3D graphics shouldn't require a degree in computer science. This book reflects that philosophy, though advanced Java developers will probably want more detail on this exciting new graphics package. --Richard Dragan Topics covered: Individual applets for morphing, translation, rotation, and scaling; support for light and transparency; adding motion and interaction to 3D objects (with Java 3D classes for behaviors and interpolators); and Java 3D classes used for event handling.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id f58e
authors Bugay, Edson Luiz and Ulbricht, Vania Ribas
year 1999
title Hipermidia para Ensino de Render no AutoCad 14 (Hypermedia for the Tachinf of Render 14 AutoCad)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 280-284
summary Hypermedia applications in education have grown very much and are nowadays available in a great variety of titles covering a major extension of topics. However most of these applications have not gathered too much pedagogic embodiment and when they do have it, it is rather nearly to the intuitive level than based on one or more pedagogic theories. This paper's objective is to provide a practical view of hypermedia directed to teaching which has formed the development basis of a prototype for teaching render in Autocad 14. The several stages' view of developing an hypermedia were considered in the process of the prototype's creation such as the theme's definition, the staffs composition, the metaphor's choice, and the pedagogic model are discussed in details, as well as the several stages that should be followed since the proposals beginning until the product's final distribution. The chosen metaphor is the one of an art study having in mind the meaning of the word "render" being "the artistic representation of a model" once defined the metaphor, the screen's graphical part were developed accordingly.
keywords Hypermedia, Rendering, Learning, Teaching
series SIGRADI
email elbugay@matrix.com.br, ulbricht@mbox1.ufsc.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 5716
authors Cohen Egler, Tamara Tania
year 1999
title Cyberspace: New Forms of Social Interaction
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 253-258
summary The cyberspace becomes into news forms of communication that transform and expand interaction among men. The objective of our reflection is to understand how space-time relations are changed by the new technologies of communication and information. The starting point of this analysis is the historic dimension of production, interaction and appropriation of space-time processes, proceeding in the se of solving their contemporary forms defined by the growing technology of daily life. It is possible to notice how communication expands the interaction among companies, institutions and society because processes and procedures are publicized, reducing the disorder and uncertain. It is a way of making social complexities more accessible, more clear, being easier read by individuals so they are able to lead with the complex of opportunities and responsibilities that compound the social system. The fundamental constitution of cybernetic spaces is on its capacity of make accessible the processes of communication and information which expand the interaction eliminating intermediaries. The condition of material localization dissolves itself to give place tommunicative interaction. The essential of the question can be stated in the theory that explains that social practices are the result of a cognitive system. That statement send us to the heart of analysis over the importance of comprehending as a moment that precede the action. When societies can be read through a union of knowledge condensed all along their social and cultural development. The development of new technologies of communication and information make nations capable to produce, accumulate diffuse knowledge, conducting to an action of intelligent individuals who write the social development.
series SIGRADI
email tamara@ippur.ufrj.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id 84e8
authors Cohen, J.M., Markosian, L., Zeleznik, R.C., Hughes, J.F. and Barzel, R.
year 1999
title An Interface for Sketching 3D Curves
source ACM Symposium on Interactive 3D Graphics, pp. 17-22 (April 1999). ACM SIGGRAPH. Edited by Jessica Hodgins and James D. Foley
summary The ability to specify nonplanar 3D curves is of fundamental importance in 3D modeling and animation systems. Effective techniques for specifying such curves using 2D input devices are desirable, but existing methods typically require the user to edit the curve from several viewpoints. We present a novel method for specifying 3D curves with 2D input from a single viewpoint. The user rst draws the curve as it appears from the current viewpoint, and then draws its shadow on the oor plane. The system correlates the curve with its shadow to compute the curve's 3D shape. This method is more natural than existing methods in that it leverages skills that many artists and designers have developed from work with pencil and paper.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 37d1
authors Corona Martíne, Alfonso and Vigo, Libertad
year 1999
title Before the Digital Design Studio
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 247-252
summary This paper contains some observations which derive from our work as Studio Professors . In the last years, studios are in a transition phase with the progressive introduction of computers in later stages of the design process. The initiative generally belongs to students rather than to studio masters, since the former are aware that a knowledge of CAD systems will make them able to get work in architects offices. It is the first few Studios that will guide the student in forming a conception of what is architecture . Therefore, we have observer more attentively the way in which he establishes his first competence as a designer. We believe it is useful to clarify design training before we can integrate computers into it. The ways we all learn to design and which we transmit in the Studio were obviously created a long time ago, when Architecture became a subject taught in Schools, no longer a craft to be acquired under a master. The conception of architecture that the student forms in his mind is largely dependent on a long tradition of Beaux-Arts training which survives (under different forms) in Modern Architecture. The methods he or she acquires will become the basis of his creative design process also in professional life. Computer programmes are designed to adapt into the stages of this design process simply as time saving tools. We are interested in finding out how they can become an active part in the creative process and how to control this integration in teaching. Therefore, our work deals mainly with the tradition of the Studio and the conditioning it produces. The next step will be to explore the possiblities and restrictions that will inevitably issue from the introduction of new media.
series SIGRADI
email freedom@cvtci.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id 5c7d
authors Couwenbergh, J.P., Croegaert, A., Gallez, B., Petit, P. and Tilman, M.
year 1999
title The Architect, CAD and Teaching The Pedagogical Point of View at Tournai's ISA Saint-Luc
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 221-228
summary Object-oriented approach to software development is discussed as a conceptual framework and working computational model for creative architectural design. Two modes of obejct orientation in design are elaborated. The more conservative mode is static, based on class- type/object-instance hierarchies. The other mode is dynamic, based on a modern view of computation as multi-threaded evolution of interacting objects.
series AVOCAAD
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 9745
authors De Paoli, Giovanni and Bogdan, Marius
year 1999
title The Backstage of Vitruvius' Roman Theatre: A New Method of Computer-Aided Design that Reduces the Gap between the Functional and the Operational
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 411-422
summary Computers are increasingly being used in professional design studios and by students of Architecture. However, their use is limited to technical functions (tekhne); what one usually calls computer-aided design is often no more than computer-aided drawing. In this research paper we reflect on the architect's work methods, and suggest an approach to design based on the "projection" of properties of the object (i.e. operators), rather than by geometric primitives. We propose a method of design using procedural models, and encourage a reevaluation of current programs of study with their traditional subdivision into separate disciplines. By means of a procedural model of Vitruvius' Roman theatre, we show that, from a generic model we can produce a three dimensional (volumetric) model with all the characteristics belonging to a single family of objects. In order to clarify the method of construction, we use a functional language that allows us to model the actions. Similarly, we can use this functional language to encapsulate the properties of the building. The scientific result of this experiment is the understanding and confirmation of the hypothesis that, by means of computers, we can find operators that help the architect assimilate a complex building design.
keywords Architecture, CAD, Discipline, Functions, Modeling, Operator
series CAADRIA
last changed 2000/01/13 11:32

_id 762b
authors De Paoli, Giovanni and Bogdan, Marius
year 1999
title The Front of the Stage of Vitruvius' Roman Theatre - A new Approach of Computer Aided Design that Transforms Geometric Operators to Semantic Operators
source Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-8536-5] Atlanta, 7-8 June 1999, pp. 321-333
summary The driving force of all researches where the systems of computation are used, is the utilization of an intelligent method for the representation of building. The use of computer, in design process, is often limited to technical functions (tekhne), and what one usually calls computer-aided design is often no more than computer-aided drawing. In this research paper we continue a reflection on the architect's work methods, and suggest an approach to design based on the semantic properties of the object (i.e. semantic operators), rather than by geometric operators. We propose a method of computer aid design using procedural models where the initial state of design is vague and undefined. We operate from a paradigm that leads to represent a building by means of parametric functions that, expressed algorithmically, give a procedural model to facilitate the design process. This approach opens new avenues that would permit to add the logos (semantic properties) and lead to a metaphorical representation. By means of procedural models, we show that, from a generic model we can produce a four dimensional model that encapsulate a volumetric model with semantic characteristics. We use a meta-functional language that allows us to model the actions and encapsulate detailed information about various building elements. This descriptive mechanism is extremely powerful. It helps to establish relations between the functions, contributes to a better understanding of the project's aim, and encapsulates the building properties by recalling characteristics of common classes which give rise to a new configuration and a completely original design. The scientific result of this experiment is the understanding and confirmation of the hypothesis that it is possible to encapsulate, by means of computing process, the links between design moves during conceptual and figural decisions and transform the geometric operators in semantic operators.
keywords Architecture, CAD, Function, Modeling, Semantic Operator, Geometric Operator
series CAAD Futures
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 0b84
authors De Silva Garza, Andrés Gómez and Maher, Mary Lou
year 1999
title Evolving Design Layout Cases to Satisfy Feng Shui Constraints
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 115-124
summary We present a computational process model for design that combines the functionalities of case-based reasoning (CBR) and genetic algorithms (GAÌs). CBR provides a precedent-based framework in which prior design cases are retrieved and adapted in order to meet the requirements of a new design problem. GAÌs provide a general-purpose mechanism for randomly combining and modifying potential solutions to a new problem repeatedly until an adequate solution is found. In our model we use a GA to perform the case-adaptation subtask of CBR. In this manner, a gradual improvement in the overall quality of the proposed designs is obtained as more and more adaptations of the design cases originally retrieved from memory are evolved. We describe how these ideas can be used to perform layout design of residences such that the final designs satisfy the requirements imposed by feng shui, the Chinese art of placement.
series CAADRIA
email mary@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/05/17 07:54

_id ga9901
id ga9901
authors Dehlinger, H.E.
year 1999
title Minimial generative principles for large scale drawings: an experimental approach and its results
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The line as an element or linear structures as such can be observed in many circumstances and in many places of our daily life´s. Lines have poly semantic characteristics and the word line is denoting much more than a long thin mark made by a pencil. The concept of a line is a very rich concept, and it seems, each epoch of art is developing its own codes for lines to deposit its world views within them. The emergence of generative approaches is characteristic of our epoch, and it is lines as elements of drawings generated by algorithms, executed on machines, and drawn with a pen equipped plotter on which this work is based.
series other
email dehling@hrz.uni-kassel.de
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 3ac3
authors Devetakovic, Mirjana and Radojevic, Milan
year 1999
title The Electronic Communication as a Part of CAAD Educational Process
source AVOCAAD Second International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-02-07] Brussels (Belgium) 8-10 April 1999, pp. 265-273
summary Considering demands of contemporary architectural practice to shift spatial and cultural barriers and became more global and more creative, this paper analyses the role of electronic communication within the process of CAAD (Computer Aided Architectural Design) education. After explaining Virtual Design Studio phenomena, represented by several worldwide university projects, this paper focuses on the reflection of those projects in rethinking the CAAD education approach at the Faculty of Architecture, University of Belgrade. The case illustrating the problem is The Virtual Group activity within the Course "The basics of Computer Application in Architecture". Some examples of student work are given as well as several conclusions based on two-year experience.
series AVOCAAD
email mirjana@arh.arh.bg.ac.yu
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 125a
authors Dikbas, Attila
year 1999
title An Evaluating Model for the Usage of Web-based Information Technology in Computer Aided Architectural Design and Engineering Education
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 349-352
summary New technologies often reshape expectations, needs and Opportunities so as to develop strategic Plans for the implementation of Information Techniques in education and research. The widespread acceptance of the internet and more specifically the World Wide Web (WWW) has raised the awareness of educators to the potential for online education, virtual classrooms and even virtual universities. With the advent of computer mediated communication, especially the widespread adoption of the web as a publishing medium, educators see the advantages and potential of delivering educational material over the Internet. The Web offers an excellent medium for content delivery with full text, colour graphics support and hyperlinks. The Purpose of this paper is to present a model for the usage of web-based information technology in computer aided architectural design and engineering education. It involves the key features of a full educational system that is capable of offering the teacher and the student flexibility with which to approach their teaching and learning tasks in ways most appropriate to the architectural design and engineering education. Web-based educational system aims at creating quality in on-line educational materials taking collaboration, support, new skills, and, most of all, time. The paper concludes with a discussion of the benefits of such an education system suggesting directions for further work needed to improve the quality of architectural design and engineering education.
keywords Web-based Information Technology, Online Education, Virtual Campus, Computer Aided Architectural Design, Engineering Education
series eCAADe
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

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